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How to cook dried chickpeas

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How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are practically a staple ingredient in Middle Eastern cooking. They are the basis for foods like hummus and falafel and, while it is convenient to use canned chickpeas, dried chickpeas really are a better option.

Dried chickpeas are much more economical and they tend to have a more natural flavor because they aren’t soaked in preservatives. Also, any extra beans can be frozen to be used at a later time. The only drawback is that you have to soak chickpeas before you can cook them. We’ll tell you how to do both so your family can enjoy these tasty little morsels.

Watch Now: How to Soak and Cook Dried Chickpeas

How to Soak Chickpeas

Just as with any other dry bean, the first thing you will have to do before cooking dried chickpeas is to soak them. It’s best done overnight but if you forget and are in a pinch, there is a shortcut you can take. We’ll get to that, but first, let’s take a look at the traditional method of soaking.

  1. Sort through the beans to make sure there are no stones or debris, removing any that you find.
  2. Place the chickpeas in a large bowl and cover completely with cold water.
  3. Allow to soak overnight, or about 12 hours. A teaspoon of baking soda can be added to aid with the soaking process, but plain water for 12 hours tends to work just fine.

Soak Chickpeas in One Hour

Do you really want chickpeas but don’t have the patience to wait for the conventional soak? Did you forget to prep them last night? It happens to everyone and you’re in luck because you can also do a rapid, quick soak. Here’s how:

  1. Sort through the beans and remove any stones or other debris.
  2. Place them in a colander and rinse under cool running water before draining.
  3. Transfer the beans to a saucepan and cover with 2 inches of water.
  4. Bring to a boil, cook for 1 minute, cover and remove from the heat.
  5. Leave the beans to soak for 1 hour, then rinse and cook as you would if you had soaked them overnight.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

How to Cook Chickpeas

Once the chickpeas have soaked, it’s time to cook them. It’s very easy and takes just over an hour.

  1. Drain the chickpeas in a large colander and transfer them to a large cooking pot.
  2. Cover with water twice the amount of the chickpeas and bring to a boil.
  3. Cover, lower the heat and allow the pot to simmer for approximately one hour.
  4. Do a taste test to make sure they are tender enough for your liking. If they’re not quite where you want them, simmer for a little longer.
  5. Drain and allow to cool for 15 minutes.

Once the chickpeas are cooled, they are ready to be used. Cooked chickpeas can be kept covered in the refrigerator for up to three days. They can also be frozen in an airtight container for about a month.

Learn how to soak and cook dried chickpeas for silky hummus and side dishes. We’ve also got tips for cooking with tinned chickpeas.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Chickpeas are such a versatile ingredient – use them whole, or crushed to make falafel or veggie burgers, or mashed to a creamy consistency for hummus or a side dish. They’re a healthy food, too. You only need 3 tbsp of chickpeas to count as one of your five-a-day and 100g contains 7g of protein, plus they’re rich in plant hormones called isoflavones.

Buying chickpeas

You may find them labelled as garbanzos (this is what they’re called in America and Spain), or gram and chana in recipes from the Indian subcontinent. There are several varieties of chickpea; desi varieties are smaller and often darker (sometimes green) and are the more common variety grown in Asia, though a rarer black variety, kala chana, also grows in Puglia and Basilicata in Italy where they are called ceci neri. Kabuli varieties are bigger, smoother and lighter and grown in Europe, the Mediterranean, North Africa and South America.

You can buy chickpeas both dried and pre-cooked in cans. Dried chickpeas are available in different sizes and can be variable in quality while large castellano garbanzos are grown in Southern Spain. Garbanzo de Fuentesauco, also from Spain, carry a PGI status (Protected Geographical Indication).

Canned or jarred chickpeas just need to be reheated if you are eating them in a hot dish, or can be used straight from the can for a recipe like hummus. Like dried chickpeas, they vary in quality and size, as do some of the jarred varieties from Spain.

Buying canned chickpeas will also give you aqua faba, or chickpea water, which can be used to make vegan meringues. Like other pulses, chickpeas can also be a budget food, especially if you buy them dried and cook them yourself. Home-cooked chickpeas can be frozen for later use.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

How to cook dried chickpeas

Dried chickpeas generally need to be soaked before cooking as they are very hard. Depending on where you buy your chickpeas from, you may need to sort through them first and remove any stones or discoloured ones.

Slow soaking dried chickpeas: Tip them into a bowl and cover with cold water, and use plenty of water as they will swell as they soak. Leave overnight or for 8-12 hours to absorb water and swell. Adding bicarbonate of soda can help the soaking process, especially if you live in a hard water area. It will soften the skins and, if you are making hummus, give a lighter, smoother result. Use 1 tbsp per 500g dried chickpeas.

Quick soaking dried chickpeas: Tip your chickpeas into a saucepan and cover them with lots of cold water, bring to a boil (again add bicarbonate of soda, if you like) and then boil for 1 minute. Turn off the heat and leave to soak for 1 hour.

Stove top cooking dried chickpeas
How long your chickpeas will take to cook will depend on how long they have been dried and stored for.

  1. Drain your soaked chickpeas and tip them into a pan.
  2. Add cold water until you have twice the volume of the chickpeas.
  3. Bring the water to a boil, then turn the heat down and simmer the chickpeas for 45 mins (if you are going to cook them further in another dish) or up to 1 hour. Taste to see if they are tender. If not, continue cooking, checking the tenderness every 10 mins. Drain.

If you want to cook a whole bag at a time and freeze them in batches then cool them first. They will freeze for up to a month or keep in the fridge for up to three days.

Instant pot or pressure-cooking dried chickpeas
Chickpeas can be cooked from dry or pre-soaked in a pressure cooker. If you soak them for 12 hours, then they will cook in minutes, but you can also skip the soaking altogether. Chickpeas can be pressure-cooked from dry in 40 minutes, plus the time it takes for the pressure to rise and fall.

Oven cooking
You can roast pre-cooked chickpeas in the oven to make a crisp snack or to sprinkle over a salad or other savoury dish like these crispy chickpeas.

Skin the chickpeas to make super silky hummus
If you have ever eaten a very smooth hummus, then it’s likely that the cooked chickpeas were skinned. Chickpeas have a thin skin that can easily be slipped off if you have the time or inclination.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Dried chickpeas recipe

Depending on their final use, you can add flavour to the cooking water such as garlic, bay leaves, cinnamon sticks and chilli.

  • 500g dried chickpeas
  • 1 tbsp bicarbonate of soda (optional)
  1. Tip the chickpeas into a bowl and sort through them. Throw away any discoloured ones.
  2. Cover with cold water, add the bicarbonate of soda, if using, and leave to soak for 8-12 hrs.
  3. Drain the chickpeas and tip into a saucepan.
  4. Add cold water to come to about 8-10 cm above the chickpeas and bring to a boil.
  5. Turn down the heat and simmer for 45 mins – 1 hr, or until the chickpeas are tender. Drain well.

Canned chickpeas recipe

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 400g can chickpeas, drained
  • chopped parsley, optional
  1. Heat the oil in a pan and add the garlic.
  2. Cook for 1 min, then stir in the chickpeas.
  3. Season well and heat gently, stirring, until all the chickpeas are hot.
  4. Stir in the chopped parsley, if you like.

5 of the best chickpea recipes

What’s your favourite chickpea recipe? Leave a comment below.

Foregoing canned chickpeas and rehydrating your own is well worth the effort.

While other beans have dominated the kitchen spotlight over the years, chickpeas—aka. garbanzo beans—have recently gotten their chance to shine thanks to Mediterranean cuisine’s rising popularity. However, these versatile and healthy beans are still primarily used from a can—rather than in their dry form—which robs them of the chance to reach their full culinary potential.

While canned chickpeas are undoubtedly the more convenient of the two options, the superior taste and texture of the dried beans is worth the extra effort. Not only are dried chickpeas more affordable than their canned counterparts, but they are also more flavorful, as they haven’t been soaked in a preservative-packed liquid to keep them shelf stable, and better maintain their form and texture during the cooking process.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Easy never tasted so awesome.

Though time-consuming, the dried chickpea rehydration and cooking process is a simple kitchen task that any level of home cook can master, and will be well worth your efforts in the end.

Watch: How to Make Savory Chickpea Waffles

Soaking and Rehydrating

The first step to successfully cooking with dried chickpeas is to soak and rehydrate the beans properly. Start by sifting through your dried beans and removing any stones or excess debris before covering your dried chickpeas in water and soaking for 8 hours. Keep in mind that your dried chickpeas will expand significantly during this process, so be sure to use a large enough bowl.

At this point, you can also opt to add 1 tablespoon of baking soda per pound of chickpeas to your soaking water. While it’s completely possible to rehydrate and cook chickpeas without baking soda, this common household ingredient can make a world of difference. By soaking the chickpeas in baking soda, you create a reaction that breaks down the pectin—a natural thickening agent—in the chickpeas, which allows the skin to soften. When cooked, this softened skin will disintegrate easily and leave only the center of the chickpea, resulting in a more tender texture. While the addition of baking soda is optional, it will hugely benefit your end result, particularly when making creamier dishes, like hummus.

After your chickpeas have soaked for a minimum of 8 hours—or ideally overnight—drain the liquid and rinse the chickpeas thoroughly before moving on to the cooking step.

If you forget to prep your chickpeas but need them for a recipe ASAP, you can speed up the rehydration process with the help of a little heat. Start by rinsing your chickpeas thoroughly under cold water before adding the beans to a saucepan and covering with a couple of inches of water. Bring the mixture to a boil and cook for 1 minute before removing the pan from heat, covering, and letting the chickpeas soak for 1 hour in the pan before rinsing and preparing as usual.

Cooking

While it might appear that your chickpeas are ready to be consumed once rehydrated, they need to be cooked before they’re worked into any dish or recipe. There are a few options for cooking your chickpeas, some of which require the beans to be pre-soaked, and others that do the hydration heavy lifting for you.

Stovetop

This simple method for cooking your chickpeas is as traditional as it gets. Start by adding your rinsed chickpeas to a large pot, covered by a couple inches of water. You can also choose to add salt, garlic, bay leaves, and other seasonings at this point to infuse some flavor in your legumes. Bring the pot to a boil before covering, lowering the heat, and simmering for between 1-2 hours, depending on the quantity and desired texture. Determining when your chickpeas are done is completely subjective. After about an hour, occasionally taste for tenderness; if the chickpeas are still too firm for your liking, continue to simmer. Once they’ve reached your ideal consistency, drain the beans and cool for 15 minutes before using them in a recipe or storing.

Rehydrated chickpeas can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days, or in the freezer for a few months.

Slow Cooker

One major benefit of using a slow cooker to cook your legumes is that you have the option to skip the pre-soak. This method is also the most hands-off option for cooking your beans, and can be started in the morning and completed just in time to make dinner.

Simply add your dried chickpeas and water to your slow cooker—about 8 cups of water per pound of chickpeas—and cook on low for 6-8 hours. To speed up the process, you can also choose to cook on high for 3-4 hours. However, a low and slow cooking process will result in a more tender, melt-in-your-mouth texture.

You can also cook pre-soaked beans in the slow cooker by scaling down the water by half and cooking for 2 hours on high or 4 hours on low.

Pressure Cooking

For pressure cooker lovers and Instant Pot devotees, cooking your chickpeas with this method is a no-brainer. This is the quickest method for cooking the beans, and can be done with either pre-soaked or dry beans.

If cooking pre-soaked beans, add the rinsed chickpeas to your Instant Pot or pressure cooker with 3 cups of water and cook on high pressure for between 12-18 minutes, depending on the texture you’re aiming for. The longer the cook time, the softer the texture will be.

If cooking dry beans, rinse your dried beans thoroughly before adding to the Instant Pot or cooker with a few cups of water. Cook for 35-40 minutes before allowing the pressure to release naturally. With either of these methods, you can opt to add garlic, bay leaves, and salt in with the chickpeas for some added flavor.

Recipes to Try

Once your dried chickpeas have been rehydrated and cooked, they’re ready to be incorporated into any recipe your legume-loving heart desires. While there are some obvious chickpea dishes we all know and love—like Creamy Tahini Hummus and Falafel Pitas—these beans have tons of potential beyond the traditional mezze spread.

Liven up your brunch spread with Savory Chickpea Waffles and a salad of Chickpeas with Broccoli Rabe and Bacon, or create a simple, health-conscious snack like Crispy Roasted Chickpeas.

Incorporate your garbanzo beans into a satisfying side dish, like a Chickpea and Orzo Dinner Salad or Pancetta and Chickpea Soup, or create an Italian-inspired feast with Orecchiette with Greens, Mozzarella, and Chickpeas and Sausage and Clams with Chickpeas.

Chickpeas also make a great partner to a wide variety of meats, like Moroccan Style Lamb and Chickpeas, Grilled Scallops with Lemon-Chickpea Salad, and Tuna and Chickpea Salad with Pesto—or can give bulk to vegetarian recipes like Quinoa and Chickpea Burgers.

Whichever way you cook them, going the extra mile by using dried chickpeas is guaranteed to take any of your dishes to the next—completely can-free—level.

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💥Chickpea time! Chickpeas (also known as garbanzo beans) are filled with plant-based protein and fiber, and are super easy to make in big batches. It’s recommended that we consume about 1 1/2 cups legumes each day. Cook a big batch of dried beans at the beginning of the week for easy snacking and meal prepping throughout the week. I like to use these chickpeas to prepare homemade oil-free hummus, roasted chickpeas, and also just add them unseasoned to salads. PS – Most kids I know love these beans!

I’ve found that adding a little baking soda and lemon juice while the chickpeas are soaking helps speed up the cooking time. This is optional, as it adds more sodium, though is very helpful if you prefer not to cook the chickpeas for two hours. If you do add the baking soda and lemon juice, the cook time is reduced down to about 20 minutes.

Makes 4 cups cooked chickpeas

Ingredients

  • 2 cups dried chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
  • Water for rinsing, soaking and cooking
  • 1 tsp baking soda, optional
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice, optional

Directions

  1. Rinse dried chickpeas 1-2x.
  2. Drain and place dried chickpeas into a bowl with optional baking soda and lemon juice, along with enough water to cover by a few inches.
  3. Let soak for 4-8 hours.
  4. Pour soaked chickpeas and water into a big pot.
  5. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes (if using baking soda and lemon juice), or 2 hours if not, until cooked through and tender. Skim off any foam that rises to the top of the pot.
  6. Pour cooked beans and water into an airtight container with lid.
  7. Store in the fridge for up to 1 week.

❤️ Add cooked chickpeas to your salads, purée into a dip, mix into your soups and enjoy plain.

Best tips on how to cook dried chickpeas for perfectly cooked beans every time plus some recipes for using the beans. This post is continuously updated as I learn more tips, and the most recent update was made October 9, 2019. 5 tips for cooking dried chickpeas perfect every time. These tips address the most common problems with cooking chickpeas.

Health Benefits of Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans)

Chickpeas are high in protein making them an excellent meat substitute for vegetarian and vegan diets. Chickpeas are a good source of fiber. This means they can keep your appetite sated longer. These above benefits + their low Glycemic Index means chickpeas support steady blood glucose levels. The combination of nutrients means chickpeas may protect you agains chronic health problems such as heart disease and diabetes. They’re good for your financial health, as they can fit into most any budget.

Ways to Cook Dried Chickpeas

  • Simmer on the stove top in a Dutch Oven or other heavy bottomed pot:
    • Great if you don’t have a slow cooker or electric pressure cooker
    • Can be difficult to keep the pot at a constant low simmer
    • Risk of the water boiling off, ending up with chickpeas cooked to the bottom of the pot
  • Slide the Dutch oven into the oven, and bake the beans instead of cooking on the Stove Top
    • Infuses flavors into the beans far better than stove-top cooking due to 360˚ cooking process
    • Improved texture over stove top due to 360˚ cooking process vs only heating on the bottom
  • Cook them in a Slow cooker such as this one that I use from All-Clad :
    • Great if you want to do this while you’re at work
    • No risk of boiling over, no risk of water boiling off
    • Produces a great consistent chickpea texture
    • Not a workable option if you’re in a hurry
  • Use an Electric Pressure Cooker, such as an Instant Pot or the MultiPot (I use both!)
    • Perfect option when you’re in a hurry
    • No risk of boiling over, no risk of water boiling off
    • Produced a great consistent chickpea texture
    • Doesn’t allow for varying degrees of chickpea dryness, so if they’re super dry, you’ll have to cook longer
    • NOTE: If you’re interested in purchasing the MultiPot by Mealthy, enter my coupon code THEWIMPYVEGETARIAN when you check out and you’ll get $10 off the price.

5 Tips for Cooking Perfect Chickpeas Every Time:

You can do everything according to the book, and sometimes you still end up with beans that didn’t cook. Or they cooked, but they’re a hot mess with the beans splitting out of their skins. Here are some tips so that hopefully it never ever happens again.

Tip #1: Pre-soak the beans in a brine

Pre-soaking is one of the most important steps when cooking dried chickpeas. And using a brining liquid for this step is by far best of all. The beans don’t absorb much saltiness, nor does a brine translate into a tougher cooked bean. Instead, it promotes a consistent cooked bean texture surpassing either pre-soaking without salt or skipping the pre-soak step.

Additionally, pre-soaking typically makes the beans easier to digest and promotes a faster cook time, so it’s worth taking a little extra planning for this step.

Here’s what always works for me: Cover the beans with 2 inches of water (about 1 quart), add 1 tablespoon salt and either (1) cover and soak over night, or (2) cover and simmer for 2 minutes, remove from the heat, cool for 4 hours and rinse well.

Tip #2: Salt the beans before cooking

After soaking the beans in a salty brine solution (see Tip #1), thoroughly rinse them with fresh water. Place them in a pot with water for cooking, and add 1 teaspoon kosher salt (or 1 1/2 teaspoon regular salt) for every 1 cup dried chickpeas.

Salting improves the flavor, and helps prevent beans from splitting open and slipping from their skins. Adding salt during cooking of beans is controversial, with many experts believing this toughens their skins. In my experience, it promotes a much improved texture and appearance of the the cooked bean. There are now a number of studies out explaining the chemistry around why salting during soaking and cooking is the best approach.

Tip #3: Keep the water at a low simmer to minimize foaming

When cooking dried beans on the stovetop, foaming is very common in the early cooking stages. Unfortunately, this often leads to the formation of air pockets in the beans, which translates into a dry texture when cooked. If you see any foaming, skim the surface of the water with a metal spoon, and reduce your heat a bit.

Keep a bowl of water nearby to dip the spoon into, in between skimmings. This easily removes the foam from the spoon.

If you want to move to a more vegetarian diet, but not sure the best steps to take, join the Monthly Vegetarian Meals Challenge. Each month I’ll post some tips – great plant protein sources, must-haves for the vegetarian pantry, ways to build flavor, and more. Additionally, we tackle 1 – 3 seasonal recipes tied to the theme that month. Subscribe to Monthly Vegetarian Meals Challenge.

Tip #4: Add a pinch of baking soda

If you’re having consistent problems with dried beans not softening enough during the cooking process, it may be because you live in a very dry climate, in high altitudes, or have water that has a heavier metal content.

In these cases, you may benefit from adding a pinch of baking soda to the pre-soaking water. Baking soda promotes a tender bean by helping to dissolve their cellular walls. Use only 1/4 teaspoon baking soda per pound of dried beans, and be sure to thoroughly rinse the beans before cooking in fresh water.

Another approach with baking soda is to add 1/4 teaspoon to the cooking water. But be careful – the cooking times may be reduced by half. But don’t add baking soda to the pre-soaking water AND the cooking water.

WARNING: If you add baking soda and cook beans the same length of time as you normally would, you will end up making hummus.

Note: Some people notice an unappealing chemical taste added to the cooked bean when using baking soda in the water. However, I use this method when I make hummus so the beans disintegrate a bit before hitting the blender. I’ve personally never tasted the chemical flavor residue. Hwever, I typically add other flavors to the hummus which may hide it.

Tip #5: Use store-bought vegetable broth for the cooking liquid.

If you have hard water, it’s possible that the minerals in the water are leaving deposits on the beans preventing them from cooking. If the baking soda approach doesn’t work, use store-bought vegetable broth for the liquid instead of tap water.

125 mins 137 cals 12 servs

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Learn How to Cook Chickpeas in the Instant Pot, Crock-Pot, or stovetop without soaking overnight. The three methods below will turn dried garbanzo beans into either al dente or soft legume that can be used in soups, stews, or your favorite hummus recipe.

Want a few ideas for chickpea recipes you can try? You might also enjoy this Homemade Hummus, Chickpea Curry, and Mediterranean Chickpea Salad with Cucumber.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

How to Cook Chickpeas

Chickpeas, oh chickpeas!! Why have I not been cooking you from your dried counterpart my whole life?

Seriously, do you know how to cook these cute little legumes?

On the stovetop, in the Crock-Pot, or in the Instant Pot?

Like… not the canned kind you buy in the store.

The clear bag full of those tiny, dried garbanzo beans that initially look SO intimidating!

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Dried versus Canned

The first time I ever tried chickpeas that were cooked at home was when my mother-in-law made her famous Homemade Hummus recipe. I had made hummus with the canned beans before, but this hummus was different.

The texture was fluffy and the flavor incredible.

Really? Could cooking chickpeas on the stovetop really make that big of a difference?

Not only were the ones made from scratch better for hummus making, but they also taste incredible on their own with a touch of lemon juice, salt, and pepper.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

What are Chickpeas?

Chickpeas, oftentimes referred to as garbanzo beans, are part of the legume family and commonly used as a culinary ingredient. While they have been in Indian and Middle Eastern cultures for over 7500 years, it is quickly gaining popularity in the American culture.

This legume is most often found in recipes such as chana masala, hummus, and falafel. It boasts numerous health benefits and nutrition, too. (See below for more about health benefits.)

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Nutritional Information

In a 1-ounce serving of chickpeas you will find:

  • 46 calories
  • 8 grams carbs
  • 2 grams of fiber
  • 3 grams of protein (plant-based protein)
  • Folate, iron, phosphorous, and magnesium

While they are moderately dense in calories, they do contain a good amount of fiber and protein that will help keep you stay full for a good length of time.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

How to Cook Garbanzo Beans

There are three ways you can cook dried chickpeas: on the stovetop, in a Crock-Pot or slow cooker, or in an Instant Pot or pressure cooker.

But before you begin cooking you will first want to make sure you sort, rinse, and drain them.

While most bags of dried chickpeas have been thoroughly sorted, you still want to make sure a dirt clod did not make its way into your bag.

