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How to manually update your chromebook when the software is too old

They don’t have the mass-market appeal of Macs or Windows machines, but Chromebooks are great alternatives. They boot up quickly, are safer, and are usually much less expensive than the competition. Chromebooks also have a leg-up on the competition in another area: updates. Not only is it easy to update your Chromebook, but updates only take a few minutes to download and install. By the time PCs and Macs finish updating, you’re up and running with your Chromebook. Not to mention direct updates from Google make it possible to get the most recent software quickly.

Here’s our step-by-step guide on how to perform a Chromebook update.

QUICK ANSWER

To update your Chromebook, open the Settings app, click About Chrome OS in the left pane, and click the Check for updates button in the right pane. Wait for the download to complete, and restart your Chromebook to finish the update when prompted.

How to do a Chromebook update

  • Connect your Chrome OS device to the internet over Wi-Fi or ethernet.
  • Click on the settings tray in the bottom-right corner of the screen.
  • Enter the settings using the gear icon.
  • Click on About Chrome OS at the bottom of the left column.
  • Select the Check for updates option.
  • If there is an update available, your Chromebook will begin downloading and installing it.
  • Once the update finishes, click Restart.

Of course, this procedure is only needed if you want to accelerate the process and manually push an update. While the ability to do this is nice, it’s not always necessary. Chromebooks will get updated automatically. When this happens, you’ll see an Update Available notification. You can then click on Restart to update to finish the process.

Can you update an old Chromebook?

If you see a message that says your Chromebook is too old to get updates, there is no way to force an update.

Is my Chromebook too old to update?

Chromebooks tend to get updates for longer than most computers, up to around five years. If your Chromebook is too old to update, you will see a message that says so.

How do I force my Chromebook to update?

Chromebooks usually auto-update and prompt for a restart when done. The method we have described above is the way to force an update if you haven’t received an update automatically.

Justin Duino is the Reviews Director at How-To Geek (and LifeSavvy Media as a whole). He has spent the last decade writing about Android, smartphones, and other mobile technology. In addition to his written work, he has also been a regular guest commentator on CBS News and BBC World News and Radio to discuss current events in the technology industry. Read more.

Brady Gavin has been immersed in technology for 15 years and has written over 150 detailed tutorials and explainers. He’s covered everything from Windows 10 registry hacks to Chrome browser tips. Brady has a diploma in Computer Science from Camosun College in Victoria, BC. Read more.

Google updates Chrome with major new versions every six weeks and security patches more often than that. Chrome normally downloads updates automatically but won’t automatically restart the browser to install them. Here’s how to immediately check for updates and install them.

How to Update Google Chrome

While Google Chrome downloads and prepares updates in the background, you still need to restart your browser to perform the installation. Because some people keep Chrome open for days—maybe even weeks—the update could be idly waiting to install, putting your computer at risk.

In Chrome on Windows, Mac, or Linux, click the three-dot menu icon in the top-right corner, hover your mouse cursor over “Help,” and select “About Google Chrome.” You can also type chrome://settings/help into Chrome’s location box and press Enter.

Chrome will check for any updates and immediately download them as soon as you open the About Google Chrome page.

If Chrome has already downloaded and is waiting to install an update, the menu icon will change to an up arrow and take on one of three colors, depending on how long the update has been available:

  • Green: An update has been available for two days
  • Orange: An update has been available for four days
  • Red: An update has been available for seven days

After the update has been installed—or if it’s been waiting for a few days—click “Relaunch” to finish the update process.

Warning: Make sure you save anything you’re working on in any open tabs. Chrome reopens the open tabs after the relaunch but doesn’t save any of the data contained in them.

If you’d rather wait to restart Chrome and finish up the work you’re doing, close the About Google Chrome tab. Chrome will install the update the next time you close and reopen it.

When you relaunch Chrome, and the update finally finishes installing, head back to chrome://settings/help and verify you’re running the latest version of Chrome. Chrome will say “Google Chrome is up to date” if you’ve already installed the latest updates.

Looking for how to update your Chromebook? The process is nearly identical.

