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How to make perfect perspective shifts in photoshop for images and logos

Michael Crider is a veteran technology journalist with a decade of experience. He spent five years writing for Android Police and his work has appeared on Digital Trends and Lifehacker. He’s covered industry events like the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) and Mobile World Congress in person. Read more.

It’s easy enough to superimpose a logo onto something in Photoshop. But what if your base photo isn’t head-on, so a square logo (or any other image) will look skewed? Here’s how to get your top image aligned with the correct perspective.

Using The Transform Tool For Perfect Matches

Let’s use a gadget screen image as a base: a common need for marketers (or web writers like me). Our source image here is a Nintendo Switch with a regular 16:9 screen, but we need to put on a screenshot of something else—let’s say an image from Zelda instead of Mario. Here are the pictures I’ll be using, so you can grab them and practice on your own:

Highlight the screenshot image in the Layers tool, then activate the Transformation tool with the Ctrl+T shortcut on Windows or Command+T on macOS.

If you’ve used Photoshop for any amount of time, you’re probably comfortable with the Free Transform tool already: you should know how to move the image around, shrink or expand it, or rotate it. But you can also skew it considerably, enough to let you alter it to alter the perspective and match it to the image below. This is a pretty straightforward example: we’re going to match this rectangular screenshot of Zelda to the rectangular screen on the Switch, a simple corner-to-corner move.

Hold down the Ctrl button on Windows or the Command button on Mac, then click one of the white squares at the corner of the screenshot that are part of the Transform tool. Holding down Ctrl and the left mouse button, drag one of the corners of the top screenshot image to the matching corner on the Switch’s screen on the image beneath. Zoom into the pixel view if you need to match it perfectly.

You’ll notice that instead of the normal resize action, the Ctrl or Command modifier lets you grab one corner of the image and move it while the other four corners remain in place.

Repeat this step for the next four corners, moving the screenshot image over the screen of the Switch beneath. Don’t apply the transformation until you’re finished, or you won’t be able to grab all four corners again—they’ll be filled in with transparency. You can make the top layer extend past the bottom one by a pixel or two just to make sure that it completely covers the screen beneath. Press Enter to close the Transform tool.

Because both the phone’s screen and the screenshot image have the same aspect ratio, this little cover-up fits perfectly and needs no further editing. Let’s move on to something a little trickier.

Using The Transform Tool On Oddly-Sized Images

Say you’ve got this image of a Mac laptop and you don’t want to use an Apple logo in an advertisement. You’d rather show off your company logo. I’ll use a circular Review Geek logo as an example—both source images are below.

So you want to cover up the Apple logo just like the phone screen before, but now the plane of the source image (the laptop lid) doesn’t match the layer you want to add (the circular logo), and you still need to keep the perspective right. In this case, we’re going to use something else in the photo as a guide: the roughly rectangular lid of the laptop. We’ll match the logo’s perspective to the laptop lid, then scale it down to the size we need while keeping the perspective locked.

To begin, press Ctrl+T or Command+T with the top layer selected to open the transformation tool again. Now press Ctrl+Click or Command+Click, select the guide squares at the corners of the logo layer, and match them up with the corners of the laptop lid. The corners are rounded, but you can use the edges of the lid and the transform guide to line up.

Because the lid of the laptop isn’t square, your circle is a little too wide. You can adjust it back down to a square-sized transformation. You can eyeball this if it doesn’t need to be perfect, or rotate the layer beneath and use Photoshop’s Ruler guides if you need more precision. Press Enter to apply the transformation when you’re ready.

Now you have a square image over the laptop screen, and it’s in the right perspective to match the Apple logo beneath. You need to size it down, so it doesn’t look out of place. With the Transform tool active, hold Alt+Shift on Windows or Option+Shift on a Mac, then click one of the corners and drag it inwards to scale the logo image down, so it’s not much bigger than the Apple logo.

Here’s the final result:

If your bottom image is fairly regular, with a perspective skew that’s predictable on one side, you can hold Ctrl+Alt+Shift on Windows or Command+Option+Shift on Mac to use the Transform tool in Skew mode. It’s pretty rare that your image will line up perfectly for this, though.

Using Free Transform On Irregular Surfaces

Okay, so now you can match a perspective and resize as needed. But what if you’re trying to get something on a surface that isn’t flat? Let’s try one more example: putting the Review Geek logo on a ball. Once again, use the images below in your copy of Photoshop for practice.

Using the tools you learned in the previous sections, it’s easy to get the logo image onto the top of the ball and even adjust its perspective to match the orientation of the ball itself. But the logo file looks odd because it’s flat and the surface of the ball is not.

To fix this, press Ctrl+T or Command+T to activate the Transform tool and look at the top of the Photoshop window. You’re looking for the curved rectangular button that activates Warp Mode. Click it.

With the Transform Tool in Warp Mode, you can move the image around at any point on the inside or outside, not just the corners. This lets you click and drag different parts of the image into irregular positions. You’ll see the nine guidelines move along with the image, helping you to see how you’ve changed things.

The Warp Tool takes some practice to use effectively. You might need to undo and redo your work several times. But within a few minutes, you should be able to match the curve of the ball pretty well. Press Enter to apply the transformation.

For surfaces that are a little more predictable, but still too irregular for the regular Transform tool, you can use the pre-set Warp tools on the right side of the upper menu.

You can combine the techniques above with any other tools in Photoshop, like color corrections, curves, filters, blurs, et cetera, to get your top layer to match your bottom layer. Play around with these tools, and you’ll soon be matching up logos and screenshots with ease.

