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How to cite pictures in powerpoint

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Microsoft PowerPoint’s image-insertion feature makes it simple and quick to add graphics to your presentations, but you don’t want to skip over one important step — giving credit where credit is due. Attribute your images through citations which give presentation viewers more details about what they’re looking at and also serve as some due diligence on your part. Use the American Psychological Association, or APA, guidelines to ensure that your citations are formatted properly.

Start Microsoft PowerPoint. Click one of the two text box placeholders on the slide. Press the “Delete” key. Repeat to delete the other text box. Technically, these won’t show up on your slide, but they just get in the way.

Click the “Insert” tab. Click the “Picture” button below the tab. Navigate to the picture to cite and double-click the image. Drag it into place on the slide.

Click the “Text Box” button on the ribbon. When the cursor turns into an upside down cross symbol, drag the cursor to form the text box for the citation. You can always adjust the text box size when you see the citation size.

Click inside the text box. Type the last name of the image creator with a comma, such as “Pollock,” and type the artist’s first initial with a period, such as “Pollock, J.” Do not type the quotation marks.

Type an open parenthesis and type the date of the image creation. Type a closed parenthesis and then type a period, so the entire line so far looks like “Pollock, J. (1992).” Do not type the quotation marks.

Type the name of the image. Do not use capitals except for the first word. Highlight the image name and click the “I” icon on the “Home” tab to make the title italic. Type an open bracket and type the type of image, such as “[Painting]” or “[Photograph].”

Type where the image is displayed, then type a comma and the location of the facility, such as “Museum of Modern Art, New York City.”

Type where you accessed the image from, which is a permissions statement or a credit back to the original website owner. Your complete citation looks like this: “Pollock, J. (1992). Splatter effects [Painting]. Museum of Modern Art, New York City. Permission to reprint by MOMA.” Remember that the image title, in this case “Splatter effects,” should be in italic font.

Click and drag a corner of the citation text box and resize it as necessary. To change the appearance of the text in the text box, highlight it, click the “Home” tab and use the options in the “Font” section of the ribbon.

Embedding an animated image, using a humorous cartoon to illustrate a point and adding a photo to a slide are just some of the ways you can unintentionally plagiarize the work of others in a PowerPoint presentation. Whether you intended to take credit for the images or not, using the work of others in your projects without permission is a crime. The creator of the image can pursue legal action and you might lose the right to keep your creative work or pay damages to the artist. Avoid criminal charges by adhering to a simple two-step process: “ask and assign.” Always ask artists for permission before using their work and assign credit to them through citations.

Find the author, year of creation and title of the image. Note the date of access and website the image was taken from. Write down the city and state of origin and current location of a hard-copy image. Contact the webmaster or a museum curator if this information is not readily available.

Select a format such as American Psychological Association (APA), Chicago-style or Modern Language Association (MLA). Ask your professor or supervisor for guidance when unsure which style-format and citation-style to use. Look through previously completed reports and check your departmental handbook for policy regarding the format used in your office for PowerPoint presentations; certain offices have their own unique style format.

Click the “Text Box” button under the “Insert” tab in PowerPoint. Click on the slide where you want to place the citation. Bibliographic information can be placed in a caption under the image, at the bottom of the slide containing the image or at the end of the presentation. Follow the accepted style format regarding the placement of citations.

Cite images retrieved from an online database in the APA format — for example, Smith, John (Photographer). (2008). Starlet [Photograph], 29 April 2011, from: www.museumofphotos.com. For APA citations, list the components of the citation in the following order: Last name, First name (Role of the Artist). (Year of creation). Title of work (italicized) [Type of work], Date of access, from: URL.

Substitute the date of access and URL for the following if using a hard-copy image such as a painting with the city and state abbreviation of country of creation, and the name of the institution where the piece is housed as follows: Smith, John (Photographer). (2008). Starlet [Photograph]. NYC, NY. Museum of Photos.

Reference offline images in Chicago-style — for example, Smith, John, Starlet, 2008, gelatin silver print, 12″ x12″, Museum of Photos, NYC, NY. Order the information in the citation as follows: Last name, First name, Title of work (italicized), year of creation, medium and support, measurements, name of institution where the piece is housed, and present city. Cite images retrieved online as follows: Last name, First name, Title of work (italicized), year of creation. Present city. URL (Date of access).

@bsovvy
April 29, 2020, 11:23am EDT

How to cite pictures in powerpoint

Billions of images are on the internet—but not all of them are free to use. When you add licensed photos to PowerPoint documents, you’ll probably need to cite where it’s from and who made it. Here’s how.