Google Chrome is trying to avoid another Y2K style bug. We all remember the Y2K bug or the millennium bug the world experienced after we entered the first day of the last year in the 20th century. For those of you who do not remember it, when the date changed from 31st December 1999 to 1st January 2000, many systems around the world experienced major failures. This happened primarily because computer systems used to abbreviate the last two digits of the year to save space. When the year moved from ‘99’ to ‘00’, it resulted in malfunctioning of many softwares that were not able to recognize the correct year.

How does this affect Google Chrome? Well, Google Chrome, at present, is on its 96th version. The versions change everytime a new update is introduced to Google Chrome. Now, Google expects to release its 100th update sometime in the first half of 2022. This might cause many websites to experience the same doom of Y2K bug all over again due to errors in its user-agent string.

And Google Chrome is worried. When Chrome first updated itself from version 9 to version 10, there were major issues with many websites and they would not be displayed on Chrome browser at all. The main reason why it happened was because websites registered single digit before it, so many websites redirected to Google Chrome version 0, which did not exist and became incompatible for the latest version.

Now, as version 100 approaches, Google Chrome intends to not let it happen again.

Google Chrome offers runtime flag to avoid the disaster

In order to avoid the potential catastrophe, Google Chrome has introduced a feature flag in its 96th iteration. This new runtime flag will force the user-agent string to use the 100th version in its code and apply to both user-agent request header as well as Javascript API.

To help site owners prepare ahead of time, Google Chrome’s new flag called “chrome://flags/#force-major-version-to-100” has been made available in the 96th iteration of Chrome.

How can website owners test it out?

Google Chrome has introduced this link, which when you visit, checks if your browser is sending the user-agent string for Chrome’s 100th version or not. If going to that link displays a huge NO in red, then your string is not working as intended. However, that is fine.

Website owners can proceed to the next step where they can turn the flag on in Google Chrome and experiment with it. To open it, you must type “chrome://flags” in the address bar, and enable the hash #force-major-version-to-100 flag.

Revisiting the link after enabling the flag should give you a YES in green color, indicating that the 100th update of Google Chrome, whenever it may come, will not cause any issues for your website.

However, if you still see a NO, you should send your bug report to Web Compat so they can address it as soon as possible. For more information, check out this blog by Google Chrome.

Follow HT Tech for the latest tech news and reviews , also keep up with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. For our latest videos, subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Cameron Summerson is ex-Editor-in-Chief of Review Geek and served as an Editorial Advisor for How-To Geek and LifeSavvy. He covered technology for a decade and wrote over 4,000 articles and hundreds of product reviews in that time. He’s been published in print magazines and quoted as a smartphone expert in the New York Times. Read more.

If you buy a Chromebook that has been out for a while, there’s a small chance it could have an issue downloading the latest OS updates. Fortunately, getting your Chromebook to a completely up-to-date state isn’t impossible.

It’s unclear why this failure happens, but if a Chromebook sits on the same build for too long, it simply can’t pull the latest version from Google servers. Instead, it will kick back an error or tell you that the system is up to date when you know it isn’t.

The first solution is the simplest: change channels, then change back.

How to Change Channels on your Chromebook

Open the Settings menu by clicking the system tray and then the gear icon.

From there, click the “About Chrome” option. On the About page, you should see a “Change Channel” button under the “Channel” section. If you’re using the Material Design settings page (as I am in the screenshot below), this option is found under the “Detailed Build Information” section, instead.

On the “Change Channel” screen, switch to the “Beta” channel.

This should force the Chromebook to pull the latest version from the dev channel. After it’s finished and your Chromebook restarts, you can use this same method to move back to the Stable Channel. Just be aware this will force a “Power Wash,” resetting the device back to its factory state.

What to Do if That Doesn’t Work

If your Chromebook still won’t pull the update from the beta channel, you’ll need to use the Chromebook Recovery Utility.

This utility pulls a fresh copy of ChromeOS and installs it on a flash drive, so that you can then re-install the OS onto your machine. You’ll need a 4GB or larger flash drive and your Chromebook’s exact model number to do this. If you try to set it up from your Chromebook, however, there’s a chance it will auto-detect the model number, making it super easy.

From there, the recovery process is basically on autopilot. Again be aware that this will wipe all data on your Chromebook. For a more detailed look at how to use the Recovery Utility, check out the bottom third of our article on how to factory reset a Chromebook.

