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How do holograms work on stage

How do holograms work on stage

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Holograms at concerts

If you have seen the holograms of Tupac and Michael Jackson and or they give you chills or a dose of nostalgia, you have to admit that the hologram technology is awesome. But how does it work? And are they holograms or just projections?

Of course, not all holograms on stage serve to bring dead people to the present. The technology has been used to broadcast live performances by Janelle Monae and MIA, to cast Gorillaz avatars on stage with Madonna, and to bring fictional stars such as Hatsune Miku to life.

But, they are not holograms.

Let’s quickly clear things up. There is a lot of debate about what a hologram is or is not. So, for the sake of argument, let’s stick to a very simple definition of the word hologram.

Holograms are independent 3D light structures. They are not projected onto a surface (which 2D would do) but can be diffused by the glass, “moon crystals” from science fiction movies, or any other object that does the job.

So, Princess Leia’s secret message in Star Wars? That IS a hologram. Michael Jackson’s ghost? That is NOT a hologram, it is projected onto a flat surface and exists in 2D (but we will still refer to these as holograms to understand ourselves).

Either way, these holographic concerts are a step in the right direction. But they are not exactly a new idea. The holographic representations of Tupac, Janelle Monae, MIA and others are based on a trick from the 1860s called Pepper’s Ghost or Pepper’s Ghost. It is a simple trick that was used extensively at Victorian fairs, plays, and parties. Surely you’ve seen it in action at Disney’s Haunted Mansion if you’ve ever been to Disneyland.

Pepper’s Ghost trick is smoke and mirrors (well minus the smoke). A reflective glass panel is placed on a stage and tilts down toward a hidden booth. When the secret cabin lights up, it reflects an image on the glass, which then reflects the image to the public. At eye level, this image would look squashed (remember, the glass is angled). But as the audience looks on stage, the picture looks “correct,” with a ghostly, translucent quality.

Of course, the Pepper’s Ghost trick requires an actor. The last time we checked, Michael Jackson was dead, so we can assume the technology has changed a bit, right?

Musion Eyeliner Screenings

Musion Eyeliner sounds like a local rock band, but it’s a proprietary, modernized version of the Pepper’s Ghost ghost trick. And, in a way, it’s even simpler than Pepper’s Ghost.

Rather than relying on secret rooms, actors, and glass to project humans onto a stage, the Musion eyeliner trick simply requires a projector and a thin sheet of mylar.

First, the mylar sheet is placed at the front of a stage at a 45-degree angle. Then a projector in front of the stage shoots an image onto the mylar sheet. And that’s all there is to it, more or less. There also needs to be a source video for these screenings. Ideally, the source video should be completely still, creating the illusion that an interpreter is on stage. This can be done by recording performance with a still camera, or by creating an expensive 3D model and then preparing it for singing and dancing (Tupac, Jackson, and Roy Orbison holograms are 3D models).

Problems with technology

Aside from the obvious ethical dilemmas, Musion Eyeliner has many technical flaws and vulnerabilities:

  • Phase issues: Musion Eyeliner’s most elaborate holograms use multiple projectors to make an image as comprehensive and detailed as possible. But these projectors need to work correctly with each other. If one falls out of phase, it ruins the picture.
  • Wavy Screens: The Musion Eyeliner holograms are based on a thin mylar screen, which “flutters” like a flag when struck by a good gust of wind. This is very easy to see in the Michael Jackson hologram video, where the entire stage appears to be underwater.
  • Viewing Angle: Again, the viewing angle of the audience determines whether a Musion Eyeliner hologram looks “correct” or “squashed.” When viewed from the side, these projections may appear flat, like paper.
  • Lighting: Musion Eyeliner projections work best in dark environments. The problem is that they always create brilliant images, which is not a big deal on its own. However, holograms in dark backgrounds can look ridiculously bright and flat, especially when real people roam the stage (as shown in Tupac’s performance).
  • Cost: It doesn’t cost much to install a Musion Eyeliner hologram. But it was recreating famous people in 3D costs a lot of money (the Tupac 3D model costs around $ 400,000). Even with a full auditorium, it’s difficult to recoup those kinds of expenses.

You probably shouldn’t judge Musion Eyeliner holograms for their technical flaws. But the fact that the wind can ruin these projections is a sign of how young this technology is.

The future of holograms

Right now, most of their major electronic corporations are spending a lot of money on augmented reality. From Instagram and Pokemon Go filters to spooky undead musicians, we’re getting closer and closer to the inevitable – the authentic 3D holograms.