Before we begin, it’s important to remember that how you cite pictures may vary. Formal citation is required in an academic setting, where formal styles like APA are used for documents. Alternatively, copyright licensing may require you to cite images in a different way, depending on the license used.

How to Cite Pictures and Images in PowerPoint

The process for citing pictures and images in PowerPoint is actually quite simple. Unlike citations in Microsoft Word or other Office software, PowerPoint isn’t really designed with referencing in mind. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t cite pictures in PowerPoint—it may still be a requirement for academic and licensing reasons.

To cite an image or photo in PowerPoint, you’ll need to first open a PowerPoint presentation and insert a picture or image.

To add a citation to the image, you’ll need to add a text box. To do this, click Insert > Text Box on the ribbon bar.

How to cite pictures in powerpointText Box to add a text box in PowerPoint” width=”526″ height=”150″ src=”https://www.howtogeek.com/pagespeed_static/1.JiBnMqyl6S.gif” onload=”pagespeed.lazyLoadImages.loadIfVisibleAndMaybeBeacon(this);” onerror=”this.onerror=null;pagespeed.lazyLoadImages.loadIfVisibleAndMaybeBeacon(this);”/>

Next, draw your text box using your mouse or trackpad—place this under your image or in a suitable position close by to it.

Once the text box is created, you can add the citation.

How to cite pictures in powerpoint

Refer to the relevant image licensing guide or academic style guide on how to do this. For academic referencing, you can use the Cite This For Me service to create a citation which you can copy into your text box.

Once your citation is in place, you can then format the text using the formatting options in the ribbon bar under the “Home” tab.

Grouping Citation Text and Images Together in PowerPoint

It’s probably a good idea, once your citation is in place, to anchor it to your image using the PowerPoint grouping feature.

To do this, select both your citation text box and image using your mouse and then right-click. In the options menu that appears, select Group > Group to bind the image and text box together.

How to cite pictures in powerpointGroup to bind the image and text box together.” width=”622″ height=”359″ src=”https://www.howtogeek.com/pagespeed_static/1.JiBnMqyl6S.gif” onload=”pagespeed.lazyLoadImages.loadIfVisibleAndMaybeBeacon(this);” onerror=”this.onerror=null;pagespeed.lazyLoadImages.loadIfVisibleAndMaybeBeacon(this);”/>

By grouping your citation text box and image together, any changes you make to your image (for instance, resizing or moving it) will now be applied to both simultaneously.

To ungroup them later, simply repeat the steps above by right-clicking your image or text box and then clicking Group > Ungroup instead.

Referencing visual media in your research paper, thesis, or dissertation can be an engaging and effective way to support your argument. Photographs, paintings, infographics, and maps are only a few examples of the many types of visual content that can be included.

Citation Generator

In this guide, you will learn how to create accurate APA citations for digital images, infographics, maps, and even artwork from museums. The information from this guide comes from the 7th edition of Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (Chapter 10, Section 10.14).

Looking to cite a different type of media, like an audio recording or a radio interview? EasyBib.com has citing tools that can help!

Citing vs. ‘Reproducing’

This guide provides information on how to cite images and photographs. However, reproducing the image inside of your essay or research paper might require additional permissions and/or attributions. Section 12.15 of the Publication manual provides more information on reproducing images and graphics.

Citing an Image in APA

The guidelines for citing visual works are detailed in section 10.14 of the APA handbook, and include a number of different image and source types. In every case, the following information is required:

  • Name of author, artist, or photographer
  • Date of publication or creation
  • Title of work
  • A bracketed description of media type (e.g., [Photograph] or [Painting])
  • Publisher, production company, or museum name
  • Location of publisher (if a museum or university)
  • URL if accessed online

For most images sourced online, the above information is easily accessible and usually provided alongside the image.

For digital images, using Google’s reverse image search is an effective way to determine the creator and creation date of a particular image.

Citing a Digital Image or Photograph

Creating an APA 7 citation for a digital image is easy. In the following example, we are going to show you how to cite a digital image found online.

Author last name, First initial. (Publication or creation date). Title of image [Type of media]. Name of publisher, museum, or university. URL

Stone, M. (2020). [Picture of fireflies at night in Congaree National Park] [Photograph]. National Geographic. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2020/06/synchronous-fireflies-rare-look-congaree-national-park/#/fireflies-congaree-1994.jpg

Note: In the above example, the photograph is not presented with a title. For untitled photographs, a description of the photo is included inside of square brackets in the place of the title.

In-text citation
Parenthetical (Stone, 2020)
Narrative Stone (2020)

Citing an Image from a Museum or a Museum Website

The following citation structure can be used for all types of museum artwork, including paintings, photographs, drawings, and even sculptures.