Getting a Chromebook that won’t update can be frustrating, but with a little time and patience, you can get that new machine up and running on the latest version of ChromeOS. Good luck!

They don’t have the mass-market appeal of Macs or Windows machines, but Chromebooks are great alternatives. They boot up quickly, are safer, and are usually much less expensive than the competition. Chromebooks also have a leg-up on the competition in another area: updates. Not only is it easy to update your Chromebook, but updates only take a few minutes to download and install. By the time PCs and Macs finish updating, you’re up and running with your Chromebook. Not to mention direct updates from Google make it possible to get the most recent software quickly.

Here’s our step-by-step guide on how to perform a Chromebook update.

QUICK ANSWER

To update your Chromebook, open the Settings app, click About Chrome OS in the left pane, and click the Check for updates button in the right pane. Wait for the download to complete, and restart your Chromebook to finish the update when prompted.

How to do a Chromebook update

  • Connect your Chrome OS device to the internet over Wi-Fi or ethernet.
  • Click on the settings tray in the bottom-right corner of the screen.
  • Enter the settings using the gear icon.
  • Click on About Chrome OS at the bottom of the left column.
  • Select the Check for updates option.
  • If there is an update available, your Chromebook will begin downloading and installing it.
  • Once the update finishes, click Restart.

Of course, this procedure is only needed if you want to accelerate the process and manually push an update. While the ability to do this is nice, it’s not always necessary. Chromebooks will get updated automatically. When this happens, you’ll see an Update Available notification. You can then click on Restart to update to finish the process.

Can you update an old Chromebook?

If you see a message that says your Chromebook is too old to get updates, there is no way to force an update.

Is my Chromebook too old to update?

Chromebooks tend to get updates for longer than most computers, up to around five years. If your Chromebook is too old to update, you will see a message that says so.

How do I force my Chromebook to update?

Chromebooks usually auto-update and prompt for a restart when done. The method we have described above is the way to force an update if you haven’t received an update automatically.

If you want to make sure you’re on the latest version of Google’s Chrome browser, here’s how to check and update on the desktop, Apple iOS, and Android devices.

You can get a lot done with Google Chrome, which is probably why its use dwarfs that of competing internet browsers like Edge, Firefox, and Safari. Ease of use is a top selling point, too, from cross-platform syncing to quiet updates.

For the most part, those updates are on auto-pilot; you don’t have to do much beyond opening and closing the browser window. But there are some exceptions. If you want to make sure Google is doing its job, here’s how.

Chrome’s Release Schedule

Google has a publicly available schedule (Opens in a new window) with estimated key dates and official release dates for upcoming versions of Chrome. These versions also include work done to update the Android, Chrome OS, desktop, and iOS versions of the browser.

The schedule typically has a new release every one or two months. Chrome 89, for example, arrived in March 2021, followed by Chrome 90 in April and Chrome 91 in late May. Chrome 92 is expected to release at the end of July and Chrome 93 will initially release at the end of August.

The updates are automatic; when they’re available, Chrome will apply them the next time you open your browser window. With so many users, it can take a few days to a full week for everyone to get the latest version. But if you don’t close your browser in between sessions, no update will come. In this instance you can also manually trigger an update to ensure you’re on the latest version.

Update Chrome on Desktop

You can tell when Chrome has an update because an update icon will appear in the top-right corner of the browser. Eventually that icon will go from green, to yellow, then to red if you don’t restart Chrome, signifying that your instance is now out of date.

If you have an update pending, click that icon in the right-hand corner and select Update Google Chrome. Chrome will then shut down and restart the browser with the update applied.

Which Version of Chrome Am I On?

If there’s no alert, but you want to know which version of Chrome you’re running, click the three-dot icon in the top-right corner and select Help > About Google Chrome. On mobile, open the three-dot menu and select Settings > About Chrome (Android) or Settings > Google Chrome (iOS).

Here, Chrome tells you which version you’re running—in my case, Version 90.0.4430.212 (Official Build) (64-bit). This page will also remind you of any pending updates and give the option to install them by clicking the Relaunch button.

