Categories
Design

How to make crispy seaweed bok choy

8 Answers

Crispy Seaweed ingredients

8 oz of spring greens or bok choy

¼ cup of toasted almonds

2 teaspoons of brown sugar

Corn oil, for deep frying

Wash the spring greens or bok choy and drain

Chop the almonds very finely

In a wok or a saucepan, heat the corn oil

Deep fry the seaweed for about 45 to 60 seconds, until it begins to turn dark green

Remove from the pan and drain thoroughly

Sprinkle brown sugar and a pinch of salt over top of the leaves. Toss until mixed

Garnish with the chopped toasted almond

How To Make Crispy Seaweed

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Crispy Seaweed ingredients list:

8 oz of spring greens or bok choy.

¼ cup of toasted almonds.

2 teaspoons of brown sugar.

Corn oil, for deep frying.

Instructions for Crispy Seaweed:

Wash the spring greens or bok choy and drain.

Chop the almonds very finely.

In a wok or a saucepan, heat the corn oil.

Deep fry the seaweed for about 45 to 60 seconds, until it begins to turn dark green.

Remove from the pan and drain thoroughly.

Sprinkle brown sugar and a pinch of salt over top of the leaves. Toss until mixed.

Garnish with the chopped toasted almond

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Although the dish is traditionally made with seaweed in China, in this country it’s often made with spring greens. Try this recipe, which serves 4:

Remove and discard the tough stalks from 175g (6oz) washed spring greens. Spin to remove excess water, then shred finely. Dry on kitchen paper.

Heat a shallow layer of sunflower oil in a wok until very hot, then add a handful of greens, standing back in case it spits. Fry for 30sec or until bright green and crisp. Remove with a slotted spoon, put on a baking sheet lined with kitchen paper and keep warm. Repeat with remaining greens.

Sprinkle 2 level tsp caster sugar and ¼ level tsp salt over the top and toss the greens, then serve in a warm dish.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

If you want to eat truly healthy, lose body fat consistently, normalize your blood pressure, cholesterol levels, prevent cancer, and even boost your brain health and energy levels, you may have heard all over the news that the Paleo Diet has been found to be one of the best methods of achieving all of these benefits compared to any other popular “fad” diets out there. Go here https://biturl.im/aU8dd

The truth is that the Paleo Diet will never be considered a fad because it’s just simply the way that humans evolved to eat over approximately 2 million years. And eating in a similar fashion to our ancestors has been proven time and time again to offer amazing health benefits, including prevention of most diseases of civilization such as cancer, heart disease, alzheimers, and other chronic conditions that are mostly caused by poor diet and lifestyle. One of the biggest misunderstandings about the Paleo Diet is that it’s a meat-eating diet, or a super low-carb diet. This is not true

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

As per above, but be very careful to dry it all thoroughly, and only fry a little at a time – you will be cleaning grean oil off your cooker for days!

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

It’s deep fried shredded cabbage. It cooks in seconds and burns easily, so be careful.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Yvette Clark

Chinese Crispy Seaweed is much less exotic than it sounds. While “seaweed” is in the title of the dish, it’s traditionally made from bok choy. Cabbage or other greens make an equally delicious recipe. Rather than venturing to Asian markets, you can buy the ingredients at your local supermarket—and then wow your guests with the authentic recipe.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Things You’ll Need

1 lb. bok choy or other greens

Two baking trays

Wok or deep pan

Oil for deep frying

Ground fish, optional

Dried shallots, optional

Step 1

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Clean the bok choy or other greens. To ensure a crispy result, the greens must be completely dry before you fry them so wipe the greens with a damp paper towel rather than rinsing them in water.

Step 2

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Cut the thick center stems from the greens and set them aside for use in another recipe.

Step 3

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Lay the leaves on top of each other and roll them tightly together lengthwise. Shred the leaves into thin strips, cutting across the bundle with the knife.

Step 4

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Dry the shredded greens by spreading them in a single layer on a tray. It might take an hour or two for them to dry out, though you can speed the process up by putting them in an oven set at about 150 degrees. They’re ready when they are dry to the touch.

Step 5

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Preheat the oven to 250 degrees, and line two baking trays with paper towels.

Step 6

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Heat 2 inches of oil in a deep pan or wok to 375 degrees. Add a small amount of shredded greens to the oil and deep fry until they turn deep green, about 45 seconds.

Step 7

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Remove the greens with a slotted spoon and place them in a single layer on a paper towel-lined baking tray. Put the tray in the oven to keep the greens warm as you finish frying the rest of them.

Step 8

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Toss the fried greens with salt and sugar to taste, garnish with dried fish or shallots, if you desire, and serve as an appetizer or as an accompaniment to a Chinese entree. The greens will stay crispy for about 30 minutes. If they lose their crispiness, simply warm them in a 300-degree oven.

If you’re making a fried or stewed entree to go with the seaweed, add the stems from the greens to the entree. For an especially authentic flavor, deep-fry the greens in peanut oil.

Warning

Add the greens to the oil carefully, as the oil could splatter, even if the greens are completely dry. Watch the greens constantly as you fry them. They can quickly turn from a delicious dark green to a burnt brown.

Crispy Bok Choy Chips are the new big thing in healthy vegetable snacks! Homemade and flavored with garlic, ginger and chili paste, you won’t be able to stop eating them. How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Spicy and and full of flavor, Crispy Bok Choy Chips are an addicting snack, a scrumptious side dish and would add perfectly to a menu celebrating the Chinese New Year!

Really, they’re ideal for any occasion.

Snacks for Chinese New Year

The celebration for the Chinese New Year is a fifteen-day festival. Though I’m not even close to being an authority on this holiday, it seems to be focused greatly around family — and food.

Here’s a great overview of the holiday .How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok ChoyI absolutely love Asian flavors and greens, and this quick and easy recipe is a fun way to use Baby Bok Choy to kick off a Chinese New Year feast — or any meal.

Or, here’s another idea . . . make this for a super cool Game Day snack.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

How to Serve Crispy Bok Choy Chips

  • Right off the bat, I imagine these in a large serving bowl for snacking.
  • They’re also lovely to serve as a side dish. The bok choy chips would be delicious with meat, chicken or fish.
  • How about in a burger? I would love it.

Move over kale chips. 😉 Though they can also be super tasty, the markets seem to be saturated with them lately. Let’s try something new and different.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok ChoyYou can make all sorts of homemade vegetable chips, actually. And not just from leafy greens, either. You can use beets, sweet potatoes, turnips, carrots, and the list goes on.

Those are a bit more common, and more easily found in stores. I love making things you wouldn’t typically see, and these bok choy chips are certainly in that category, and they’ve become my new favorite homemade vegetable chips.

Recipe Tip

For this recipe the best way to grate the ginger and garlic is with a Microplane zester . If you don’t have one, simply chop them as finely as possible.

8 Answers

Crispy Seaweed ingredients

8 oz of spring greens or bok choy

¼ cup of toasted almonds

2 teaspoons of brown sugar

Corn oil, for deep frying

Wash the spring greens or bok choy and drain

Chop the almonds very finely

In a wok or a saucepan, heat the corn oil

Deep fry the seaweed for about 45 to 60 seconds, until it begins to turn dark green

Remove from the pan and drain thoroughly

Sprinkle brown sugar and a pinch of salt over top of the leaves. Toss until mixed

Garnish with the chopped toasted almond

How To Make Crispy Seaweed

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Crispy Seaweed ingredients list:

8 oz of spring greens or bok choy.

¼ cup of toasted almonds.

2 teaspoons of brown sugar.

Corn oil, for deep frying.

Instructions for Crispy Seaweed:

Wash the spring greens or bok choy and drain.

Chop the almonds very finely.

In a wok or a saucepan, heat the corn oil.

Deep fry the seaweed for about 45 to 60 seconds, until it begins to turn dark green.

Remove from the pan and drain thoroughly.

Sprinkle brown sugar and a pinch of salt over top of the leaves. Toss until mixed.

Garnish with the chopped toasted almond

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Although the dish is traditionally made with seaweed in China, in this country it’s often made with spring greens. Try this recipe, which serves 4:

Remove and discard the tough stalks from 175g (6oz) washed spring greens. Spin to remove excess water, then shred finely. Dry on kitchen paper.

Heat a shallow layer of sunflower oil in a wok until very hot, then add a handful of greens, standing back in case it spits. Fry for 30sec or until bright green and crisp. Remove with a slotted spoon, put on a baking sheet lined with kitchen paper and keep warm. Repeat with remaining greens.

Sprinkle 2 level tsp caster sugar and ¼ level tsp salt over the top and toss the greens, then serve in a warm dish.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

If you want to eat truly healthy, lose body fat consistently, normalize your blood pressure, cholesterol levels, prevent cancer, and even boost your brain health and energy levels, you may have heard all over the news that the Paleo Diet has been found to be one of the best methods of achieving all of these benefits compared to any other popular “fad” diets out there. Go here https://biturl.im/aU8dd

The truth is that the Paleo Diet will never be considered a fad because it’s just simply the way that humans evolved to eat over approximately 2 million years. And eating in a similar fashion to our ancestors has been proven time and time again to offer amazing health benefits, including prevention of most diseases of civilization such as cancer, heart disease, alzheimers, and other chronic conditions that are mostly caused by poor diet and lifestyle. One of the biggest misunderstandings about the Paleo Diet is that it’s a meat-eating diet, or a super low-carb diet. This is not true

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

As per above, but be very careful to dry it all thoroughly, and only fry a little at a time – you will be cleaning grean oil off your cooker for days!

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

It’s deep fried shredded cabbage. It cooks in seconds and burns easily, so be careful.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Stillfactory / Getty Images

There are many different types of Chinese cabbage. These Chinese cabbage recipes feature the two most well-known varieties, Bok Choy, and Napa Cabbage (which is frequently referred to as Chinese cabbage).

Stir-fry Baby Bok Choy

DigiPub / Getty Images

Bok choy is the most well-known type of Chinese cabbage, with its “spoon shaped” green leaves and white stalks that are similar to celery. Bok choy is very adaptable—it can be stir-fried, deep-fried, grilled or steamed. Here, baby bok choy is stir-fried with soy sauce and other seasonings.

Bok Choy Chicken Soup

Tender leaves of bok choy are simmered with soy sauce and other seasonings in this simple, nourishing soup. Feel free to experiment with the basic recipe, adding other ingredients as desired.

Roasted Bok Choy

The Spruce / Jennifer Perillo

As with many other vegetables, bok choy becomes rich and nutty when roasted in a hot oven. This recipe kicks up the flavor level a notch with a homemade Asian vinaigrette made of soy sauce, sesame oil, and vinegar. The mixture is drizzled over the roasted bok choy, making for an addictive side dish.

Spicy Stir-fry Chinese Cabbage

haoliang / Getty Images

Napa cabbage (also called by its Chinese name, sui choy) is stir-fried with chili paste and fresh garlic and then finished with rice wine or dry sherry and a bit of sugar.

Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup

The Spruce Eats / Anna Rider

Bok choy and wheat noodles are the perfect finishing touch to Taiwanese beef noodle soup. Considered the national dish of Taiwan, this flavorful soup can easily become a favorite in your house too.

Panfried Potstickers

Chinese cabbage is used in the filling of numerous Chinese dumpling recipes. Here, Napa cabbage is paired with ground pork, green onion, and Asian seasonings in this recipe for potstickers dumplings—those tasty dumplings that are pan-fried on one side and then steamed. You can serve the potstickers on their own or with a dipping sauce.

Cabbage With Chinese Sausage

Huang Xin / Getty Images

This dish pairs cabbage with sweet and savory Chinese sausage (lop cheong). Both the Chinese sausage and hot bean paste used in this recipe are sold in Asian markets.

Lion’s Head Meatballs

Gary Stevens / Flickr / CC2.0

This is the classic Shanghai dish, with oversized meatballs representing the lion, and shredded greens (bok choy or Napa cabbage are fine) to represent the mane, cooked in a nourishing broth.

Shrimp Stir-fry with Chinese Greens

jeffreyw / Flickr / CC2.0

Shrimp is paired with bok choy and mushrooms in this easy stir-fry. The recipe calls for fresh mushrooms, but feel free to use Chinese dried mushrooms if desired.

Beef Lo Mein

The Spruce Eats / Teena Agnel

A popular dish on Chinese restaurant menus, egg noodles, and shredded cabbage soak up the sauce in this nourishing noodle dish.

Bok choy can be prepared many ways but my favorite is a quick stir-fry with garlic and ginger. In less than 10 minutes you’ll have a tasty side dish that’s full of nutrients and anti-inflammatory health benefits.

If you’re looking for a main dish to go with the bok choy I recommend my Scallops with Citrus Ginger Sauce, Crispy Baked Chicken Thighs and Dijon Baked Salmon.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Boy choy has always been one of my favorite side dish recipes. Why do I love it? It’s easy to prepare and the garlic ginger combination is so darn flavorful. I also love that a quick stir-fry makes the leaves tender but crisp. It’s that same crispiness you would expect from a vegetable from the cabbage family.

Also known as “Chinese Cabbage” there are several varieties of bok choy. But what you’ll find in the market usually comes in two sizes, regular bok choy and baby bok choy. Both are wonderful, but I tend to grab baby bok choy.

Bok Choy Recipe Video

Want to know how to make the tastiest bok choy recipe? Watch the quick tutorial video below!

The Health Benefits of Bok Choy

Bok choy truly is a powerhouse of vitamins, minerals and nutrients. It’s loaded with vitamin A, C and K and contains antioxidants which protect the eyes and a significant amount of calcium and magnesium for strong bones. As a cruciferous vegetable it provides the same health benefits of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts for cardiovascular health and fighting cancer.

And that’s not even considering the bonus anti-inflammatory benefits of both garlic and ginger! So next time you want a healthy green side dish, switch up your normal spinach, green beans and zucchini routine with this boy choy recipe.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

How to Prepare and Cut Bok Choy

Similar to leeks, bok choy can sometimes harbor dirt and debris under its leaves. To prepare the baby bok choy cut it in half, then rinse it under the faucet. If you’re using regular size bok choy, you can cut a small portion off the base then remove the individual leaves to rinse.

Baby bok choy can be cooked as halves, but I’d recommend slicing regular bok choy into smaller pieces before cooking.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

How to Cook Bok Choy

Because it only takes a couple of minutes to cook, make sure to have your fresh ginger and garlic already minced. Then just follow these steps:

  • Heat two tablespoons of oil in a wok or sauté pan
  • Add the minced garlic and ginger and stir for 30 seconds
  • Add the bok choy and use tongs to toss and stir-fry for 2 minutes
  • Pour two tablespoons of water (or broth) into the pan, cover with a lid and cook for 2 minutes more
  • Turn off the heat, sprinkle a little sea salt and black pepper, stir and serve!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Taylor DiVico

Preparing collard greens allows your loved ones to enjoy a nutrient-rich vegetable, packed with fiber and vitamins A, B, C and K. This leafy, green vegetable is a staple food of Southern-influenced cuisine, complementing barbecue fare as a side dish and used as a component in soups. Collards taste similar to cabbage and are typically cooked with pieces of ham hock or bacon for extra flavor. Collard green leaves are dense, requiring longer preparation than other greens. Boil and saute collard greens on the stove top to soften the texture and bring out the flavor quickly.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Things You’ll Need

Olive oil or butter

Step 1

Bring a large pot of water to a boil on high heat on your stove top.

Step 2

Cut the stems off collard greens with a chef’s knife. Detach the leaves from the center rub with your hands or a knife.

Step 3

Rinse the collard green leaves individually under water to remove dirt and pesticides. Repeat rinsing two to three times. Collard greens that are not well-rinsed have a gritty consistency from dirt residue.

Step 4

Place the leaves on a cutting board and chop them into 1-inch-thick pieces. Put the collard green leaves in the boiling water and boil them for 15 minutes.

Step 5

Drain the leaves in a colander. Press the leaves with your hand or a spoon to remove excess water. Heat 2 tbsp. of olive oil or butter in a skillet over medium-high heat until the oil begins to sizzle. Add the collard greens and seasonings such as minced garlic, salt and pepper.

Step 6

Toss the ingredients with a spatula, coating the greens in olive oil. Saute the collard greens for five minutes.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Crisp, fresh, and bursting with loads of unexpected flavor, this Garlic Bok Choy Recipe is guaranteed to be your new favorite side dish. Ready in just 10 minutes, enjoy this easy vegetarian side dish with chicken, beef, or fish.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Sometimes the simplest things are the best things. This Garlic Bok Choy Recipe- totally simple, easy, and delicious– is made with just a handful of ingredients including ginger, garlic, and soy sauce. Ready in just 10 minutes, all you need is a hot skillet and a spatula.

What is Bok Choy (Pak Choy)

Bok choy, also known as pak choy or pok choi, is a type of Chinese cabbage, that has smooth, wide, flat leaf blades at one end with the other end forming a cluster similar to that of celery. May be eaten cooked or raw.

What is the between Bok Choy and Baby Bok Choy?

Since several of you have asked, I did a little research and this is what I have found.

  • They are basically the same.
  • The difference is that baby bok choy is harvested earlier producing smaller, more tender leaves.
  • This means that baby bok choy is much sweeter than and is often served directly in soup or in salads.
  • Bok choy, on the other hand, is much heartier, perfect for longer cooking times as in stir-frys.

Bok Choy Nutrition

Bok Choy is high in nutrients and low in carbohydrates. As such, it is an excellent option when trying to eat more healthy, low-calorie foods.

  • 1 cup raw bok choy- 1.5 grams carbohydrates, 1 gram fiber, 9 calories

High in fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin A, and beta-carotene, this wildly popular green is also an excellent source of folate, calcium, and vitamin B6. It is also considered both a cruciferous vegetable and a leafy green vegetable.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Ingredients in this Garlic Bok Choy Recipe

  • oil
  • garlic
  • shallots
  • baby bok choy
  • soy sauce
  • sesame oil
  • crushed red pepper (optional)

If you prefer a more mild vegetable side dish, I recommend skipping the crushed red pepper. In my experience, even with jarred, store-bought crushed red pepper, the heat level can be somewhat unpredictable, so unless you love a little extra heat, leave it out.

Other fantastic additions would include crushed ginger, a splash of fish sauce, or a sweet chili dipping sauce.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

How to cook bok choy

  1. We want to keep our baby bok choy somewhat intact, so the first thing we want to do is either halve or quarter each stalk (depending on the size of the bok choy) and wash under cold running water.
  2. Heat a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat and add the oil. Swirl to coat the entire surface of the pan. As soon as the oil is hot, add the garlic and the shallots, and sautè for 1-2 minutes, stirring continuously.
  3. Add the bok choy, soy sauce, and sesame oil. Toss and cover. Cook for approximately 2 minutes before uncovering, tossing, and covering. Continue to cook the bok choy until white parts reach desired doneness (I have found that this varies from person to person as some people prefer crunchier bok choy, while others prefer a more well-done stir-fry).
  4. Sprinkle with crushed red pepper, if using, and drizzle with additional sesame oil, if desired.

What to serve with bok choy

Aside from how easy this recipe is to make, one of my favorite parts about it is that it goes with just about everything!

  • Add some shrimp for a low carb, high protein meal.
  • Serve with your favorite chicken or steak and a side of rice.
  • Add onions, carrots, bell pepper, and broccoli for a veggie-packed stir-fry the whole family will love.
  • Toss with ramen and drizzle with chili sauce for a meal guaranteed to taste better than take-out.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

If you try making this 10 Minute Garlic Bok Choy Recipe, please leave me a comment and let me know! I always love to hear your thoughts.

For more bok choy recipes check out,

    Ginger Garlic Noodle Soup with Bok Choy (Bok Choy Soup)How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

REMEMBER TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE FORKED SPOON NEWSLETTER FOR FREE AND RECEIVE WEEKLY RECIPE NOTIFICATIONS DELIVERED STRAIGHT TO YOUR INBOX!

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

I love a good rice bowl and I’m finding that more often than not, I’m most happy when it’s topped with vegetables and a handful of crispy tofu. This recipe is a solid addition to your weeknight meals.

Bok Choy

Bok choy is one of my favorite plants to watch grow. I love how concise the plant is while producing beautiful green leaves. However, I don’t use it as often as I should, primarily because I keep greens on hand that I can use both raw and cooked. If you want to use something you might already have on hand, try wilting chard or kale in place of the bok choy. I find this is just as delicious and another good way to eat your leafy greens.

One note: I cook the bok choy in this recipe so that the greens are soft but the stems still have quite a bit of texture. If you want similar texture for the leaves and stems, separate them and slice them into similar-sized pieces. Cook the stems until just tender then add the leave and cook until just wilted.

The Grains

I went with rice but the beauty of this crispy tofu bowl is that any grain will really do. I’ve been known to eat this combination on sorghum, quinoa, or millet. You could also drop the rice and eat the bok choy and tofu over noodles.

Crispy Tofu, for the win

Given that I still don’t eat a lot of tofu, I rely on friends for recipes that I know work. I used this crispy tofu recipe from The First Mess. I don’t change it one bit which is why you’ll need to head to her site for the recipe.

Sauce

Finally, this recipe isn’t overly sauced. I look at the sauce as more of a glaze for the bok choy. If you’re wanting to make this recipe with a solid amount of sauce, I recommend doubling the liquids you put into the pan after you cook the bok choy. You could also branch and make a separate sauce, like this homemade teriyaki sauce.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Crispy Tofu Bowls with Sesame Bok Choy

  • Author: Erin Alderson
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 45
  • Yield: 3 to 4 servings 1 x
  • Category: dinner
  • Method: stove top

Description

A perfect excuse to pick up those beautiful looking bok choy and make them the star of your dinner. Keep this vegan by omitting or replacing the honey.

Ingredients

Rice + Tofu

1 cup short grain brown rice

Bok Choy

2 small heads of bok choy

1 tablespoon neutral oil

1/4 cup soy sauce

2 tablespoon s honey

2 tablespoon s rice vinegar

½ teaspoon sesame seeds

Chili Oil or Crushed Red Pepper

Instructions

  • Combine the rice with 2 cups of water. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover, and let cook until the rice is tender, about 40 minutes.
  • While the rice is cooking, make the tofu and the bok choy. For the tofu, I followed these instructions (and you should too) .
  • For the bok choy, heat a pan (that can be covered with a lid) over medium-high heat. Slice the bok choy in quarters, length-wise. Rinse well to remove any dirt caught in the stems, just be careful not to fully separate the stems.
  • Add the oil followed by the bok choy. Cook just until a nice sear develops on the stems and the greens are starting to brown. Turn heat to low, add about 3 tablespoons of water, cover, and let steam for a couple of minutes. The greens will begin to wilt and the stems will soften slightly. Once there, remove the lid and add the soy sauce, honey, rice vinegar, and sesame seeds. Spoon to coat the bok choy and cook for a minute or two more.
  • When ready, assemble the bowls with the rice, crispy tofu, bok choy, and a small drizzle of the sauce left in the pan. Serve with soy sauce, extra sesame seeds, and chili paste if desired.

Notes

NOTES

As noted in the post, the stems stay pretty crunchy in this version. If you’re looking for a more even texture, separate the stems from the leaves then cook the stems first, until tender.