Author last name, First initial. (Publication or creation date). Title of artwork [Type of media]. Name of museum, Location of museum. URL if applicable.

Monet, C. (c. 1900) Waterloo bridge [Painting]. Denver Art Museum, Colorado, United States.

Note: If you accessed an image through a museum’s website or online collection, then include the URL at the end of the reference entry.

In-text citation
Parenthetical (Monet 1900)
Narrative Monet (2020)

Citing an Infographic

According to APA 7, infographics are treated identically to any other type of image or photograph. Infographics tend to include all the necessary reference information within the image itself, usually in the bottom corner.

Author last name, First initial. (Publication or creation date). Title of infographic [Infographic]. Name of publisher or organization. URL

Lutz, E. (2014). An animated chart of 42 North American butterflies [Infographic]. Tabletop Whale. https://tabletopwhale.com/2014/08/27/42-butterflies-of-north-america.html

In-text citation
Parenthetical (Lutz 2020)
Narrative Lutz (2020)

Citing a Map

Author last name, First initial. (Publication or creation date). Title of map [Map]. Name of publisher or organization. URL

Cambridge University Press. (1912). Historical map of the religious divisions of Germany c. 1610 [Map]. Emerson Kent. https://www.emersonkent.com/map_archive/germany_1610.htm

In-text citation
Parenthetical (Cambridge 2020)
Narrative Cambridge (2020)

Citing a Map from Google Maps

Dynamically created maps like those generated by Google Maps do not have titles, so the map must be cited with a clear description in brackets, as well as a retrieval date (Publication manual, p.347).

Program or service. (n.d.). [Description of map]. Retrieval month, day, year, from URL

Google. (n.d.). [Google Maps directions for driving from Auckland to Wellington, New Zealand]. Retrieved June 13, 2020 from https://bit.ly/37wTTvx

Note: Some Google Maps links can get unnecessarily long. Link shortener services like Bitly and Ow.ly allow users to create shortened links that will make your references list cleaner and easier to look at.

In-text citation
Parenthetical (Google, n.d.)
Narrative Google (n.d.)

References

American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (7th ed.). https://doi.org/10.1037/0000165-000

Cambridge University Press. (1912). Historical map of the religious divisions of Germany c. 1610 [Map]. Emerson Kent. https://www.emersonkent.com/map_archive/germany_1610.htm

Google. (n.d.). [Google Maps directions for driving from Auckland to Wellington, New Zealand]. Retrieved June 13, 2020 from https://bit.ly/37wTTvx

Lutz, E. (2014). An animated chart of 42 North American butterflies [Infographic]. Tabletop Whale. https://tabletopwhale.com/2014/08/27/42-butterflies-of-north-america.html

Monet, C. (c. 1900) Waterloo bridge [Painting]. Denver Art Museum, Colorado, United States.

Stone, M. (2020). [Picture of fireflies at night in Congaree National Park] [Photograph]. National Geographic. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2020/06/synchronous-fireflies-rare-look-congaree-national-park/#/fireflies-congaree-1994.jpg

Published 20, 2012. Updated June 23, 2020.

Written and edited by Michele Kirschenbaum and Elise Barbeau. Michele Kirschenbaum is a school library media specialist and the in-house librarian at EasyBib. You can find her here on Twitter. Elise Barbeau is the Citation Specialist at Chegg. She has worked in digital marketing, libraries, and publishing.

They say a picture tells a thousand words—so photographs can serve an important purpose in essays you’ve written or presentations you’re working on. Google Images, which contains images from thousands of websites at the click of a button, is one of the easiest places to find photos on the Internet. Knowing how to cite an image found on Google Images is, therefore, pretty helpful.

While you might know how to cite a thousand word long journal article, citing an image might seem more difficult, especially if you’ve obtained that image from an online source. Luckily, citing a picture you’ve found on Google Images isn’t all that different from citing a website you found after doing a quick Google search.

Say you’re working on an biographical paper or PowerPoint presentation about President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and you want your title page or opening slide to contain a photograph of the former president, who has the distinction of being the only president to serve more than two terms and who led the country out of the Great Depression and throughout much of World War II.

Google Images has you covered on the picture—the site has pages and pages of images, including this neat one of FDR sitting at his desk in the Oval Office—and if you want to cite the photo in MLA format , APA format , or Chicago style, we’ve got you covered on that.

Copyright Considerations

Before continuing, you should understand that many of the images found through Google and other search engines are copyright protected. This means that you are not allowed to make money from the use of these images. For example, it is illegal to make and sell t-shirts that display this image of Franklin D. Roosevelt. However, according to Chapter 1, Section 107, of the Copyright Law , you are allowed to use images for research and classroom purposes.