Update on iPhone

Most iPhone users probably have apps set to automatically update. To check the status of this setting, navigate to Settings > App Store > App Updates and toggle it on (or off).

Chrome OS isn’t like other operating systems — and the way it handles upgrades is no exception.

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In many ways, Google’s Chrome OS platform is really starting to feel like a desktop version of Android. It looks like Android, it acts like Android, and it even runs Android apps. But for all their similarities, Chrome OS and Android still differ in some pretty significant ways.

One of those is how the two operating systems handle upgrades. Software updates on Chrome OS are much simpler, more frequent, and more consistent than what you see on Android — to put it mildly — and you as the user have far more visibility into what exactly is happening and what’s ahead.

Whether you’re already using Chrome OS or just thinking about giving it a whirl, here are some important things to know and remember.

1. Chrome OS upgrades happen automatically and quietly, with no annoying delays or notifications.

The first rule of Chrome OS upgrades is that your device doesn’t talk about Chrome OS upgrades. Google’s software updates itself automatically in the background while you’re using your Chromebook; the system won’t pester you to reboot or make you wait while it applies new software at startup (with the exception being the very first time you power up and sign into a new Chrome OS device).

You’ll see a small arrow icon in the lower-right corner of the screen, near the clock, whenever a new update has been downloaded and is ready to go. If you open it, the system will offer you the opportunity to apply the update immediately; otherwise, it’ll just take effect on its own with no fanfare the next time you restart.

You can manually force a Chromebook to check for updates by going into its Help screen (chrome://help) — but unless you’re just impatient and itching for something new, there’s really no need to do that. The updates will always show up and take care of themselves in short order.

2. Chrome OS upgrades arrive every two to three weeks — sometimes even more frequently — regardless of what device you have.

Software updates on Chrome OS are delivered multiple times a month — and since they’re sent to all devices directly from Google, they generally show up for everyone at more or less the same time. Device-makers can’t modify the operating system as they can with Android, so there’s no real variance in the software from one device to the next and thus no need for manufacturers to be involved in the rollout process.

Officially, the regular stable version of Chrome OS is updated every two to three weeks with minor fixes and every six weeks with more significant revisions. Sometimes, though, upgrades arrive even more frequently than that.

3. You can step up your Chrome OS update schedule and get early access to new features if you want.

Like Google’s Chrome browser, Chrome OS has three different channels from which you can choose: the Stable channel, which provides fully tested and polished software and is the best bet for most users; the Beta channel, which is updated every week or so and sees new features more than a month ahead of their Stable channel release; and the Dev channel, which is often updated multiple times a week and includes cutting-edge stuff that’s still actively being developed (and often rough around the edges or sometimes even completely nonfunctional as a result).

If you want to try out a different channel, type chrome://help into the address bar of a browser tab on your Chromebook. Click “Detailed build information,” then click “Change channel.” Select the channel you want and follow the steps the system provides to complete the process.

Just be aware that anything other than Stable can — by its very nature — make your system less stable to use, since it relies on software that’s still being tested and developed instead of a polished final release. The Dev channel in particular comes with a warning that it’s subject to bugs and should be selected only by advanced users who are interested in seeing what’s in the works and don’t mind the occasional glitch.

4. You can always find out what’s new in a Chrome OS update — if you know where to look.

Even though Chrome OS itself doesn’t typically jump and shout about incoming upgrades, Google does make detailed info about what’s new readily available for the curious among us. The easiest way to keep tabs on releases is to follow the official Chrome Releases blog. Look for the posts involving the Chrome OS channel you use (“Stable Channel Update for Chrome OS,” for instance), and click inside to find out what’s changed with any given update.

5. Chrome OS devices don’t receive updates forever, but they do get them for a pretty long time.

Google says all Chrome OS devices now receive regular upgrades for a minimum of six and a half years from when their chipset first appeared on the platform — which usually ends up meaning any given device will be updated for at least five years from its initial sale date. In some cases, the window ends up being even longer.

(Note: An earlier version of this story stated that the upgrade guarantee was six and a half years from a device’s launch date, but Google has clarified that the term is actually now tied to the launch of the chipset, not the device itself — a change from the way things used to be handled.)

6. You can check to see how long any Chrome OS device will receive updates right now — or even before you buy it.

Google maintains a Chrome OS end-of-life database that lists out exactly when every Chromebook (and Chromebox) will stop receiving OS updates. It tends to be updated quite quickly as new devices launch — so anytime you’re thinking about buying a Chrome OS product, mosey on over to that page first so you’ll be fully informed about how long it’ll remain current.

One important footnote to keep in mind: Devices’ end-of-life dates do sometimes end up being pushed back later than what’s initially listed — thus giving you a longer than expected period of updates — but Google promises it’ll never go the other way, and you’ll never end up receiving a shorter window of support than what that page had promised.

And with that, congratulations: You’re now officially a Chrome OS Upgrade Expert. Please pick up your certificate of completion on the way out (optional) and bring me a cookie and/or freshly baked pie (strongly encouraged).*

* Hey, it’s part of the job description. Don’t look at me — I don’t make the rules.

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Contributing Editor JR Raphael serves up tasty morsels about the human side of technology. Hungry for more? Join him on Twitter or sign up for his weekly newsletter to get fresh tips and insight in your inbox every Friday.

I f you have an ancient device that isn’t receiving any more updates, then the odds are good that someone, somewhere, is going to find and exploit a vulnerability in it that nobody is interested or able to fix anymore. This is why we preach that you should always keep your wifi router updated with the latest firmware, and the same goes for your old-school Android phone—especially with the news that more than 1 billion older Android devices aren’t receiving security updates anymore.

The report from Which? claims that two out of every five Android users worldwide no longer receive security updates for their older Android devices. And while this might sound like something you can just brush off, since who cares about old devices anyway, it’s apparently not that difficult to take advantage of these gaping security holes. As Which? describes:

“Which? experts took a selection of affected phones and tablets into its labs, including handsets still available to buy from online marketplaces such as Amazon, and found they could easily be hit by a range of malware and other threats.

Researchers tested a range of phones including models from Motorola, Samsung, Sony and LG/Google and found vulnerability to hacks including enabling personal information to be stolen, a hacker to take complete control over the phone or large bills for services that the phone owner hasn’t used themselves.

Recently out-of-support devices won’t immediately have problems, but without security updates, the risk to the user of being hacked goes up exponentially. Generally speaking, the older the phone, the greater the risk.”

By Phillip Tracy published 30 September 19

Update Sept 30: Google has extended the life of eight Chromebook models: Lenovo Flex 11 Chromebook, Lenovo 100e Chromebook (2nd Gen), Lenovo N23 Yoga Chromebook, Lenovo 300e Chromebook (1st and 2nd Gen), Lenovo IdeaPad S330 Chromebook, Lenovo IdeaPad C330 Chromebook, Poin2 Chromebook 14. Support for these laptops was due to expire on June 2022 but has been extended to June 2025.

Are you thinking about buying a Chromebook? If so, find out how old the model is or risk purchasing an unsupported laptop.

As it turns out, every Chromebook as an expiration date on which Google stops supporting the device. As reported by The Register, Google will provide new hardware with 6.5 years of auto-update support.

While that may sound like a long time (Chromebooks were first introduced just 8 years ago), the timer starts counting down from the time “when the first device on the platform is released.” We’ve reached out to Google for clarification, but that vague phrasing seems to suggest that support begins when the first unit of a specific model is released.

Google’s support page on the matter also states that if a manufacturer releases a device on a “1-year-old hardware platform” then it will have only 5.5 years of auto-update support remaining.

That wouldn’t be a problem if Chromebooks were frequently refreshed. However, some older models, especially budget notebooks like the Samsung Chromebook 3, have been selling as new for years. In fact, Google’s documents show that the Chromebook 3, one of our favorite budget Chromebooks, will receive support for only two more years.

So, what happens when the Auto Update Expiration date expires? First, Google will stop pushing automatic updates to that specific laptop model, which means it won’t get the latest Chrome OS features or security patches. Also, that model will no longer receive technical support and business users and teachers won’t be able to use the Google Admin console or other tools to manage their devices.

Unfortunately, some users found out about Google’s end-of-life support the hard way by purchasing a new Chromebook only to find out that it would stop receiving auto-updates within a few years.