Many instructions also recommend that you soak them overnight. However, the three recipes below do not require soaking, making them much quicker and easier methods.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

3 Different Way

Stovetop Method

  1. In a large pot add chickpeas, salt, and enough water to cover them by 1 ½ – 2 inches.
  2. Bring the pot to a boil, cover with a lid and reduce heat to a simmer.
  3. Simmer for 1 ½ hours for al dente and 2 hours for soft.

Instant Pot Method

  1. Add garbanzo beans, salt, and enough water to cover them by 1 ½ – 2 inches in a 6-quart Instant Pot.
  2. Set Instant Pot to high pressure and cook for 30-35 minutes for al dente and 35-40 minutes for soft.
  3. Allow a 10 minute natural pressure release.

Crock-Pot Method

  1. Add chickpeas, salt, and enough water to cover them by 1- 1 ½ inches in a 6-quart slow cooker.
  2. Set slow cooker to high and cook for 3 hours for al dente and 3 ½ – 4 hours for soft.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Are Garbanzo Beans Chickpeas?

Yes, garbanzo beans and chickpeas are the same legume. Both names are used interchangeably throughout the United States.

Do I have to Cook Canned Chickpeas?

No, canned chickpeas are already cooked so you do not need to cook them. However, cooking them will tenderize the beans and soften them up a bit when used in various recipes.

Do You Have to Soak Them?

No, it is not necessary to soak chickpeas overnight in order to cook them. Just make sure you cook them until fork tender using one of the various methods below.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Do You Have to Peel?

While some argue that peeling chickpeas will give you an incredible texture, it takes quite a bit more time for minimal reward. So no, you do not have to peel cooked garbanzo beans to use in recipes but you can if you would like a slightly better texture.

How to Freeze?

Once you have cooked the chickpeas by one of the methods mentioned, drain any excess liquid thoroughly and freeze in a freezer-safe container or zip-top bag. They will keep in the freezer for up to 3-6 months.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Recipes to Try

While cooked chickpeas will taste delicious on their own with a sprinkle of salt and a touch of lemon or lime juice, there are a few recipes you might want to try out:

They’re so versatile.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

If you’re a person who loves eating chickpeas, buying them dried can save you a ton of money. Plus, if you make a big batch of cooked chickpeas to keep in your fridge, you’ll be able to toss them in salads, throw them in your morning smoothie, or add them to a batch of weeknight pasta after a long work day. Even if you’re not down with this versatile legume yet, after learning how to cook them to perfection, you’ll be ready to add them to any dish.

Getting Started

Bags of dried chickpeas can occasionally come with impurities, like small stones, which is a completely normal occurrence.

Before you get to cooking, sort through the chickpeas by hand, making sure to pluck out anything that looks like it doesn’t belong, and rinsing them well in a strainer underneath cold water.

There’s an old wives’ tale that says you should not salt your beans while cooking, as it will make it tough. In reality, the opposite is true. Salt helps the skin of beans to soften, resulting in a creamy, well-seasoned finished product. Cooking and soaking your chickpeas in unsalted water will result in tough skins which can cause indigestion, so don’t forget to salt your water!

Chickpeas, like all dried beans, need to be soaked before they’re cooked. The only exception to this rule: you can cook from dry if you’re using a pressure cooker, like an instant pot, or a slow cooker. Here’s a few methods of cooking dried chickpeas, depending on what equipment you have in your kitchen.

Stovetop

Fill your largest pot ⅔ of the way with water, then stir in a tablespoon of kosher or sea salt. Add the dried chickpeas, stir well, and cover with a lid or plastic wrap. Let the chickpeas rehydrate for at least eight hours.

You can do this overnight, or in the morning before you leave for work.

Once the chickpeas have rehydrated, drain well, return to pot, and then fill with enough water to cover by two inches. Cover the pot and bring to a boil. Remove the lid and drop the heat to a simmer. Cook until the chickpeas can be pierced with a fork, about two hours. Make sure to stir occasionally to ensure even cooking, and add more water as needed to make sure the chickpeas stay covered.

Slow Cooker

Put 1 pound of dried chickpeas in the slow cooker with a tablespoon of salt, then fill with water until it comes up 1” from the top. Cover and cook, without removing the lid, for 8 hours on low, or 4 on high. Test for tenderness — if you’d like your chickpeas to be even more tender, place the cover back on and cook for another 30 minutes to 1 hour over high heat. Drain well.

Pressure Cooker or Instant Pot

The ratio for pressure cooking is 1:3 — for every cup of dried chickpeas, add 3 cups of water. Add a hefty pinch of salt, stir, and seal. Cook on high pressure for one hour, then allow the pressure to release naturally for 10 minutes, then vent the steam. Drain and rinse.

Now What?

There’s so many quick and easy ways to make crazy flavorful and super nutritious meals when you’ve got chickpeas on hand. Toss a bowl of them with vinaigrette, herbs, a bits and bobs of whatever vegetables you may have in your fridge for a salad that will keep you full all day. Pop them in a food processor with garlic, lemon, tahini, salt and some water for hummus that’s a fraction of the cost of the stuff you buy in the store. Toss a few into your morning smoothie for an extra dose of fiber and protein that you won’t even taste. Throw them into a skillet with some oil, garlic and red chili flakes, then toss with pasta. Truthfully, the possibilities are endless, and their extreme versatility is a great reason to always keep big container of chickpeas in your fridge.

Matthew Card
April 22, 2020

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Freshly cooked dried chickpeas have a nutty, sweet flavor and tender, creamy texture that’s far better than canned beans. As a bonus, dried chickpeas generate a rich broth as they simmer, which can be used instead of chicken or vegetable broth in soups, stews and braises. Refrigerated in the broth, cooked chickpeas last five days.

To prepare them, soak 1 pound dried chickpeas overnight in 8 cups water with 2 tablespoons kosher salt. When ready to cook, drain, and in a Dutch oven combine the chickpeas, 6 cups water, 1½ tablespoons salt, 1 bunch cilantro stems (bundled together with twine), 2 árbol chilies or 1 tablespoon Aleppo pepper, 1 large carrot (cut into pieces), 1 onion (peeled and halved), 1 garlic bulb (top third cut off) and 1 teaspoon cumin or coriander seeds (optional). Bring to a simmer over high heat, then cover and transfer to the oven and bake at 275°F. Cook until fully tender and creamy, 1½ to 2 hours. Once cooled, discard the vegetables. Reserve the garlic; when cool enough to handle, squeeze out the cloves, then mince to a paste and fold into the chickpeas. Taste and season with salt. Store the beans in their cooking liquid in an airtight container for up to 5 days. A pound of dried chickpeas yields roughly 6 cups cooked (about four 15-ounce cans).

I use the chickpeas and their broth in Persian-style chicken noodle soup or quick minestrone, just add pasta, green beans and spinach. They also are great for a Venetian-style scampi of shrimp and chickpeas sautéed with garlic, chilies and basil. Or try smashing chickpeas coarsely with fresh herbs, harissa paste and abundant olive oil to accompany steak or lamb.

Or consider some of Milk Street’s greatest hits, like Chickpea and Harissa Soup, Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard or quick Indian-style Butter Chickpeas from Portland chef Jenn Louis.

Finally, if remembering to soak beans the night before is challenging, soak them in advance and store them in a zip-close bag in the freezer. They don’t need to be defrosted before proceeding with the recipe.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

How to Use

Chickpea and Yogurt Soup: This is a simplified version of one we learned from Yasmin Khan, author of “The Saffron Tales.” Cook 1 large minced onion and 4 peeled-and-smashed garlic cloves with a large pinch kosher salt in 2 tablespoons salted butter until softened. Add ½ cup basmati rice and 4 cups broth (chickpea, chicken or vegetable). Boil, then add 2 to 3 cups cooked chickpeas and simmer over low until the rice is tender and the broth has thickened, 20 to 25 minutes. Off heat, stir in 1 cup of whole milk yogurt and ½ to ¾ cup mixed chopped fresh herbs (such as dill, flat-leaf parsley, cilantro or mint, or 1½ cups chopped baby arugula). Season to taste and serve with harissa.

Crispy Chickpeas: These are excellent as a snack or appetizer. Or try them in hearty salads, sprinkled onto hummus, or instead of croutons in soups and stews. Make sure the chickpeas are drained and patted dry before adding the cornstarch; otherwise they’ll pick up too much starch and turn gummy. In a medium bowl, generously sprinkle 2 cups cooked chickpeas (well-dried) with cornstarch and toss to coat. Transfer to a mesh strainer and shake to remove excess cornstarch. In a 10-inch skillet over medium-high, heat 4 tablespoons oil until shimmering. Add the chickpeas and cook, stirring, until golden brown and crisp, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and toss with 1 teaspoon each cumin and smoked paprika and ½ teaspoon each kosher salt and black pepper.

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How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Chickpeas (also known as garbanzo beans) have endless beneficial properties for our organism, such as digestive and diuretic properties. At the same time, their high protein and unsaturated fatty acid content allows you to control cholesterol levels. However, as do all pulses, they also have a great deal of calories, which is why it’s recommended not to have them too often. To create a dish with them, first of all you need to cook them. But do you know how to cook them properly? Keep on reading this oneHOWTO article and find out how to cook dried chickpeas.

Before you start to cook dried chickpeas or garbanzo beans, we need to soak them for at least 12 hours in a cool place with no humidity at all. If we leave them to soak in tepid water, they will probably be ready to cook within 10 hours. If you prefer leaving them in the fridge, we must wait for 24 hours. The chickpeas mus be completely covered in water.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

If the water we use to soak the dried chickpeas in is hard and has great quantities of limescale, we have the option of adding a teaspoonful of bicarbonate sodium. You should be careful with the amount of bicarbonate you add and the time you leave the chickpeas soaking, as this product could alter its taste if we leave it in for longer than estimated. If we add bicarbonate, they’re usually ready in 8 hours.

If you want, you can add some hard salt while they’re soaking, but the most adequate is to do it during the last minutes of cooking. Regarding the right amount of chickpeas per person, it varies according to the dish you want to prepare. If you’re going to serve it as a main dish, 100g (3.5oz) per person approximately. As they are soaking, the garbanzo beans will grow in size.

When you’re done soaking them and the garbanzo beans are ready, drain them with a sieve and wash them well. This step is very important, so don’t forget to wash them. To cook the chickpeas you must get a good sized pot and add 1 litre of water (35 fl oz). If you want to, you can add a laurel leaf. It’s recommended that water has as less calcium and magnesium as possible. To to so, use bottled water. Heat the water on high heat.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

When the water boils, add the chickpeas. The water must completely cover them at least three centimeters (one inch). If you use a pressure cooker to cook them, you should close it as soon as you put the garbanzo beans in, lower the heat when it whistles and keep the steam output to the minimum. If you use a normal pot, you can cover it (leaving a small gap to let the steam out) to accelerate cooking.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

For traditional pots, you should cook the garbanzo beans for 10 minutes at high heat. Then, once they have stopped cooking, sieve them, add new water and let them cook on low heat. This process can last two hours. You should add salt when you change the water. In the case of pressure cookers, add some salt as soon as you add your chickpeas and a bit more when you lower the heat. With this kind of cookers chickpeas are cooked in 45 minutes, approximately.

When they’re properly cooked, take them off the heat and sieve them. As you can see, cooking garbanzo beans is a slow process which requires dedication, as cooking time depends on the kind of chickpea and the intensity of the heat. At the same time, if you’d like to add a salty ingredient, you should pay attention to the amount of salt you use.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

If you want to read similar articles to How to Cook Dried Chickpeas (or garbanzo beans), we recommend you visit our Food & drink category.