Information Needed for the Citation

After finding the image that you’d like to use, to the right of the image, click the button that says, “Visit page.” This is where you’ll find the information you need to cite the image.

Here’s the specific information you’ll need to locate when citing an image you found on Google Images:

  1. Full name of the image’s creator, such as the name of the photographer or illustrator (if available)
  2. Formal title of the image (if available) or a description of the image
  3. Name of the website where the image lives (Do not use Google as the name of the website!)
  4. Publisher of the website where the image was found on
  5. Date this information was published on their site
  6. The URL

*Please note that if putting these citations in a printed paper, the lines should be double-spaced and indented.

How to cite an image from Google Images in MLA 8:

Last name, First name of creator. “Title” or description of the image. Title of the Website, Publisher, Date of publication, URL.

  • In MLA, If the image has a title, place it in quotation marks and include capital letters for the first letter in each important word and for pronouns. If it does not have an official title, create a simple description. Only capitalize the first letter in the description and the first letter for any pronouns.
  • Only include the name of the publisher if it is different than the name of the author and title of the site.
  • For URLs, remove https:// and https:// from the citation

How to cite the example image in MLA 8:

Photograph of Franklin D. Roosevelt at his desk. The Washington Post, 25 Apr. 2017, www.washingtonpost.com/news/fact-checker/wp/2017/04/25/the-white-house-boo-boo-in-counting-roosevelts-executive-orders/?utm_term=.06cac0ac12e5.

How to cite an image from Google Images in APA:

Image creator’s Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year published). Title of image [Photograph, Cartoon, Painting, etc.]. Website Name. URL.

The reference list entry for the image consists of its author, year of publication, title, description in brackets, and source (usually the name of the website and the URL).

  • In APA, if the image does not have a formal title, describe the image and place the description in brackets.
  • In APA, do not place a period at the end of the URL

How to cite the example image in APA:

US National Trust. (2017). Franklin D. Roosevelt at his desk [Photograph]. Google Images. https://www.google.com/images/the-white-house-boo-boo-in-counting-roosevelts-executive-orders/?utm_term=.06cac0ac12e5

How to cite an image from Google Images in Chicago:

Last name, First name Middle initial of creator of image. “Title of image” or Description. Digital Image. Title of Website. Month Day, Year Published. Accessed date. URL.

  • If the image does not have an official title, create a description. Do not place the description in quotation marks.
  • Only include the date the image was accessed if there is no publication date!

How to cite the example image in Chicago:

Franklin D. Roosevelt at his desk. Digital Image. The Washington Post. April 25, 2017. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/fact-checker/wp/2017/04/25/the-white-house-boo-boo-in-counting-roosevelts-executive-orders/?utm_term=.8d30c188c74c.

Works Cited

“Chapter 1: Subject Matter and Scope of Copyright.” Copyright Law of the United States , p. 19, www.copyright.gov/title17/chapter1.pdf.

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How to cite pictures in powerpoint

How to cite pictures in powerpoint

When putting together a PowerPoint presentation, especially one that you will share inside the company or with clients, it is extremely important to credit the pictures and images you use. Unlike Word, PowerPoint does not offer a feature to add a caption to a photo, so the process is a little more complex.

How to Cite Pictures in PowerPoint:

  • Open the PowerPoint presentation and select the image you want to credit.

How to cite pictures in powerpoint

  • Under the Insert tab, select Text Box. Move the mouse over the picture and drag a box. You can move or resize it if necessary.

How to cite pictures in powerpoint

  • Type the credits in the text box you just created. You can change the font type, size or color, just as you would do with any text in PowerPoint.

How to cite pictures in powerpoint

  • Once you are done, click outside the picture and you will see how the credits appear on top of the image.

How to cite pictures in powerpoint

  • To make sure the credits stay in the same position, even if you move or resize the image, you need to group them together. Click on the image and then, while holding Ctrl, click on the text box. Under the Picture Tools Format tab, click Group.You can also group using hotkeys (ctrl+g).

How to cite pictures in powerpoint

How to cite pictures on Mac

The process is almost the same on Mac; the only difference is the grouping process:

  • Once you add the text box with the credit, click on it. While pressing Command, click on the image.
  • Under the Shape Format or the Picture Format tabs, click on Group.
  • If the Group tab is not visible, click on Arrange to display it.

If you need any help improving PowerPoint design for your presentation, or you need one created from scratch, we are here 24/7. Reliable and efficient delivery, as quickly as 12 hours.