“My Dad just got a big FU notification on the Chromebook he bought new less than 3 years ago that it is now out of support under the Google AUE policy,” Martin Woodware wrote in a tweet.

How to check if your Chromebook’s support will expire

Before you buy a Chromebook, check to see when the model was first released. Unfortunately, that information isn’t typically provided by laptop manufacturers. Instead, the easiest way is to visit the support page on Google’s Auto Update policy.

Here, Google lists all Chromebook models and their corresponding expiry dates. Models due to expire in less than 90 days are highlighted in bold.

Once your device reaches its Auto Update Expiration date, you will receive a notification saying “This device will no longer receive the latest software updates. Please consider upgrading.” You can still use a Chromebook beyond its expiration date, but it will stop receiving important updates that give it new features and crucial security patches, so we strongly suggest you avoid doing so.

Phillip Tracy is the assistant managing editor at Laptop Mag where he reviews laptops, phones and other gadgets while covering the latest industry news. After graduating with a journalism degree from the University of Texas at Austin, Phillip became a tech reporter at the Daily Dot. There, he wrote reviews for a range of gadgets and covered everything from social media trends to cybersecurity. Prior to that, he wrote for RCR Wireless News covering 5G and IoT. When he’s not tinkering with devices, you can find Phillip playing video games, reading, traveling or watching soccer.

When you’re home visiting the family, often times you’ll find yourself updating a few computers that have fallen behind. While updating software isn’t hard to do, you’ve probably run into a family member or two who have yet to learn how. This guide is for them.

To help you out in your tech support role, we’re offering easy-to-email guides to teach beginners the basics of using a computer. You can find all of the guides here . Today we’re going to take a look at keeping system software and third-party applications up-to-date. You’ll find the instructions below, but the same instructions are also available in video form above.

System Software Updates

First, let’s look at updating system software. You always want to keep your system updated as much as possible as updates most often focus on bug fixes, so your system will run better, and additional security, so your computer doesn’t end up with a virus or something like that. To update system software on a Mac, just follow these steps:

  1. Click the Apple menu (up in the top left corner of your screen) and choose “Software Update.”
  2. Software Update will load and check for updates. When it finishes, it’ll let you know if there are any updates to install. Click “Show Details” to see any updates Software Update wants to install, or just click the “Install” button to install them.

The process is similar on Windows computers. To update your system software on Windows, just follow these steps:

  1. Click the Windows icon in your task bar to open up the Start menu. (If you don’t already know, this icon is in the bottom left corner of your screen.)
  2. Click “All Programs.”
  3. Click, “Windows Update.”
  4. After Windows Update opens, click “Check for Updates” on the top left side of the window.
  5. Once Windows finishes checking for updates, click the “Install” button.
  6. When the updates have finished installing, restart your computer (if prompted).

Software Update (Mac) and Windows Update (Windows) will periodically run all by themselves and ask you to update. Nonetheless, you may not notice this or ignore it from time to time, so it’s good to check yourself once in a while.

Microsoft Office Professional 2021 Lifetime License

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Enjoy Microsoft’s suite of essentials with a one-time purchase and installation, as opposed to that fee you’re paying every month.

Note: If you’re worried about messing up your computer, don’t. It’s very hard to make a mistake when updating your software nowadays, and Windows Update even creates a restore point for you in case an update goes south. If you’re on a Mac and already backing up with Time Machine, you’ll be able to restore as well. The chances of something going wrong are pretty slim, however, so as long as you don’t turn off your machine during an update you have nothing to worry about.

Third-Party Software Updates

Third-party software describes any software created by a third party and did not come with your computer’s operating system. This primarily includes any software you, yourself, have installed on your machine. Because third-party software is created by different people, the way you update it varies.

Web browsers, such as Firefox and Google Chrome, update themselves. You don’t have to do anything at all. Other software may also update itself, or notify you of an update so you can choose whether to install it or not. Most software will allow you to check for updates manually. The location varies, but you’ll almost always find a “Check for Updates” option in one of the program’s menus. Some software will not notify you of updates and you’ll have to visit the software’s web site in order to find out if a new version is available. If it is, just download the available update or the most recent version and install it like it’s a new program. If it asks you to replace the previous version, it’s okay to allow that. Finally, if you downloaded an application from the Mac App Store, simply open the Mac App Store, click the “Updates” tab, and install any available updates.

Those are the basics of updating software. It’s a good idea to set a day and time each week to check for new updates to make sure you don’t forget. It only takes a few minutes and your computer will be better off for it.

Emailable Tech Support is a tri-weekly series of easy-to-share guides for the less tech savvy people in your life. Got a beginner tech support question you constantly answer? Let us know at [email protected] Remember, when you’re just starting out computing, there’s very little that’s too basic to learn.

You can follow Adam Dachis, the author of this post, on Twitter and Facebook . If you’d like to contact him, Twitter is the most effective means of doing so.

The new Microsoft Edge isn’t part of Windows 10 anymore and is updated automatically more frequently. But you can make sure it’s up-to-date manually, too.

Microsoft’s new version of its Edge browser built with Chromium is now available. Microsoft is rolling it out to Windows 10 users via Windows Update, but anyone can download and install Edge now. In addition, the browser is now truly cross-platform and available for Windows 10, 8, 7, macOS, and mobile, and Linux.

Also, since the new Edge isn’t part of Windows 10 anymore, Microsoft can automatically update the new browser more frequently. The company should be adding new and improvements approximately every six weeks. But there may be times when you want to manually check for updates to make sure you have the latest version up and running.

Manually Update Microsoft Edge on Desktop

To manually grab updates for the new Microsoft Edge, head click the Options (three dots) button in the upper-right corner. Then go to Help and feedback > About Microsoft Edge.

If an update is available, it will start downloading automatically. Then you will need to restart the browser to complete the update process.

Note: If an update is automatically available, you’ll see a small green or orange arrow notification on the Options button. In that case, all you need to do is restart the browser to get the latest updates.

That’s all there is to it. If you’re a Chrome user, you’ll have no problem diving right into the new Microsoft Edge. Although Microsoft is making the browser its own, there are some differences. For more on that, check out our article on how to get started with the new Edge.

Get New Edge Features First

While the stable version of Edge will get new features roughly every six weeks, you can be the first to try them. Like any browser built using the Chromium code, early beta and dev build through the Microsoft Edge Insider Channels. So if you’re interested in testing out new upcoming features, check out how to install the Chromium Edge Beta.

Google’s ambitions to become your only password manager strengthened Friday with several security updates across the Chrome and mobile, including iOS. Google said it will administer site logins on Android, create new passwords for those that may have been compromised, and more.

Google declined to offer a timetable for these changes to be implemented, saying that they would be rolled out over the next couple of months.

Interestingly, Google said that it would step in to manage passwords on iPhones. You can already authorize Google to manage and store passwords on Android, of course, but Google said it will offer iPhones the same capability. With Apple’s tendency to strictly manage apps and their implementation on iOS, Google seems to be sidestepping Apple by moving some of this functionality to its browser.

Android, though, remains Google’s playground, and you’ll see several password-specific improvements arriving on Android phones. For one, Google today offers the capability to autofill passwords for various sites, by taking your username and autofilling the password. Google said it will add an improvement called “Touch-To-Fill” over the coming months, automatically logging you in via just a touch that will simplify the process slightly further.

If you’d like to manage your existing passwords, Google will allow that, too: you’ll be able to add a shortcut to your stored passwords on your Android phone’s homescreen — though not iOS, Google said. Google’s automated password checker is also being improved. Google already periodically looks at your passwords and determines if they’re on a list of breached credentials. If so, it recommends that you change them. The improved Password Checkup feature will now allow you to change those passwords without going through the site’s password update process, which usually relies on passcodes being emailed back and forth. Warnings about compromised passwords will now be sent to Chrome users on Android, Chrome OS, iOS, Linux and Windows.

Users will also be able to manually add their own existing passwords to Google’s password manager, too, Google said.

Ensuring you have the latest software installed on your Garmin watch is essential to getting the best experience.

Not only do you receive all of the latest feature additions, but regularly updating your Garmin – whether it’s a Forerunner, Fenix, Quatix or Vivoactive – also helps get rid of any niggling bugs that may be undermining performance.