Unlike Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop doesn’t have a dedicated perspective grid tool. So if you want to create a perspective grid in Photoshop, you need to use a special brush or set up the Shape tool in a very specific way.

In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to create a perspective grid in Photoshop that you can turn into a brush or a custom shape for future use!

If you’re interested in perspective grids, you’re probably interested in Photoshop drawing brushes as well. You can find them on Envato Elements—one subscription gives you access to millions of creative assets, including this huge set of brushes designed for technical drawing.

What You’ll Learn in This Photoshop Perspective Grid Tutorial

  • How to draw a perspective grid in Photoshop
  • How to create a perspective grid Photoshop brush
  • How to create a vector perspective grid
  • How to draw a 1-point perspective grid in Photoshop
  • How to draw a 2-point perspective grid in Photoshop
  • How to make a vanishing point in Photoshop

1. How to Create a Perspective Grid in Photoshop

Step 1

Open Photoshop and create a New File. Use the 5000 x 5000 px for the dimensions, and keep the background white.

Step 2

Open the Shape Tool menu in the toolbar, and select the Polygon Tool.

Step 3

Set the Mode to Shape, Fill and Stroke to black, and make the Stroke 1 px thick.

Step 4

Now click anywhere in the canvas—a new window should appear. Adjust the settings the following way:

  • Set Width and Height to 5000 px
  • Set Number of Sides to 100
  • Set Star Ratio to 1%
  • Check From Center

Step 5

A nice 1-point perspective grid in Photoshop should appear! Select both layers now with the Shift key, take the Move Tool (V) and Align Horizontal and Vertical Center to properly position the grid.

2. How to Create a Perspective Grid Photoshop Brush

Step 1

You could create the grid this way every time you need it, but it’s easier to turn it into a perspective grid Photoshop brush, or simply a custom shape. To turn it into a brush, simply go to Edit > Define Brush Preset and give it a name.

Step 2

Then you can create your perspective grid just by clicking on the canvas. However, this grid can’t be resized on the fly to a size bigger than 5000 px. You can resize it after drawing it, but it’s raster, so it will come with a loss of quality.

Step 3

The second method is to turn the grid into a custom shape. To do this, select the layer with the grid and choose the Polygon Tool (U). Then go to Edit > Define Custom Shape and give it a name.

Step 4

Your perspective grid is now available on the Custom Shape tool’s list of shapes.

Step 5

In the Path Options, check From Center—it will make it easier to place the vanishing point where you want it to be. Check Defined Proportions as well, to keep the grid symmetrical.

Step 6

Now you can just draw the grid by clicking and dragging. This perspective grid is vector and can be resized without any loss of quality.

3. Drawing Perspective in Photoshop

Step 1

Once you have your grid tools, all you need to do is decide the location of the horizon and the vanishing points. You can draw the horizon using the Line Tool (U) from the Shape Tool menu. Use the same settings as before, and set the Weight to 1 px.

You can also use a Guide for the horizon

Step 2

To create a 1-point perspective grid in Photoshop, place your vanishing point right in the center. You don’t have to be precise—after drawing the grid, you can take the Move Tool (V) and use the arrow keys to nudge the grid into the right place.

Use the Shift key to draw straight lines

Step 3

To create a 2-point perspective grid, place two vanishing points on your horizon. It’s good to keep them far away from each other.

Good Job!

Now you know how to create a perspective grid in Photoshop, both in the 1-point and 2-point versions!

Top Recommended Photoshop Brushes From Envato Elements

Are you looking for Photoshop brush sets designed to look like traditional tools? Give these a try!

Pencil Brushes (ABR)

A pencil is the simplest drawing tool, but its textured strokes are a perfect base for any type of artwork—from technical sketches to detailed portraits. This set is simply a must-have for any digital artist!

Pen Brushes (ABR)

If you’re interested in technical drawing, a digital brush imitating the strokes of a ball-point pen can make your sketches clean, while also keeping that natural effect of traditional drawing. This set contains 60 of them!

Marker Brushes (ABR)

Sometimes you may need thicker strokes for your artwork, and although it’s possible to make pencil or pen strokes bigger, it makes the natural effect go away. If you need thicker strokes, use a thicker tool—and this set gives you exactly this!

Dry Marker Brushes (ABR)

If want to make your strokes look extra convincing, you can add a “drying ink” effect to them with this set. It contains 70 marker brushes with realistic textures.

Stipple Brush Set for Photoshop and Illustrator (ABR, AI, EPS)

If you need something for shading, you can use any brush—but nothing will give you a unique style like a set of stipple brushes. This set contains 62 brushes—32 for Photoshop and 30 for Illustrator.

Discover More Photoshop Tutorials and Resources

If you want to learn more about drawing in perspective, try these tutorials:

How to Make Perfect Perspective Shifts in Photoshop for Images and Logos

It’s pretty easy to overlay a logo on top of something in Photoshop. But what if your base photo isn’t facing you, so a square logo (or any other image) will look skewed? Here’s how to align your top image with the correct perspective.

Using the Transform Tool for Perfect Matches

Let’s use a gadget screen image as a base – a common need for marketers (or web writers like me). Our source image here is a Nintendo Switch with a normal 16:9 screen, but we need to put in a screenshot of something else, say an image of Zelda instead of Mario. Here are the images I’ll be using, so you can grab them and practice on your own:

Highlight the screenshot image in the Layers tool, then activate the Transform tool with the shortcut Ctrl + T on Windows or Command + T on macOS.