It’s hard to know when genuine holograms will become commonplace in our lives, but they can be used for entertainment for decades to come. We already know that there is a hologram concert market. The BBC is also currently investigating hologram televisions (which are mostly small-scale, 3D versions of the Pepper’s Ghost ghost trick).

At the moment, we will have to wait for the technology to mature a little.

Whether holograms of Tupac and Michael Jackson give you the heebie-jeebies or a dose of nostalgia, you’ve got to admit the technology is impressive. But how does it work? And are these really holograms or just projections?

Of course, not all onstage holograms are posthumous ethical conundrums. The technology has been used to simulcast performances by Janelle Monae and MIA, to throw the Gorillaz avatars on stage with Madonna, and to bring fictional stars, like Hatsune Miku, to life.

Sorry, They Aren’t Holograms

Let’s clear the air real quick. There’s a lot of debate on what is or isn’t a hologram. So, for argument’s sake, we’re going to stick with a very simple definition for the word hologram.

Holograms are freestanding 3D light structures. They aren’t projected onto a surface (that would make them 2D), but they can be diffused by glass, sci-fi moon crystals, or whatever object gets the job done.

So, Princess Leia’s secret message in Star Wars? That’s a hologram. The ghost of Michael Jackson? That isn’t a hologram—it’s projected on a flat surface and exists in 2D (but we’re still going to refer to these as holograms to keep things simple).

How do holograms work on stageThe Richard Balzer Collection

Either way, these holographic concerts are a step in the right direction. But they aren’t exactly a new idea. The holographic performances by Tupac, Janelle Monae, MIA, and others are based on an 1860s parlor trick called Pepper’s Ghost. It’s a simple trick that was used extensively at Victorian fairs, plays, and parties. You’ve seen it in action at Disney’s Haunted Mansion if you’ve ever been to Disneyland.

The Pepper’s Ghost trick is literal smoke and mirrors (well, minus the smoke). A reflective pane of glass is set on a stage and angled down toward a hidden booth. When the hidden booth is illuminated, it reflects an image onto the pane of glass, which then reflects the image toward the audience. At eye level, this image would look squished (remember, the glass is angled). But because the audience looks up at the stage, the image looks “correct,” with a ghostly, translucent quality.

Of course, your garden-variety Pepper’s Ghost trick requires an actor. Last time we checked, Michael Jackson was dead, so we can assume the technology has changed a bit, right?

Musion Eyeliner Projections

Musion Eyeliner sounds like a crappy local band, but it’s actually a patented, modernized version of the Pepper’s Ghost trick. And, in a way, it’s even simpler than Pepper’s Ghost.

Rather than relying on secret rooms, actors, and glass to project humans onto a stage, the Musion Eyeliner trick simply requires a projector and a thin mylar sheet.

How do holograms work on stageMichael Jackson/Youtube

First, the mylar sheet is placed at the front of a stage at a 45-degree angle. Then, a projector in front of the stage shoots an image at the mylar sheet.

And that’s all there is to it—kind of. There also needs to be a source video for these projections. Ideally, the source video is completely still, creating the illusion that a performer is on the stage. This can be done by recording a performance with a still camera, or by creating an expensive 3D model and then rigging it to sing and dance (the Tupac, Jackson, and Roy Orbison holograms are 3D models).

Problems with Tech

Aside from obvious ethical dilemmas, Musion Eyeliner has a lot of technological shortcomings and vulnerabilities:

  • Phase Issues: The most elaborate Musion Eyeliner holograms use multiple projectors to make an image as wide and detailed as possible. But these projectors need to work perfectly with one another. If one falls out of phase, it ruins the image.
  • Wavy Screens: Musion Eyeliner holograms rely on a thin mylar screen, which “waves” like a flag when hit by a good gust of wind. This is very easy to observe in the Michael Jackson hologram video, where the entire stage looks like it’s underwater.
  • Viewing Angle: Again, the audience’s viewing angle determines whether a Musion Eyeliner hologram looks “correct” or “squished.” When viewed from the side, these projections can look flat, like paper.
  • Illumination: Musion Eyeliner projections work best in dark or dim environments. The problem is, they always create bright images, which isn’t a big deal on its own. However, holograms in dark environments can look ridiculously bright and flat—especially when real people wander on stage (as shown in the Tupac performance).
  • Cost: It doesn’t cost much to set up a Musion Eyeliner hologram. But re-creating famous people in 3D costs a ton of money (the Tupac 3D model cost about $400 k). Even with a sold-out auditorium, it’s hard to recoup that kind of expense.