Keywords: crispy tofu, rice bowl, bok choy

Did you make this recipe?

Tag @naturallyella on Instagram and hashtag it #naturallyella

Grains of jasmine rice take on a toasty, crispy crust in this perfect pot of rice topped with salmon, bok choy, and corn. To achieve the crust at the bottom of the pot, use a squeeze bottle to drizzle oil around the edge of the pot, or apply it precisely with a spoon. Use your senses to understand what’s happening inside: Listen for a faint crackling sound, and smell for a nutty aroma. (If you smell burnt popcorn, the rice has over-toasted.) Make it without toppings for a satisfying side dish. Chinese clay pots are wrapped in a heat-diffusing wire to prevent thermal shock so that they can be used over high heat. They’re also excellent for simmering single portions of soups and stews.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup uncooked jasmine rice (6 1/2 ounces) (such as Three Ladies Thai Hom Mali Rice)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 1/3 cups cold water
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 2 (2-ounce) pieces boneless, skinless salmon belly (about 1/2-inch thick)
  • 3 ounces baby bok choy, yu choy, or broccoli florets (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 1/4 cup fresh or frozen yellow corn kernels
  • 2 scallions
  • Ginger-Scallion Sauce
  • Mirin-Soy Sauce

How to Make It

Rinse rice in a strainer until water runs clear. Shake rice dry in strainer. Stir together rice, salt, and 1 1/3 cups cold water in a 1-quart Chinese clay pot. Let stand at room temperature 1 hour.

Heat rice mixture, uncovered and undisturbed, on a gas stovetop over medium-high until water along edges of clay pot begins to simmer in spots, 8 to 10 minutes. Continue simmering, uncovered and undisturbed, over medium-high until water is completely absorbed and rice makes a faint crackling sound, 5 to 6 minutes. Drizzle sesame oil evenly around inside edges of pot. Reduce heat to low; cover and cook until rice is just tender, about 10 minutes.

Working quickly, turn off heat, uncover, and arrange salmon belly, baby bok choy, and corn in an even layer on top of rice. Increase heat to medium-high. Cook, covered, until rice smells nutty and makes a constant crackling sound, 4 to 5 minutes. Turn off heat, and let stand, covered, on unlit burner 15 minutes. Slice green parts of scallions to equal 3 tablespoons, and sprinkle over salmon, baby bok choy, and corn. (Reserve remaining scallion for another use.) Serve with ginger-scallion sauce and mirin-soy sauce.

2 1/4 pounds bok choy
peanut oil for deep frying (about 3 1/2 cups)
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 cup toasted pine nuts

Okay, this is not seaweed but a mock version of fried seaweed. Which I have been served at restaurants before. It kind of looks like the green stuff in Easter baskets, it’s very light in texture and the sugar and salt along with the pine nuts is really an interesting combination. I did not make this in my wok , but used my fryer. And I have never used savory cabbage before. In fact this was the first time I have made this. I liked it very well and reminded me of the time I had it in the restaurant, they must have used bok choy also.my fryer was set at 350°F and cooked this amount for 30 seconds. I definitely will be making this again!

Rinse the bok choy leaves under cold running water, then pat dry thoroughly with absorbent paper towels.
Roll each bok choy leave up then sliced through, then lay so that the leaves are finally shredded.

Heat the oil in a large wok (or use a deep fryer as I did.) Add the shredded leaves and fry for about 30 seconds or until they are shriveled up and become crispy. You may need to do this amount in four batches.
Remove the crispy seaweed from the walk with a slotted spoon and set aside to drain on absorbent paper towels.
Transfer the crispy seaweed to a large bowl and toss with the salt, sugar and pine nuts. Serve immediately.
Variation: use savory cabbage instead of bok choy if it is unavailable making sure that the leaves are well dried before frying !

This recipe serves 4

__________________
“Vegetarian – old Indian word for bad fisherman”

I am currently unsupervised I know it freaks me out to. But the possibilities are endless!

TSR, I need your help.
I love crispy seaweed, but my crispy seaweed doesn’t turn out like the takeaway’s at all, and I can’t afford £2.80 every time I want some.

So I bought a huge pack of dried seaweed off the interwebs. Fried it in oil, sprinkled it with sugar. Didn’t taste very nice at all. Then I rehydrated the seaweed, fried it in oil, sprinkled it with sugar. Still didn’t taste right.

Then I looked up some recipes. Apparently in china and japan, crispy seaweed is made with seaweed, but here it’s made with pak choi or cabbage.

So, 2 questions, helpful TSRians.
1) How do I make my crispy seaweed taste like the takeaways’?

2) If my seaweed is useless for making crispy seaweed, does anybody have a recipe I could use it in, which they’ve tried and tasted?

Not what you’re looking for? Try…

I use bok choy or pak choi for my crispy “seaweed”, finely shredded, basically dry it in the oven at a low heat with plenty of salt, a little msg and some sugar.
Then deep fry in groundnut oil before serving.

I think it’s better than english cabbage for it and easily as good as any takeaway.

To be honest though some seaweed is actually bloody nice if you live by a beach

I believe it’s just deep fried, thinly-shredded cabbage. I think any cabbage would suffice tbh and as long as you’ve got enough oil in the fryer, it should be alright

I know what you mean though, the “seaweed” at chinese restaurants always seem to taste the best!

That’ll be the MSG, you can buy it from any good asian deli, it’s a key ingredient in a lot of chinese food.

It’s like the chinese equivalent of salt, people don’t realise the value of seasoning food correctly.

(Original post by Megaross)
That’ll be the MSG, you can buy it from any good asian deli, it’s a key ingredient in a lot of chinese food.

It’s like the chinese equivalent of salt, people don’t realise the value of seasoning food correctly.

(Original post by Piko_Piko)
TSR, I need your help.
I love crispy seaweed, but my crispy seaweed doesn’t turn out like the takeaway’s at all, and I can’t afford £2.80 every time I want some.

So I bought a huge pack of dried seaweed off the interwebs. Fried it in oil, sprinkled it with sugar. Didn’t taste very nice at all. Then I rehydrated the seaweed, fried it in oil, sprinkled it with sugar. Still didn’t taste right.

Then I looked up some recipes. Apparently in china and japan, crispy seaweed is made with seaweed, but here it’s made with pak choi or cabbage.

So, 2 questions, helpful TSRians.
1) How do I make my crispy seaweed taste like the takeaways’?

2) If my seaweed is useless for making crispy seaweed, does anybody have a recipe I could use it in, which they’ve tried and tasted?

why did you use sugar?

the last time i tasted crispy seaweed from my takeaway, they don’t taste particularly sugary. I think they used some sort of seasoning instead, not sugar

(Original post by internet tough guy)
why did you use sugar?

the last time i tasted crispy seaweed from my takeaway, they don’t taste particularly sugary. I think they used some sort of seasoning instead, not sugar

(Original post by Piko_Piko)
TSR, I need your help.
I love crispy seaweed, but my crispy seaweed doesn’t turn out like the takeaway’s at all, and I can’t afford £2.80 every time I want some.

So I bought a huge pack of dried seaweed off the interwebs. Fried it in oil, sprinkled it with sugar. Didn’t taste very nice at all. Then I rehydrated the seaweed, fried it in oil, sprinkled it with sugar. Still didn’t taste right.

Then I looked up some recipes. Apparently in china and japan, crispy seaweed is made with seaweed, but here it’s made with pak choi or cabbage.

So, 2 questions, helpful TSRians.
1) How do I make my crispy seaweed taste like the takeaways’?

2) If my seaweed is useless for making crispy seaweed, does anybody have a recipe I could use it in, which they’ve tried and tasted?

Not sure for sure, but my friend cooks Chinese meals from scratch and always gets ingredients from Chinese supermarkets. They will most likely sell it there. I think you’re doing it right, but in most takeaways they put sugar, SALT and an orange flavouring on it, but I forget what it is. They’ll most likely sell it in the supermarket. I think you’re doing it right, but the flavouring really does make it taste differently, so perhaps that’s where you are going wrong.

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read the disclosure policy.

Stir-fried garlic bok choy is a healthy and delicious side dish for just about any meal! You can make this easy recipe in 10 minutes with only 4 ingredients. Fresh bok choy is cooked with amazing garlic flavor using a few essential tips for perfect results every time!

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Bok choy is one of my favorite veggies and I have served it as a side dish with chicken, beef, salmon along with rice or noodles. A simple stir fry is the best way to enjoy this leafy green vegetable, and it comes together in less than 10 minutes!

While I like cooking it with garlic and oil, you can add in your favorite spices or sauces. As it cooks so fast, I always get everything else prepared first and when dinner is almost ready, just quickly stir-fry this dish for a few minutes. Plus, it’s low-carb, gluten-free and dairy-free!

Bok choy or pak choi (上海青) is a type of Chinese cabbage and it’s in the cabbage family with high amounts of nutrients and vitamin. It tastes best when the leaves are slightly wilted while the bottom is still crispy and crunchy. Depending on the size of your bok choy, you can cook them whole if your bok choy is small, about 3 inches, or you can chop it down to bite-size chunks.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

THE SECRET TO PERFECT GARLICKY FLAVOR

For this recipe, I use cold oil method to bring out the best garlicky flavor and avoid burning the garlic in the wok or pan. When you add in minced garlic to a hot wok, it can easily get burned and become bitter. Although some recipes call for slightly burned garlic, the bitter flavor doesn’t go well with bok choy.

To avoid the garlic from burning, the secret is to add the minced garlic to the wok while the oil is still cold. Then slowly heat up the oil, during the process, the oil soaks up the garlic flavor gradually and the garlic will be cooked perfectly without burning.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

HOW TO COOK BOK CHOY

Bok choy is delicious and crispy when properly cooked. It’s important to stir-fry them on high heat for a short time so that they won’t be overcooked and become wilted.

  • Rinse the bok choy with cold water to remove any dirt. If your bok choy is quite big, you can separate out the leaves, but keep the center part (baby bok choy) intact. The center of each bok choy is the most tender and delicious part. Pat dry.
  • Add minced garlic to cold oil. Place over medium heat. When the oil begins to bubble, add in bok choy.
  • Increase the heat to high, and stir until the green leaves start to wilt and white bottoms begin to soften, about 5 to 8 minutes.
  • Season with salt and serve.

Note: Raw bok choy sometimes may seem too much before cook, but they cook down quite a bit.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

WHAT TO SERVE WITH BOK CHOY

We love serving bok choy with protein and starch such as:

Oven Roasted Bok Choy is a very easy and delicious side dish, ready in 20 minutes and loaded with garlic flavor. Vegan and Gluten-Free, but with lots of flavors!

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Easy Oven Roasted Bok Choy

Oven Roasted Bok Choy is one of the easiest and tastiest side dishes you will make. They are a favorite in our house and pair well with so many main courses. Just recently we have served Oven Roasted Bok Choy with this succulent Pressure Cooker Pulled Pork. The Oven Roasted Bok Choy is loaded with lots of minced garlic, red pepper flakes, and sea salt.

Roasted to perfection it becomes crispy, garlicky and incredibly tasty. Also, the preparation is very easy, you just toss all the ingredients on a baking sheet and roast. After 20 minutes you get to enjoy garlicky baby bok choy.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Is Bok Choy Healthy?

Yes! This vegetable is super healthy and has an excellent source of fiber, vitamin C, K, A. In addition, it has a great source of antioxidants which can protect you from cancer and plenty of nutrients. Feel free to incorporate this green vegetable in your daily diet as it is super easy to prepare and tastes amazing well.

How Do You Clean or Prepare Bok Choy?

Cleaning the vegetables is pretty simple.

  • First, soak them in cold water for a few minutes. This will remove the dirt from leaves and stems.
  • Then, trim the stem (the end part of it) and discard it.
  • Scrub off any remaining dirt and rinse again under cold water.
  • Using a sharp knife, cut each vegetable in half lengthwise, making two piles.

Oven Roasted Bok Choy Recipe Tips

  • First, you can use regular or baby bok choy for this recipe. It will work great either way. However, baby bok choy will be done sooner.
  • In addition, seasoning is key, using fresh minced garlic is great. So I recommend it over the pre-minced packaged garlic, that doesn’t have enough flavor.
  • For a little heat, sprinkle red pepper flakes over the bok choy or drizzle a bit of Sriracha sauce right before roasting.
  • Also, use a good quality oil for roasting at high temperatures. For example, I use avocado oil or extra virgin olive oil. However, you can also use infused extra virgin olive oil to add even more flavor.
  • Roast a big batch as the bok choy tends to reduce in volume and make sure you don’t over roast.
  • Be careful with the salt, so you don’t end up with super salty baby bok choy

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

What to serve with Oven Roasted Bok Choy?

They are perfect as a side dish or appetizer. Some of our favorite way to serve them is with:

Tools/Ingredients I used to make the Oven Roasted Bok Choy Recipe:

  • Sheet Pan – I love these pans, they are 17×12 inches and also have a lifetime warranty, great for so many recipes, I have a few in my kitchen and I use them for sweet and savory recipes
  • Organic Olive Oil – olive oil can make or break a dish, I always opt for organic, high-quality oil to add to my marinades and salads
  • Red Pepper Flakes – we sprinkle these on everything, they are great for cooking but also on top of salads and pizza

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy
Crispy-Skin Local Sustainable Black Cod
Ginger Braised Baby Bok Choy
Garlic Chive Blossom Garnish

This simple preparation of Black Cod is a welcome respite between all the rich lavish holiday foods. Wild-caught locally, off the coast of Santa Barbara, this species is relatively abundant and harvested with methods that cause little damage to habitat and other marine life. The cod needs only to be seasoned with salt and pepper and cooked over high heat with olive oil to let the fabulous textures of crisp skin and silky flesh with a buttery flavor shine through.

The bok choy cooking method is equally straightforward. Flavored with ginger, soy, sesame, and a bit of brown sugar – the braising liquid infuses the vegetable with umami flavors, a hint of sweetness and a note of ginger spiciness. This cod & bok choy make a delightful pair, especially when one is in the mood for a clean and uncomplicated yet satisfying meal.

Crispy-Skin Black Cod Recipe

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Rinse two 6 oz. pieces of fresh black cod then dry well with paper towels. Rub with olive oil and season with coarse salt and fresh ground pepper. Heat a non-stick, oven-proof pan over high heat. Add olive oil, then sprinkle a bit of coarse salt over the oil. When the oil is hot, add the fillets, skin-side down. Sauté for 4 to 5 minutes until the skin is crispy. Turn over the fish and finish cooking in a 425° oven for about 4 minutes. Serve immediately, skin-side up.

Ginger Braised Baby Bok Choy Recipe

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Slice 3 baby bok choy in half lengthwise, rinse very well. In a pan large enough to hold the bok choy flat, bring 1/2 c. water to a boil along with 2 t. olive oil, 1 t. toasted sesame oil, 1 T. soy sauce, 2 t. brown sugar, and several strips of fresh ginger. Place the bok choy in the liquid, cut side down. Cover, lower the heat, and cook until the bok choy is tender, about 5 minutes.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Serve the bok choy on a platter with the cut-side up. Ladle braising liquid over the top.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Time the vegetable so the fish can be served immediately, retaining its hot crackling skin. Serve with a bowl of simple steamed rice on the side.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

A handful of diminutive garlic chive blossoms brings the dish to life, embellishing the basic preparation with a kiss of beauty and joy .

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Extending my Best Wishes to You
For a Beautiful and Joyful 2012!

Here’s everything you need to know about the leafy green veggie.

Though it was introduced to North America relatively recently, bok choy has been a staple in Chinese cuisine for thousands of years. Here’s what makes the leafy green vegetable so special:

What Is Bok Choy?

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Cooking dinner shouldn’t be complicated

Bok choy, also called pak choi or pok choi, is one of two main types of leafy green vegetable known as Chinese cabbage. The cruciferous vegetable belongs to the mustard family along with cabbage, turnips, broccoli, and kale.

Though its closely related to the headed cabbage you’re likely familiar with, bok choy looks kind of like a celery/lettuce hybrid.

The entire plant is edible, from its thick, clustered stalks to its dark green leaves.

It seems bok choy has been an essential ingredient in Asian cuisine for a very long time: Archaeologists discovered 6,000-year-old Chinese cabbage seeds in China’s Yellow River Valley.

The ancient vegetable has been slowly growing in popularity in the U.S. ever since it was introduced to North America in the 19th century.

Bok Choy vs. Napa Cabbage

“Chinese cabbage” can refer to two types of leafy green veggie common in Chinese cuisine: the Pekinensis Group (napa cabbage) and the Chinensis Group (bok choy).

Both plants are variant cultivars of the turnip, and they’ve both been used as food and medicinally for thousands of years.

Of the two, napa cabbage is most common. Napa cabbage looks more like the Western cabbage that originated in Europe, but it is slightly oblong. It’s made up of green leaves with white petioles (the stalk that joins a leaf to a stem) that are wrapped in a tight bunch.

Bok choy, on the other hand, does not form a head.

In terms of flavor, napa cabbage is milder.

What Does It Taste Like?

Bok choy tastes similar to cabbage. It has a mild, fresh, and grassy flavor with a slight peppery kick.

The stalks have a celery-like crunch, while the leaves are soft and crisp.

Bok Choy Nutrition

The Chinese staple has been used medicinally for thousands of years for a reason: It’s incredibly healthy.

Here are some bok choy nutritional highlights:

  • Bok choy is rich in vitamins A (supports eye health), C (boosts immune function), and K (promotes bone and heart health).
  • It’s also a good source of potassium, which can lower your blood pressure and risk of stroke, and calcium, which is essential to build and maintain strong bones.
  • Though it’s packed with vitamins and nutrients, bok choy is extremely low in calories (about 9 calories per cup).

How to Prepare Bok Choy

How to Buy

Look for vibrant colors with little to no browning. Avoid bok choy with wilted leaves. You may be tempted to buy too much at the store, but here’s some good news: Bok choy doesn’t lose much volume as it cooks (like spinach), so what you see is pretty much what you get.

How to Clean

Before you wash bok choy, trim the tip of the stem. Rinse the vegetable under cold water, using a vegetable brush to scrub away any remaining dirt toward the base of the stems.

How to Cut

While both the stems and the leaves are edible (and quite tasty), you’ll want to separate them before cooking. The leaves cook much faster than the stems, so they should be added later.

The leaves can stay intact, but the stalks are usually cut into ½-inch pieces.

How to Cook

One of the most common ways to cook bok choy is in a stir-fry, as it’s super quick and easy. Our most popular bok choy stir-fry recipe is as delicious as it is simple to make: All you need is a wok or frying pan, a few simple ingredients, and about 10 minutes.

Pro-tip from the test kitchen: Thoroughly drying the bok choy before cooking ensures that you don’t end up with a watery sauce.

Learn three ways to prepare bok choy for cooking.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

StirFry_BokChoy_0014002.tif

A bowl of bok choy mushroom stir-fry with Canadian bacon

Photo by: Charles Masters

If you’re not already familiar with bok choy, it’s time to introduce yourself to it. Bok choy, also known as pak choi, is a crunchy, emerald green cabbage that has a subtle “cabbagey” flavor that can sometimes taste like celery, and is packed full of vitamins. It originated in China before the 15th century, and its name in Cantonese means “small white vegetable.” Bok choy is versatile — you can rely on it for crunch and texture in salads, soups and many other Asian recipes.

Bok choy generally comes in two varieties, traditional and Shanghai. Traditional bok choy has dark, crinkly leaves and crisp, white stems; Shanghai bok choy has spoon-shaped leaves and jade green stems. The cool thing is that both the leaves and the stalks can be eaten, and this wonderful little plant is an excellent go-to for fiber, as well as for beta-carotene and vitamins C, K and A. It’s also a good source for calcium and vitamin B6.

Bok choy choices

Bok choy can vary in flavor, size and color. Varieties with larger leaves work great for salads and soups, and those with narrower heads are perfect for stir-fry meals. When picking out bok choy, look for bright green leaves and crisp stalks free of holes or discoloration. Remember that crunchiness is good and steer clear of bunches that are rubbery or dried out at the stem, or are browning at the edges.

Baby bok choy is another popular variety, which true to its name is smaller and harvested earlier than traditional versions. It has thicker stems and smaller leaves, and a flavor that’s a bit milder and more tender than the regular kind. It’s great when you’re not up for a laborious night in the kitchen, because you can cook the whole thing without breaking the leaves apart.

Once you get it home, store the bok choy in a bag — ideally a reusable one like a Stasher, push the air out of the bag, seal it and toss the bag in your refrigerator’s produce drawer. Fresh stalks should keep for up to 5 days.

Cleaning and preparation

When you’re ready to use bok choy, you have several different choices for cutting and preparing. Here’s the easiest: Get a sharp knife and slice off the bottom 1/2 to 1 inch of the stem. (Aim for just above the junction of the base of the leaves.) Remove any tough or discolored leaves, separate the stalks, and swish in a bowl of water. If there’s any dirt or other debris on the leaves, gently rub it off and then drain the water. You can also rinse each stalk under water while keeping an eye on the base of the stalk, where dirt usually collects.

There are a few different ways to cut up bok choy. Top safety tip for all of them: Don’t get your fingers in the way of the sharp knife. The first technique, slicing, is pretty straightforward. Place the washed stalks flat on a cutting board and squeeze them into a bunch. Keep the stems and leaves separate (this is important because stems and leaves cook at different speeds), and then do your best crab-claw imitation to hold the stems in place.

Don’t chop! Hold the knife at a 45-degree angle to get a clean, angled cut that increases the surface area and helps the stems to cook faster. Slice your bok choy into 1-inch sections from the base all the way to the top of the leaves.

Bok choy rectangles

For this technique, remove the leaves from the stem. Some remaining smaller leaves are OK, but be sure to cut off the biggies. Select a single stalk and make a lengthwise cut down the middle to make two halves. (Cut into thirds if desired.) Cut the stem halves into 1-inch rectangular pieces, which are great for sauteing with other veggies.

To dice bok choy, first cut the leaves from a single stalk and slice lengthwise into three long strips of roughly the same width. Bunch them together and then cut the strips horizontally into little half-inch pieces. And there you have it — a great addition to soups and salads.

Published April 23, 2018

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

tab1962/iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images

A satisfying, flavorful vegetarian meal that’s ready in less than 30 minutes! Brown rice contains more fiber than white rice and provides a nice chewy texture to the stir-fry.

Ingredients

20 ounces microwaveable frozen brown rice
1 tablespoon coconut oil
14 ounces extra firm tofu, drained and pressed, cut into ½-inch cubes
8 cups bok choy chopped leaves and stems, rinsed (about 2 heads of bok choy, or 4 baby bok choy)
¼ cup tamari or light soy sauce
2 teaspoons agave nectar or maple syrup
1 teaspoon Sriracha hot sauce, optional
Green onions, to garnish

Directions

Before you begin: Wash your hands.

  1. Prepare brown rice according to package directions. Set aside.
  2. In a large skillet, heat coconut oil over medium-high heat. When oil is hot, add tofu cubes carefully. Cook for 2 minutes, then flip tofu to another side. You can remove the pan from heat while flipping tofu to avoid oil splatter. Cook tofu on at least 4 sides for crispy texture, cooking for 2 minutes on each side. Once cooked as desired, remove tofu from pan and set aside.
  3. Using the same skillet, sauté bok choy over medium heat for 2 minutes. While bok choy is cooking, combine tamari, agave nectar and Sriracha hot sauce (if using) in a small bowl.
  4. Turn heat off and add sauce and cooked brown rice to skillet with bok choy and stir together. Add in tofu cubes and mix together briefly to maintain crispiness of tofu. Top with green onions and serve.

Cooking Note

  • If not using coconut oil, canola or sesame oil may be used as substitutions.

Nutrition Information

Serving size: 1 cup
Serves 4

Calories: 435; Total fat: 12g; Saturated fat: 4g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 1,286mg; Carbohydrates: 66g; Fiber: 8g; Sugars: 8g; Protein: 23g; Potassium: n/a; Phosphorus: n/a

Last Modified: Oct 4, 2018 by Becky Striepe

Disclosure: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. See my Privacy Policy for more details.

If you have never made baby bok choy in your air fryer, you are totally missing out. Air fryer baby bok choy is one of life’s joys, and it takes less than 10 minutes, from chop to finish.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Air Fryer Baby Bok Choy Basics

Y’all, I don’t know why it took me so long to put baby bok choy in my air fryer! Bok choy is one of my family’s favorite veggies, and since I perfected this method, air fryer baby bok choy has been on our supper menu at least once a week. Some weeks, it’s more like two or three times.

When you cook baby bok choy in the air fryer, the leaves get crispy and the stems get perfectly sweet and tender. All that you need to make it is a little bit of spray oil, a sprinkle of garlic powder, and approximately nine spare minutes.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

If you don’t do oil, you can toss your baby bok choy in a little bit of soy sauce whisked with maple syrup. The maple syrup will help the soy sauce cling to the leaves, so they won’t get dry during cooking.

Besides the obvious time savings from the air fryer, you save even more time on this recipe by not chopping the bok choy into bite-sized pieces. Instead, you cook up the whole leaves in the air fryer. They look beautiful on the plate, and they taste freaking delicious.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Seriously. It’s that easy. Our rice bowls haven’t been the same since.

How to Use Air Fryer Baby Bok Choy

There are so many ways to serve up your baby bok! It works great as a side dish alongside. basically anything.

We also like to pile it onto our sushi bowls or serve it over sesame noodles with air fryer tofu or a handful of cashews. I also have a Tofu Ramen recipe coming up that uses air fryer baby bok choy as a delicious topping.

Basically, anywhere you’d add some sauteed baby bok choy, you can use air fryer baby bok choy instead.

This post may contain affiliate links. See my full disclosure here.

Tender Southern smothered chicken is seared until the skin is crisp and golden then simmered in a creamy onion gravy. Southern dish combines Asian bok choy for an easy and delicious fusion weeknight dinner. Keto friendly too! How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Subscribe to Whisk It Real Gud to have each of my posts delivered straight to your e-mail box

SOUTHERN SMOTHERED CHICKEN

Southern smothered chicken is has got to be one of my favorite southern meals. Plus, I’m a huge fan of chicken. Vegetables too, thanks to my grandmother who grew a lot of veggies when I was a kid.

I know you may be thinking, why smothered chicken with bok choy….well, to answer your question, I love southern food. I don’t eat it too often, but when I do, I like to mix things up, like I did in this recipe.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

BOK CHOY WITH CHICKEN

This year, I’ve been eating a good amount of Chinese greens called baby bok choy. I love it. It’s basically a Chinese cabbage that’s really good for you. One cup has 9 calories! I’ve made smothered chicken with Shanghai bok choy also. It’s pretty much the same. One is bigger than the other. You can use either one to use in your smothered chicken. Bok choy is one of my favorite vegetables. Collard greens is my other fav.

Some say that baby bok choy has a sweet and mild flavor, whereas, Shangai bok choy has a mineral flavor. To be totally honest, I don’t really taste a difference. If you’ve never made boy choy with chicken with a southern twist you gotta try this recipe out!

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

HOW TO MAKE SOUTHERN SMOTHERED CHICKEN WITH A TWIST

This amazing southern recipe with bok choy and mushrooms is, oh my goodness good and super easy! The chicken is smothered in a rich onion gravy. Pure deliciousness. I’m getting hungry just thinking about it.

And staple ingredients that I’m sure you already have. You’ll probably have to go to the store for the baby bok choy or Shanghai bok choy. Pick one. No biggie right?!

Traditional smothered chicken recipes usually say to coat the chicken in flour first but I don’t follow cooking rules…

Instead of coating the chicken in flour, I like to season the chicken then sear the chicken first on both sides until the skin crisps up. I use flour to help thicken the gravy. Here’s the quick breakdown of the recipe.

November 14, 2017

This seaweed salad with cabbage is a delicious light dish for lunch or dinner. This salad is loaded with nutrients, and is vegan, gluten-free, and allergy-free.

This seaweed salad with cabbage is vegan, gluten-free, and allergy-free, is loaded with nutrients, and is really light and delicious for a meal or side.

This seaweed salad recipe comes from Debbie Adler’s new book, Sweet, Savory & Free: Insanely Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Without Any Of The Top 8 Food Allergens.

I was honored to blurb this book. It is an incredible resource for any family living with food allergies or wanting to eat healthy. Debbie makes plant-based and allergy-free living delicious and fun with her super tasty and nutritious recipes.

Debbie opens the book with her “Just Haves” – herbs and spices, condiments, seeds, grains, flours, powder, sweeteners, and the canned and packaged goods, and all of the necessary kitchen tools that make allergy-free living easy.

Then, she divides the recipes into homemade staples, morning munchies, soup, meals in muffin tins and ramekins, pizza and pasta, mains, sides, breads, and sweets.

Some of my favorite recipes include: sriracha, strawberry shortcake pancakes. quinoa & kale breakfast burritos, matzo ball soup, creamy celery root soup, curried pumpkin soup, eggplant parmezan florentine, Asian fusion noodle kugel, spaghetti piccata twirls, cannellini cupcakes with whipped parsnip, veggie pad thai, cajun wild mushroom risotto, paella, egg rolls, spanakopita enchiladas, spaghetti squash chow mein, palak paneer, latkes, super crunchy seed crackers, banana java date bread, caramelized onion naan, NYC deli-style flatbread, tiramisu cupcakes, chocolate rosemary doughnuts, and this sea vegetable and cabbage slaw.

Most people turn up their noses when I talk about sea vegetables. But, these foods grown in marine and fresh waters are powerful prebiotic foods for gut health, and are some of the most mineral-rich alkalizing foods on offer. Sea veggies contain anti- inflammatory and antioxidant agents, and promote cell integrity and boost immunity. Seaweeds also cleanse heavy metals and environmental wastes from the body.

There are thousands of sea veggies. But, the most readily available are nori, hijiki, wakame, arame, dulse, kombu, and kelp. Most sea veggies need to be soaked to rehydrate them, and a little goes a long way. I used a mixture or arame, wakame, and hijiki to make this salad, and the results were fabulous.

Sea veggies can taste like a big old gulp of murky sea water. The secret is tossing them with delicious citrus dressings and other light land veggies such as cabbage, lettuce, leafy greens, and carrots.

Debbie’s simple light dressing and combo of veggies is delightful, and such a pleasant way to get your quota of sea vegetables. As you can see from the image, this salad is also really elegant and beautiful.

This salad is going on my holiday table this year, and I’m really excited to encourage my family and friends to eat more sea vegetables.

Get your copy of Sweet, Savory & Free, and learn more about Debbie Adler.

Everyone knows that cauliflower, asparagus, and basically any root vegetable is delicious when roasted, but have you ever tried throwing baby bok choy in the oven? It takes about 2 minutes to prep, 15 to roast, and it’s my new favorite caramelized vegetable.

Baby bok choy is widely available, relatively inexpensive, and let’s face it, absolutely adorable. Not only is it super tasty, it’s also a great source of antioxidants and vitamins C, A, and K. I’ve always loved it sautéed and recently started pan-searing it over high heat to get a little caramelization on the cut sides of the choy. But roasting is even better. Here’s why.

Pan-searing might bring out bok choy’s sweet cabbage flavor but it has a downside: It often takes several batches to sear the bok choy properly on all surfaces (without crowding the pan), which adds a lot of “active” time to my weeknight meal prep.

Last week I had a revelation: roast the bok choy! Roasting is the best because the cooking time is mostly unattended, which frees me up to pull the rest of a meal together. I cranked my oven to 450°F, halved the bok choy lengthwise, and tossed it in salt, pepper, and olive oil (vegetable oil is fine, too). I roasted the choy cut side down on a baking sheet for 10 minutes, then flipped it and roasted 5 minutes more.

The result? Slightly crispy leaves (similar to a kale chip), crisp-tender cores, and a delicate cabbage-y flavor. My roasted baby bok choy tasted like sweeter, more mild version of roasted Brussels sprouts; in other words, delicious! What’s more, you could easily prep a couple baking sheets of bok choy and roast them in the upper and lower oven racks to feed a crowd. Or try this technique with regular bok choy: just quarter the heads and add a little more cooking time if they’re large. Roasted bok choy will pair well with almost anything, but especially chicken, beef, pork, or tofu.

This sweet and gingery beef becomes extra tender from marinating it in beer. Turn this meal into a party hors d’oeuvre by serving the beef in bite-sized pieces with toothpicks on top of the crispy noodles. Plus: More Beef Recipes

Ingredients

  • 1 pound of flank steak
  • 1 bottle of beer (any kind)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • One 2-inch piece of ginger, julienned
  • 3 cloves of garlic, sliced
  • 1/2 cup of soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup of water
  • 3/4 cup of brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon molasses
  • 1-3 teaspoons Sriracha, to taste
  • 1 1/2 cup chow mein noodles
  • 2 cups plus 4 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1/2 pound baby bok choy, each bunch cut in half

How to Make It

Place the flank steak in a sealable plastic bag and add the beer. Marinade in the fridge for 2 hours, occasionally shaking the bag.

While the steak is marinating prepare the sauce. Heat the sesame oil in a small saucepan over medium high heat. Add the ginger and garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the soy sauce and water and bring to a boil. Add the brown sugar, molasses and Sriracha and continue to boil 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

When the beef has finished marinating, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the chow mein noodles and cook according to package directions. Drain and rinse well under cold water. Using a clean kitchen towel remove much of the water from the noodles.

Line 2 plates with paper towels. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in an 8-inch cast iron pan or non-stick pan over medium heat. Add half of the noodles and spread them around evenly. Cook, without disturbing, for about 4 minutes, until light brown and crispy on the other side. Using a spatula lift a corner of the noodles. If the noodles have started to brown and crisp carefully flip the disc over. Remove the crispy noodles from the pan and place on the paper towel-lined plate. Add 2 more tablespoons of oil to the pan and repeat the process with the remaining noodles.

Remove the beef from the marinade and discard the marinade. Dry the beef with paper towels. Cut into thin strips cutting across the grain. Toss the strips with the cornstarch.

Line a baking tray or large plate with paper towels. Heat the remaining 2 cups of vegetable oil in a small saucepan with high sides over medium high heat. Attach a candy/deep fry thermometer to the side of the pot. Once the oil reaches 350° carefully place 3-4 pieces of the beef in saucepan. Cook for 1 1/2 minutes then remove with a slotted spoon and place on the paper towel-lined baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining beef, adjusting the heat to maintain the oil temperature at 350-375°.

Add the bok choy and 1/2 cup of water to a large frying pan over high heat. Steam for 3 minutes then remove from the heat.

Toss the beef with 1/2 cup of the sauce. Cut each crispy noodle circle in half and divide them amongst the plates. Top with bok choy and Mongolian beef. Serve the remaining sauce on the side.

Home » Recipes » Salads » Bok Choy Salad with Sesame Soy Sauce

This bok choy salad is crispy and crunchy with a tangy Asian inspired sesame soy dressing. Try it paired with a juicy grilled steak or chicken.

Yesterday we woke up in our hotel overlooking the falls and couldn’t see 5 inches out the window it was so foggy.

We went to breakfast, realized all of our options for things to do were outside, checked the weather to see if it was going to clear up at all during the day and that’s when I saw that it was supposed to be 91 and sunny at home today.

It took us about 2 minutes to decide to pack up a day early and head home so we could enjoy the full day off in the sunshine.

I’m probably laying on a beach towel in my front yard right now attempting to get rid of my winter Casper appearance. It really doesn’t do me any favors.

This whole 60 hour trip, 15 of which were spent in the car, made me realize a few things…

I know the lyrics to a disturbing amount (and quite varied bunch) of songs.

From Snoop to Easton Corbin to Billy Joel to O.A.R. to Christina Perri, I can pretty much recite every word. I can’t hit the notes for shit, but I can tell you what they’re saying.

Ulysses, however, likes to make up 90% of the lyrics. This seriously gets under my skin.

I’m quite positive hip hop peaked in 1998. Mo Money Mo Problems will forever be one of my favorite songs. “Stay humble, stay low, blow like Hootie.” You just don’t get lyrics like that anymore.

I have a weird thing where I must have the side of the bed furthest from the bathroom in hotels. It’s not like this at home, just at hotels.

I also cannot stand walking on hotel tile with bare feet and will make a “trail” with bath towels to step on. The carpet doesn’t bother me though.

McDonald’s does serve one good purpose on this earth and that is vanilla soft serve cones at the 5 hour mark in the car.

Canadian border patrol officers are incredibly odd. Increeeeedibly.

I missed veggies. A LOT.

I did seriously enjoy the double mousse with caramel brittle and chocolate & hazelnut pot de crème for dessert, like seriously seriously, but I don’t think I’ve ever been so happy to see leftover veggies in the fridge as I was when I saw this bok choy salad at 9pm last night.

Even after 3 days, it was still crunchy and delicious.

The sesame soy sauce had plenty of time to marinate every single shred of vegetable and I ate every single one of them up in about 2 minutes flat.

How Do You Make Bok Choy Salad?

This salad is as simple as any other, you literally just throw all the ingredients together in a bowl and toss with the sesame soy dressing.

Wait! Can You Eat Bok Choy Raw?

Baby bok choy is perfect for this. You can eat regular bok choy raw too I just prefer the tenderness of the baby bok choy.

What Exactly Is Bok Choy?

Bok choy looks like lettuce on the top and celery on the bottom. Although, it doesn’t really resemble either in taste.

It can be slightly bitter raw (that’s why this salad is tossed in a delicious sesame soy sauce!) but not so much as say mustard greens.

It’s a little more cruciferous (because of this, it stands up great to grilling too like in this grilled baby bok choy recipe) and almost a bit like cabbage but more delicate.

It can pair nicely with savory (like in this soba noodle carbonara) or sweet (like in this pineapple cashew bok choy) ingredients and is an all around pretty versatile vegetable.

What Are The Health Benefits of Bok Choy?

Well for starters, it’s a vegetable and I’ve never met one of those that aren’t good for you!

Bok choy is high in vitamins C, A and K and also a good source of iron, calcium, magnesium and potassium. Some consider it a green leaf superfood.

Whether you saute it, grill it or make a bok choy salad, it’s a vegetable worth adding to your routine!

Love this recipe for baby bok choy salad?

This bok choy salad is crispy and crunchy with a tangy Asian inspired sesame soy dressing. Try it paired with a juicy grilled steak or chicken.

Ingredients

  • 4 baby bok choy, washed and thinly sliced
  • 1 carrot, thinly sliced or peeled
  • 2 stalks of celery, thinly sliced
  • 1 red pepper, thinly sliced
  • 21/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon agave (or honey)
  • salt & pepper
  • sesame seeds

Instructions

  1. Combine all vegetables in a large bowl.
  2. Whisk together dressing ingredients (olive oil through salt & pepper) and pour over vegetables.
  3. Toss well to fully dress the salad.
  4. Garnish with sesame seeds.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE?

Please leave a comment & rating below or share a photo on Instagram and tag @runningtothekitchen

20 minutes and 7 ingredients to a miso noodle soup perfect for a cold night, quick dinner or comfort for the nasty cold. Full of greens, protein and detoxifying properties to help give your health that extra boost!

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

This recipe was originally published on 1/18/2016

Simple soups are sometimes the best, especially when you can dress them up or down. This miso noodle soup is delicious quickly thrown together without the crispy tofu, or if you’re feeling that extra oomph of effort it can be brought up a notch. You can even add more veggies if you’re really feeling fun!

Soups are the best detox

There is nothing worse than a head cold, especially in the spring and summer. Hay fever is not my friend, but soups full of detoxifying ingredients filled with healthy nutrients are one of my besties.

My go to sick soup is always Asian in theme. I love the soothing flavor they have, and the goodness in what you fill them with is like no other. Miso is the perfect broth base, and the only other ingredients you need her to nail that flavor are Tamari/Soy Sauce and some Mirin. I call these my 3 wise men. They bring gifts of health wherever they go.

This soup is filled with great things that give back to your body:

  • Portobello mushrooms: low in calories but high in fiber and B vitamins, add extra protein
  • Bok choy: cruciferous veggie that is low in calories and has cancer fighting benefits, immune booster
  • Miso: provides probiotics and helps improve digestion

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Good for you and easy to make? No way!

This miso noodle soup is a breeze to throw together. If you ditch the crispy tofu, it literally comes together in under 20 minutes. This is what I call husband territory. Now marinating and baking a little tofu really isn’t rocket science, but it does add an extra step which can be looked at as grounds for confusion.

No crispy tofu option:

  1. Make sauce.
  2. Chop bok choy and mushrooms.
  3. Saute mushrooms with sauce.
  4. Add bok choy and water.
  5. Serve with noodles and optional soft tofu.

Crispy tofu option:

  1. Marinate tofu.
  2. Bake tofu.
  3. Make sauce.
  4. Chop bok choy and mushrooms.
  5. Saute mushrooms with sauce.
  6. Add bok choy and water.
  7. Serve with noodles and crispy tofu.

A staple in Asian cooking, this round-leafed vegetable may be less familiar to American cooks. Here’s what you need to know — including what its name means, how to wash it, and how to use it.

1. Bok Choy’s Name

Bok choy is sometimes referred to as white cabbage, not to be confused with Napa cabbage, which is also a type of Chinese cabbage. There are many kinds of bok choy that vary in color, taste, and size, including tah tsai and joi choi. You might also find bok choy spelled pak choi, bok choi, or pak choy.

2. Its Plant Family

Bok choy might look a lot like celery, but it’s a member of the cabbage family.

The Chinese have been cultivating the vegetable for more than 5,000 years.

4. Where It’s Grown

Although the veggie is still grown in China, bok choy is now also harvested in California and parts of Canada.

Bok choy, known for its mild flavor, is good for stir-fries, braising, and soups. You can also eat it raw.

6. How to Clean It

The leaves and the stalks can both be cooked, but they should be separated before washing to ensure that both parts are thoroughly cleansed.

7. Keeping Bok Choy

For optimal freshness, don’t wash bok choy until you’re ready to use it. Unused parts can stay fresh in the refrigerator for up to 6 days.

The veggie is packed with vitamins A and C. One cup of cooked bok choy provides more than 100% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of A, and close to two-thirds the RDA of C.

9. Growing Bok Choy

The veggie takes about 2 months from planting to harvest and thrives best in milder weather.

10. Bok Choy: The Soup Spoon

Bok choy is sometimes called a “soup spoon” because of the shape of its leaves.

Recipe

Sesame Asian Bok Choy Salad

Makes 4 servings

3 cups thinly sliced bok choy

1 cup chopped Napa cabbage

1 large red pepper, sliced

1/2 cup shredded carrots

1/2 cup chopped, seeded cucumber

1/2 cup snow peas, blanched

1/4 cup sliced green onions

1/4 cup chopped cilantro

1/4 cup unsalted peanuts

2 Tbsp low-sodium soy sauce

1 Tbsp brown sugar

1 Tbsp rice vinegar

2 Tbsp lime juice

1 garlic clove, minced

1 Tbsp fresh ginger, minced

2 tsp sesame oil

1 Tbsp olive oil

1. Place all salad ingredients in a large bowl, and toss to combine.

2. To prepare dressing, whisk together all salad dressing ingredients.

3. Drizzle dressing over salad, and toss gently to coat.

Per serving: 229 calories. 9 g protein. 22 g carbohydrate. 14 g fat (1 g saturated fat). 6 g fiber. 9 g sugar. 348 mg sodium. Calories from fat: 44%

Sources

Tufts University Sustainable Farming Project: “Specialty Crops: Baby Bok Choy.”

Producepedia: “Bok Choy.”

Fruits and Veggies More Matters: “Bok Choy.”

I love this easy bok choy recipe! See how to make sautéed bok choy with fresh lemon and garlic in under 10 minutes. Make this as a side dish or add your favorite protein for a full meal. Jump to the 10 Minute Lemon Garlic Sauteed Bok Choy Recipe or read on to see our tips for making it.

Watch How We Make It

What is Bok Choy

If you are wondering what bok choy is, let’s get that out of the way first. More recently, we have been noticing bok choy show up in our local grocery store.

It’s in the same family of veggies as broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower. It’s light, crisp, and crunchy on the bottom and has dark green leaves on top. It tastes mild and we absolutely love it — especially when we quickly stir-fry or saute it. The leaves wilt a little and the white bottoms stay light and crisp.

Our Favorite Way to Cook Bok Choy

This recipe was actually the result of a mistake — I was throwing together a quick lunch while using up as much of what was left in the fridge as I could. I threw bok choy into the skillet intending to toss and flip it often so that it cooked slightly, but didn’t brown. Instead, I became distracted and realized that I had left it in the skillet, without moving it for a couple of minutes. (Thanks, Instagram)

This left the underside of the bok choy browned and caramelized. The garlic in the pan was also toasted pretty dark. Thinking that I’d ruined it, we had a taste. After a generous squeeze of lemon and a tiny drizzle of olive oil, we realized it was one of our favorite veggie dishes we’ve made in a while. So that’s why we are sharing it with you.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

That mistake has quickly turned into one of our favorite ways to cook bok choy! Here are the easy steps:

How We Cook Bok Choy, Step-By-Step

Prep the bok choy. Remove any discolored outer stalks of the bok choy and discard them (or save for stock later). Place the bok choy into a colander and rinse with cool water, rubbing any grit or dirt from between the leaves. Trim the ends then slice each bok choy in half lengthwise. Or if they are large, cut into quarters. Pat dry.

Combine oil, garlic, and red pepper flakes in a cold skillet, and then place over medium heat. The cold skillet prevents over-browning the garlic.

Cook the bok choy in one layer in the skillet. Sprinkle with about 1/4 teaspoon of salt then cook, without stirring, until the bottom is starting to turn brown. Flip then cook until the green leaves have wilted and the white bottoms are beginning to soften, but still have some crunch.

Serve with lemon juice and a little olive oil drizzled on top.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

The whole dish comes together in under 10 minutes and it’s great as a bed for this baked salmon or served as a light side with roasted chicken. I’ve also spooned canned albacore tuna on top and drizzled everything with a little more olive oil and loved it.

Here’s another idea, try swapping fresh garlic for roasted garlic! Roasted garlic is one of the best things you can make in your oven. Here’s how we roast garlic as well as lots of ways to use it.

More Easy Vegetable Recipes

  • Here’s another way to cook bok choy: Add it to soups. We add regular green cabbage to our cabbage soup with ham, but bok choy would be excellent.
  • This creamy asparagus soup is guilt-free. It’s low in calories, tastes great, and cleverly reduces ingredient waste.
  • Quick and easy sauteed green beans with butter and fresh ginger.
  • Sauteed zucchini is a quick, easy, and healthy side. It’s delicious, too. Try our version with zucchini cooked in garlic and butter.
  • Try our spicy garlic ginger edamame recipe! It’s so quick to make and tastes amazing.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

10 Minute Lemon Garlic Sauteed Bok Choy

  • PREP 5mins
  • COOK 5mins
  • TOTAL 10mins

Boy choy is a nutritious vegetable and an excellent source of vitamin C and vitamin A. It tastes mild and when cooked correctly has a light crunch at the bottom with wilted greens on top. When making the recipe below, it’s important not to burn the garlic. I love this when the garlic is well toasted, but if the garlic turns very dark brown, it will taste bitter.

Another thing to note is that even when you have removed the bok choy from the pan, it continues to wilt and soften. So if you notice the garlic browning too much, it’s okay to transfer everything out of the pan a minute early.

You Will Need

1 pound baby bok choy

1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

3 garlic cloves, minced

Pinch crushed red pepper flakes

Half of a lemon, cut into wedges

Directions

Remove any discolored outer stalks of the bok choy and discard them (or save for stock later). Place the bok choy into a colander and rinse with cool water, rubbing any grit or dirt from between the leaves. Trim the ends then slice each bok choy in half lengthwise. Or if they are large, cut into quarters. Pat dry.

Add the oil, garlic and red pepper flakes to a wide room-temperature skillet. Place over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until the oil begins to bubble around the garlic, but before the garlic starts to turn light brown.

Toss in the boy choy and spread into one layer. Sprinkle with about 1/4 teaspoon of salt then cook, without stirring, until the bottom is starting to turn brown, about 2 minutes.

Flip then cook another 2 minutes or until the green leaves have wilted and the white bottoms are beginning to soften, but still have some crunch.

Transfer to a platter then squeeze 2 lemon wedges on top. A teaspoon or so of olive oil is nice, too. Serve with more lemon wedges on the side.

Adam and Joanne’s Tips

  • Add Your Favorite Protein: To turn this into a main dish, add cooked chicken, shrimp or tofu. Season the protein with salt and pepper then cook until almost cooked through. Add the garlic, pepper flakes and the bok choy then cook until the green tops have wilted and the bottoms are crisp-tender. Finish with the lemon and olive oil.
  • Nutrition Facts: The nutrition facts provided below are estimates. We have used the USDA database to calculate approximate values. We omitted salt from the calculations since you will need to add to your tastes.

If you make this recipe, snap a photo and hashtag it #inspiredtaste — We love to see your creations on Instagram and Facebook! Find us: @inspiredtaste

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

A super flavorful vegan dish that tastes almost as good as meat. No, it tastes even better!

Bok choy stir-fry with crispy tofu is one of my favorite vegan dishes. You only need a few spices – green onion, soy sauce and sugar, to create a flavorful sweet savory sauce. The cooking is quick, simple and straightforward. The dish has a great texture. The bok choy is cooked until slightly charred and meaty in texture. The rich fried tofu absorbs the sauce well and almost tastes meaty. It’s a great way to get a good amount of green in your weekday dinner.

If you’ve never tried deep fried tofu before, I highly recommend you give it a shot. In Chinese cooking, fried tofu is usually used as an alternative to meat, in order to turn a dish into a vegetarian one. It is a bit greasy by itself but works like magic with veggies, both in stir fried dishes and in stews. Functioning similarly to meat, the fried tofu adds richness to a light dish. Plus, because of its fluffy texture, it will absorb tons of flavor from the sauce it’s cooked in. That’s why it tastes even better than chicken in a noodle soup, such as laksa.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

The Art of Stir-Fry

In the video below, I asked for my mom’s help in cooking the dish while I shot the video. We have very different styles for cooking stir fried dishes. She grew up using a wok and feels most comfortable with it. For me, I really prefer to use a nonstick skillet (you can find the reason here).

Watching her cook is really enjoyable. I’m always amazed by the high heat she uses when cooking such a simple vegetable dish. She always turn the heat to the almost highest setting, so you can hear a vibrant sizzling all the way through the stir fry. You’ll get the idea when you watch the video or from the thick wok hei (or wok air) in the cooking process pictures below.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

In this case, the cooking is finished quickly, within 4 minutes. On the other hand, if you prefer to use a normal skillet, especially a nonstick one, you might want to lower the heat a bit and prolong the cooking time, because a nonstick skillet cannot handle high heat for too long. You will move more slowly too, since the skillet is shallower and you’ll need to stir carefully to keep all the ingredients in the skillet (otherwise you’ll need to clean the floor instead of the plate afterward).

Always judge carefully with your eyes and ears during cooking. If you see too much smoke above the skillet, or the food gets charred too quickly, you need to lower the heat. On the other hand, if the sizzling sound disappears, turn it back to high heat.

Stir-frying is an art and takes a bit time to master. But you’ll be hooked once you get the idea, because you can get a plate of super flavorful food in a very short time.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Bok choy is a popular vegetable used in Chinese cooking. A member of the cabbage family, bok choy is crisp in texture and light in flavor. Its white stalks and dark green leaves are packed with Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and calcium. Used in China for hundreds of years, bok choy can now be found in most U.S. supermarkets.

Head to your local grocery store or Asian supermarket. Look for bok choy with firm stalks and leaves. Avoid yellow and wilting leaves.

Cut and clean the vegetable. With a sharp knife, chop off the base of the bok choy. Rinse the stalks and leaves under running water.

Prepare your steamer. Fill the pot half way with water. Put the steaming rack in place.

Steam the bok choy. Once the water boils, place the cleaned bok choy leaves into your steamer. Cover and steam for 6 minutes or until the leaves are tender.

Serve the boy choy. Carefully remove the bok choy from the steamer. Sprinkle with salt or soy sauce.

Bok choy can also be boiled, sauteed or eaten raw. Bok choy pairs well with flavors like soy sauce, toasted sesame oil and hot peppers. Baby bok choy is smaller and more tender than regular bok choy. Bok choy is also called pak choi, pak choy and bok choi.

Warning

Wash your bok choy thoroughly before cooking.

with Bok Choy & Crispy Onions

MAIN INGREDIENTS

  1. 1 oz fresh ginger
  2. 2 garlic cloves
  3. 6 oz baby bok choy
  4. 1 lime
  5. 1 shallot
  6. 1 Thai chile
  7. 2 tsp turbinado sugar
  8. 2 tbsp red curry paste
  9. 2 tsp tamari
  10. 5.5 oz coconut milk
  11. 7 oz dried rice noodles
  12. 8 oz tempeh
  13. 2 tbsp crispy onions
  14. 3 tbsp vegetable oil*
  15. Salt and pepper*
  16. *Not included
  17. For full ingredient list, see Nutrition

TOOLS

  • Large nonstick skillet
  • Medium saucepan
  • Large pot

INSTRUCTIONS

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil for the rice noodles. Peel and mince the ginger and garlic. Trim and thinly slice the baby bok choy. Peel and thinly slice the shallot. Halve and juice the lime. Thinly slice the Thai chile.

Add the sliced shallot, just half the lime juice, just 1 tsp turbinado sugar, and a pinch of salt to a small bowl and toss to combine.

Heat 1 tbsp vegetable oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the minced ginger, minced garlic, and red curry paste. Cook until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the tamari, coconut milk, 1½ cup water, ½ tsp salt, and ½ tsp pepper. Bring to a simmer, add the sliced baby bok choy, and reduce heat to low.

Add rice noodles to the large pot of boiling water, stir, and remove from heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until noodles are tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water to stop the cooking process.

Heat 2 tbsp vegetable oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Crumble the tempeh into the skillet. Add a pinch of salt and pepper and cook, tossing occasionally, until the tempeh is browned and crispy, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the remaining turbinado sugar, toss to coat, and cook another 2 to 3 minutes.

Add the remaining lime juice to the broth. Taste, and add salt as necessary. Ladle the broth between shallow bowls. Top with cooked rice noodles, crispy tempeh, pickled shallot, sliced Thai chile, and crispy onions. Bon appétit!

Last Updated on March 30, 2019 By Vicky 5 Comments

Sauteed Baby Bok Choy with Sesame Oil – It’s a great addition to soup, stir fry, or just sauteed on its own. It will be your new favorite side dish!

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Get My Weekly Meal Plan Plus My FREE GF/DF Avocado Recipes Ebook.

Baby bok choy is my new favorite vegetable. I can’t believe I only tried it for the first time a couple months ago. I’ve really been missing out these last 23 years.

Aside from the fact that it’s just absolutely adorable to look at it also tastes delicious. Unlike regular bok choy, baby bok choy really does stand out in taste. It is a bit more delicate and gentle and cooks up more quickly.

It’s a great addition to soup, stir fry, or just sauteed on its own — just make sure not to over cook it – otherwise the leaves will get all wilted and sad. You definitely do not want that! I love adding it to my Asian noodle soup, and it’s perfect in my bok choy mushroom stir fry. It’s just super versatile and can even stand alone on its own to be the start of a dish like is here in this bok choy with sesame oil stir fry recipe!

I didn’t measure out any of the ingredients for this boy choy with sesame oil recipe – just a splash of this and that and it’s all you need for a light simple side dish (the perfect accompaniment to the steamed branzini). Some recipes really require no measuring at all – you just need to eye things on this one, a splash on this and that is all you need.

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

Exclusive Bonus: Download 25 of my all time favorite vegan and gluten free recipes.

Let me know what you think of this bok choy with sesame oil stir fry recipe in the comments below! If you have other recipe ideas for how to use bok choy please feel free to share in the comments too. Now that bok choy is one of my favorite veggies I want to make use of it as much as possible! So far I’ve only added it to Asian style recipes, but who knows maybe it would work elsewhere too?! Sky’s the limit!

Flour Bakery + Cafe, Boston and Cambridge, MA

Search Recipes

“When Karen became our chef, one of our first meetings was to go through the menu item by item so she could learn the story behind each dish. This dish, I told her, was one of our top sellers and had been on our menu since opening day, and we would never ever take it off the menu. About four years into her tenure with us, she surprised us at one of our weekly tastings with a fabulous chicken-udon-vegetable dish called Hong Kong noodles that we inhaled. We all looked at one another and whispered, “Maybe we could take the udon off and put this one on. ” Open the floodgates! The new dish was on our menu for all of about three weeks before we yanked it and reinstated this original udon dish. As scrumptious as the new udon was, our guests clamored for the standby. And for good reason. It’s a classic dish that hits all the right notes: juicy tender chicken, crisp greens, bouncy udon noodles, and a spicy rich sauce to bind it all together. Pro tip: Keep your wok very hot while making the stir-fry or everything will steam instead of char. If you don’t have a wok, use a large, heavy skillet. Cast iron is the closest way to get a high-heat char on this dish.” —Joanne Chang

Ingredients

Udon Sauce:

  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1/3 cup oyster sauce
  • 1/4 cup hoisin sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Shaoxing cooking wine (or substitute dry sherry or dry white wine)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sambal oelek
  • 2 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon fish sauce

Noodles:

  • One 16-ounce package fresh udon noodles
  • 2 cups plus 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, such as canola, divided
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon Shaoxing cooking wine (or substitute dry sherry or dry white wine)
  • 1 large egg white
  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts, thinly sliced into 2 x 1/4-inch strips
  • 8 heads baby bok choy, root ends trimmed and leaves separated (about 1 pound)
  • 1/2 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Method

Make the udon sauce: in a small bowl, whisk together the cornstarch and 2 tablespoons cold water until smooth to make a slurry. In a medium saucepan, combine the oyster sauce, hoisin sauce, Shaoxing wine, sambal oelek, soy sauce, sesame oil, sugar, and fish sauce. Whisk together and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Add the cornstarch slurry and whisk continuously for 20 seconds, or until the sauce thickens. Remove from the heat. The udon sauce can be made up to a week in advance and stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Bring to room temperature before using. (It will be thick and gelatinous.)

In a large pot, bring about a gallon of water to a rolling boil. Add the udon noodles and cook for 6 minutes. Drain into a large bowl, rinse with cold water, and toss with 1 tablespoon vegetable oil to keep the noodles from sticking together. Set aside.

In a medium bowl, stir together the cornstarch, Shaoxing wine, and egg white. Add the chicken strips to the bowl and use your hands to coat the chicken thoroughly in the mixture. Marinate the chicken in an airtight container in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes or up to 1 day.

Now we are going to velvet the chicken. Place a few paper towels on a large plate and set aside. Heat the remaining 2 cups vegetable oil in a wok or deep skillet until the oil reaches 250°F. (Test the heat by placing a piece of chicken in the wok; it should float immediately.) Working in two or three batches, carefully add the chicken to the hot oil and cook until the strips just turn white, about 30 seconds, using a wooden spoon or chopsticks to gently separate them. (We are going to cook the chicken again, so do not worry if it does not seem cooked all the way through.) Quickly remove the chicken strips from the wok as soon as they turn white and drain on the paper towel–lined plate. Carefully pour out the oil into a heat-safe container and set aside.

Wipe out the hot wok with a paper towel and heat over high heat for 30 seconds. Measure out 2 tablespoons of the velveting oil and add it to the wok. Add the bok choy leaves and onions and stir continuously with a spatula or wooden spoon for about 3 minutes. Remove the vegetables from the wok and place on the same plate as the chicken.

Wipe out the wok again and heat over high heat for 30 seconds. Measure out another 2 tablespoons of the velveting oil and add to the wok. When the wok starts to smoke, add the reserved udon noodles. Don’t stir them immediately; let them cook in the hot oil for at least 2 to 3 minutes to give them a nice char.

When the noodles start to pick up some color, stir with a wooden spoon and then add the chicken and vegetables. Stir to combine everything and finish cooking the chicken, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the udon sauce and the red pepper flakes and stir to distribute the sauce and coat the noodles thoroughly and evenly. Divide among four plates and serve immediately.

From MYERS + CHANG AT HOME © 2017 by Joanne Chang with Karen Akunowicz. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

How to Cut Bok Choy

A bright green member of the cabbage family, bok choy is a crunchy, fresh and mild-tasting addition to a meal. Packed with nutritious vitamins, great texture and subtle flavor, bok choy is found in many Asian recipes, but this versatile vegetable can be used in salads, soups, stir-fries and more. Both the leaves and the stalks can be eaten.

Edit Steps

Edit Choosing and Washing Your Bok Choy

  1. Choose bok choy with bright green leaves and crisp stalks. Look for heads with bright green leaves — not yellow or brown — and crisp white stalks without holes or discoloration. Avoid any bok choy bunches that look rubbery or dried out towards the stem. Crunchy is good! [1]

How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

  • Bok choy, also known as pak choi, can be found in a number of varieties that offer different flavors, sizes and colors. [2]
  • Varieties with larger leaves tend to work well for salads and soups, while the smaller, narrower heads work well for stir-fries. [3]
  • Buy baby bok choy for a milder flavor. Baby bok choy is a smaller variety of bok choy that is just harvested earlier than mature bok choy. The stems are usually thicker and the leaves are smaller. The flavor is usually pretty similar to regular bok choy, but if often milder and more tender. [4]

    How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

    • Baby bok choy is also appealing because you can cook the vegetable whole without needing to break the leaves apart. [5]
  • Store your bok choy in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 5 days. Place your bok choy in a grocery store plastic produce bag. With the bok choy in the bag, run your hand along the stalk to push the air out of the bag. Twist the end of the bag so it stays shut and store it in your produce drawer in your refrigerator for up to 5 days. [6]

    Trim and discard the thick base of the bok choy stem. Use a sharp knife to slice off the bottom with a sharp knife just above where the base of the leaves connect. Pull off and discard any outside leaves that are discolored or particularly tough. You will be left with several long individual bok choy stalks.

    Wash the individual bok choy stalks in a bowl of cold water. Separate the leaves and swish them around in large bowl full of cold water. Gently rub the leaves together to remove any dirt. Drain the water from the bok choy using a colander.

    • Alternatively, you can rinse each individual stalk under cold running water in your sink. [7]
    • Dirt tends to collect towards the base of each stalk, so pay special attention to that part. [8]
  • Edit Slicing the Bok Choy

    1. Bunch the stalks together and slice off the white stems. Once all the stalks have been washed, lie them flat on your cutting board. Then, group them together in a bunch and use your knife to separate the thick, white stems from the green leaves.

    • Keeping the stems and leaves separate is helpful because the stems and the leaves tend to cook at different rates, with the stems cooking slower than the leaves. [9]
  • Hold the bok choy in a stable position using a claw-like grip. Grip the bok choy with your fingertips and curl them inwards, pressing only the knuckles of your middle and ring fingers against the knife blade. This grip will protect your fingers. [10]

    How to Make Crispy Seaweed Bok Choy

    Hold your knife at a 45 degree angle over the bok choy stems. Don’t chop the stems by bringing the knife straight down — hold it at a 45 degree angle for a slanted cut across the stem. Slicing at an angle like this works to increase the surface area of each piece, allowing the bok choy to cook faster.

    Slice the bok choy into sections. Cut the stems into sections beginning at the base and slicing all the way up to the top. Gradually move the hand that holds the bok choy away from the knife as you slice further along the stalk. Then, repeat this process for the leaves.

    • Make your cuts thinner if you’re looking to make a stir fry.
  • Edit Cutting the Bok Choy Into Rectangles

    1. Cut an individual stalk in half down the middle. Make a long cut down the middle of an individual white stalk to separate it into 2 halves. Lay these halves next to each other flat on your cutting board. [11]

    • If you want thinner rectangle slices, cut your bok choy stalk into thirds.
    • Rectangle cuts can be great if you’re looking to saute bok choy stems with other vegetables or meats.
  • Separate the green leaves from the white stem. Slice off the leafy part of the bok choy, leaving mostly thick, white stem. It’s fine if you leave some of the smaller leaf sections where the leaves connect to the stem, but try to remove as much of the leaves as you can.

    Cut the stem into long rectangular pieces. Make horizontal cuts to divide the stem up into bits that are roughly the shape of rectangles. These pieces should be pretty thick. [12]

    Edit Dicing the Bok Choy

    1. Cut the leaves off of the bok choy. Take an individual stalk of bok choy and cut off the top leafy part. You should be left with the remaining white stem. [13]

    • Diced bok choy is a wonderful addition to soups and salads!
  • Slice the stem vertically into 3 long strips. Use a larger knife to make these longer cuts in 1 smooth motion each. Try to make all the strips about the same width. [14]

    Cut the strips horizontally into small long diced pieces. Bunch the strips together with your non-dominant hand, and carefully dice them into small pieces starting at the end of the stem. long is good, but make the pieces smaller if you want. [15]

    Edit Tips

    • Slice the bok choy into smaller sections for stir fries to speed up the cooking time and avoid overcooking.

    Edit Warnings

    • Make slow, deliberate slices until you get more comfortable slicing at a faster pace.
    • Use a well-sharpened chef’s knife to cut the bok choy as dull knives are more likely to slip and cause injury.

    Edit Things You’ll Need

    • Cutting Board
    • Sharp Knife
    • Colander or Strainer
    • Large Kitchen Bowl

    Edit Related wikiHows

    Edit Sources and Citations

    Edit Quick Summary

    Cite error: tags exist, but no tag was found

    A super easy oven roasted bok choy recipe, made even better with roasted garlic! It makes a naturally low carb, gluten-free, keto, paleo and healthy side dish.

    FREE PRINTABLE: LOW CARB & KETO FOOD LIST!

    Join 120,000 others to get a FREE keto food list, plus weekly keto recipes!

    This post may contain affiliate links, which help keep this content free. (Full disclosure)

    After a pumpkin cheesecake recipe earlier this week, I have to admit that a bok choy recipe – even a super easy garlic bok choy recipe – is a little anticlimactic. And if you haven’t tried bok choy before, it might sound intimidating or not very good. But, hear me out!

    As much as we all love our keto dessert recipes and comfort foods like low carb pizza and cheeseburger casserole, sometimes you just need a super simple meal or side dish. Very few people have the luxury of cooking a complicated, multi-step meal more than occasionally – let alone all the time!

    So, when you just want an easy, delicious side dish on the table, a basic roasted bok choy recipe fits the bill.

    The thing is, bok choy is not the most common vegetable. Don’t be put off by that. It can be delicious! And, it’s naturally low carb, gluten-free, keto, paleo, and even vegan if that’s your thing.

    How To Roast Bok Choy

    Specifically, the best way to eat bok choy is to roast it. Because let’s face it. Almost every vegetable – from broccoli to cauliflower to cabbage – is better roasted.

    You may not traditionally think of leafy greens as something to roast. But when you have tougher greens like bok choy, roasting them actually softens them and creates a delicious flavor. Especially when you pair it with garlic!

    The process is super simple. Cut up the bok choy, top with avocado oil, salt, pepper and minced garlic, and then roast in the oven. Flip it halfway through.

    Doesn’t get much easier than that!

    How To Choose Bok Choy

    Try to choose bok choy that is very leafy. The leaves should be bright and crisp, not wilted or browned.

    Fewer leaves means that it will burn more easily before the firmer part is cooked. Otherwise, if your bok choy isn’t very leafy, cut into fewer pieces to encourage more even cooking.

    You can make either regular roasted bok choy or roasted baby bok choy with this recipe. The time will be approximately the same, but if you use very small baby bok choy, you may need to reduce the roasting time.

    How To Cut Bok Choy For Roasting

    There is some variation in how roasted bok choy recipes recommend cutting the bok choy. Based on my testing, fewer pieces is better. Not only does it save time, it also creates more browning and even cooking.

    To cut bok choy for roasting, simply cut it lengthwise in half, then repeat the process, cutting each piece lengthwise in half again. The end result should be quarters or eighths, depending on the size of your bok choy and the amount of leaves. The larger or more leafy it is, the narrower your pieces should be.

    Here is the bok choy in the pan, ready to go in the oven, with a good balance of leaves and stems:

    What To Serve With Roasted Bok Choy

    You can serve just about any protein with roasted bok choy! Chicken, beef, fish – you name it.

    A few of my recent favorites include:

    Make Ahead Oven Roasted Bok Choy

    Unlike many recipes with leafy greens, you can prepare oven roasted bok choy ahead of time. It’s still best to roast it fresh, but you can prepare the pan with oil, salt, pepper and garlic ahead of time. Simply cover and place in the fridge, then roast right before serving.

    If you must, you can store extra roasted bok choy in the fridge and reheat. It will wilt a bit more, but is still fine since roasting already wilts it to begin with. That makes it great for lunch meal prep!

    Easy Garlic Roasted Bok Choy Recipe:
    Pin it to save for later!

    Follow Wholesome Yum on Pinterest

    Reader Fave Keto Recipes

    The recipe card is below! Readers also made these similar recipes after making this one.