When I first bought my instant pot it stayed in the box for months. I’m sure many of you can relate! It was one of those appliances that I wanted, but really didn’t need. Or so I thought. I made a few dishes and didn’t have the best success so I was ready to ditch it, until I used it to cook chickpeas, dhal, and Caribbean soup (with root vegetables). What a total game changer! I couldn’t believe the tenderness, especially for dried beans. Cooking chickpeas in the instant pot is my go-to method now. All you have to do is add water, press a button and walk away. Could it get any easier?!

Aside from the instant pot yielding tender results, I love how easy it is to eliminate the soaking part of the equation. If you’ve never cooked dried chickpeas before – typically the beans have to be soaked in water for a long period of time, then boiled before it’s ready for use. I love the texture and taste of dried chickpeas, but the reality is there is a lot of waiting time. A pound of dried chickpeas can take over an hour to cook on the stove top (without soaking first). And I don’t always remember to soak the chickpeas the night before. On Saturday mornings when I want to make a batch of boil & fry channa for breakfast, I’ll reach for two cans because it’s quick and convenient. Not anymore!

If you haven’t used your instant pot as yet, hopefully this easy method for cooking chickpeas will encourage you to get it out the box!

Important measurements and info

Sometimes you’ll want to cook a lot of of chickpeas, sometimes a little. Here’s a helpful guide on measurements.

  • 1lb dried chickpeas = about 6 cups cooked, which is about four 15oz cans
  • For every 1 cup of beans, 3 cups of water is enough for cooking
  • 8oz dried beans will yield about 3 cups cooked, that could serve 3-4 people.
  • Raw chickpeas takes 50 minutes to cook with a 10 minute natural release.
  • Chickpeas that were soaked overnight or 6+ hours take 25-30 minutes on high pressure.

Disclosure: I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for website owners to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

Below is the instant pot I am currently using. It is perfect for a family of 4-6.

How to use or store chickpeas after cooking

After beans are cooked, strain it and if you’d like, reserve the liquid. Water you’ve cooked beans in is known as aquafaba. There are many amazing recipes you can make from aquafaba. It’s actually a great egg replacer. Check out this list from Vegan Society for more ideas.

Use chickpeas straight from the instant pot in whatever dish you’re cooking, or wait for them to cool off and parcel into freezer bags. Alternatively, you may refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 3-5 days.

ABOUT THE REVIEWER

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Michelle Kerns

Michelle Kerns writes for a variety of print and online publications and specializes in literature and science topics. She has served as a book columnist since 2008 and is a member of the National Book Critics Circle. Kerns studied English literature and neurology at UC Davis.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Cooking dried beans instead of purchasing them canned gives you less sodium per serving, more flavor and better control over the texture of the finished beans. However, you can cook chickpeas without soaking them first.

Most recipes call for dried beans to be soaked in cold water overnight before cooking. Dried chickpeas — also known as garbanzo beans — can be cooked without presoaking in anywhere from 40 minutes to eight hours, depending on the method that best suits your needs.

However, cooking garbanzo beans without soaking first can increase risk of digestive side effects including gas and bloating. To reduce unwanted side effects, consider presoaking chickpeas and discarding the soaking water, as advised by the Cleveland Clinic.

Cook in the Stockpot

If you forgot to soak chickpeas overnight, don’t worry. You need nothing more than water and a stockpot or large saucepan. Put rinsed chickpeas in the pot, add 3 cups of water for every 1 cup of beans, and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat.

Use a spoon to remove any foam that rises to the surface. Lower the heat so that the water is at a simmer and cook the beans, stirring them occasionally and adding in more water, if needed, until they’re at your desired level of tenderness.

For chickpeas, this may take around 60 to 90 minutes, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. But if you do choose to presoak the beans, then it would reduce cooking time up to 25 percent.

Make Chickpeas in the Oven

Cook dry beans in the oven along with water and your choice of seasonings, such as garlic or bay leaves. For 1 pound of dried chickpeas — approximately 4 cups of beans — use a Dutch oven or large pot with a tight-fitting lid.

Cover the beans with about 1 inch of water, put the lid in place and bake at 375 degrees Fahrenheit. After 75 minutes, stir the chickpeas and check their tenderness. If they’re not yet soft enough, return them to the oven for 15 minutes and check again.

Most dried beans, including chickpeas, will be done in 90 minutes to two hours when using this method.

Cooking Chickpeas in Slow Cookers

Cooking chickpeas in a slow cooker is a simple method if you forgot to soak chickpeas overnight. Some slow cooker recipes begin with dry beans, as described by Utah State University.

Pour the cleaned, dried chickpeas into the cooker’s insert and add enough water to cover the beans by at least 1 inch, though check to be certain that the surface of the water is a few inches below the top of the insert.

Cook the chickpeas for four hours on the slow cooker’s high setting or between six and eight hours on the low setting. To help you estimate how long the beans should remain in the cooker, consider how you’ll be using the finished beans.

Try a shorter cooking time for firmer beans that you want to use in soups, stews or casseroles and the longer times for cooking chickpeas for hummus.

Use a Pressure Cooker

Dried, unsoaked chickpeas can cook in approximately half the time is you use a pressure cooker, according to North Dakota State University. However, they might not soak up flavor as well as cooking chickpeas in a slow cooker.

Put the beans into the cooker, pour in enough water to cover them, add in any aromatics you may want — garlic or onions, for instance — and stir in a tablespoon of oil for every pound of dried chickpeas.

The oil will decrease the foam that may accumulate in the cooker and interfere with the pressure valve while the beans are cooking. Turn the cooker to the high pressure setting; reduce it to medium pressure and allow the chickpeas to cook for the recommended time.

Check the beans after you’ve turned off the heat and the pressure has decreased. If the beans are not tender enough, repeat the process for five- to 10-minute intervals.

Ever wondered how long it takes to cook dried chickpeas? Here’s a handy guide on how to cook chickpeas 3 ways: stovetop, slow cooker, and Instant Pot.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Some of you are probably reading the title of this post and wondering, “Why would I bother cooking chickpeas when I can just buy them in a can?” One word: texture.

I will be the first to admit that canned chickpeas are very convenient for weeknight meals. However, I actually prefer chickpeas cooked slightly al dente, when they still have a light crunch as I bite into them. They’re better for salads, and I love snacking on them. And yes, I do actually eat chickpeas as a snack.

Of course, others may prefer chickpeas on the softer side and that’s completely fine! That’s the beauty of cooking chickpeas yourself—you get to control the texture of the beans to your liking.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

In general, it is a good idea to soak your chickpeas for at least 8 hours (overnight is even better). The soaking speeds up the cooking process. Do note that the chickpeas will soak up water and expand over time, so be sure to use the right sized bowl.

If you are using unsoaked beans, I recommend cooking them in the pressure cooker because it is faster. You can also cook unsoaked beans in the slow cooker on low for 8 hours. The texture of the chickpeas will be al dente.

HOW TO USE YOUR COOKED CHICKPEAS: A FEW RECIPES

TOOLS I USED

  • Slow Cooker
  • Instant Pot:This is an older model that I own.

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How to Cook Chickpeas 3 Ways: Stovetop, Slow Cooker & Instant Pot

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

5 from 3 reviews

In this basic recipe, I am cooking the chickpeas with water, bay leaves, garlic, and salt. Feel free to use broth or any other herbs, such as thyme or oregano. If you are cooking the beans with broth, you can save the chickpea broth for soups and stews.

Are you ready to learn how to use pantry staples in your meals? This guide on how to cook dried chickpeas is exactly what you need to get you started!

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Chickpeas have so many great health benefits, so they are a great addition to any diet. They make the perfect pantry staple because they are so versatile!

All About Dried Chickpeas

Chickpeas or garbanzo beans are part of the legumes family. Like lentils, these are packed full of protein and fiber and complement your diet perfectly!

Chickpeas are available in two different forms, canned and dried. The canned variety is great for quick recipes but sometimes fresh (or dried) is the better option. This post will center more around the fresh/dried variety.

Dried chickpeas are definitely preferred over their canned counterparts if you want a “chewier” texture with the end result, they have a great buttery flavor and are fairly easy to prepare.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Do you have to soak chickpeas before cooking?

Soaking your chickpeas cuts down on cooking time, and it also helps them be a little easier to digest. So it’s best to soak them before you cook. There are two ways you can soak your beans: overnight or the quick soak method.

To soak overnight:

  1. Sort your chickpeas – make sure any bad ones have been picked out along with any debris that may have made it into the packaging.
  2. Put your chickpeas into a bowl, cover completely with cold water and cover – it’s best to let them soak overnight. Make sure you put plenty of water as the will double in size when soaking.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Quick soak:

If you don’t have time to let your chickpeas soak overnight there is a 1 hour method!

  1. Rinse and sort your chickpeas – same as above step.
  2. Put chickpeas into a saucepan and cover with 2 inches of water.
  3. Bring to a boil and allow to cook for about 5 minutes, then remove from heat and cover.
  4. Let stand for one hour!

Can you over soak beans?

Generally speaking, yes. It takes a while, but eventually the beans will sprout or ferment. If you are going to soak them longer than overnight (8 or so hours), you should put them in the refrigerator. Also, if the temperatures are high, use the refrigerator for all soaking time.

Can you eat raw chickpeas after soaking?

Eating raw chickpeas isn’t recommended. You will have a really hard time digesting them. Some recipes use the chickpeas raw after soaking, but they cook the recipe as part of the process. One example is falafel.

How do you cook raw chickpeas?

Here are the steps for getting your dried chickpeas ready to use!

  1. Soak dried chickpeas (see the methods above). How to Cook Dried Chickpeas
  2. Once soaking is done, rinse and drain them, then put them in a pot on the stove covering them with water. Cook for about 30-60 minutes. If you want, you can also add things like a bay leaf, garlic, onions, etc to the water. How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

How long does it take to cook chickpeas?

This time varies depending on many factors (soaking time, what you will use them for, stove top, the bean itself). Mine were done in 30 minutes, but if you want them super soft, for things like hummus, cook them longer.

If you are using them in a recipe that is cooked more, like when making baked tacos with my whole foods vegan taco meat, you may want them on the more al dente side.

Tips for dried beans that won’t soften when cooking

There are many reasons that your beans may not cook evenly or get soft even after a lot of cooking time. Here are some tips to help make sure your beans soften:

  • If you have hard water, your beans may not soften as easily. To help this, cook using broth.
  • Add about 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda per pound of beans to the soaking water.
  • Add about 2-3 tablespoons of salt per pound of beans to the soaking water.
  • Use the pressure cooker method below, since pressure cookers are able to cook beans faster.

How to cook in a pressure cooker

In a pressure cooker you can soak or not soak the beans because they cook much faster. Here are the 2 ways you can cook them in a pressure cooker or instant pot:

  1. Soaking: for each pound of dried chickpeas use 6 cups of water. Put everything in the pot, making sure the valve is on sealing, then cook on high pressure, manual setting, for 12 minutes. Allow the pressure to release naturally for about 10 minutes when done. Then you can move the valve to venting and wait for the pressure to fully release.
  2. No soaking: do the same as above but you will be cooking for 50 minutes.

How to cook in a slow cooker

For a slow cooker you do not need to soak the chickpeas, but you still can if you have trouble digesting beans generally. Simple put the beans with water into the slow cooker and cook on high for about 3-4 hours or on low for 7-8 hours.

Can you overcook chickpeas?

Absolutely. The more you cook them, the softer they will get. While soft chickpeas are great for certain recipes, for others it will not give you the end result you are looking for.

Do you have to cook chickpeas from a can?

Nope. Canned chickpeas are cooked and ready to eat!

Tips for removing the skin

If you want to remove the skin from your cooked chickpeas, here is an easy way to do that. Put them in a kitchen towel, and gently rub them back and forth. This will help the skin come off!

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Recipes using chickpeas

I love chickpeas and have so many great recipes that use them! Here is a list of some of the most popular ones:

Flavorful chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are an inexpensive source of protein, fiber, potassium, iron and calcium. These versatile legumes are traditionally used to make hummus as well as other Mediterranean and Indian foods. Take advantage of their mild, slightly nutty flavor by adding them to a variety of dishes, including salads, soups, stews and main dishes. Dry chickpeas have a richer flavor but require soaking and cooking before use. Canned chickpeas are ready to use, making them a great time-saver for busy moms.

Soak Dry Chickpeas

Check carefully before soaking, as dry chickpeas often contain a few twigs or shriveled, damaged chickpeas. Soak dry chickpeas in at least 3 cups of water for every 1 cup of chickpeas. Soak them for at least 4 hours, but overnight is best. Once they are soaked, rinse the chickpeas with clear water before cooking, as rinsing removes gas-causing sugar and carbohydrates.

Cook Dry Chickpeas

Cook soaked chickpeas in a saucepan filled with enough water to cover the chickpeas. Bring the water to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer the chickpeas, with the cover on, for 1 to 2 hours. Soaking the chickpeas for 12 to 24 hours decreases cooking time to about 30 minutes, although older chickpeas are harder and require a longer cooking time.

Soups, Stews and Salads

Although chickpeas are good added to nearly any soup or stew, they are best when incorporated in broth-based soups rather than cream-based soups. Make a kid-friendly, nutritious soup by adding cooked or canned chickpeas to a homemade vegetable soup. Cook soups and stews slowly, as hard boiling damages the outer covering of the chickpeas. If you prefer a velvety texture, puree the soup with a stick blender. For a quick dinner option, make chickpeas a salad topping. Add a handful of cooled chickpeas to your family’s favorite salad and top with a creamy dressing.

Casseroles and Main Dishes

Use your imagination when incorporating chickpeas into casseroles and main dishes. If your kids are picky eaters, try hiding the chickpeas in spaghetti sauce for a low-fat alternative to ground beef. You can also use chickpeas as a pizza topping. Include chickpeas in a baked bean dish with kidney beans, pinto beans and lentils, or add them to a baked dish with sliced zucchini, tomatoes, onions and cheese.

Cook chickpeas in a large saucepan, as they double or triple during the cooking process. To reduce foaming, add 1 tsp. of canola or olive oil to the cooking water. Save time by cooking a large batch of chickpeas, then freeze the extra to use later. When frozen in an airtight container or plastic bag, chickpeas retain their quality for up to six months. Don’t discard the water that you cooked the chickpeas in — it makes an excellent soup stock. Freeze the stock in an airtight container and use it the next time you want to make a homemade soup.

by Andrew Olson March 15, 2017, 9:10 am

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

I recently started cooking my own chickpeas from scratch instead of buying them canned and there’s at least 37 really good reasons to do this. For example:

– They taste a million times better

– They cost a fraction of canned chickpeas ($1.60 per pound, or about 4x cheaper)

– You can control the sodium

– No added chemicals, preservatives, or weird stuff like BPA from the can liners.

– By freezing a few bags, you always have a convenient supply of cooked chickpeas right when you need them.

The first time I made these, I practically ate the entire batch like it was popcorn. Freshly-cooked chickpeas have a much more satisfying firm texture, softer flavors, and a sense of freshness that you just can’t get from something that’s been sitting in brine for months.

Best of all, the process of cooking chickpeas is incredibly simple, so I thought I’d put together a quick tutorial on how it’s done. Trust me, you’ll never go back to canned beans again…

Step One: Buy

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas
Repeat after me: “I will not be afraid of the bulk bins.” Seriously, the bulk bins are my favorite part of the grocery store. You can save 50% or more on products that are (usually) fresher and have less waste than their prepackaged counterparts. That’s definitely the case here. $1.60 for a pound of chickpeas will yield about 3.5 cans which would cost 4-5x as much.

So grab the big spoon and measure out about a pound of chickpeas. See how easy this is so far?

Step Two: Soak

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas
Chickpeas need to soak before cooking – preferably overnight. You might be able to get by with 3 hours, but 8 is ideal. A good rule of thumb is to allow them to double in size, as you can see from the photos above.

I like to rinse the chickpeas as well. So pour them into a large bowl and fill with water, then run your hands through them to sort out any debris. Pour that water out and fill again with fresh soaking water. Set aside overnight.

Step Three: Cook

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas
You need to cook the chickpeas for an hour, or up to 90 minutes if you want them really soft. So begin warming a big stockpot of water. Drain the chickpeas of their soaking water and pour them into the stockpot when it reaches a boil. If you want salty chickpeas, now is the time to add salt into the water. I added a full teaspoon (remember, most of it will get drained out with the water) and they turned out perfect. Now turn down the heat slightly and allow them to simmer for 60+ minutes.

Step Four: Drain

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas
If you’re freezing the chickpeas (next step), draining is super important to remove the moisture so that you don’t end up with a bag of ice later on. Once you’ve tasted the chickpeas to ensure they’re soft and the raw/green taste is gone, remove them from the heat and carefully pour them through your colander (preferably a 1970’s-era baby blue one…) and just let them sit there for 10-20 minutes, so that the steam & moisture can evaporate. You can use these as-is now, or freeze them for later use.

Step Five: Freeze

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

The best way to make sure you always have chickpeas on hand is to make a big ol’ batch like this and then freeze them so that you don’t have to go through this entire process each time you want some curry or chickpea tuna salad. So, once the chickpeas are thoroughly drained and dry, pour them into a Tupperware container or zip-top bag and freeze for up to a year.

Pro Tip: One of the problems with fresh chickpeas is trying to figure out how many to use in recipes that call for “1 can of chickpeas.” I figured out that one can is approximately 14 oz (by volume) of chickpeas. So get out a measuring cup and portion out 14 oz of chickpeas into each zip-top bag and freeze each “can” individually.

That’s all there is to it! If you’re ready to kick the can for good, you can apply the same process to all the canned beans in your cupboard for fresher, cheaper, tastier, and (potentially) healthier beans that are just as convenient as the slimy canned versions.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Here I will tell you how to cook dried chickpeas, a base for many fabulous dishes!

It’s more than a month now that I’ve been wanting to write a series of posts about chickpeas, because it is amazing how many different tasty recipes you can get from them.

Italian traditional cuisine uses dried legumes a lot.

They are often presented as a “piatto della salute” (literally “dish of health” meaning a plate containing health, on the table)!

Well I must admit that, even if they were healthy, I’ve always hated legumes as a kid!

But once a week at minimum there was a soup with beans, chickpeas, lentils and so on for dinner!

I had to eat it anyway because that was the law of the house (often they would puree them for me and it was pleasant enough).

I think I didn’t like the fact that they were in a soup mainly…but anyway I am glad to say that I have outgrown this hostility and embraced the little species, always exploring and appreciating all the different ways I can enjoy them!

In Tuscany a good number of bakeries still have wood fired ovens and they slowly cook legumes in terracotta pots directly in the oven, taking advantage of the natural heating used for the bread.

Last summer we visited some friends in Prato and every day we used to go to the Panificio del Duomo, where they have been cooking legumes in terracotta pots, in the same way, for more than 70 years (if you go there, do not forget to try their “bozza pratese,” their “schiacciata” and their “pane salato” too).

You can simply go to the bakery and ask for your fresh cooked chickpeas or beans with all their delicious cooking stock and use them for whatever recipe you have in mind.

I know you could simply open a can. But believe me it is not the same!

And with this I don’t mean to judge at all: I use tinned legumes myself when in need.

But I guess mine is a matter of culinary culture: as I said dried legumes are used a lot in Italy.

Maybe because we grow them and therefore we let them dry to be able to use them in the winter.

Imagine that when we lived in Rome it was very common to find, in the many street food markets, already soaked chickpeas, ready to be cooked on the day.

I know cooking legumes takes a long time, but the only limit is the time because the cooking process does not require your attention at all.

You just have to remember to soak them and to calculate the time needed for them to simmer.

Maybe you could cook them in the evening while you watch a movie…

I usually cook a kilo of chickpeas and with them I make chickpeas and pasta, roasted chickpeas, hummus and falafel.

Sometimes instead of roasted we enjoy the chickpeas simply with extra virgin olive oil and salt. Delicious.

Ingredients for Cooking Dry Chickpeas

  • 1 kg dried chickpeas
  • 1 bayleaf
  • 1 kombu seeweed
  • Salt

How to Cook Dry Chickpeas

Place a kilo of dry chickpeas in very large salad bowl and fill it with water to the brim.

Let them soak for a night or even for more changing the water when you remember (of course you don’t need to wake up during the night).

When it is time to cook them drain them and place them in a pot.

Cover with water 3 cm above the chickpeas.

Add one bayleaf, salt and, if you have it, one kombu seaweed.

Cover and bring to the boil.

Let them simmer for as long as they are tender.

I have a pressure pot and it takes me 1 hour and a half from the whistle. Remember to lower the flame after the whistle.

In a normal pot it should take the double of the time. In this case remember to put a little bit more water or to check that it doesn’t dry.

Another great way of preparing them, they tell me,is in a slow cooker, I don’t possess one but I am gonna ask a friend to lend me one and I will try!

At this point I usually use the amount I need straight away and I store the rest in the fridge once cooled, together with the water they cooked in.

Sometimes I divided them already in different container for the different uses.

How to Cook Chickpeas in the Slow Cooker

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Before we get to the recipe, I’m just wondering: Do you call them chickpeas or garbanzo beans?

Personally, I love the name garbanzo beans. Garbanzo is just one of those fun words to say. Like Bazinga. Or Gizmo.

But today I’m calling them chickpeas because when I went to buy a bag at the grocery store, that was what the bag said.

Canned beans are pretty inexpensive. So why would you go through the trouble of cooking dried chickpeas?

Because when you cook chickpeas in the slow cooker, you don’t have to soak them beforehand!

This makes them incredibly easy to make, and since you are using your slow cooker, it is practically no work at all.

Plus, you can freeze your cooked chickpeas. In fact, chickpeas can be frozen for up to a year. Yes, I said a year!

It’s so easy to cook chickpeas in the slow cooker, I’m almost embarrassed to call this a recipe.

How to Cook Chickpeas in the Slow Cooker:

1 16-ounce bag dried chickpeas
1/2 teaspoon baking soda

Put the chickpeas in a slow cooker and cover with water by 2 inches. Add baking soda. Cover and cook on low for 6 to 8 hours.

SEE. I told you it was hardly a recipe.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Chickpeas are great additions to salads and soups, but Chili Flavored Crispy Roasted Chickpeas are my favorite way to eat them. They are like a healthier Doritos.

OR if you prefer sweet to salty, use your cooked chickpeas to make Dark Chocolate Chickpea Cookie Dough. It satisfies your sweet tooth with the added bonus of fiber to fill you up.