If you’ve used Photoshop for a while, you’re probably already comfortable with the Free Transform tool: you should know how to move the image, shrink it, expand it, or rotate it. But you can also skew it considerably, enough to allow you to modify it to alter the perspective and make it match the image below. Here’s a pretty simple example: we’re going to match this rectangular Zelda screenshot to the rectangular screen on the Switch, a simple corner-to-corner flick.

Hold down the Ctrl button on Windows or the Command button on Mac, then click one of the white squares in the corner of the screenshot that are part of the Transform tool. Holding down the Ctrl key and the left mouse button, drag one of the corners of the screenshot image above to the corresponding corner on the Switch screen in the image below. Zoom in on the pixel view if you need to blend it perfectly.

You’ll notice that instead of the normal resize action, the Ctrl or Command modifier allows you to grab one corner of the image and move it while the other four corners stay in place.

Repeat this step for the next four corners, moving the screenshot image over the switch screen below. Don’t apply the transformation until you’re done, or you won’t be able to grab all four corners again; will be filled with transparency. You can make the top layer extend beyond the bottom one by a pixel or two just to make sure it completely covers the screen below. Press Enter to close the Transform tool.

Because both the phone screen and the screenshot image have the same aspect ratio, this little cover-up fits perfectly and needs no further editing. Let’s move on to something a little more complicated.

Using the Transform tool on oddly sized images

Let’s say you have this image of a Mac laptop and you don’t want to use an Apple logo in an ad. Do you prefer to wear your company logo? I’ll use a circular as an example, both source images are below.

So you want to cover the Apple logo like before on the phone screen, but now the source image plane (the laptop lid) doesn’t match the layer you want to add (the circle logo), and you still need to do it keep the right perspective. In this case, we’ll use something else in the photo as a guide: the roughly rectangular lid of the laptop. We’ll match the logo’s perspective to the lid of the laptop, then scale it down to the size we need while keeping perspective locked.

To get started, press Ctrl + T or Command + T with the top layer selected to bring up the transform tool again. Now Ctrl + Click or Command + Click, select the guide squares at the corners of the logo layer and merge them with the corners of the laptop lid. The corners are rounded, but you can use the cap edges and the transform guide to line up.

Because the laptop lid is not square, its circle is too wide. You can resize it to a square size transform. You can look at this if you don’t need to be perfect, or rotate the layer below and use Photoshop’s ruler guides if you need more precision. Press Enter to apply the transformation when you’re ready.

You now have a square image above the laptop screen and it is in the correct perspective to match the Apple logo below it. You need to scale it down so it doesn’t look out of place. With the Transform tool active, hold Alt + Shift on Windows or Option + Shift on a Mac, then click on one of the corners and drag it inwards to scale the logo image down so it’s not much bigger than the Apple logo.

Here is the end result:

If your bottom image is fairly regular, with a predictable perspective skew on one side, you can hold down Ctrl + Alt + Shift on Windows or Command + Option + Shift on Mac to use the Transform tool in Skew mode. However, it’s quite rare for your image to line up perfectly for this.

Using Free Transform on Irregular Surfaces

Ok, now you can match a perspective and resize it as needed. But what if you try to place something on a surface that is not flat? Let’s try one more example: putting the Review Geek logo on a ball. Once again, use the images below in your copy of Photoshop to practice.

Using the tools you learned in the previous sections, it’s easy to place your logo image on top of the ball and even adjust its perspective to match the orientation of the ball. But the logo file looks weird because it is flat and the surface of the ball is not.

To fix this, press Ctrl + T or Command + T to activate the Transform tool and look at the top of the Photoshop window. You are looking for the curved rectangular button that activates Warp mode. Click it.

With the Transform tool in Warp mode, you can move the image anywhere inside or outside, not just the corners. This allows you to click and drag different parts of the image to irregular positions. You’ll see all nine patterns move along with the image, helping you see how things have changed.

The Warp tool requires some practice to use effectively. You may need to undo and redo your work several times. But in a few minutes, you should be able to match the curve of the ball pretty well. Press Enter to apply the transformation.

For surfaces that are a little more predictable, but still too jagged for the normal Reshape tool, you can use the preset Warp tools on the right side of the top menu.

You can combine the above techniques with any other tools in Photoshop, such as color corrections, curves, filters, blurs, and so on, to make your top layer match the bottom layer. Play around with these tools and soon you’ll be able to match logos and screenshots with ease.

It happens to the best of us: we take a quick pic, hoping to blog it or print it. And despite good intentions, it never comes out straight! Here’s a quick fix in any version of Photoshop to straighten and correct perspective of those frustrating photographs.

*Edit: Added a second method that might be less frustrating for many users. Check out both methods to see which one suits you better.

The Manual Method

I started with this pic of a Doctor Who novel I needed a straight image of. My picture is both crooked and receding in perspective, so I have my work cut out for me.

Press until you have the Polygonal Lasso tool. It looks like the selected tool above.

Draw points around your image by clicking the corners.

Press to copy your selection to a new layer.

Turn your Background layer off by clicking the .

At this point, I want to give myself a little more room to work with.

Press to bring up “Canvas Size.”

I add an arbitrary amount of extra space around each side.

Draw a horizontal rule by clicking on the and dragging into your image area.

Draw rules around your image. You want to create a rectangle that will become the new size and shape of your image. Err on the side of cutting into your image.

Go to Edit > Transform > Distort while your layer is selected.

Grab the points and stretch and warp your image until it more or less accurately fills the rules you drew. Notice I am not moving the points to fill the rules, but the image.

Without releasing your Distort Transformation, click the to draw more Horizonal Guides. Use them to check the straightness of lines in your image and adjust appropriately.

Press to release your Transformation.

Press for the crop tool. Click and drag to create a square edged rectangle around your image. Don’t worry about cutting off some of the image.

Press to finalize your crop. Your image is now straightened, in perspective, with clean edges around the sides.

A Second (Easier) Method

This is a method I would recommend not only for Photoshop Newbies, but for anyone that isn’t a crazy perfectionist that loves to do things manually.

Begin with your skewed image. Press for the crop tool.

Draw a rough outline around your skewed image.

You should see a “Perspective” button in your Control Palette at the top of your screen. Turn it on if it is not. (If you don’t see it, you likely have a version of Photoshop that doesn’t support this)

Drag the corners of your crop to the skewed corners of your image. Your lines shouldn’t be squared off anymore.

Press to release your crop.

As you can see, this method is pretty much just as good, and faster. If you don’t want to worry about tweaking your image by hand, this is really the way to go.

Photography by the author. Doctor Who image assumed fair use.

The actual title for the latest video tutorial by Phlearn is “How to create a Packaging Design Mockup in Photoshop”, but it’s so much more than that. There is no doubt that the ability to create product packaging mockups is valuable. Maybe we’re doing it for ourselves, or maybe it’s for a client. But it’s something many photographers and designers have done at some point or another.

But, the techniques shown in the video go far beyond simply adding logos to a brown box. It can be used to replace signs in streets, for example, or to switch out logos on the side of a vehicle. Perhaps you’re presenting room interior makeover mockups to a client. You can use this technique to hang art on the walls. Or. you can even use it to patch holes in surfaces like potholes in roads.

The basic principle is quite simple. You make a new file and create your design as it would appear if you were looking at it head on, then copy it to the clipboard. Then load up the image of the surface you wish to apply it to. In this case, a cardboard box. With the image of the box, you use the Vanishing Point filter to draw out the shape of the surface you wish to cover.

You’ll want to make sure you get your corners perfectly positioned, so that Photoshop can create an accurate perspective. Fortunately, it has a handy grid you can use to check your that lines are running where they’re supposed to.

With the vanishing point filter still open, you paste your design into the image, and then simply drag it around to where it needs to be. Once your mouse moves the image over the boxes you drew out it will automatically snap to align to the “surface”. You’ll also notice that it also distorts to follow the perspective of the box.

Then you just need to scale and adjust it to fit. To cover another surface, you simply extend your existing plane around the corner, then paste in another copy of your design. You can see here, that the design will even wrap around two sides simultaneously.

Wrapping around two sides simultaneously might seem a little strange for something like this. Indeed, it is. Have you ever received a package with a big logo on it that wrapped awkwardly around an edge? No? Me either.

But it can be handy. For example, if you’re doing a street photography scene, and want to add some posters to a wall for a band playing a local club, they often repeat and wrap around walls in the real world. Or if you’re redecorating a room interior and want the wallpaper to appear to wrap inside a corner.

The final trick to sell the effect that the labels are really printed or stuck to the surface is to match the blur of the original photograph. If the back of the box starts to go out of focus, then naturally the label will, too. Aaron solves this problem by using the Tilt-Shift Blur filter. Perhaps not the most obvious blur filter, but it works very effectively.

Whether you need to make a product packaging mockup or not, the Vanishing Point filter can be extremely useful. Knowing how to use it well can save you a lot of hours of work messing around with transform tools and trying to smush things manually.

What other uses have you found for the Vanishing Point filter? Is it a tool you use often? Do you think there are better alternatives to this method? Let us know and show off some examples in the comments.

Contents

  • Getting Started
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Before you get started with the Photoshop Advanced course
    • 3. How to earn your certificate
  • Selections & Masking – Advanced
    • 4. The easiest way in the world to mask a person in Adobe Photoshop
    • Introduction

      Comments

      Video transcript

      Hi there, in this video we’re going to learn how to use Perspective Warp to do this. See all the weird lines heading off in all sorts of directions. Hey presto, it’s all straight. It’s one of the typical uses for Perspective Warp.

      Another use though is this. This is my original container but I need to turn it a different direction. Imagine if you could go back in time and move it around. Cool, huh? That is the Perspective Warp tool in Adobe Photoshop. Go and learn how to use it now. These two files are going to be Perspective Warp 1 and 2, not Crop. Though we’re going to be doing kind of a similar thing. So let’s start with Perspective Warp 1. And in this case the lens, to get this shot with all the background, you can see, it’s kind of distorted the lines here. So nothing’s really straight. So this is a perfect option for ‘Edit’, ‘Perspective Warp’.

      Now to be fancy we should convert it into a Smart Object first. Then we can turn that effect on and off later. So ‘Edit’, ‘Perspective Warp’. And what you do is you just click once anywhere. That gives you your first kind of plane. Just drag the corners so you’re kind of covering the– what kind of covering, exactly covering one face of the church. I’m just dragging this around. And the way I’m kind of lining it up is, obviously there’s a clear line down the bottom here in the dirt. But then there’s this other rule of thirds here, so I’m dragging that around because I really want– can you see there? Now I feel like that’s a straight line, or a straight plane across it, I want to get the cross in. So just mess about it until you feel like these lines all aligned with, you can see that one there, aligns with the roof of the roof line there.

      Now we want this other plane over here. Easiest way again is just to click once over here, and just drawing these up, you join the first one up, and it just snaps to it. Then spend a bit of time lining that up. The same thing, I want– it’s easy to line this bottom one up. I want to make sure that this guide here, kind of aligns with the roof and that should give me some sort of shape. Basically just tells Photoshop what the two planes we’re dealing with.

      So there’s two phases, there’s layout which we just did, and then you move to Warp, and this is where the magic happens. What I want to do is I want to say, all these lines, I want you to be straight up and down. Cool, huh. Now works really cool with just boxes, but because this is a church and there’s a pitched roof, and there’s a little bit of weirdness going on here. I’ll just kind of fudge it by lifting this up a bit. You can see, I can kind of really manipulate real life, like I’ve turned this thing around. When you finish, either click the ‘Tick’ or hit ‘Return’. And let’s turn these Smart Folder ‘on’ and ‘off’. Cool, huh?

      Let’s look at another example. This container here could be the most perfect example of this, because it’s nice and square. Things aren’t square, things can get a little weird, and also, so you know, if there’s a person standing in front of this, they’re going to get distorted and it’s not going to be that realistic. So there’s kind of like a perfect storm that needs to happen for this tool to be amazing, but it’s definitely good enough. But when the example is right this tool is pretty amazing, watch this. So here we go.

      So that’s my first plane. I should be more perfect with it. You can click once and then just drag them into it. Another little trick is, click and drag, just get it close. You’ll see those two lines get highlighted and it will snap to it. So here we go, my friend. So instead of just straightening it out, which is not what I want to do now. It is nice and straight, what I want to do is try and turn it around. I’m going to switch from Layout to Warp. What I can do is a little trick. I can hold down ‘Shift’ and click on this line here. You can see, it kind of locks that into my straight up and down plane. And it means whenever I drag one of these, can you see, the top one comes along for the ride as well.

      You can see, kind of turned this thing around. Grab you. A little bit of, like tongue out, how’s this looking? You can see, I can kind of make it look like the container was actually facing the other way when it was photographed. How good is that? I forgot to turn it into a Smart Object, so I’m going to click ‘Return ‘on my keyboard, you saw it there already. Whole thing’s turned around. I’m going to use my undo. That way, that way, cool, huh?

      Let’s jump back to this one here and finish it up, because I want to fill this with Content Aware Fill. But I can’t, because it’s a Smart Object. So I have to destroy all my good work. I’m going to right click it, I’m going to go to this one that says ‘Rasterize Layer’. Gets rid of all my hard work, but now, I’m going to use my Rectangle Marquee Tool just to draw a couple of quick boxes. Holding ‘Shift’ key to add to the selection. I should use the Lasso tool, being lazy. You’ve seen this before anyway. Let’s go to ‘Edit’, ‘Fill’, ‘Content Aware Fill’. Magic. I love it. Nature, it does so well with nature, right? Content Aware Fill just kind of like magics it up. I’ve been teaching this for ages and I’m still super impressed. That is Perspective Warp.

      One thing before I go, it can be really good for internal shots as well. So if you’ve got, say the internal view of a house or a room, can be a nice way of straightening up the walls. If like this image they’re being distorted, but as soon as you add, like big objects in the middle of the room, especially people or recognizable objects, that can’t look kind of smeared, like these windows smear just fine. They can be changed angles and they’re fine, but if there was a person, they were slightly wider than they were meant to be, it just doesn’t work, so keep it in your tool kit, for those times that you need it. Quick and easy to use, but it doesn’t work perfect every time. Let’s get on to the next video.

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      A business name and yet still a more powerful image is linked to a company’s identity. Whether it is an individual product or service, logos indicate a person’s relation to it amongst other choices. In other words, it connects to one’s particular preference and taste.

      For anyone setting up a business, there should be no rush to come up with a logo overnight. The idea is to spend time, think through, feel, and even more so is to relate to it along with your business goals and mission.

      Many businesses make changes to their branding and identity without creating market awareness. Taking consumer feedback into consideration as part of market surveys should be decisions that businesses need to invest in. Here are some logos with powerful brand images that have stood outthrough time. These designs serve as learning points and have been summarized in conclusion.

      Coca-Cola

      The easily recognizable Coca-Cola logo is written as Spencerian script. This script while keeping the logo simple has also undergone a few changes over the years to mark the logo’s history and product’s existence. This script has been used multiple times in parodies as it is considered easy to rip off. However, it remains unique as a product logo and a drink which is found in almost all countries around the world.

      The Nike logo has widely been regarded as one of the most popular and well-known logos in history. The logo was conceptualized by a graphic design student. The Nike ‘Swoosh’ logo symbolizes victory and the wing of the Greek Goddess of victory. Moreover, the original mark has been registered as a trademark in 1995 and a well-known identity of the company.

      Nokia

      Nokia’s logo today is among the line of famous company logos. The logo with two people connecting hands with each other demonstrates communication and serves as a perfect image for the product. Further, it supports and goes well with the company’s mission and slogan.

      Google

      Yes, the logo that a vast majority of us come across nearly each day of our lives is the iconic, Google logo. The occasional tweak is all very well-known. The Google logo is around for nearly 17 years and has experienced redesigns and overhauls.

      Apple

      Steve Jobs in 1981 was asked why he named his company, ‘Apple’. It is not unusual for people to wonder a simple fact of it being a computer company and not a fruit store. However, in a press conference, he replied, “I like apples and love to eat them. But the main idea behind the apple was to bring simplicity to the people, in the most sophisticated way and that was it, nothing else.”

      While the history of the Apple logo is indeed very unique with a series of variations and lawsuits, the missing bite does take the logo to the next level. This is especially true with its deeper meaning – computers and bytes.

      The IKEA logo with elegant lettering originates from the founder’s initials – Ingvar Kampar. The letters E and A come from his family name, Elmtaryd and a small town in Southern Sweden known as Agunnaryd. This famous international home products firm’s logo is internationally recognized. Interestingly, the blue and yellow colors correspond and highlight the colors of the Swedish national flag.

      A logo we need say much about, but one that has a hidden meaning. Look closely at the logo and notice the ‘equal’ signs represented by white lines passing through. This indicates equality in the IBM logo.

      Rolex

      The Rolex logo has generally remained the same throughout the years. It comprises of a pointed crown above the name and symbolizes prestige, victory, and perfectionism. The company’s slogan has been, ‘A Crown for every Achievement’, and this explains the logo further.

      Shell

      This logo has always been a shell. Initially, it was just a black and white image of a shell and later red and yellow colors were put into it. The company name has moved in and around the logo as well. However in recent times, it has been omitted and perhaps considered unnecessary.

      The original logo of the famous ‘GAP’ was just the name as text. This was used for a number of years. Later the logo was change to the blue box which has become an iconic symbol for the company. In 2010, a new addition included a small blue block behind the text. Reportedly, there was significant outrage via social media and the company went back to the original blue box.

      Louis Vuitton

      This unique logo has become a symbol of fashion. It was designed by Louis’ son, Georges Vuitton who used his father’s initials and since 1896 it became the corporate identity. The logo demonstrates a Japanese-inspired flower motif and the colors of the logo embodies excellence, innovation, and elegance among other features. Additionally, the Louis Vuitton logo includes a hand-drawn typeface.

      Firefox

      The firefox logo depicts a fox with flames around a round design symbolizing the planet. Colors used in the logo include blue representing the earth or planet. Other colors include red and yellow which indicate a blazing fire. The fire’s blaze is associated with blazing speed and the colors cumulatively stand power, speed, and excitement and so on.

      The WWF logo is among the most appealing logos that one comes across. The image demonstrates a panda using only black and white as the colors. However, this image has been altered over the decades and was designed by Sir Peter Scott.

      Ferrari Logo

      Car lovers know that the Ferrari logo symbolizes strength and power through its iconic horse. This creative logo’s horse is black in color with a yellow background and seen crowned with other colors including green, white, and red strips. Moreover, this logo is widely recognized and among the unique logos in the car racing industry.

      Pringles

      The ever so famous Pringles potato chips was coined by Alexander Liepa of Montgomery, Ohio. With a very interesting logo history, the name was actually picked from telephone directory by spotting ‘Pringle Avenue’. However, with the logo came the creation of ‘Julius Pringles’. Over the year, the logo was played with by variations to Mr. Pringle. At times, one would spot a bow-tie and at other times rosy cheeks. Later, the ‘I’ in the pringle was dotted with a chip with no eyebrows left on Mr. Pringle’s face.

      Reading through these famous and iconic logos, it is possible to draw two conclusions. Firstly, their creators have paid attention to custom lettering and secondly, they focused on making it uniquely recognizable. Lastly, is their color palette with a significance to the fact that colors communicate ideas and have meaning.

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      Hello. Are you struggling with perspective and/or making a perspective grid? Well today, I am going to teach you how to make an EASY perspective grid in Adobe Photoshop CS6.

      This can work on any Adobe Photoshop Software. And I am also not sure if this’ll work with other programs just to clarify.

      1. Open (if you have Photoshop) Photoshop

      2. Make any size document you want.

      3. Draw a nice straight line in the middle of the canvas or wherever you want it. That’ll act as your horizon line!

      The Vanishing Point: That’s is where you’ll be able to see where the perspective line come to you from the horizon line.

      Here is a line I drew in the middle of the canvas on Photoshop. As you can see, that is the Horizon Line currently.

      4. Use the Polygon Tool

      This is a very IMPORTANT part of making the perspective grid.

      • Go to the Rectangle Tool next to the Path Selection Tool and right click (or click the tiny triangle) and you’ll see different options. Click the Polygon tool!

      5. Make sure you’re on the right settings.

      Now when using the Polygon Tool, you need to make sure you have the right settings.

      • Make sure you are on Shape. The Shape act as a Vector which means adjusting it will keep the same pixels as you transform it. You can also choose path or pixels, but shape is the most recommended.
      • Look for the Gear icon on the tool bar after clicking the Polygon Tool.
      • Click on the gear’s tiny triangle and then you will see different options to choose. Choose the star option.
        • Note , on older versions on Photoshop, the gear doesn’t exist. To find the box with the star option, click on the upside down triangle and then you will see the option to change it.
      • Be sure you have your stroke and fill on and both with the same color. You can also have any thick line size you want. I would recommend using 1-3pt if you want to see your lines nice, thin, and easy to see.
      • Change the sides to 100. That way you can have the most lines possible to create a good looking grid. You can have the option to have less lines.
      • Change the indent size to 99%. It cannot go any higher than 99%.
      • As the picture says, make sure the indent size is at 99%, otherwise your indent size will create a thicker middle section and the lines will not be straight out thin.
      • Once it’s at 99%, you’ll get lines that look

      As you can see, the middle area is a very small circle. That can aid you when making a perspective grid.

      5. Now to make the perspective grid

      • Let’s make a One-Point Perspective Grid first

      Drag your mouse on the horizon line wherever you want the dot to be. That will act as your vanishing point.

      NOW YOU HAVE AN EASY ONE-POINT PERSPECTIVE GRID! But what if you want a Two-Point Perspective Grid?

      • Making a Two-Point Perspective Grid

      This process is actually very easy!

      • Zoom out your canvas (if you’re close to canvas) so that you can see the negative space out of the canvas. You can either use the Navigator Icon or the Magnifying Glass to Zoom out.
      • Luckily the Shape Vector can help you see where your lines are at.
      • Drag your mouse to create lines that can fill the canvas far from the canvas.
      • Duplicate your polygon using Ctrl J and press the shift tool to move the layer straight to the other side of the outside space of the canvas to make the lines connect.

      Now that you have a Two-Point Perspective, you can create perspective boxes and triangles and many more shapes

      Here’s an example of what I drew with the grid!

      WHAT ABOUT 3-POINT PERSPECTIVE?

      You can duplicate one of the layers of the polygon and move it over the canvas or under it. And you’ll get this in the end

      You can make as many perspective points as you need just by using that easy method!

      Here’s a nice 4-Point Perspective Grid I made.

      Here’s a picture school building I made using the easy method.

      Colin Smith

      I’m going to show you a feature in Photoshop that makes it easy to repeat transformations over and over again to create some really cool art.

      We will use a picture of a woman and a feather from Adobe Stock.

      The feather is already cut out (I have lots of other tutorials on cutting out things in Photoshop and combining images in photoshop.) We will focus on making multiple feathers and arranging them without it taking a lot of fimt, or being hard work.

      First thing, is to position the feather. Press Ctrl/Cmd+ T for free Transform. Rotate and position it. We want to make multiple feathers and rotate them around the head.

      With the move tool selected (V). click on the top left of the toolbar to make the piviot point visable.

      Drag to move the pivot point. It can be positioned outside the object boundaries, all transformations will happen around this pivot point. The video shows a good way to test the positioning of the pivot pont, by rotating the image around the point and visualizing where it will go.

      4. With the feather selected press Ctrl/Cmd+J, to duplicate the feather layer. Ctrl/command + T for free transform.

      5. Rotate the duplicated feather into position. You only have to do this once, here is the magic…

      6. Holding down Shift+option+command (mac) Shift+Alt+Ctrl (windows) and tap the T key, notice that it repeats the last transformation and creates a new feather layer. Each time you tap the T key (while still holding down the other keys) you will get another copy with the transformation applied.

      7. Repeat this all the way around.

      Because it’s repeating that same transformation from the pivot point, that pivot point is really important.

      8. Let’s organize. Select all the feather layers: click the top one in the Layers panel. Hold shift and click the bottom feather layer, all the layers in between with be selected.

      9. Press Ctrl/Cmd+G to put them all in a group. Much easier to work with. Click the eye in the layers panel to hide the feathers.

      Extending the background

      Here is how to extend the background color.

      1. Choose the Rectangular marquee tool.

      2. Drag to make a thin selection.

      3. Press Cmd/Ctrl+T for free transform.

      4. Drag the left side of the box while holding down Shift.

      5. Press enter to apply. Repeat for the other 3 edges.

      Let’s cut out our model.

      1. Click the Object Selection, or quick select tool from the layers panel.

      2. Click on select subject.

      You will see marching ants selections. The selection doesn’t need to be perfect for this.

      3. Press Ctrl/Cmd+J to copy the selected pixels to a new layer.

      4. In the layers panel, drag our cutout of the model, above the Feathers group.

      5. Click the eye to make the feathers visible again.

      And here is our result! That could have taken a lot longer without the repeat transformation.

      I hope you found this tutorial useful!

      BTW, if you came here from our you youtube channel, youtube no longer sends email notifications, so join our mailing list, so you know when I upload new tutorials!

      Browse our hundreds of other free tutorials here, or search for what you are looking for in the search at the top of the page.

      You can also browse by topics in the free tutorials menu.

      If you are ready to get serious about Photoshop, see our full length courses here

      PS Don’t forget to join our mailing list and follow me on Social Media>

      (Ive been posting some fun Instagram and Facebook Stories lately)

      It’s hard to photograph many images head-on. For example, if you try to shoot a framed picture on a wall, the reflection of your camera’s flash often obliterates half the image. Similarly, if you take a picture of a tall building from the sidewalk, the vertical lines of the building appear skewed (they look like they get closer together near the top).

      The problem is that images shot at an angle suffer from a problem of perspective, where straight lines diverge at angles, called keystone. If the image has only slight keystone problems, you can probably fix them easily with Photoshop’s Filter > Lens Correction feature. But for many images, you need a more extreme (but still very easy) solution: the Crop Tool.

      Whoa! Why would you use the Crop Tool to fix perspective and keystone? Because our faithful little Crop Tool offers a cool and mostly-overlooked option: adjusting for perspective. The key is to turn on the Perspective checkbox in the Options bar after drawing the cropping rectangle; this lets you grab the corner points and move them willy-nilly where you will.

      I’ll show two examples of this feature in action:

      Had to Shoot at an Angle

      While visiting an amazing archaeological tourist spot, I wanted a photographic souvenir, but I had to keep to the catwalk around the edge. My photograph was understandably skewed. Fortunately, it’s a quick fix in Photoshop with the Crop Tool.

      First draw a rectangle over some part of the image; it almost doesn’t matter where. After you draw the rectangle, Photoshop offers you the Perspective checkbox in the Options bar. Turn it on!

      Now you can drag each corner, to the proper place. Positioning the corner points of the cropping “rectangle” can be tricky. You must first find something in the image that is supposed to be a rectangle, and set the corner points on the corners of that shape. In the example of a building, you might choose the corners of a window. In this image, there is a pretty clear square in the middle.

      Fortunately, you can zoom in and pan/scroll around the image while you’re working; you want to place the corners as precisely as possible.

      If we accepted the crop now, we’d cut out most of our image. Instead, hold down the Shift key and the Option/Alt key, then drag one of the corner handles; this expands the crop but retains its shape.

      When you have the cropping shape the size you want, drag the center point icon to where the camera was pointing (or where you imagine the center of the focus should be). Then press Enter or Return (or click the Commit checkbox button in the Options bar). Photoshop does its magic:

      Photographing a Piece of Paper

      I needed to scan a form in order to fill it in using InDesign. Unfortunately, there is so much stuff piled on my scanner that I decided to just “scan” it by putting it on the ground and taking a picture with my camera phone. I shot it at an angle to allow me to get close enough but still avoid the shadow of my hand and phone.

      Let’s try this quick fix in Photoshop once again. The rectangle is very clear in this image, so I drag the Cropping tool, turn on Perspective, and set my points. (I zoomed in on each corner to ensure I got as close to the corner as possible.)

      When I click Enter, Photoshop straightens the image for me. Note that the result would have been better if I had put the paper on a flat surface like a clean desk. But if you saw my office, you’d understand why I used the carpet.

      Ultimately, this looked good. But to be sure, I tried printing it, physically transposing it with the original form, then holding it up to the light. The match wasn’t 100% perfect, but it came very, very close.

      By the way, I find that when using this tool Photoshop often alerts us that either the center point or the corner points are in the wrong position. This usually happens when you haven’t selected the corner points of something that should be rectangular. In other words, Photoshop acts as a safety net, stopping you when you choose a distortion that isn’t likely to happen in a real photograph. Sometimes simply moving the center point to a different location (by trial and error) does the trick.

      To whomever wrote the algorithm for the perspective feature in Photoshop: I want to shake your hand. This is one of the most useful features ever.

      Colin Smith

      In this tutorial I’m going to show you how to create a reflection in Photoshop. This is more of a graphic design trick that has been used a lot lately for things like logos, text and modern design. If you want to do a reflection on Photographs, check out this tutorial instead

      Step 1

      Start with a gradient. Tip: To constrain the gradient to 90 degrees hold down the shift key.

      Step 2

      Add your text or image

      Step 3

      Make a copy of the text by dragging to the new layer icon (or pressing Ctrl/Cmd+J)

      On the copy go into free transform by pressing Ctr/Cmd+T.

      Left click >Flip Vertical.

      Drag the copy beneath the original, so that it looks reflected

      Step 4

      Add a layer mask to the reflected copy and drag with a black to white gradient. (See the Gradient masking technique here)

      Experiment with different starting and end point on the gradient for different results.

      Step 5

      You should now have something that resembles this, for a sharp reflection.

      Extra Credit, softer reflection

      There are times when you want the reflection to be a bit softer, this simulated a different kind of surface that you are reflecting onto.

      Choose Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur

      You will have the option to convert to a Smart Object. Accept this option.

      Apply a small amount of blur to the reflection to suit your tastes

      Here is the softer result.

      CS6 Superguide

      Join our list to receive more tutorials and tips on Photoshop. Get exclusive tutorials, discounts and the free super guides. No spam, all content, no more than once a week.
      If you’re on our list, you will receive it free by email as soon as it’s available. If not, sign up now and get the CS6 Superguide for free. Or click the image below.

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      Forced perspective is a technique that employs optical illusion to make an object appear farther away, closer, larger or smaller than it actually is. It is used primarily in photography, filmmaking and architecture. It manipulates human visual perception through the use of scaled objects and the correlation between them and the vantage point of the spectator or camera.

      There are many ways to attack photography and some are much more expensive than others. Here in this showcase, we presenting a Stunning collection of Forced Perspective Photography and Pictures taken by various artists in which all pictures are linked to the author’s pages. You may want to explore further works of the photographers we’ve featured below.

      When it comes to inspiration then there is no limitation on resources. Photography is one of the key sources of inspiration for some of our past work. Here we talking about photography of Specific form named as “Forced Perspective Photography” which I find usually amaze me. If you know how to shoot a photo then you can also change something fairly simple to something creative or abstract or otherwise more artistic. You don’t need any special skills for taking such shots. It all depends on the environment and perfect timing.

      You may be interested in the following related articles as well.

      Feel free to join us and you are always welcome to share your thoughts that our readers may find helpful.

      Brilliant Examples of Forced Perspective Photography

      Photography can serve as a nice source of inspiration. We designers, can derive inspiration from almost everything around, and this collection can fulfills your Forced Perspective Photography Inspiration related needs as the creativity in shooting photos is somewhat hot trend now days. We can promise you that when you start browsing them farther in details it will surely refresh your memory.