You probably shouldn’t pass judgment on Musion Eyeliner holograms for their technical shortcomings. But the fact that wind can ruin these projections is a sign of just how young this technology is.

The Future of Holograms

Right now, most of your favorite electronics corporations are spending oodles of money on augmented reality. From Instagram filters and Pokemon Go to creepy undead musicians, we’re inching closer and closer to the inevitable: genuine 3D holograms.

It’s hard to know when genuine holograms will become common, but they may be used for entertainment over the next few decades. We already know there’s a market for hologram concerts. The BBC is also currently researching hologram TVs (which are, essentially, small-scale, 3D versions of the Pepper’s Ghost trick).

At the moment, we’re just waiting for the technology to mature a bit. When that happens is anyone’s guess. In the meantime, we’ll just have to live with (and get used to) creepy posthumous concerts and Hatsune Miku.

Whether holograms of Tupac and Michael Jackson give you the heebie-jeebies or a dose of nostalgia, you’ve got to admit the technology is impressive. But how does it work? And are these really holograms or just projections?

Of course, not all onstage holograms are posthumous ethical conundrums. The technology has been used to simulcast performances by Janelle Monae and MIA, to throw the Gorillaz avatars on stage with Madonna, and to bring fictional stars, like Hatsune Miku, to life.

Sorry, They Aren’t Holograms

Let’s clear the air real quick. There’s a lot of debate on what is or isn’t a hologram. So, for argument’s sake, we’re going to stick with a very simple definition for the word hologram.

Holograms are freestanding 3D light structures. They aren’t projected onto a surface (that would make them 2D), but they can be diffused by glass, sci-fi moon crystals, or whatever object gets the job done.

So, Princess Leia’s secret message in Star Wars? That’s a hologram. The ghost of Michael Jackson? That isn’t a hologram—it’s projected on a flat surface and exists in 2D (but we’re still going to refer to these as holograms to keep things simple).

How do holograms work on stageThe Richard Balzer Collection

Either way, these holographic concerts are a step in the right direction. But they aren’t exactly a new idea. The holographic performances by Tupac, Janelle Monae, MIA, and others are based on an 1860s parlor trick called Pepper’s Ghost. It’s a simple trick that was used extensively at Victorian fairs, plays, and parties. You’ve seen it in action at Disney’s Haunted Mansion if you’ve ever been to Disneyland.

The Pepper’s Ghost trick is literal smoke and mirrors (well, minus the smoke). A reflective pane of glass is set on a stage and angled down toward a hidden booth. When the hidden booth is illuminated, it reflects an image onto the pane of glass, which then reflects the image toward the audience. At eye level, this image would look squished (remember, the glass is angled). But because the audience looks up at the stage, the image looks “correct,” with a ghostly, translucent quality.

Of course, your garden-variety Pepper’s Ghost trick requires an actor. Last time we checked, Michael Jackson was dead, so we can assume the technology has changed a bit, right?

Musion Eyeliner Projections

Musion Eyeliner sounds like a crappy local band, but it’s actually a patented, modernized version of the Pepper’s Ghost trick. And, in a way, it’s even simpler than Pepper’s Ghost.

Rather than relying on secret rooms, actors, and glass to project humans onto a stage, the Musion Eyeliner trick simply requires a projector and a thin mylar sheet.

How do holograms work on stageMichael Jackson/Youtube

First, the mylar sheet is placed at the front of a stage at a 45-degree angle. Then, a projector in front of the stage shoots an image at the mylar sheet.

And that’s all there is to it—kind of. There also needs to be a source video for these projections. Ideally, the source video is completely still, creating the illusion that a performer is on the stage. This can be done by recording a performance with a still camera, or by creating an expensive 3D model and then rigging it to sing and dance (the Tupac, Jackson, and Roy Orbison holograms are 3D models).