Published: Jun 2, 2019 · Modified: Jul 30, 2020 by bhavana ·This post may contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases

Cooking perfect chickpeas in the Instant Pot Pressure Cooker (Soak & No-Soak Method) is a fast and easy method than making them on the stove top.These pressure cooker chickpeas are cheaper, healthy and taste better than canned.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

I usually make these pressure cooker chickpeas in big batches and then freeze the cooked chickpeas in 11/2-2 cups quantity and use in recipes instead of canned chickpeas.

Note:11/2 cups of cooked chickpeas replace 1 can of store brought chickpeas.So this recipe yields 3 cups ie 2 15 oz cans of chickpeas.

I have mentioned the instructions for how to cook soaked and No-soak chickpeas methods in instant pot pressure cooker below.

LOOKING FOR MORE CHICKPEA RECIPES?

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

SCIENCE BEHIND SOAKING BEANS?

1.Beans contain indigestible complex sugars that cause gas and hard on tummies and can cause digestive issues like bloating and flatulence for some.Therefore, soaking and sprouting the beans is an excellent way to reduce the uneasiness produced by them.

2.Soaking dried beans ahead of time (soaked for at least 3-4 hours in hot water) will cook faster compared to the beans that have not been soaked at all.

TIPS TO COOK CHICKPEAS:

There are few tips to cook perfect chickpeas

  • Old chickpeas take longer to cook – Usually fresh chickpeas take less time to cook compared to old beans lying in the kitchen pantry.
  • Organic chickpeas take longer to cook than regular chickpeas.
  • Aways try to quick soak chickpeas in hot water for atleast 3-4 hours, this will also reduce the cooking time.

HOW TO STORE COOKED CHICKPEAS?

Cooked chickpeas can be refrigerated in an airtight container up-to 3 to 4 days.

You can also freeze it ,by patting any excess moisture in a paper towel and then storing in 1-2 cups batches in freezer safe bag and store up to 3 months.

HOW MANY CUPS OF COOKED CHICKPEAS WILL 1 CUP DRIED CHICKPEAS YIELD?

Dried chickpeas will usually triple in size when cooked. So 1 cup of dried chickpeas will yield about 3 cups of cooked chickpeas.Which is close to 2 15 oz canned chickpeas.

HOW TO COOK CHICKPEAS IN INSTANT POT (SOAKED & NO-SOAKED METHOD)

SOAKED METHOD:

Rinse 1 cup of dried chickpeas and soak them in 2 cups of water in a large bowl for at-least 8 hours or overnight.You can also quick soak dried chickpeas in hot water if you dont have time.

Once you are ready to cook, drain the water and add the chickpeas in to the Instant Pot bowl.Cover the soaked chickpeas with 3 cups of water along with some salt.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Close the lid on the pot and turn pressure valve to SEALING position.Set the pot to MANUAL/PRESSURE COOK (High Pressure) and set timer to 13 to 15 minutes.Once the pot beeps ,let the pressure release naturally.Open the Lid

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Take one chickpeas and mash it with your fingers to check the tenderness.Perfectly cooked instant pot chickpeas is ready.

You can use cooked chickpeas right away or refrigerate for later use in a airtight container.

**Note:11/2 cups of cooked chickpeas replace 1 can of chickpeas.So this recipe yields 3 cups ie 2 cans of chickpeas.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

NO-SOAK METHOD:

Add the dried chickpeas in to the Instant Pot bowl.Cover with 5 cups of water along with some salt.

Close the lid on the pot and turn pressure valve to SEALING position.Set the pot to MANUAL/PRESSURE COOK (High Pressure) and set timer to 35 -40 minutes.Once the pot beeps ,let the pressure release naturally.Open the Lid

Take one chickpeas and mash it with your fingers to check the tenderness.

You can use cooked chickpeas right away or refrigerate for later use in a airtight container.

Note:11/2 cups of cooked chickpeas replace 1 can of chickpeas.So this recipe yields 3 cups ie 2 cans of chickpeas.

CHECKOUT MORE INSTANT POT BASIC SERIES:

INSTANT POT CHICKPEAS RECIPE CARD

★ DID YOU TRY THIS RECIPE? Don’t forget to give a ★ rating. Just click on the stars in the Recipe Card to rate!

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Chickpeas, which are a type of legume also known as garbanzo beans, are a healthy, protein-packed addition to many meals. They are especially popular in Middle Eastern cuisines, where they are used to make falafel and hummus or served as tasty additions to wraps and meat-based dishes. Indeed, what makes chickpeas so great is that they are not only healthy but also incredibly versatile: You can add them to salads, soups, stews, or serve alongside rice and other vegetables for a filling vegetarian dinner. You can also, of course, add a little sesame seed paste and olive oil and whip them into hummus for a perfect dip to go with crackers or pita chips.

So how do you go about preparing chickpeas? The easiest method of preparing meals with chickpeas is to use canned garbanzo beans. The problem with that is that canned chickpeas can be chock-full of preservatives and other additives that lower their health quotient. For the health (and taste) conscious, dried chickpeas are the way to go. But how do you cook dried chickpeas? It’s a bit more complex of a process than simply opening a can and serving, but it’s actually not as difficult as you might believe. Read on to find out how to make these delicious legumes without ever touching a can!

1. Gather your ingredients.

Depending on how much food you want to make, you will need dried garbanzo beans, water, and salt (optional).

2. Soak the garbanzo beans prior to cooking them.

You will need to soften the chickpeas by soaking them in water before you cook them. If you have enough time, put the beans in a bowl of cold water, cover with a clean towel, and allow to soak overnight. Note that once softened, the beans will expand to about twice their size, so you should leave plenty of water on top of the chickpeas to accommodate this expansion.

You can also soften the chickpeas in about an hour by putting them at the bottom of a large pot, filling the pot with water (leaving several inches of water above the chickpeas), and then bringing the water to a boil for about five minutes. Remove from the heat and allow the chickpeas to soak in the pot of hot water for another hour.

Bear in mind that the softer the beans, the easier they are to digest. In some cultures, they are allowed to soak for several days before cooking. This may lead to sprouted garbanzo beans, which many believe to have additional health benefits. If you’re soaking for longer than overnight, make sure to switch up the water each day to help prevent any food-borne illness.

3. Drain and rinse the chickpeas.

You should rain and rinse the soaked beans before you cook them. You may want to use a strainer for easier drainage.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

4. Cook the soaked beans.

When you are ready to cook the chickpeas, add them to a larger pot. You should use about one quart of water for every cup of chickpeas. If you want to add salt, you should add about one-eighth of a teaspoon of salt for every cup of chickpeas and quart of water. Cook over medium heat for 60 to 90 minutes depending on how tender you want the beans to be. The beans may continue to expand as you cook them, so make sure to monitor them and add additional water to the pot if necessary. The desired level of tenderness should depend on what you’re planning to use the beans for. Dishes like hummus require softer beans, whereas if you’re adding the chickpeas as an ingredient in a salad, soup, or stew, firmer beans are better. It’s also better to leave beans on the firmer side if you’re planning on freezing them after they are cooked.

5. Freeze the beans for later use.

If you’re not planning on using the beans right away, you should pat them dry and store them in Ziploc bags in the freezer. Make sure to store only a single layer of the beans in any given Ziploc bag; if you just throw a bunch of beans into a bag, they will clump together when they freeze. Frozen beans can last up to a year in the freezer.

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How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Alisha is a freelance writer and mom of 8 children. She owns a child safety education company, Kids Home Safe, is a contributing writer for Power Automedia, has had a regular column on Women’s Voices Digital Magazine. She has written for numerous sites across the web since she began writing, nearly 18 years ago. When she isn’t writing she’s spending time with her children at the pool swimming or watching their favorite show, Shark Tank.

From hummus to stews to curries, chickpeas are a protein-rich ingredient that give dishes heft. They come both dried and canned, but the dried ones are decidedly more wallet-friendly. Here’s how to cook dried chickpeas, and store them for use later.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Do you like chickpeas? These beans are delicious in so many recipes from soups and salads to curries and pasta. I love buying dried chickpeas from the bulk bins at my local natural food store since I can purchase as much as we need — no more, no less.

It does take some planning ahead to prepare dried beans of any kind. But once they are reconstituted, they can be used as you would canned beans in recipes.

From an economic standpoint, dried chickpeas are better for my wallet too. Canned beans are fine in a pinch (we use them sometimes!) but they come at a premium price. Dried beans bought in bulk cost less than canned alternatives.

Where to buy dried chickpeas in bulk

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Look for dried chickpeas at grocery stores, health food stores and the like throughout the United States.

The dried beans in one-pound packages are easiest to find and are located where the beans are in the store. But many stores also have bulk bins, and that’s an even better place to purchase them since they are even more wallet-friendly and you can buy only the amount you need.

Our local natural store, the Natural Living Center, is where I typically purchase them. They’re also available from bulk bins at co-ops, health stores and some bigger organic-forward stores.

How to cook dried chickpeas

There are many methods for cooking dried chickpeas — stovetop or in a pressure cooker, for instance — but my favorite is cooking them in a slow cooker. You don’t have to soak the chickpeas when you do it this way, which makes this an ultra-simple process.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Start by weighing your chickpeas to ensure you are cooking your desired amount. I generally cook one pound at a time.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Rinse and pick over the chickpeas. You want to make sure there aren’t any straggler rocks in what you’re going to cook. No one wants to find a rock in their batch of cooked beans, right?

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Add the chickpeas plus 7 cups of water and a bay leaf to your slow cooker. Cover and cook on high for four hours. You can also cook them on low for 7-8 hours, but I prefer the faster cooking method.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

And voila! Perfectly cooked chickpeas made in a slow cooker ready for recipes or tossing on salads.

These recipes are excellent for using chickpeas. From Indian-inspired dishes to refreshing salads to delightful dips, there’s something for everyone.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Baked Vegetables with Chickpeas and Garam Masala

Meaty chickpeas, loads of vegetables, fragrant garam masala … this dish is delicious served with rice.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Indian-Inspired Roasted Cauliflower and Chickpeas over Rice

This Indian-inspired dish has those lovely warm flavors of Indian cuisine, without the spiciness of some dishes.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Curried Chickpea and Vegetable Stew

Love a good Indian curry? This stew has the flavors of India in a veggie-filled stew that goes perfectly over a bed of rice. Hint: When plating, make a well in the center of the rice and pour the stew in there. It’s perfect that way.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Garlic Scape Garbanzo Dip

This Garlic Scape Garbanzo Bean Dip is so simple and easy to make. It takes 10 minutes and tastes divine.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Roasted Tomato, Basil and Chickpea Pasta Salad

Grape tomatoes are roasted with a drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkle of salt and pepper, which renders them sweet meaty bits of goodness. They are delightful in this pasta salad.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Caramelized Shallot Hummus

This homemade Caramelized Shallot Hummus is rich and creamy with a tinge of sweetness from the caramelized shallots

Richard Cornish

I am new to lentils and chickpeas. How do I cook them? P. Nieman

With patience. Legumes are a brilliant source of nutrition, offering twice as much protein as grains, plus a good whack of iron and B vitamins. When you serve grains and legumes together, you are eating a culinary combination that has powered civilisations. Rome marched on fava beans and barley. The Aztecs built pyramids on a volcanic lake thanks to corn and beans, while Chinese emperors led armies fed on fermented soy and rice.

All dried lentils and other legumes (apart from black beans) require soaking. About four hours is enough to begin to soften the skins and rehydrate the interior. Most recipes, however, suggest soaking the legumes overnight. Drain the soaked pulses and cook them in enough water to cover them. Split red lentils could be ready in under 10 minutes, while brown lentils can take 20 minutes. Puy lentils (French green lentils) take longer still.

Bring soaked chickpeas to the boil then simmer, covered, for an hour or so until soft but not mushy. Some varieties, especially larger ones, can take several hours to cook. Add more water when necessary. It takes about 45 minutes to cook chickpeas in a pressure cooker.

Legumes will cook faster in slightly alkaline water and there are many recipes suggesting adding sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) to the cooking water. This method will soften the legumes but will leach important nutrition into the water. Conversely, legumes do not soften in acidic conditions, such as in a chilli or curry sauce, so cook them first then add to the dish.

​I have a surplus of bread. What do I do with it? K. Vanturen

Well my friend, you’ve come to the right place. When I was working with Melbourne baker Phillippa Grogan on her book, Phillippa’s Home Baking, we were perfecting the bread recipes for the home kitchen and in doing so ended up with dozens of loaves of bread. To avoid waste, we developed and devoted an entire chapter to cooking with bread.

One of my favourite recipes is to make a savoury bread and butter pudding by simmering four bay leaves, a dozen peppercorns and four cloves of garlic in a litre and a half of milk, cooling, whisking in eight eggs and seasoning. Pour this over 500g of buttered sourdough slices layered in a buttered ovenproof dish and cook at 160C for 45 minutes or until the custard is set. Allow to rest for five minutes. Serve with pork, veal or chicken as the starch dish.

Also consider making a hot panzanella by tearing 500g of two-day-old sourdough bread into pieces, putting the bread, along with 500g chopped tomatoes, 12 basil leaves, three finely chopped garlic cloves and 100ml olive oil into a large bowl, mixing and allowing to rest for several hours before baking in an ovenproof dish as above. I’ll have more suggestions next week.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Chickpeas, which are a type of legume also known as garbanzo beans, are a healthy, protein-packed addition to many meals. They are especially popular in Middle Eastern cuisines, where they are used to make falafel and hummus or served as tasty additions to wraps and meat-based dishes. Indeed, what makes chickpeas so great is that they are not only healthy but also incredibly versatile: You can add them to salads, soups, stews, or serve alongside rice and other vegetables for a filling vegetarian dinner. You can also, of course, add a little sesame seed paste and olive oil and whip them into hummus for a perfect dip to go with crackers or pita chips.

So how do you go about preparing chickpeas? The easiest method of preparing meals with chickpeas is to use canned garbanzo beans. The problem with that is that canned chickpeas can be chock-full of preservatives and other additives that lower their health quotient. For the health (and taste) conscious, dried chickpeas are the way to go. But how do you cook dried chickpeas? It’s a bit more complex of a process than simply opening a can and serving, but it’s actually not as difficult as you might believe. Read on to find out how to make these delicious legumes without ever touching a can!

1. Gather your ingredients.

Depending on how much food you want to make, you will need dried garbanzo beans, water, and salt (optional).

2. Soak the garbanzo beans prior to cooking them.

You will need to soften the chickpeas by soaking them in water before you cook them. If you have enough time, put the beans in a bowl of cold water, cover with a clean towel, and allow to soak overnight. Note that once softened, the beans will expand to about twice their size, so you should leave plenty of water on top of the chickpeas to accommodate this expansion.

You can also soften the chickpeas in about an hour by putting them at the bottom of a large pot, filling the pot with water (leaving several inches of water above the chickpeas), and then bringing the water to a boil for about five minutes. Remove from the heat and allow the chickpeas to soak in the pot of hot water for another hour.

Bear in mind that the softer the beans, the easier they are to digest. In some cultures, they are allowed to soak for several days before cooking. This may lead to sprouted garbanzo beans, which many believe to have additional health benefits. If you’re soaking for longer than overnight, make sure to switch up the water each day to help prevent any food-borne illness.

3. Drain and rinse the chickpeas.

You should rain and rinse the soaked beans before you cook them. You may want to use a strainer for easier drainage.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

4. Cook the soaked beans.

When you are ready to cook the chickpeas, add them to a larger pot. You should use about one quart of water for every cup of chickpeas. If you want to add salt, you should add about one-eighth of a teaspoon of salt for every cup of chickpeas and quart of water. Cook over medium heat for 60 to 90 minutes depending on how tender you want the beans to be. The beans may continue to expand as you cook them, so make sure to monitor them and add additional water to the pot if necessary. The desired level of tenderness should depend on what you’re planning to use the beans for. Dishes like hummus require softer beans, whereas if you’re adding the chickpeas as an ingredient in a salad, soup, or stew, firmer beans are better. It’s also better to leave beans on the firmer side if you’re planning on freezing them after they are cooked.

5. Freeze the beans for later use.

If you’re not planning on using the beans right away, you should pat them dry and store them in Ziploc bags in the freezer. Make sure to store only a single layer of the beans in any given Ziploc bag; if you just throw a bunch of beans into a bag, they will clump together when they freeze. Frozen beans can last up to a year in the freezer.

Share on

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google +
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  • Email

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Alisha is a freelance writer and mom of 8 children. She owns a child safety education company, Kids Home Safe, is a contributing writer for Power Automedia, has had a regular column on Women’s Voices Digital Magazine. She has written for numerous sites across the web since she began writing, nearly 18 years ago. When she isn’t writing she’s spending time with her children at the pool swimming or watching their favorite show, Shark Tank.

Chickpeas, also known as Garbanzo Beans, are so wonderfully versatile, it’s no wonder we’ve been eating them around the globe for thousands of years.

Chickpeas contain a huge number of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals including folate, magnesium, and zinc but are most popular for their high plant-based protein content.

You can grab your chickpeas precooked and tinned without any added salt or preservatives! Or grab a bag of our 100% Australian grown dried chickpeas. Dried chickpeas need to be soaked first to ensure they soften up and are enjoyable to eat, but are firmer in texture and more ideal for salads and snacking. (Read our guide to cooking chickpeas below!)

Do you have some organic chickpeas in the cupboard but don’t know what to do with them? Check out these 7 scrumptious ways in which you can use your chickpeas:

SALADS

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Salads are a super-easy way to incorporate chickpeas into your diet. Add spices and fry them until crispy for a delicious flavoursome crunch.

CURRIES

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

You can’t beat a simple, nutritious and filling curry for a mid-week meal. Chickpeas give it an added boost of protein, flavour, and texture.

HUMMUS

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Who doesn’t like hummus?! It’s great for dipping, spreading and snacking and is made from predominately chickpeas.

ROASTED

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

When roasted, chickpeas make a tasty and crunchy snack. Simply add a range of herbs and spices, then let the oven do the work!

SNACKING

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Toasted sourdough bread with a smearing of homemade hummus, and topped with delightfully spiced chickpeas make a flavoursome, protein-packed snack that gives avocado on toast a run for its money.

COOKIES

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Yes, you did read that right, you can bake vegan, flourless cookies using chickpeas! They’re soft, chewy and you wouldn’t even know they were made with chickpeas.

FALAFELS

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Delightfully crispy on the outside, and soft and fluffy on the inside. Made with protein-packed chickpeas and served with a creamy Greek yoghurt sauce for a satisfying, meat-free meal!

HOW TO COOK CHICKPEAS

1. SOAK:

Long Soak: Add dry chickpeas to a large bowl and cover with several cms of water. The chickpeas will triple in size as they rehydrate so be sure to add plenty of water. Soak for 8 hours or overnight.

Quick Soak: Add the chickpeas to a large pot, cover with several cms of water and bring to a boil. Boil for 5 minutes then remove from the heat and let them soak in the water for 1 hour.

2. COOK:

Once soaked, drain and rinse the chickpeas well. Add them to a large pot, cover with several cms of water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until they reach your desired tenderness, around 1 ½ to 2 hours.

GOODNESS TIP: Chickpeas simmered without a lid will be cooked, but firm (perfect for salads or chilli). When cooked with the lid on but slightly ajar, they will be creamier, softer and break apart more easily (perfect for hummus and curries).

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

This How to Cook Chickpeas post includes affiliate links. When I find a great product or service, I like to share it with my readers. Sometimes I use affiliate links so I can earn commission for my recommendations. Thank you for your support!

Vegan Cooking 101: How to Cook Chickpeas

Chickpeas (also known as garbanzo beans) are a key ingredient in many vegan recipes. “Sure, sure, I know all about hummus,” you might be thinking, but did you know you can make cookie dough out of chickpeas?* It’s good too! And don’t forget about other vegan-friendly chickpea recipes like chickpea curry and chickpea salad sandwiches!

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Chickpeas are a member of the legume family. They’re small, pea-sized spheres with a firm texture that breaks down when cooked. Chickpeas are a good source of protein for the vegan eater. They’re also high in fiber and other nutrients like folate and manganese. Fiber, of course, is nature’s clever way of getting humans to eat less by making them feel full. Just remember you heard it here first: The Chickpea Diet!

How to Cook Chickpeas: Preparation

Chickpeas come both dry and canned. In my travels, I’ve learned that dried (and subsequently soaked) chickpeas have a slightly less beany taste than their canned counterparts. As such, I frequently opt to use dried chickpeas if I am making something like chickpea cookie dough. Canned chickpeas, of course, have the benefit of being quick and easy to prepare.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Dried chickpeas need to be soaked for at least 8 hours (overnight is best). Put them in a covered container (I find glass measuring cups with fitted lids to be ideal) and add twice the amount of water. For example, if you’re soaking 1 cup of dried chickpeas add 2 cups of water. If you forget to soak your chickpeas though there is a quick version. Add the chickpeas to a large stockpot and cover them with water. Bring the water to a boil then set the chickpeas aside and allow them to soak for an hour.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Once soaked, chickpeas can then be cooked. If you’re prepping them for hummus or another cold preparation, simply simmer them in 2x the amount of water for an hour (or until they are tender). Then drain and rinse the chickpeas and refrigerate them for later use. Cooked chickpeas can be stored in the refrigerator for about 3 days. For hot recipes, soaked chickpeas can be added to the recipe as canned chickpeas would.

How to Cook Canned Chickpeas

Canned chickpeas should be drained and rinsed. Canned chickpeas often still have their skins intact. I generally don’t worry about this for recipes like my Chickpea Chana Masala, but if I am seeking a creamy consistency (as I would for hummus) I do take the time to remove the skins. Removing chickpea skins isn’t terribly difficult. Just pour the drained and rinsed chickpeas on to a clean kitchen towel and gently rub the chickpeas. The skins will separate.

How to Cook Chickpeas: Oh, the Things You Can Do!

Sometimes I feel like Bubba from Forrest Gump when I talk about chickpeas. You can roast them, fry them, bake them, stew them, eat them raw… They can be ground into flour for baking or pureed for hummus. If that’s not enough, the liquid from canned chickpeas (called aquafaba) can be used as an egg replacement in vegan baking.

Chickpeas are commonly found in Middle Eastern cuisine. Dishes like Chana Masala, falafel and hummus use chickpeas as a featured ingredient. Chickpea flour can be made to use chickpea tofu (also known a Burmese tofu) – which makes for a nice change of pace every once in a while. Chickpea flour can also be used as a base for crust-less vegan quiche or a vegan omelet.

Crunchy roasted chickpeas make for a great vegan snack. I also like adding them to soups and substituting them for croutons. Chickpea salad is a popular replacement for tuna or chicken salad. I like stuffing avocados with it, serving it open-faced on toast and using it for lunchtime lettuce wraps.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

A Note on Aquafaba…

If you’re new to vegan cooking, it’s likely you haven’t heard of aquafaba yet. Aquafaba is the viscous liquid that accompanies chickpeas in the can. Aquafaba has a bean-like taste but loses that flavor upon cooking. It can be used as a binding agent, but when whipped it behaves like egg whites. About 3 tbsp of aquafaba is equivalent to one egg.

Need Another Reason to Love Chickpeas?

As if. We’ve clearly already established that chickpeas are a culinary superstar, but did you know that chickpea cultivation is also good for the planet? It’s true. Chickpeas play a role in soil health by replenishing it with vital nitrogen stores to be consumed by other plants. They also have a low water and carbon footprint.

How to Cook Chickpeas: A Few of My Favorite Recipes

  • Chickpea “Tuna” Salad
  • Chickpea Cookie Dough*
  • Sundried Tomato & Chickpea Stew*
  • Creamy Hummus*

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

*Denotes a recipe in my forthcoming 5-Ingredient Vegan Cookbook. Look for it Spring 2021!

Heading: About Herbivore’s Kitchen

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Herbivore’s Kitchen is a blog run by me, a plant-based home chef and aspiring food photographer. I switched my and my family’s diet to a plant-based diet after learning about the health benefits of going vegan. Making this change has prompted a variety of food and holistic-lifestyle related questions that I explore through this blog. I talk about how to pick and prepare the most nutritious foods, to how to reduce waste at home, to how to live a more sustainable lifestyle while on the road.

Published September 20, 2017 Updated March 18, 2019 By Meeta Arora 21 Comments | This post may contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Try cooking Chickpeas / Garbanzo beans in the pressure cooker or instant pot. They are quick and hands free. And guess what, you don’t have to use the high-sodium canned chickpeas anymore. While doing that, also save on some money…honey!

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

I grew up in India, where growing up I had never seen a can of chickpeas. I know, surprising…right? But in Indian everyone just uses their pressure cooker (stovetop) to cook chickpeas from dried one’s. They are cheaper and healthier. Then I came to Chicago for work and realized the abundance of canned products. At first, it seemed exciting that I could use a can of chickpeas and not have to wait to boil them. But then, I started reading nutrition labels and realized the downside of the cans. Quickly, I moved back to the traditional methods. And so will you, after realizing how easy it is to cook chickpeas in an instant pot.

Make this perfectly cooked chickpeas, store them in the refrigerator for upto a week or freeze them in small batches. So you have them handy for any recipe that calls for chickpeas. I like to make salads with these chickpeas. Another great way to use these chickpeas is in a pulao or biryani. You add protein with the rice and add some veggies to make it a complete meal. Or make hummus…Yum!

Chickpeas Nutrition

Chickpeas are a popular legume across nearly every continent, which not surprising looking at the benefits and nutritional content of chickpeas. They are a powerhouse of nutrients, packed with plant-based protein, dietary fiber, and carbohydrates. One cup of boiled chickpeas has 269 calories, with 45 grams of carbohydrates, 4.5 grams protein and a whopping 12.5 grams of fiber.

How to cook chickpeas in Instant Pot?

You can either soak the chickpeas or just cook them right away. However the difference is how long they take to cook. Unsoaked chickpeas take about 40 minutes to cook under pressure, while soaked chickpeas take 20 minutes. As you can see, there is a significant time difference. I prefer to soak the chickpeas and reduce the cooking time (save some electricity too!).

I also like to add some salt when cooking chickpeas, that is totally optional. This also means I reduce the salt used in the dish that I prepare with the cooked chickpeas. Optionally, you can also add garlic and/or bay leaves when cooking.

I cooked these chickpeas in an instant pot, but you can use any pressure cooker. Just add the chickpeas and water to the pressure cooker and set it to cook at high pressure for the required time. I use a 1:3 chickpea to water ratio.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

One cup of dried chickpeas yields just more than 2.5 cups of cooked chickpeas. You can drain the leftover water after cooking the chickpeas or use it as a broth in a soup or curry.

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

Enjoy the chickpeas in a salad or pilaf or in your favorite hummus.

If you are looking for more chickpea recipes, check out Chana Masala made in the pressure cooker. Some readers asked about Black Chickpeas, here is the recipe for Kala Chana Curry.

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Chickpeas are a versatile little legume that absorb the flavour of whatever they’re cooked in and are packed full of protein. It’s for these reasons – plus the fact that they’re super affordable – that chickpeas are particularly good in vegetarian dishes, though they can be enjoyed alongside meat too.

Below you’ll discover how to cook chickpeas, whether you’re working with the dried version or the much more popular tinned variety. There are plenty of options available to you, so don’t be afraid to start experimenting with the way that you work with chickpeas.

For more recipe ideas and cooking hacks, head over to our food hub.

How to cook tinned chickpeas

Tinned chickpeas are generally ready to eat, so you could forgo the cooking entirely if you’re enjoying them in a salad, or if you’re planning on making hummus.

Alternatively, if you’re planning on adding chickpeas to a curry, stew, soup, or another warm dish, you can cook them simply by adding them to your mixture as little as 10 to 15 minutes before you plan on serving. Generally, chickpeas can’t be overcooked, so you don’t need to be too precious about timings.

We also love roasting chickpeas in the oven with a little olive oil, salt, pepper and paprika as a healthy snack or as an addition to a salad. You can also pan fry them with seasoning in about 5 minutes.

How to cook dried chickpeas

The process of cooking dried chickpeas is slightly more arduous than working with tinned chickpeas, but it’s still not too difficult. You’ll need to begin by soaking your chickpeas in water or stock overnight or for around 8 to 12 hours – they should triple in size, so take this into consideration when measuring out the amount of chickpeas you want to use.

From there, you can cook your chickpeas in boiling water, or add to a dish and allow them to infuse with the flavours for up to one hour.

Chickpea recipes

Looking for chickpea recipes that are tasty, healthy and packed full of plant based protein? You’ll find some of our favourites below.

Buying, Cooking, and Recipes

How to Cook Dried Chickpeas

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Chickpeas originated in the Middle East about 7,500 years ago and are now an inexpensive and essential ingredient in kitchens around the world, especially in North Africa, Spain, and India. These small legumes are also commonly known as garbanzo beans or ceci (chee-chee) beans. Chickpeas appear in dishes ranging from hummus and chana masala to falafel and salads. Chickpeas can be eaten straight from a can, puréed, stewed, or dried and ground into flour. Dried chickpeas must be soaked and sometimes peeled before being cooked.

Fast Facts

  • Other Names: Garbanzo beans, ceci beans, chana
  • Popular Uses: Hummus and falafel
  • Yield: 1 cup of dried chickpeas equals approximately 3 cups cooked

Varieties

Chickpeas may be green, black, brown, or red, but the most recognizable variety is the large, smooth, thin-skinned beige kabuli, the kind most commonly found in U.S. grocery stores. Smaller desi chickpeas look darker and rougher on the outside, with yellow flesh inside. You may see split desi chickpeas sold as chana dal in Indian markets. You can purchase chickpeas either dried or canned.

Chickpea Uses

Versatile chickpeas can be added to dishes whole or blended as a creamy base for a variety of uses. Roasted or fried chickpeas add a crisp element to salads, rice dishes, and soups. They can be seasoned to match the flavor profile of nearly any cuisine.

Dried chickpeas need to be soaked before you cook them. Put the beans in a large bowl, generously cover them with cold tap water, and leave them to soak at room temperature overnight (or for at least eight to 12 hours). Some cooks recommend adding a teaspoon of baking soda per liter of soaking water, which may facilitate the loosening of skins and yield a more tender cooked garbanzo bean. For a quicker method, drop the dried chickpeas into a pot of boiling water, cook them for a minute or two, and then leave them to soak off the heat for an hour. With this method, add the baking soda after you move the chickpeas off the heat. Finish by draining the chickpeas and rinsing them, extra thoroughly if you added baking soda.

Canned chickpeas are ready to use right out of the can but rinse them first to wash away any residue. You can reserve the aquafaba, the liquid in the can, for other uses, such as an egg substitute.

How to Cook With Chickpeas

Some Moroccan recipes such as harira instruct you to peel the chickpeas. The soaked chickpeas need to remain wet in order for the skins to slip off, so work with drained chickpeas quickly. If you intend to peel a large quantity, keep them in a bowl of water and remove them by the handfuls for peeling.

To peel, roll and pinch the soaked chickpeas one-by-one between your forefinger and thumb to snap off the skin. Another roll and pinch may be necessary to remove the second layer of skin. Some chickpeas may break in half during this process but they’re still fine to use.

You can also put a large quantity of soaked, drained chickpeas between two kitchen towels and massage them against a hard surface such as a counter or table. This separates the skins from the chickpeas, which you can pick out of the residue. Similarly, some Moroccans traditionally roll soaked chickpeas against the rough surface of a woven platter-like basket called a tbeq.

If a recipe calls for plain cooked chickpeas, put the soaked beans in a pot and cover them with ample salted water. Bring it to a boil, put the lid on, and simmer the pot for 60 to 90 minutes, or until the chickpeas reach your desired level of tenderness. Drain and use them salads, soups, and other dishes.

You can also cook chickpeas in a pressure cooker. Add them to salted water in the cooker, cover it tightly, and bring it to pressure over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and cook the chickpeas for approximately 45 minutes, or until tender.

What Do They Taste Like?

The mildly nutty flavor and buttery texture of chickpeas make a neutral base for an array of added seasonings or accompanying ingredients. Chickpeas blend smoothly, making them a particularly good start for dairy-free creamy dips such as hummus and vegan spinach dip.

Chickpea Substitutes

You can swap other beans for chickpeas in a recipe. It won’t be a perfect match, but try butter beans, white lima beans, or cannellini beans. They can all easily be found dried or in a can and share a similar creamy texture, especially when pureed.

Chickpea Recipes

Chickpeas are a mainstay in Indian vegetarian recipes, but they also add texture to pasta dishes and make a protein-rich base for falafel and other vegetarian patties.

Where to Buy Chickpeas

Chickpeas can be found in most major grocery stores and from online retailers, generally in 16- or 32-ounce cans or dried in bags near the rice and dried beans. They are often sold in 1-pound bags but you can also buy them in bulk. Check Middle Eastern and Indian grocers for greater variety. It’s possible to grow your own chickpeas, but you’ll need ample room outdoors since they don’t transfer well. The crop will be ready to harvest 100 days after planting.

Storage

Canned and dried chickpeas are shelf-stable for a number of years; refer to the expiration date on the packaging. You can store soaked chickpeas, with or without skins, in an airtight container in the freezer for up to a year. Make sure you drain them thoroughly and allow them to dry before transferring them to the storage container. You can also freeze cook chickpeas; for best results, use them within six months.

Nutrition and Benefits

One cup of cooked chickpeas contains 293 calories, 4.6 grams of fat, 13.7 grams of fiber, and 15.9 grams of protein.   Additionally, one cup of chickpeas supplies 48.9% of your daily requirement of fiber, 77% of your daily requirement of folate, and 28.7% of your daily requirement of iron.   Canned and dried chickpeas have a low glycemic index, so the body digests them slowly, which prevents spikes in blood sugar levels.