Powerpoint presentations are effective for conveying information to audiences in visual format but still require citation of sources. Properly citing sources will protect you from plagiarizing while also lending credibility to your own work. Following a few guidelines will ensure proper APA citation in your Powerpoint presentation.

Formating Your Presentation

There are no specific formats for presentations to meet APA guidelines. However, the American Psychological Association suggests that your presentation use font styles and sizes that are easy to read such as Times New Roman 12 point font. Citations are required in presentations just as they are in manuscripts. In-text citations and the reference page may appear in smaller font, but still must be readable.

In-Text Citations

All information that you have obtained from a source other than your own general knowledge must include a citation. This is important as it lends credibility to your work and prevents the possibility of plagiarism. To cite general information in-text, you should include the author’s last name and the date of publication in parenthesis immediately following the information. To cite a direct quote, you should include the author’s last name, the date of publication and the corresponding page number in parenthesis immediately following the quote.

For example: (Jones, 2013, p. 18).

Figures and Images

All figures and images that are not of your own creation must be cited in your Powerpoint presentation. To cite figures and images, you should include the author’s last name or the copyright holder — which is often an entity — and the date of publication directly under the figure or image in parenthesis. If the date of publication is not available, substitute the date of retrieval. If the figure or image is obtained from a print source, include the corresponding page number. If the figure or image is obtained from a digital source, include the web address from which it was retrieved. You should also make a notation if the table is reprinted or adapted and include information on the original source both in citation and on the reference page.

(Jones, 2013, retrieved from http://www.jonesimages.com).

Tables

You can cite tables that present an overview from a source by including the author’s last name and date of publication in parenthesis immediately under the table. Tables that are exact replicas from another individual’s work can be cited by including the author’s last name, date of publication and corresponding page numbers in parenthesis immediately under the table.

Reference Page

All references from throughout your presentation must be included on a separate reference page. Title the page “References.” Double-space all references and use hanging indentation.

For a journal reference, include the author’s last name, first initial, date of publication, title of work, title of journal (italicized), volume (italicized) and number of journal and corresponding pages.

Example: Homer, S. (2013). Citing references. Journal of References (italicized), 15(2), 22-27.

For a book reference, include the author’s last name, first initial, date of publication, title of book (italicized), place of publication and publisher.

Example: Homer, S. (2013). Preventing plagiarism (italicized). New York: Publisher’s Press.

For a website, include the author’s last name or entity, first initial, date of publication, title of website and the web address preceded by “retrieved from”.

Guide: How to cite a Online image or video in IEEE style

Cite A Online image or video in IEEE style

Use the following template to cite a online image or video using the IEEE citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator.

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

Template:

Example:

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Template

Example

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How do I cite a photo or other image reproduced in a Web site article?

When citing an image reproduced in an article on a Web site, you can generally refer to it in your text and then key the reference to a works-cited-list entry for the article. In the example below, the image, reproduced in an article on a Web site, is described in prose, and the name of the article’s author is provided in a parenthetical citation that keys to the works-cited-list entry:

A recent article summarizing a study of Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa shows a scan of the original Mona Lisa so that readers can judge for themselves whether or not the woman in the painting is smiling (Daley).

Work Cited

Daley, Jason. “So Is Mona Lisa Smiling? A New Study Says Yes.” Smithsonian.com, 17 Mar. 2017, www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/is-the-mona-lisa-smiling-new-study-180962580/.

Another way to cite an image reproduced in a Web site article is to treat it as a work contained in another work. Using the MLA format template, start your works-cited-list entry with a description of the image, since you are not citing the actual image but a reproduction of it. Then list the title of the article that contains the image as the title of the container, the author of the article in the “Other contributors” slot, and the publication date of the article. In a second container, list the name of the Web site and the URL:

Digital reproduction of Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. “So Is Mona Lisa Smiling? A New Study Says Yes,” by Jason Daley, 17 Mar. 2017. Smithsonian.com, www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/is-the-mona-lisa-smiling-new-study-180962580/.

If the image is altered in any way, characterize the work you are citing accurately in the entry. For example, the same article summarizing the study of Mona Lisa includes a doctored image of the Mona Lisa in which the woman in the painting is frowning. You might cite the image as follows:

Digitally altered image of Leonard da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. “So Is Mona Lisa Smiling? A New Study Says Yes,” by Jason Daley, 17 Mar. 2017. Smithsonian.com, www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/is-the-mona-lisa-smiling-new-study-180962580/.

The Web site Liberty Puzzles contains an image of the Mona Lisa in the form of a jigsaw puzzle. To cite this image, provide a description in place of a title. Then list the title of the Web site as the title of the container, followed by the URL. If there is no copyright or other date on the page, provide an access date in the optional-element slot at the end of the entry: