Categories
Design

How to make your iphone scream when you plug it in

Benj Edwards is an Associate Editor for How-To Geek. For over 15 years, he has written about technology and tech history for sites such as The Atlantic, Fast Company, PCMag, PCWorld, Macworld, Ars Technica, and Wired. In 2005, he created Vintage Computing and Gaming, a blog devoted to tech history. He also created The Culture of Tech podcast and regularly contributes to the Retronauts retrogaming podcast. Read more.

At the end of a long day of doomscrolling, both you and your iPhone probably feel like screaming. If you really want to freak out your friends, you can make your iPhone scream whenever you plug it in (or unplug it) on iOS 14 or later. Let’s get it set up!

Step 1: Get the Custom Scream Shortcut

Before we dig into creating an automation in the Shortcuts app, you’ll need to download our custom How-To Geek Play Scream shortcut. To do that, you’ll first need to allow downloading from untrusted shortcuts in Settings. Normally, this could be a security issue, but this file is just what plays the screaming sound.

To enable it, tap “Settings” and navigate to “Shortcuts.”

Toggle-On the “Allow Untrusted Shortcuts” option. After we’re done, you can come back here and disable it again, if you like.

Next—and this is a required step—visit this iCloud link on your iPhone and tap “Get Shortcut” to download our custom scream.

You’ll be taken to the Shortcuts app, in which you’ll see an “Add Shortcut” window. This gives you a chance to evaluate the shortcut before you add it to your device.

Curious how our sound shortcut works? Well, a screaming sound is encoded in text using the base64 scheme, which is a way of representing binary data as text characters. When you activate the shortcut, it decodes the base64 sound and funnels the data into the “Play Sound” action. The sound then plays through your iPhone’s speaker, and that’s the complete code.

You should never install a shortcut you don’t trust. However, this harmless (except for startling your friends) three-step shortcut just plays a sound.

Scroll down and tap “Add Untrusted Shortcut.”

The “Play Scream” shortcut will then be added to your list in the Shortcuts app. To test it out, just tap its Speaker icon.

Step 2: Build the Scream Automation

Next, we need to link up the “Play Scream” shortcut with the action of plugging (or unplugging) your iPhone. The option to create an automation was introduced in iOS 14.

If you’re not already in “Shortcuts,” open it, and then tap “Automation” at the bottom.

If you already have an automation, tap the plus sign (+), and then tap “Create Personal Automation.” If this is your first automation, just tap “Create Personal Automation.”

In the “New Automation” panel, scroll down and tap “Charger.”

On the “Charger” screen, you can decide which behaviors you want to trigger the scream. If you want your iPhone to scream when you plug it in, tap “Is Connected.” If you want it to scream when it’s disconnected (which is much more disturbing), tap “Is Disconnected.”

You can also choose both if you want. When you’re done, tap “Next.”

Now, we’ll define the action that should take place when the charger is connected. Tap “Add Action.”

Type “Run Shortcut” in the Search box, and then tap “Run Shortcut.” This allows you to trigger any shortcut you already have on your iPhone.

When the “Run Shortcut” action appears, you’ll see a space where you can define the shortcut that runs when the automation is triggered. Tap “Shortcut.”

In the list of shortcuts, tap “Play Scream.”

You’ll then see an overview of the entire automation program; tap “Next.”

Toggle-Off the “Ask Before Running” switch. If this is enabled, a pop-up message will appear every time an automation is triggered, which spoils the effect.

In the confirmation pop-up, tap “Don’t Ask.”

Tap “Done” and your scream automation is set. The next time you plug (or unplug) your iPhone, it should scream.

Step 3: Hiding the Automation Notification

The only drawback to this bit of fun is every time you trigger an automation, a notification appears on-screen, like the one shown below.

At this writing, it’s impossible to turn off Shortcuts notifications in the Settings app. Hopefully, this will be corrected in a future update. In the meantime, however, you can turn them off until the next time you restart your iPhone via Screen Time.

To do so, you’ll first have to activate Screen Time in Settings, and then run the automation (by plugging it in or unplugging it) a few times to generate some notifications.

Wait a few minutes, and then tap Settings > Screen Time > See All Activity.

Scroll down to the “Notifications” section and tap “Shortcuts.”

Toggle-Off the “Allow Notifications” switch, and then tap “Back.”

You can now exit “Settings.” The next time you trigger the automation, your iPhone will scream without a notification. Pretty freaky!

Your iPhone screen in glitching and you don’t know why. It might flicker, freeze, delay when you touch it, or something else that’s very frustrating. In this article, I’ll explain how to fix an iPhone screen glitch!

Hard Reset Your iPhone

By hard resetting your iPhone, you’ll force it to abruptly turn off and back on. Sometimes crashed software can cause screen glitches, so restarting your iPhone may fix the problem.

Follow the steps below to hard reset your iPhone:

iPhone 8 And Newer

First, press and release the volume up button. Then, press and release the volume down button. Finally, hold down the side button on the right side of your iPhone until the screen turns off and the Apple logo appears.

For iPhone 7 and 7 Plus

Simultaneously press and hold down the volume down button and the power button until the screen goes black and the Apple logo appears.

iPhone SE, iPhone 6, & Earlier

Press and hold the power button and the Home button at the same time until the screen turns off and the Apple logo appears.

Turn Off Auto-Brightness

We’ve heard from people who said they had success fixing iPhone screen glitches by turning off Auto-Brightness. Here’s how to turn off Auto-Brightness on your iPhone:

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Tap Accessibility.
  3. Tap Display & Text Size.
  4. Turn off the switch next to Auto-Brightness.

Take Off The Case & Wipe Off The Screen

iPhone displays are very sensitive. It’s possible your iPhone case or something on the display is triggering the touch screen and making it glitch. Take your iPhone out of its case and wipe it with a microfiber cloth to clear off any debris that may be on the screen.

Is An App Causing The Problem?

Do you know if your iPhone is glitching only when you open a specific app? If so, there’s a decent chance that app is causing the glitch.

There are a couple things you can do to try and fix the problem, and we’ll walk you through both those steps below.

Close The Problem App

If you think an app is malfunctioning, the first thing to do is close it and see if the problem persists.

If you have an iPhone 8 or earlier, double-click the Home button while your iPhone is unlocked. This will activate the app switcher, which shows you all the apps currently open on your iPhone. Locate the app you want to close and swipe it up and off the top of the screen.

For iPhones newer than the iPhone 8, swipe up from the bottom of the screen and hold your finger in the center of the screen until the app switcher opens. Then, swipe up on the app until it disappears.

Check For An App Update

It’s possible an app is making your screen glitch because it’s out of date. App developers regularly release updates to introduce new features, fix known bugs, and make sure their app runs smoothly on the latest version of iOS.

Open the App Store and tap on your Account Icon in the upper right-hand corner of the screen. Scroll down to the section labelled Updates. If an update is available for your problem app, tap Update to its right. There’s also an Update All option if you’d like to download all available app updates simultaneously.

Delete The Problem App

Deleting and reinstalling an app can give it a fresh start. Sometimes, app files can become corrupted, causing problems when you try to use it.

To delete an app on your iPhone, press and hold on its app icon until the menu opens. Tap Remove App -> Delete App -> Delete.

Now that you’ve uninstalled the app, open the App Store and tap on the Search tab at the bottom of the screen. Type in the name of your app, then tap the Reinstall button to its right.

Once it has finished installing, reopen the app to see if the problem has resolved. If the app continues to glitch, you may have to find an alternative.

Back Up Your iPhone

If your iPhone screen is still glitching, it’s time to back it up. While we haven’t ruled out the possibility of a deeper software problem, it’s very possible your iPhone is broken and will need to be repaired. This may be the last chance you have to back up your iPhone. Follow the steps below to save a backup to iCloud or your computer, then move onto the next step in this article.

Back Up Your iPhone To iCloud

Open Settings and tap on Your Name at the top of the screen. Tap iCloud -> iCloud Backup. Make sure the switch next to iCloud Backup is on, then tap Back Up Now.

Back Up Your iPhone To iTunes

If you have a PC, or a Mac running macOS 10.14 or older, you’ll use iTunes to back up your iPhone to your computer. Connect your iPhone to your computer using a charger cable, then open iTunes.

Click on the iPhone icon in the upper left hand corner of iTunes. Select the circle next to This computer, then click Back Up Now.

Back Up Your iPhone To Finder

macOS 10.15 replaced iTunes with Music and moved device management to Finder. Connect your iPhone to your Mac and open Finder.

Click on your iPhone under Locations and and select the circle next to Back up all of the data on your iPhone to this Mac. Finally, click Back Up Now.

DFU Restore

A DFU restore is the deepest iPhone restore. Before you put your iPhone in DFU mode, we highly recommend saving a backup because a DFU restore erases and reloads all the code on your iPhone. We bet you don’t want to lose all of that information!

After you’ve backed up your iPhone, follow our guide on how to DFU restore your iPhone or watch our video if you’d like to see us walk you through the process.

Screen Repair Options

Unfortunately, if your iPhone is still glitching after you’ve put it in DFU mode, you’ll probably have to look into repair options. It’s possible that an internal connector has been damaged or become dislodged.

Reach out to Apple support for repair options. Apple offers mail, phone, online, and in-person help. Make sure to schedule an appointment if you plan on going into your local Apple Store!

Get A New iPhone

Sometimes the best thing to do when your current phone is glitching is to get a brand new phone. If multiple internal components of your iPhone are broken, a repair could be very expensive.

Instead of paying a lot to fix your old broken phone, why not use that money and invest in a new one? Check out the UpPhone cell phone comparison tool to find the perfect phone for you!

From Glitched To Fixed!

You’ve fixed the problem with your iPhone and it’s no longer glitching! Make sure to share this article on social media to teach your family and friends how to fix iPhone screen glitch issues. If you have any extra questions, please leave them in the comments below!

About Author

David Lynch is an expert on cell phones, cell phone plans, and other tech. After using a flip phone into his early 20s, he learned the ropes about iPhones and Androids from a former Apple employee. Today, his articles and videos are read and viewed by millions, and he has been cited by major publications including Reader’s Digest, Wired, CMSWire, Consumers Advocate, and more.

Step 1: Get Custom Scream Shortcut

Before we dig into automation in the Shortcuts app, you’ll need to download our custom Play Scream shortcut. To do that, you’ll need to allow downloading from untrusted shortcuts in your device Settings. follow the below instruction to get it to enable

First To tap the “Settings” icon then navigate to the “Shortcuts.” icon

in Sharing Security Tag the “Allow Untrusted Shortcuts” icon option to switch it on.

vNext—is the custom scream app you need, visit this iCloud link then tap the “Get Shortcut” button to download this custom scream.

You’ll be taken to the Shortcuts scream app, in which you’ll see an “Add Shortcut” window. This will gives you a chance to assess the shortcut before you add it to your device.

Curious how our sound shortcut works? Well, a wonderful screaming sound is encoded in the text using this base64 scheme, When you activate the shortcut, it decodes the base64 sound and funnels the data into the “Play Sound” action. The code is complete when you get sound then you play it through your iPhone’s speaker.

If you don’t trust it don’t install the shortcut. However, this harmless (except for startling your friends) three-step shortcut just plays a sound.

Scroll and tap the “Add Untrusted Shortcut.”

In your Shortcuts app list, the “Play Scream” shortcut will then be added. Just Tap the Speaker icon to test it out.

Step 2: Building the Scream Automation

Next, we need to link up the “Play Scream” shortcut with the action of plugging (or unplugging) your iPhone. The option to create automation was introduced in iOS 14.

open it and then tap “Automation” at the bottom If you’re not already in “Shortcuts,”.

tap the plus sign (+), If you already have automation and then tap “Create Personal Automation.” If this is your first automation, just tap “Create Personal Automation.”

Tap the “Charger.” icon in “New Automation”, Section

On the “Charger”, you are given the option to decide which of the behaviors you want to trigger the scream. For your iPhone to scream when it plugged into power, tap the “Is Connected.” when it’s disconnected If you want it to scream (which is much more disturbing), tap the “Is Disconnected.”

if you want both You can also choose them. tap “Next”, When you’re done.

Tap the “Add Action” button this will define the action to be taken when your charger is connected.

Type the “Run Shortcut” in the Search box, and then tap “Run Shortcut.” This allows you to trigger any shortcut you already have on your iPhone.

When the “Run Shortcut” icon action appears, you’ll see a space where you can define the shortcut that runs when the automation is triggered. Tap “Shortcut.”

In the list of shortcuts, tap the “Play Scream.”

The entire automation program overview will be displayed; tap “Next.”

Tag the “Ask Before Running” Toggle-Off switch to enabled it, a pop-up message will appear every time automation is triggered, which spoils the effect.

In the confirmation pop-up, tap “Don’t Ask.”

Tap “Done” and your scream automation is set. The next time you plug (or unplug) your iPhone, it should scream.

Step 3: Hiding Automation Notification

The only drawback to this bit of fun is every time you trigger automation, a notification appears on-screen, like the one shown below.

it’s impossible to turn off Shortcuts notifications in the Settings app at the moment of writing this post. I believe with future updates they will be fixed, In the meantime, however, you can turn them off until the next time you restart your iPhone via Screen Time.

To do so, you’ll have to activate Screen Time in Settings first and then run the automation (by plugging it in or unplugging it) a few times to generate some notifications.

Wait for a few minutes, and then tap Settings next Screen Time next See All Activity.

Scroll down to the “Notifications” icon section and tap the “Shortcuts.”

Tag the “Allow Notifications” Toggle to switch it, and then tap “Back.”

You can now tap exit “Settings.” The next time you want to trigger the automation, your iPhone will scream without a notification. Pretty freaky!

By Charlie Sorrel • 1:00 pm, August 24, 2018

  • How-To
  • Top stories

So sad, but maybe not a complete disaster.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

This week, a friend visited me, and the screen of her iPhone is cracked so badly that it barely registers a touch. I saw her struggle to even take a photo, and realized she didn’t know the volume-button trick.

Then we saw a little girl drop an iPhone onto the cobbled street outside a restaurant, while the owner (and uncle or family friend) looked on. The screen shattered, and the poor girl was distraught. That’s when I decided to write this guide to using your iPhone with a cracked screen.

The many types of cracked iPhone screen

There are many kinds of cracked screen. The Lady once dropped an iPhone 5, and the screen shattered into a frosty mosaic. Despite thousands of shards that all wanted to lodge in a fingertip, the multitouch still worked perfectly. We put it into an old waterproof case — just to protect our fingers — and used it that way for a while.

Other times, there’s almost nothing but a single crack in the screen, but the screen stops registering touch. And sometimes even the Home button stops working.

I won’t try to cover all these situations. Instead, I’ll offer some tips for getting around your iPhone when you can’t use the screen, or even the Home button.

Using the camera with a broken touchscreen

Let’s take an easy one to start. To use the iPhone’s camera, you only need to manage a swipe, on any part of the screen. If your iPhone has the raise-to-wake feature, just pick it up. When the screen lights up, swipe left to get to the camera. Then, you can use the iPhone’s volume buttons instead of the on-screen shutter button.

If you don’t have raise-to-wake, just press the sleep/wake button to activate the screen, and go from there.

If your screen is completely dead, you can use Siri to launch the Camera app. Just invoke Siri, and say “camera.” Then use the volume buttons as before.

Prevention is better than cure

Even if you really smash up your iPhone, you can still control it using Assistive Touch, and many functions can be activated with Siri. Assistive Touch does many things, but one of them is to add a virtual Home button to the screen, which gives access to many shortcuts. Take a look:

You can even customize long-taps, double-taps, and so on. If your Home button is dead, this is essential, although it won’t help you with Touch ID. To enable Assistive Touch, go to Settings > General > Accessibility > Assistive Touch. Or, just tell Siri to “Turn on Assistive Touch.” Yes, that works! (Note, I wrote this guide using an iPhone running iOS 12 beta, so some of these tricks may not work on earlier versions).

If you’re the clumsy type, you might want to activate Hey Siri now, just in case you drop your iPhone and the Home button stops working. And you can configure Assistive Touch at any time. Go take a look around. You might even find some tricks you want to use right now.

Use your iPhone with a keyboard

Another way to use an iPhone with a broken screen is with an external keyboard. If you have a Bluetooth keyboard paired with your iPhone, you can just switch it on and start typing. You can do all kinds of tricks with the keyboard, and many of the iPad keyboard shortcuts also work with the iPhone. You can type ⌘H to go to the home screen, for example.

This only works if you’ve already paired a Bluetooth keyboard, but you may be able to limp through and pair one after your screen is broken.

You can also plug in a USB keyboard if you have Apple’s USB-to-Lightning adapter.

There’s quite a lot you can do without access to the screen, or even the Home button, using Siri and iOS’ fantastic accessibility features. Hopefully some of these tips will be useful to you.

Zoom just released the best quarter results in the company history with strong guidance for the next quarter. We have seen Microsoft and Google targeting Zoom with their video call offerings such as Microsoft Teams and Google Meet. Still Zoom is holding its ground with features like rich Whiteboard screen sharing, ease of use, the ability to share iPhone or iPad screen on Zoom using AirPlay on Windows and Mac.

During group video calls, the admin might want to showcase the current screen, file, present PowerPoint slide, etc. using screen sharing. It makes the whole conversation hassle-free. You can also share the iPhone and iPad screen directly to Zoom video calls.

The feature can be useful when you want to showcase something on iPhone or iPad screen to Zoom participants. I wanted to show my dad some of the options to change on his iPhone to fix the issue. I used the iPhone screen sharing on Zoom and showed him the way to reset the iPhone to fix the problem. That’s one of the use cases of iPhone/iPad screen sharing on Zoom.

In this post, I will guide you on how to share iPhone or iPad screen on a Zoom meeting. Let’s get started.

Share iPhone/iPad Screen on Zoom

There are two ways to mirror iPhone or iPad display to Zoom. Use a USB cable or opt for the Wireless AirPlay option. Follow the steps below.

Step 1: Open the Zoom app on your Mac or Windows.

Step 2: Tap on ‘New Meeting’ to start a new Zoom call.

Step 3: Join the meeting using computer audio to enable audio during group video calls.

Step 4: Invite the attendees and tap on the Share Screen option at the bottom or use the Shift + Command + S for Mac or Shift + Ctrl + S keyboard shortcut on Windows to open screen share menu.

Speaking of keyboard shortcuts, do read our dedicated post on Zoom keyboard shortcuts for Windows and Mac.

Step 5: Navigate to Share Screen > Basic and select iPhone/iPad via AirPlay or iPhone/iPad via cable.

Though USB cable can be reliable, going Wireless on a slow internet connection might have some setbacks. Also, a loose or faulty cable might interrupt the screen sharing experience.

Step 6: Tap iPhone/iPad via AirPlay and the Zoom app will download the required plugin to enable AirPlay service.

Step 7: Tap on the Share button below and go back to your iPhone/iPad.

Step 8: On your iPhone/iPad, swipe down from the upper right corner to open the Control Centre.

Step 9: From the Control Centre, long tap on the Screen Mirroring option.

Step 10: It will display the ‘Zoom – Laptop name’. Tap on it and it will start streaming live iPhone display to the Zoom app on the Mac/Windows.

You can follow the same steps on the iPad to share the iPad screen with the Zoom participants.

Here is how we use it among the team members. Often, I share the iPhone/iPad screen using AirPlay and show a custom image or something odd that I found. It’s much better than screen recording and then sharing it over a project management app. The function also makes the whole meeting seamless and smooth.

Screen Sharing Annotations

The iPhone/iPad screen sharing feature lets you do more. You can annotate on the iPhone/iPad display for better presentations. From the toolbar above, tap on the Annotate to open the editing menu. It becomes easier for a presenter to showcase things.

Draw: The draw menu consists of a bunch of shapes for you to pick. You can use an arrow, circle, rectangle, and other tools from the draw menu to annotate on the iPhone screen.

Text and Format Menu: Zoom allows you to add text on the iPhone/iPad screen. You can also change text color, size, add bold or italic effect to it.

Apart from that, you can use the undo, redo, and clear option to make the changes. The save button is a must-have for everyone. After brainstorming ideas with team members, you should save the current screen to the PC. You can hit save to store the current screen as an image to the Zoom folder on the device.

Thankfully, Zoom also offers a couple of security options. During the live video call, you can tap on the Security button at the top of the screen share window and disable Annotate on Shared Content from the Allow Participants to the menu. It will prevent other members from annotating on the shared screen in Zoom.

Share Screen on Zoom

When it comes to Screen Sharing, Zoom has taken the lead from Microsoft Teams, Google Meet, and others. I like how Zoom allows the flexibility to share screen using various options such as Dropbox, OneDrive, Box, second camera, files, and more.

Next up: Looking to master Zoom software? Read the post below to learn the top Zoom tips and tricks.

Last updated on 02 February, 2022

The above article may contain affiliate links which help support Guiding Tech. However, it does not affect our editorial integrity. The content remains unbiased and authentic.

Read Next

  • Top 6 Ways to Fix Zoom Screen Share Lag on Windows and Mac With screen sharing, breakout rooms, dedicated app store, whiteboard, and a lot more, Zoom is quite popular. Screen sharing is extremely useful to showcase presentations…
  • How to Share Your Screen in Google Meet on iPhone and iPad Google Meet isn’t just limited to using the cameras on your iPhone or iPad to relay video. If you want to give live presentations, showcase…
  • How to Share Video With Sound on Zoom, Microsoft Teams, and… The screen-sharing process in remote meeting apps seems quite straightforward. Press the screen share button followed by selecting the window that you want to share.…
  • How to Change Name in Zoom on Mobile, iPad, and PC When we receive a Zoom meeting link, we click on it without checking our account. Imagine joining your office meeting on Zoom with your child’s…
  • Top 13 Zoom Keyboard Shortcuts for the iPad Zoom makes teleconferencing incredibly easy with a host of intuitive controls and features. It is platform agnostic and that is one of the reasons for…
  • Can Zoom Host See My Screen Without Permission The year 2020 witnessed the rise of Zoom as a video conferencing tool. Zoom has around 300 million daily meeting participants. While it’s immensely popular,…
  • How to Enable Screen Sharing for Participants on Zoom as a… Many Zoom meeting participants are unable to share their screen. That’s because Zoom only lets the host or a co-host to share their screen by…
  • Top 8 Ways to Fix Zoom Screen Sharing Not Working on Windows Zoom screen sharing is a boon for those working from home to get things done. You can share your current computer screen or any window…

DID YOU KNOW

Before starting Zoom, founder Eric Yuan used to work in Cisco.

More in iOS

5 Helpful iOS Apps For When You Visit a New Country

How to Make the Most of Your iPhone’s Social Integration

JOIN THE NEWSLETTER

Get Guiding Tech articles delivered to your inbox.

I wear glasses during the day and often wake in the middle of the night and want to know what the time is. My iPhone and my glasses are by my bed but it is a tedious business to find the glasses and switch on my iPhone to see the time (the numbers are just not quite big enough or clear enough for me to see without glasses).

I have now stumbled on two solutions; one uses VoiceOver and the other Siri.

VoiceOver
Just before I go to bed I switch VoiceOver on (VoiceOver is the accessibility feature of iOS that reads out text), the phone says ‘VoiceOver on’, I then switch the phone off. When I want to know the time I just press the home button or the on/off button, and the time is read out to me. When I get up in the morning I put my glasses on and switch VoiceOver off and use the phone as normal.

It is very easy to set this up so here are the technical details:

  • Go to settings>general>accessibility and right at the bottom go to accessibility shortcut and choose VoiceOver.
  • Press the home button
  • Now to switch VoiceOver on just triple tap the home button, to switch it off triple tap the home button.

There is one small problem with this scenario, if you receive a notification overnight then VoiceOver will read the notification rather than the time. You can get it to read the time either by flicking left once, or by touching the screen where the time is and it will be read out.

Now you have used VoiceOver as a speaking clock you may want to try it out in other areas, for example if you are using Safari and find an interesting article you can press the reader button and then switch VoiceOver on and you can listen to the article.

You may want to learn a bit more about the VoiceOver controls, which you can find in the iPhone user manual.

Siri
When I go to bed I plug my iPhone in for recharging. This has an effect that I was not aware of, it allows you to interact with Siri, the voice activation system, by just saying ‘Hey Siri…’; when I am not plugged in I have to press and hold the home button to interact with Siri.

So with this feature I can say ‘Hey Siri what is the time?’ and it will respond with the time. I do not need to find the phone or even open my eyes.

To make this work the iPhone has to be active and unlocked.

So here are the technical details:

  • Go to Settings>General>Siri and switch on allow “Hey Siri”.
  • Go to Settings>Auto-Lock and set it to Never (I normally have it set to 3 minutes to keep the information on the phone safe, but I can trust anyone who may come into my room at night). So I will need to reset this in the morning.
  • Ensure I have an Internet connection.
  • Before I go to sleep log onto the iPhone, check that it is working, Siri will tell me the time. The reply will also be on the screen with white letters on a black background, so it produces very little light, as compared to the home screen.
  • When I want to know the time I can just say “Hey Siri what is the time?”

Once you have used Siri for this you can try it for other things: for example set your alarm for the next morning, check your diary for the next day, if you are away from home send a text to say goodnight.

Conclusion
Both the options work well. Which option I choose on a particular night may depend on circumstances—where I am, will I disturb anyone else in the room, am I connected to the Internet..

This article was co-authored by Trudi Griffin, LPC, MS. Trudi Griffin is a Licensed Professional Counselor in Wisconsin specializing in Addictions and Mental Health. She provides therapy to people who struggle with addictions, mental health, and trauma in community health settings and private practice. She received her MS in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Marquette University in 2011.

There are 31 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 3,254,902 times.

Is sex not as fun as you want it to be? Is it even kind of painful? Having sex is great for your health and your relationship, and there are all kinds of things you can do to make it better. To help you out, we’ve pulled experts’ top tips and techniques for better sex. Keep reading to learn how to spice things up in the bedroom and increase your sex drive so you can start having the best sex ever.

You Might Also Like

  1. ↑ Haavio-Mannila, E., & Kontula, O. (1997). Correlates of increased sexual satisfaction. Archives of sexual behavior, 26(4), 399-419
  2. ↑http://www.hiv.va.gov/patient/daily/sex/condom-tips.asp
  3. ↑http://www.hiv.va.gov/patient/daily/sex/condom-tips.asp
  4. ↑http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001949.htm
  5. ↑http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/vaccines/hpv-vaccine.html
  6. ↑https://uhs.berkeley.edu/whatseatingyou/pdf/TenStepsBodyImage.pdf
  7. ↑ Hurlbert, D. F., & Whittaker, K. E. (1991). The role of masturbation in marital and sexual satisfaction: A comparative study of female masturbators and nonmasturbators. Journal of Sex Education and Therapy, 17(4), 272-282
  8. ↑ Davis, D., Shaver, P. R., Widaman, K. F., Vernon, M. L., Follette, W. C., & Beitz, K. (2006). “I can’t get no satisfaction”: Insecure attachment, inhibited sexual communication, and sexual dissatisfaction. Personal Relationships,13(4), 465-483
  9. ↑ Byers, E. S., & Demmons, S. (1999). Sexual satisfaction and sexual self‐disclosure within dating relationships. Journal of Sex Research, 36(2), 180-189
  1. ↑ Haavio-Mannila, E., & Kontula, O. (1997). Correlates of increased sexual satisfaction. Archives of sexual behavior, 26(4), 399-419
  2. ↑http://www.healthline.com/health/healthy-sex-partner-communication#AWidespreadProblem2
  3. ↑http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/sexual-health/in-depth/womens-sexual-health/art-20047771
  4. ↑ Byers, E. S., & Demmons, S. (1999). Sexual satisfaction and sexual self‐disclosure within dating relationships. Journal of Sex Research, 36(2), 180-189
  5. ↑http://www.healthline.com/health/healthy-sex-partner-communication#AWidespreadProblem2
  6. ↑http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/sexual-health/in-depth/womens-sexual-health/art-20047771?pg=2
  7. ↑https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/insight-therapy/201403/why-arent-we-talking-our-partners-about-sex
  8. ↑http://www.stanleyducharme.com/resources/talkingaboutsexualmatters.htm
  9. ↑https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/all-about-sex/201207/the-real-problem-porn-its-bad-sex
  10. ↑http://www.thehealthsite.com/sexual-health/sex-tip-8-focus-on-foreplay-for-a-great-sex-life/
  11. ↑ Herbenick, D., Reece, M., Hensel, D., Sanders, S., Jozkowski, K., & Fortenberry, J. D. (2011). Association of lubricant use with women’s sexual pleasure, sexual satisfaction, and genital symptoms: A prospective daily diary study. The journal of sexual medicine, 8(1), 202-212
  12. ↑ Haavio-Mannila, E., & Kontula, O. (1997). Correlates of increased sexual satisfaction. Archives of sexual behavior, 26(4), 399-419
  13. ↑http://www.avert.org/fact-sheet-condoms-lubricants.htm
  14. ↑http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/vaginal-dryness/basics/lifestyle-home-remedies/con-20029192
  15. ↑http://www.healthyhorns.utexas.edu/hs_lube.html
  16. ↑http://www.avert.org/fact-sheet-condoms-lubricants.htm
  17. ↑ Herbenick, D., Reece, M., Hensel, D., Sanders, S., Jozkowski, K., & Fortenberry, J. D. (2011). Association of lubricant use with female sexual pleasure, sexual satisfaction, and genital symptoms: A prospective daily diary study. The journal of sexual medicine, 8(1), 202-212
  18. ↑http://www.healthyhorns.utexas.edu/hs_lube.html
  19. ↑http://www.avert.org/fact-sheet-condoms-lubricants.htm
  20. ↑http://www.counselheal.com/articles/3715/20130204/noisy-sex-really-better-study-reveals.htm
  21. ↑ Haavio-Mannila, E., & Kontula, O. (1997). Correlates of increased sexual satisfaction. Archives of sexual behavior, 26(4), 399-419
  22. ↑http://www.everydayhealth.com/sexual-health/dr-laura-berman-how-couples-have-fun-with-fantasies.aspx
  23. ↑http://www.lovepanky.com/flirting-flings/wild-secrets/how-to-create-sexual-chemistry
  24. ↑ Haavio-Mannila, E., & Kontula, O. (1997). Correlates of increased sexual satisfaction. Archives of sexual behavior, 26(4), 399-419
  25. ↑http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/sexual-health/resources/HLV-20049432
  26. ↑http://www.aamft.org/iMIS15/AAMFT/Content/Consumer_Updates/Sexual_Health.aspx
  27. ↑http://www.bettersex.com/adult-sex-education/movie-collections/sp-better-sex-video-series-sexplorations-2229.aspx
  28. ↑https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/erectile-dysfunction/symptoms-causes/syc-20355776
  29. ↑http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/erectile-dysfunction/basics/treatment/con-20034244
  30. ↑http://www.aamft.org/iMIS15/AAMFT/Content/Consumer_Updates/Sexual_Health.aspx
  31. ↑http://psychcentral.com/lib/an-overview-of-sex-therapy/

About This Article

Medical Disclaimer

The content of this article is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis, or treatment. You should always contact your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before starting, changing, or stopping any kind of health treatment.

If you want to make your sex better, work on communicating openly with your partner so they know what makes you feel comfortable and safe. While it can be scary at first, you should try to share with your partner what you like and what makes you feel good, since doing so will improve your intimacy. Before you dive into having sex, make sure to spend plenty of time on foreplay, since this will make the sex last longer and feel more enjoyable. You can try kissing, caressing, and complimenting each other’s bodies. When it comes down to the act itself, consider using a personal lubrication product to make things feel more comfortable. To learn how to keep things unpredictable in the bedroom, read more from our Relationship co-author!

Battery management is a never-ending struggle. To be on the safe side, you likely won’t want to leave your home with less than 100% battery, but continually checking your charging iPhone is a hassle. Instead of continuously monitoring your battery’s power level, have your iPhone tell you when it’s reached a full charge.

Scour your iPhone’s settings all you want, but you won’t find any options or features that will notify you when your battery is full. Instead, you have to get a little creative, using Apple’s Shortcuts app and automation to create something that doesn’t exist on iOS as a default feature.

A shortcut is a tool you create that allows you to perform multiple actions at once. You can calculate a tip, send birthday wishes automatically, and even remove water from your iPhone’s speaker. Automations are similar to shortcuts, but, as their name suggests, they’re automatic. Instead of you pulling the trigger, automations will go off on their own, based on conditions you set.

Step 1: Make Sure You’re Running iOS 14

The first thing you’ll need to do to create a battery level automation is to update your iPhone to iOS 14 if it’s not already. Only iOS 14 and later has the automation we need for this to work.

However, that doesn’t mean you’re out of luck if you’re still using iOS 13. There’s another battery level shortcut that you can build that’ll tell you when your iPhone hits a 100% charge, but you activate it manually before it starts monitoring your battery status. So it’s not entirely automated, but it’s automated enough that you can set your iPhone down and forget about it until your charge is complete. It uses an alarm sound, so if you’re looking for something louder, whether you’re on iOS 13 or iOS 14, it may be what you’re looking for.

Step 2: Disable the Battery Optimization Setting

To prevent you from overcharging, which reduces your battery’s overall lifespan, Apple has a feature called “Optimize Battery Charging” that blocks your iPhone from charging past 80% when it doesn’t think you need the extra juice. When it anticipates that you need 100%, it will ignore the setting automatically, but it’s not perfect. Turn the feature off if you want to reach 100% any time you’re charging.

Step 3: Start Your Battery Level Automation

Open Shortcuts, then tap the “Automation” tab along the bottom. Next, tap “Create Personal Automation.” If you don’t see that, tap the plus (+) icon in the top right to find it. Now, scroll down and select “Battery Level” from the list of options. On the Battery Level setup screen, move the slider to the far right, then ensure “Equals 100%” is selected. Finally, hit “Next” to continue.

Step 4: Fill Out the Battery Level Automation

Now, it’s time to add all of the actions that will be performed once your battery reaches the set level. Select “Add Action” or tap the search box at the bottom, then look for and select “Vibrate Device.”

Next, hit the plus (+) sign or the search box, and search for and select “Show Notification.” By default, the notification will say “Hello World,” so you’ll want to change that to something like “Battery Full” or “Stop Charging Me.” Make it say whatever you want it to be. Just tap “Hello World,” delete the text, then type in your personalized alert.

By default, the notification will play a sound when it hits 100% (unless your iPhone is muted). If you don’t want it to do that, or if you want to verify that it will play a sound, tap “Show More” in the Notifications action. Then, make sure the “Play Sound” switch is toggled on or off, as you desire, and hit “Next” in the top right.

Alternatively, you can skip the “Show Notification” action altogether if you just want the Shortcuts app to give you one notification that says, “Battery level reached 100 percent.” That will appear no matter what, once the shortcut automation runs automatically. If you want a sound still, add the “Play Sound” action instead.

Tip: Customize What Happens When You Reach 100%

Instead of setting a vibration, notification, and notification sound, you could do other things. For example, you could use the “Play Music” action to start a song from the Music app. You could even use “Play Podcast” if you like listing to podcasts on your way out the door. There any many actions you can have your iPhone perform, and many possible combinations. So browse the actions and play around until you find something that works better for you.

Step 5: Make the Shortcut Truly Automated

On the following settings page that describes the workflow, disable the slider next to “Ask Before Running,” then tap “Don’t Ask” on the pop-up. Apple has it enabled by default to prevent automations from taking control of your iPhone without your consent, but since you want your iPhone to take it upon itself to tell you when it reaches a 100% charge, you won’t want “Ask Before Running” enabled.

Now, just tap “Done” to save the automation.

Step 6: Wait for Your New 100% Charge Notification

With your automation in place, all that’s left to do is wait until your iPhone’s battery hits 100%. If you built the automation correctly, you should receive a notification from Shortcuts with your chosen text.

Keep Your Connection Secure Without a Monthly Bill. Get a lifetime subscription to VPN Unlimited for all your devices with a one-time purchase from the new Gadget Hacks Shop, and watch Hulu or Netflix without regional restrictions, increase security when browsing on public networks, and more.

Durgedurg

New member
  • Oct 29, 2007
  • #1
  • On your original Nintendo DS you are supposed to scream and blow etc, to your games i certain kind of situations,

    but how do you do that on an emulator? i just cant scream “or blow” at my computer? how do i solve this technical conflict? there must be something in the emulator thats installed to make things work?

    Please help me? / Durgedurg

    New member
    • Oct 29, 2007
  • #2
  • Durgedurg

    New member
    • Oct 29, 2007
  • #3
  • Do i have to install any program or something so the emulator can “feel” the microphone?

    New member
    • Oct 29, 2007
  • #4
  • ZeldaFan#1

    New member
    • Oct 29, 2007
  • #5
  • azoreseuropa

    New member
    • Oct 29, 2007
  • #6
  • Yes, iDeaS and no$gba emulators supports that.

    I am using no$gba a lots and it’s working perfectly. Try use your webcam with microphone and make sure all sound is on from your pc and even no$gba’s sound must be on as well.

    It’s working 100% perfectly.

    MacBook Pro 13″ with a Retina October 2014 (Purchased on March 28, 2015) – macOS Sierra (10.12.1)

    iPhone 6+ – iOS 10.1.1

    EMU: SDL MAME – SNES9X – FCEUX – Gens32 – No$gba – DeSmuME – ePSXe – SSF – NeoPop – OSwan – Mupen64Plus – PCSX2 – Dolphin

    Durgedurg

    New member
    • Oct 30, 2007
  • #7
  • i have the ideas emulator. but it doesnt work. how do i do to get the microphone to connect to the emulator?

    i tried to use the NO$GBA but i cant run that emulator

    azoreseuropa

    New member
    • Oct 30, 2007
  • #8
  • i have the ideas emulator. but it doesnt work. how do i do to get the microphone to connect to the emulator?

    i tried to use the NO$GBA but i cant run that emulator

    Nothing. You just connect microphone to your PC and have emulator read it!

    Make sure your microphone’s sound is on and your emulator of no$gba’s sound is on in OPTIONS and you are ready. It’s working perfectly for me.

    MacBook Pro 13″ with a Retina October 2014 (Purchased on March 28, 2015) – macOS Sierra (10.12.1)

    iPhone 6+ – iOS 10.1.1

    EMU: SDL MAME – SNES9X – FCEUX – Gens32 – No$gba – DeSmuME – ePSXe – SSF – NeoPop – OSwan – Mupen64Plus – PCSX2 – Dolphin

    As auto manufacturers and Apple have progressed forward in their relationship to make your car as smart as possible, occasionally not-smart things happen. Like your vehicle blasting music (or the latest audiobook chapter) into your ears when you first get in the car.

    While the original impulse may have been a helpful one on the part of the manufacturers — surely, users want to hear their music first thing — it’s often ended up a nuisance. Spoiler: If you’re listening to a steamy romance book on your AirPods, you don’t want that chapter to blast in the car when driving your mother to the mall.

    Unfortunately, Apple’s provided no easy “Turn off auto-playing music over Bluetooth” switch directly on your iPhone or iPad. But you can still solve this somewhat irksome issue with a couple of other fixes.

    • Option 1: Disable auto-play settings in your car
    • Option 2: Disable settings on your iPhone
    • Option 3: Send Apple feedback

    Option 1: Check your car to see if there are any auto-play settings you can disable

    Depending on your car’s make and model, it may offer its own auto-playing Bluetooth settings, separate from your iPhone (or any other smartphone. Before you go diving to shut off your iPhone, check there.

    Even if there’s no auto-play disable switch in your car, you may be able to find a default volume setting, which can limit the volume of auto-playing music or audiobooks.

    Option 2: Tell your iPhone to cut it out

    By default, your iPhone will try to play its last audio source when you connect to your car; for most people, that’s your music library (in alphabetical order), but if you’ve been listening to an audiobook, podcast, or other app, your car may try to start playing from that app, instead.

    Depending on the circumstance, there are a few ways to keep your iPhone from automatically playing audio you don’t want to hear.

    Add a silent track to your music library

    You can use the iPhone’s propensity to play songs in alphabetical order to trick your car’s Bluetooth stereo: Find a silent song like John Cage’s 4’33” and rename it so that it shows up as the very first song in your library; next time, when you get into the car, it should auto-play the sweet, sweet sound of silence.

    Tell Siri to stop

    If you tell Siri “Stop playing” at any point, your iPhone will disable all noise. Conveniently, triggering Siri will also shut off your music.

    Force quit the Music (or any other) app

    If your unwanted audio is coming from the Music app or any other third-party application, you can double-press the Home button to force quit the respective app and immediately bring an end to the noise.

    Turn off CarPlay

    This tip comes from bed269 in our forums, who notes that even if your Bluetooth stereo system doesn’t officially support CarPlay, you can use the Restrictions section of the Settings app to disable the feature — which, in turn, seems to disable auto-play. That said, if you rely on an actual CarPlay system, this may not be the best route to take. If you want to give it a go, however, here’s how to do it.

    1. Before you get in the car, open the Settings app.
    2. Tap General > Restrictions.
    3. Select Enable Restrictions.

    Enter a passcode.

  • Repeat that passcode.
  • Toggle the CarPlay switch to Off.
  • Turn off CarPlay in iOS 12

    In iOS 12, your app and content restrictions are now found under the Screen Time section of the Settings app.

    1. Open Settings on your iPhone.
    2. Tap Screen Time.

    Tap Content & Privacy restrictions.

    Switch CarPlay off.

    Turn off Cellular Data

    True, this will only stop streaming audio — but if you primarily stream your content, this will put a quick end to any unwanted chatter.

    Option 3: Send Apple Feedback

    Ultimately, none of the above suggestions are iron-proof fixes to this problem: The best way to get your iPhone to stop automatically playing is to ask Apple to put in a Settings switch to make that happen.

    Questions?

    Let us know below.

    Updated June 2018: Added instructions for turning off CarPlay in iOS 12.

    Get More iPhone

    Apple iPhone

    • iPhone 12 and 12 Pro Deals
    • iPhone 12 Pro/Max FAQ
    • iPhone 12/Mini FAQ
    • Best iPhone 12 Pro Cases
    • Best iPhone 12 Cases
    • Best iPhone 12 mini Cases
    • Best iPhone 12 Chargers
    • Best iPhone 12 Pro Screen Protectors
    • Best iPhone 12 Screen Protectors
    • iPhone 12 Pro From $999 at Apple
    • iPhone 12 from $699 at Apple

    We may earn a commission for purchases using our links. Learn more.

    20 million U.K. iPhone, iPad users could get compensation in £1.5B lawsuit

    A lawsuit in the U.K. against Apple is going to trial over claims the company has overcharged App Store users because of its dominant position in the iOS app market.

    iOS gaming recap: Is that Pokémon Go meets. basketball?

    Ever wanted to play basketball but as Pokémon Go? What about hopping into some more dino action now that the Jurassic World series has seemingly wrapped up? Check out this week in iOS gaming.

    Huge Apple TV promotion now live ahead of major upgrade

    You can now get a $50 gift card when you buy either of Apple’s TV models. The company is likely cleaning house ahead of a rumored big upgrade.

    Play Pokémon Go more comfortably on your iPhone with these PopSockets

    Show off your love of Pokémon with these adorable PopSockets, perfect for iPhone. There are plenty of designs to choose from so you can pick the one you like best.

    By Ed Hardy • 4:00 pm, July 7, 2020

    • How-To
    • Top stories

    This Belkin adapter is one option to let your iPhone connect to Ethernet.
    Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

    iPhones are, by definition, wireless devices. But an Ethernet connection brings speed, security and reliability. Fortunately, adding a wired Ethernet connection to your iPhone is very easy.

    This post contains affiliate links. Cult of Mac may earn a commission when you use our links to buy items.

    Why Ethernet for iPhone

    An iPhone can connect to cellular networks around the world, but sometimes these are weak inside buildings. Wi-Fi usually comes to the rescue, but it’s also is prone to slowdowns and dead spots. In contrast, Ethernet is reliable and fast.

    And it’s more secure. Encryption can do a lot, but wireless networks are inherently less secure than wired ones.

    It’s more hassle, though. You might consider only turning to Ethernet when you’re downloading something huge. Or when doing online banking. It’s a nice option to fall back on.

    Note that these suggestions also work for iPads with Lightning ports. An iPad Pro can use a USB-C ethernet adapter, like this one from Plugable.

    Belkin Ethernet + Power Adapter with Lightning Connector

    The simplest solution is the Belkin Ethernet + Power Adapter with Lightning Connector. Plug this accessory into your iPhone’s Lightning port, then run an Ethernet cable between it and your router and you’re connected. That’s literally all it takes. It’ll even take precedence over all your other connections.

    You can specify network settings in the iOS Settings application, but these are optional. Belkin makes an app for this adapter, but it’s only needed to update the firmware. It’s unnecessary just to get a network connection.

    The hardware is bulky, which isn’t ideal. But at least it comes with a Lightning port so you can continue to charge your iPhone while it’s connected.

    The maximum speed is 480 Mbps. In my tests, this peripheral worked flawlessly, and connected at 100% of the speed offered by my consumer-grade router.

    Pick up the Belkin Ethernet + Power Adapter with Lightning Connector on its maker’s website for $99.99. Or Amazon sells it for 10% less: $89.99.

    Apple USB Ethernet Adapter and Lightning to USB 3 Adapter

    If you’re looking for a slightly cheaper alternative, you can assemble your own iPhone Ethernet networking adapter from a couple of Apple accessories.

    The Apple USB Ethernet Adapter can’t be used directly with an iPhone because it connects to a USB-A port. But the Apple Lightning to USB 3 Adapter includes just the USB-A port needed. Attach one to the other, than plug them into your handset and you have an Ethernet connection.

    Many people already have Apple’s USB adapter because it can be used to connect external drives to the iPhone. But you might not realize it works with the Ethernet adapter too.

    This setup functions much the same as Belkin’s adapter, but maxes out at 100 Mbps. And because it comes in two pieces it’s a bit more clumsy. Plus, you have to run power to the USB adapter’s Lightning port for this combination to work with the iPhone.

    If you decide to go this route, the Apple USB Ethernet Adapter is $29, and is the same on Amazon. The Apple Lightning to USB 3 Adapter is $39, and is also the same on Amazon. The pair totals up a bit less than the Belkin Ethernet adapter.