Problems with Tech

Aside from obvious ethical dilemmas, Musion Eyeliner has a lot of technological shortcomings and vulnerabilities:

  • Phase Issues: The most elaborate Musion Eyeliner holograms use multiple projectors to make an image as wide and detailed as possible. But these projectors need to work perfectly with one another. If one falls out of phase, it ruins the image.
  • Wavy Screens: Musion Eyeliner holograms rely on a thin mylar screen, which “waves” like a flag when hit by a good gust of wind. This is very easy to observe in the Michael Jackson hologram video, where the entire stage looks like it’s underwater.
  • Viewing Angle: Again, the audience’s viewing angle determines whether a Musion Eyeliner hologram looks “correct” or “squished.” When viewed from the side, these projections can look flat, like paper.
  • Illumination: Musion Eyeliner projections work best in dark or dim environments. The problem is, they always create bright images, which isn’t a big deal on its own. However, holograms in dark environments can look ridiculously bright and flat—especially when real people wander on stage (as shown in the Tupac performance).
  • Cost: It doesn’t cost much to set up a Musion Eyeliner hologram. But re-creating famous people in 3D costs a ton of money (the Tupac 3D model cost about $400 k). Even with a sold-out auditorium, it’s hard to recoup that kind of expense.

You probably shouldn’t pass judgment on Musion Eyeliner holograms for their technical shortcomings. But the fact that wind can ruin these projections is a sign of just how young this technology is.

The Future of Holograms

Right now, most of your favorite electronics corporations are spending oodles of money on augmented reality. From Instagram filters and Pokemon Go to creepy undead musicians, we’re inching closer and closer to the inevitable: genuine 3D holograms.

It’s hard to know when genuine holograms will become common, but they may be used for entertainment over the next few decades. We already know there’s a market for hologram concerts. The BBC is also currently researching hologram TVs (which are, essentially, small-scale, 3D versions of the Pepper’s Ghost trick).

At the moment, we’re just waiting for the technology to mature a bit. When that happens is anyone’s guess. In the meantime, we’ll just have to live with (and get used to) creepy posthumous concerts and Hatsune Miku.

How That Tupac Hologram At Coachella Worked

How do holograms work on stage

Near the end of his headlining set at the 2012 Coachella Valley Music & Arts festival, Snoop Dogg (left) performed next to a hologram of the deceased Tupac Shakur. Christopher Polk/Getty Images hide caption

Near the end of his headlining set at the 2012 Coachella Valley Music & Arts festival, Snoop Dogg (left) performed next to a hologram of the deceased Tupac Shakur.

Christopher Polk/Getty Images

Tupac Shakur was killed more than 15 years ago — three years before the first Coachella Valley Music & Arts festival was held. But thanks to a trick of light, he’s probably the single most talked about musician who performed at this year’s version of the festival.

Monkey See

Tupac At Coachella: A Long History Of Singing Ghosts

Except, well, “performed” is a funny word to use. The Tupac who appeared onstage during the headlining set by Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre on Sunday was a hologram, more a feat of technology and bravado than a performance. (You can watch video, which includes a fair amount of profanity and other NSFW language, here.)

The image looked shockingly good, but how did it work? James Montgomery wrote about the Tupac hologram for MTV news, and explained to NPR’s Audie Cornish that the Digital Domain Media Group, a company that has produced special effects for movies like X-Men: First Class, Transformers: Dark of the Moon and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, used “really old theatrical technology” with a “2012 spin.”

“There’s an overhead projector that sort of reflects down onto basically a tilted piece of glass that’s sort of on the stage floor,” Montgomery says. “That then reflects the, well, reflection onto a mylar sort of screen, and it projects in this sort of 3-D kind of thing where it allows the other performers to sort of walk in front of Tupac and basically interact [with] him.”

Montgomery says the exact technique behind the technology is still a little bit in the dark, so to speak. “You don’t know whether or not they hired an actor to portray him and then sort of put digital clothing over this actor in post-production, or they built it in a computer,” he says.

But the technology is there, and don’t bet it’ll be limited to this single appearance. Already, Snoop and Dre are reportedly thinking about taking the Tupac hologram out on tour. Montgomery thinks it won’t end there.

“Once this becomes a little less cost prohibitive, given the wild popularity of deceased stars like Elvis or Michael Jackson, I can see Las Vegas shelling out a lot of money to have these sort of ‘live reviews,’ ” he says. “It’s also interesting if you look at the current stars of today, someone like Madonna or a Paul McCartney. Are they looking at what happened with Tupac, and are they thinking, maybe I have to rewrite my will and sort of include something that says, ‘I don’t want my likeness projected in 3-D holographic form at any point in the future.’ “

For her 40th birthday, the beauty mogul was gifted a scripted hologram of her father Robert Kardashian, who passed away in 2003

It’s been another Kim Kardashian West-heavy week in the news.

The reality TV star turned beauty mogul received some criticism for deciding to fly her family and friends to a private island in the midst of a pandemic – even with the caveat that they’d all been carefully tested for Covid-19 and self-isolated ahead of the trip.

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Then, husband Kanye West gave her a 40 th birthday gift she will no doubt find hard to forget: a talking hologram of her late father, Robert Kardashian.

The American attorney and businessman passed away in September 2003. However, using the latest technology, he was brought to seeming life and programmed with a script.

For my birthday, Kanye got me the most thoughtful gift of a lifetime. A special surprise from heaven. A hologram of my dad. ✨. It is so lifelike! We watched it over and over, filled with emotion. pic.twitter.com/jD6pHo17KC

Here’s what holograms are – and how they actually work.

What is a hologram?

A hologram is made from a photographic technique that records the light scattered from an object, and then presents it in a way that appears three-dimensional.

Various types of hologram have been used over the years. These include transmission holograms, which allow light to be shined through them so that the image can be viewed from the side. There are also things like rainbow holograms which are used on credit cards and driver’s licenses for security purposes.

“To create a hologram, you need an object (or person) that you want to record; a laser beam to be shined upon the object and the recording medium; a recording medium with the proper materials needed to help clarify the image; and a clear environment to enable the light beams to intersect,” Robert Workman writes for Live Science.

“A laser beam is split into two identical beams and redirected by the use of mirrors. One of the split beams, the illumination beam or object beam, is directed at the object. Some of the light is reflected off the object onto the recording medium.”

Read More

How do they create digital human holograms?

“[This] involves a physically similar stand-in being filmed wearing motion-capture markers in front of a green screen. From here, visual artists combine data from the body double’s performance with archive live footage and, if available, 3D scans, to create a mutable, computer-generated likeness of the celebrity,” Jimi Famurewa writes for Wired.

“Known as facial rigs, these involve meticulous toil – the Tupac team worked round the clock for two months in a room plastered with pictures of the rapper – but when complete, they supply the VFX team with an entire bank of facial movements and expressions to manipulate.”

Once this is done, and the hologram is read, a video is projected onto a mirror at the foot of the stage, then bounced back on that angled reflective material, pushing 2D footage into the audience’s vision. Other elements of the performance, such as stage set-up, dancers and anything else, helps to sell the elaborate visual trick.

What stars have been turned into holograms in the past?

As mentioned, Tupac, the rapper who died in 1996 aged 25, was brought back to the stage using the technology for a special posthumous performance at Coachella in 2012. The company that created the hologram, Digital Domain, won the Titanium Award at the Cannes Lions that year, which celebrates the very best new ground-breaking innovations in branded communications.

Michael Jackson’s hologram famously moonwalked into the Billboard Awards in 2014, and performed never-before-released hit “Slave To The Rhythm”. The image of still living presenter Jimmy Kimmel also managed to appear in three different locations at once in 2015, including at the Country Music Awards.

The late Latina pop star Selena was billed to tour as a hologram in 2018, however the project never came to fruition.

How much do they cost to make?

This depends on a variety of factors, but for reference, Nick Smith of AV Concepts, who curated the Tupac hologram, said it cost $100,000 to make but more than $400,000 to bring to the stage.

“I can’t say how much that event cost, but I can say it’s affordable in the sense that if we had to bring entertainers around world and create concerts across the country, we could put [artists] in every venue in the country,” Mr Smith told MTV.

Five years after his death, Michael Jackson stole the show. He always did when he was alive, and it was no different during Sunday night’s Billboard Music AwardsВ (BBMA),В when a holographic MJ joined a five-piece band and 16 dancers onstage.

He wasn’t the first. When hologram technology emerged two years ago, it seemed like a fad. Now it’s a trend of resurrection so common it might just be the future of the industry.

It began in April 2012, when a virtual Tupac Shakur took the stage at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival with Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre. It was the first time a hologram had been used in a live performance for such a huge American crowd, and the first time hologram technology was used to ressurrect a dead singer. It made a mark. Artists weighed in on Twitter, and reactions varied from Rihanna’s awestruck “#TupacBACK #unbelievable #IWASTHERE #STORY4myGrandKidz” to Tyler The Creator’s sheer terror:

Since that performance, old favorites have been returning to us with increasing regularity. The deal behind the concert was relatively simple:В Dr. Dre went to Tupac’s mother to get permission to use his likeness, then he paid electronics firm AV Concepts $400,000 to recreate the rapper from old footage. In an interview with NPR a few months after the concert, MTV’s James Montgomery reflected, “Once this becomes a little less cost-prohibitive, given the wild popularity of deceased stars like ElvisВ orВ Michael Jackson, I can see Las Vegas shelling out a lot of money to have these sort of ‘live revues.'”

It was almost prophetic. Among the dead legends now returning to earth, hologram Ol’ Dirty Bastard will make appearances at the Rock the Bells 10th anniversary shows this fall. People who were too young for a Wu-Tang show before ODB died from an overdose in 2004 can now see him rip through “Shame on a Nigga.”

These deals all involve similar work and technology. A producer finds a dead artist’s estate and obtains the necessary rights. In Jackson’s case, the producers of the BBMAs sought permission from John Branca, the coexecutor of MJ’s estate. Typically the performances are done by the same animation and production firms, places like Play Gig-It, Pulse Evolution and Tricycle Logic. “It’s like walking on the moon for the first time,” Chris “Broadway” Romero, one of the digital artists that worked on the hologram ODB for Rock The Bells, told Pitchfork about his work crafting hologram performances. “You hope it works. You hope you don’t die in front of a bunch of people. But you just go.”

After rights are obtained, it takes an enormous amount of time and effort to make each performance. It took half a year to compose the MJ sequence, and BBMA producers didn’t even see footage until eight days before the nationally broadcast show. Months of work go into every detail, from choreographed dancing to how the sweat will bead on MJ’s head to the angle of his hand after he sticks a spin move. The likenesses are built off careful study of old film, but the performances are composed using motion capture technology. If the artist is still alive, they’ll don the motion capture suit themselves, but when the artist has already passed, that duty often falls to their children. In the case of the ODB hologram, his son, Young Dirty Bastard, donned the motion capture suit. Eazy-E’s hologram was made from combining performances from his three children — one for his voice, one for his body and one for his face.

Once the performance is complete, the technology behind projecting these apparitions is fairly simple — it’s not even technically a hologram, actually. A projector is positioned above the stage, and it casts an image down onto a mirror placed at a specific angle on the floor of the stage. That image is then reflected onto a foil screen, where it appears to hover onstage, moonwalking around like MJ or traipsing about like Tupac.

The technology is widely celebrated, but the principle is a little more troubling. Bringing back the dead has always been treacherous ground to tread. In robotics, there’s a concept called the “uncanny valley,” where a digital or robotic likeness of a human is cool until it looks just enough like a real person, at which point it becomes terrifying. Think about any of Pixar’s human caricatures, and now think about the Polar Express.

There’s also the disturbing symbolism of the whole practice. This may be the future of entertainment, but perhaps it will never sit well. It takes months and long hours to create a likeness (and we will get faster), but it takes years of full life to build the real thing. According to Pitchfork, famed ’90s group TLC has considered incorporating a hologram Lisa “Left-Eye” Lopes into their show. Lopes was one of the group’s most magnetic personalities before she died in a car crash in 2002. The band was hesitant; T-Boz remembered how difficult it was just to have Lisa appear on the giant LED screens behind them after her death. “It took us 10 years just to be able to look back [at the screen],” she said. “I have to have tunnel vision, because it’s a constant reminder that she’s not there.”

The technology, though, is looking to become an integral part of the future in music and beyond.В Narendra Modi, the new prime minister of India,В usedВ the technologyВ to reach more votersВ in the country’s recent elections.В Galaxy Chocolate used a similar technology to recreate Audrey Hepburn (in a likeness that came dangerously close to the “uncanny valley”) to sell candy. The biggest pop star in Japan, Hatsune Miku, isn’t actually a real person:В She’sВ a “digitally synthesized voice encapsulated in a crowd-sourced humanoid persona” — a projection of national preferences.

Admittedly, it’s all a bit creepy, but she has more than 1.8 million Facebook followers, and more than 100,000 original songs. Her impact is real, even though she is, arguably, not. The draw is even bigger for dead artists. Fame often only amplifies once a star dies and becomes a legend. If those legends can return to us, they may well begin replacing real life performers with all the flaws that accompany a real live life. At Coachella in 2012, Tupac may not have been there, but his fame was:

How Holograms Form Three-Dimensional Images

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How do holograms work on stage

  • Ph.D., Biomedical Sciences, University of Tennessee at Knoxville
  • B.A., Physics and Mathematics, Hastings College
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If you’re carrying money, a drivers license, or credit cards, you’re carrying around holograms. The dove hologram on a Visa card may be the most familiar. The rainbow-colored bird changes colors and appears to move as you tilt the card. Unlike a bird in a traditional photograph, a holographic bird is a three-dimensional image. Holograms are formed by interference of light beams from a laser.

How Lasers Make Holograms

Holograms are made using lasers because laser light is “coherent.” What this means is that all of the photons of laser light have exactly the same frequency and phase difference. Splitting a laser beam produces two beams that are the same color as each other (monochromatic). In contrast, regular white light consists of many different frequencies of light. When white light is diffracted, the frequencies split to form a rainbow of colors.

In conventional photography, the light reflected off an object strikes a strip of film that contains a chemical (i.e., silver bromide) that reacts to light. This produces a two-dimensional representation of the subject. A hologram forms a three-dimensional image because light interference patterns are recorded, not just reflected light. To make this happen, a laser beam is split into two beams that pass through lenses to expand them. One beam (the reference beam) is directed onto high-contrast film. The other beam is aimed at the object (the object beam). Light from the object beam gets scattered by the hologram’s subject. Some of this scattered light goes toward the photographic film. The scattered light from the object beam is out of phase with the reference beam, so when the two beams interact they form an interference pattern.

The interference pattern recorded by the film encodes a three-dimensional pattern because the distance from any point on the object affects the phase of the scattered light. However, there is a limit to how “three-dimensional” a hologram can appear. This is because the object beam only hits its target from a single direction. In other words, the hologram only displays the perspective from the object beam’s point of view. So, while a hologram changes depending on the viewing angle, you can’t see behind the object.

Viewing a Hologram

A hologram image is an interference pattern that looks like random noise unless viewed under the right lighting. The magic happens when a holographic plate is illuminated with the same laser beam light that was used to record it. If a different laser frequency or another type of light is used, the reconstructed image won’t exactly match the original. Yet, the most common holograms are visible in white light. These are reflection-type volume holograms and rainbow holograms. Holograms that can be viewed in ordinary light require special processing. In the case of a rainbow hologram, a standard transmission hologram is copied using a horizontal slit. This preserves parallax in one direction (so the perspective can move), but produces a color shift in the other direction.

Uses of Holograms

The 1971 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to the Hungarian-British scientist Dennis Gabor “for his invention and development of the holographic method”. Originally, holography was a technique used to improve electron microscopes. Optical holography didn’t take off until the invention of the laser in 1960. Although holograms were immediately popular for art, practical applications of optical holography lagged until the 1980s. Today, holograms are used for data storage, optical communications, interferometry in engineering and microscopy, security, and holographic scanning.

How do holograms work on stage

Summary

Conferences can put holograms on stage. These do not require the audience to wear any glasses to see.

Technology

Stage Holograms are not true holograms, because you cannot walk around them to see every angle.

They are still, however, very impressive as a form of 3D presentation!

Euclideon’s Advantage over other Stage Holograms

When others make these sort of stage holograms they normally look very flat, yet Euclideon’s holograms appear to look like real, large floating objects. The reason for this is because other companies are simply putting a project onto a flat silk screen and so their projections look flat. Euclideon Holographics uses a new patented technology that makes the objects appear to be 2.5m thick.

This technology is best described as follows:

“Normally people use the trigonometry of their two eyes to determine depth, but from more than 3 metres away the human brain prefers to determine an objects shape and dimensions based on how light and shadows curve across the object. By artificially projecting alternate moving light fields across the object the human brain will map a 2d object according to the 3dinesions that the software provides.”

Using this technology makes a very big difference.

Presentations can have hologram people, or large rotating hologram objects. These can run one after another, or can be set to be run like a powerpoint presentation or slideshow. This way, a speaker at a conference can move along when they are ready to move on to the next subject.

Alternatively, these can be used in impressive dances or performances. Sometimes they can be used for advertising, given a dark enough environment!

Device size

The standard standalone version of this is a booth, measuring 4m (13.1ft) wide by 2m (6.5ft) deep. It is 2.5m (8.2ft) tall.

However, custom-built versions can be made for any size up to 5m high by 10m wide, and can be built directly onto existing stages!

Special Requirements

Stage Holograms require that the lights be off when in use.

Projection

Holograms appear to float in the air, and the projection appears to be around 3m thick.

Number of users

Stage Holograms do not require glasses and therefore support an infinite number of viewers.

Special Features

There is a red and blue glasses option that gives an even more impressive 3D effect that will make objects appear to float down to each individual user and be within touching range.

We also have a new technology where real people can be made into holograms. A special technology is applied to these people so that their characters appear to be facing and talking directly to each member of the audience. This is an amazing effect.

Comparison to other Devices

For advertising, conferences or performances, this is the best technology.

It can also be used to make impressive showrooms

Content

Our Present Creator software will allow you to make anything you can think of.

How do holograms work on stage

Holograms and how they work

In simple terms, a hologram technology is a three-dimensional projection which can be seen without using any special equipment such as cameras or glasses. The image can be viewed from any angle, so as the user walks around the display the object will appear to move and shift realistically. Holographic images can be static, such as a picture of a product, or they may be animated sequences which can be watched by multiple people from any viewpoint.

The technology used to capture and project Holograms has advanced rapidly in recent years. These latest techniques allow increasingly convincing and interactive models to be displayed and are expected to become even more widespread in the future.

Now that we’ve got a better idea of how holograms technology work, let’s take a look at the areas most impacted by hologram:

The healthcare industry

Doctors and patients alike will benefit from radical new applications of holograms to the medical industry. The type of data provided by modern imaging techniques such as MRI and CAT scans can be easily translated into digital information. Traditionally, doctors have viewed this data on computer screens in 2D slices. Medical hologram technology will allow a complete 3D visualisation of internal organs and body parts. This will allow doctors a greater ability to examine diseases and injuries in individual patients and will lead to more accurate diagnoses.

This technology can also be used in the new field of surgical pre-planning. Prior to making the first incision, the surgeon can fully visualise the entire course of the operation. By understanding exactly what precise cuts are to be made, the chances of a successful outcome are vastly improved.

High-tech security

If you want to see how holograms are being used to improve security, simply open your wallet. Banknotes, identity cards and credit cards have all adopted security holograms in recent years. Holograms such as these require expensive equipment to create and make forgery much more difficult. The new generation of security holograms offer a host of features such as full-colour and three-dimensional images, moving displays, individual customised text and serial numbers, all of which will make illegal replication almost impossible.

Entertainment and gaming

Holographic entertainment is no longer simply a science fiction dream. One of the most visible applications of this technology in recent years has been its use in concerts. Stars from the past can be resurrected to perform once again, and even accompany modern artists live on stage.

These displays can also be used for live performances where the musicians are not physically present, instead transmitting their image to appear before the audience.

In the area of gaming, holographic display table which allow real-time multiplayer games are already being tested. Manufacturers are also integrating this technology into the next generation of smartphone displays, which will allow portable 3D gaming.

In the classroom

One of the most exciting application of holograms is to the improvement of the educational experience. In order to engage students more fully, interactive digital lessons will be used in schools. This combination of digital and real-world information is known as mixed reality.

Complex subjects can be taught using holographic images that students can interact with and examine. For example, pupils can virtually explore the ruins of ancient building during history lessons, or observe individual atomic particles and how they behave.

At LamasaTech we provide high-quality holographic technology and expert guidance on holograms and how they work. Get in touch today to arrange a consultation.

By Reuters Staff

LONDON (Reuters) – Musicians are using an interactive hologram based on Victorian technology to reach fans in the locked down world of the coronavirus pandemic.

Musion 3D teamed up with Faroe Islands singer Dan Olsen to launch Fanshare, a modern twist on an illusion technique known as Pepper’s ghost involving a huge sheet of glass which was used in theatres in the 1860s.

“It’s the closest you’re going to get to a virtual image, a virtual likeness of the real human being,” Musion director Ian O’Connell told Reuters.

“You don’t need glasses, you don’t need a headset. You’re sitting here as if you’re watching a regular stage show.”

Olsen and a guitarist played in a small studio in east London while their images were projected onto a stage in central London where the piano player was performing live.

“It looks like all three of us are on stage playing at the same time but two of us are holograms,” Olsen said.

The technology allows a performer to be anywhere in the world, ideal in a time of rapidly changing restrictions on public life caused by the pandemic.

“The timing couldn’t be better to do this now because people are looking like how can we play to an audience because we can’t get musicians to travel and all of a sudden with this you can do it anywhere in the world,” Olsen said.

Although most fans won’t yet be able to gather in large numbers, Musion hopes people who spend so much time on social media have a different understanding of what an audience is, and the company eventually wants to get gigs onto mobile devices.

“We’ve coined this phrase from home to phone,” O’Connell said.

“If this goes on for many months and we’re able to rock up to a local music pub like the Half Moon in Putney (in London) and do an open day for musicians to play and we stream them out to the wider web on a pay-per-view basis.”

Reporting by Stuart McDill, writing by Ed Osmond; Editing by Janet Lawrence