Luckily, updating one of the sports watches is a simple process, and the majority of users will be updating without even realising. In this guide, we’ll tell you how to check if you’re running the latest software, as well as provide details on automatic and manual updates.

Do you have the latest software?

Software updates can be large or small and, unlike iOS or Android, they’re unique to the specific Garmin models. For example, v4.20 was specific to Forerunner 645 and offered small bug fixes, like an issue for New Zealand users when sunrise and sunset times weren’t adapting to daylight savings, and a problem where non-GPS activities were being displayed in the Navigation menu.

Whether it’s new tools or simply ensuring the device is running well, you’re going to want the latest version pushed to your wrist.

To check the software version of your Garmin

1. Head to Settings > About.

2. Here, you’ll see the Unit ID (the serial number), as well as the software version (e.g. 5.70 (1517997)). This information can be really handy if you’re having problems with your watch and need to troubleshoot through customer support.

The easiest way to access the software version history is to perform a web search – ‘[device name and model] updates and downloads’. Here, you should see results from the official Garmin site, like this Forerunner 945 example, where you can cross reference your software version with the ones listed.

Automatic software updates

Updating the software on most Garmin watches can be an afterthought once you’re paired with the Garmin Connect mobile app. Automatic software updates are the default, but to check this setting is enabled you’ll need to dive deep into the settings on the watch.

1. Long press on the top button to bring up the system menus.

2. Scroll down to Settings and select Start/Stop.

3. From here choose System and scroll all the way down to the bottom of the menu.

4. Here you’ll find Software Update.

5. Use the select button to toggle between on and off.

When enabled, software updates will automatically be transmitted to the watch via the mobile app. When there’s an update available, the Garmin Connect app will automatically download in the background and install it. Your watch will likely reset at the end of the process.

Manual software updates

If you toggle Automatic Software Updates to Off within Settings > System, new versions will not automatically be updated to the handset. In these instances, you have to go looking for them.

Follow the same route as listed above, and, if an update has been downloaded by the Garmin Connect app, you’ll have the opportunity to hit Install to apply it to your watch.

1. Long press on the top button to bring up the system menus.

2. Scroll down to Settings and select Start/Stop.

3. From here choose System and scroll all the way down to the bottom of the menu.

4. Here you’ll find Software Update.

5. You’ll see the version (e.g. v4.60 available), the option to Install Now and the estimated time said installation will take.

6. Press select to confirm.

Update on your computer using Garmin Express

If you’re not using the Garmin Connect smartphone app to wirelessly sync your watch, you can hook up to a Mac or Windows PC via a physical connection.

This involves plugging the charging cable into the USB port of your laptop or desktop and connecting your watch. If you don’t have the Garmin Express app, you can download it it here. Follow the on-screen instructions to pair your device. If you don’t have a Garmin Connect account, you’ll need to set one up.

Once plugged in, the Garmin Express app should automatically open, showing the status of your watch. If you have automatic software updates enabled (see above) Garmin Express will send it to your device.

If automatic updates are turned off, you’ll be informed new firmware is available. Either way, follow the on-screen instructions and do not disconnect the watch from the computer during the update process.

When Google set out to create Chrome OS, it was designed to be very stable and require no maintenance from the user, however, nothing is flawless.

In this tutorial we’ll show you how to create a recovery disk for your Chrome device.

“Just Works”

Google’s Chrome OS has been designed to be stable, secure and to “just work”. Users should not need to update software, troubleshoot issues and make sure their computer is virus-free; Chrome OS is design to handle all the maintenance.

Chrome OS cant boot, requires recovery.

However, Google has implemented a recovery tool into Chrome OS incase something does go wrong.

A Chrome OS Recovery Disk is used to wipe and restore your Chrome device back to a factory state. You may switch on your Chrome device to find out that it will not boot, and will ask you to restore Chrome OS from a recovery image.

But there are other reasons why you may want to restore including:

  • You plan on selling or giving away your Chrome device
  • You want to toll back to a stable release of Chrome OS

To do it, all your need is a USB Flash Drive or an SD Card that is at least 4GB in size.

Creating a Recovery Disk

There are two ways to create a recovery disk: using your Chrome device or a traditional desktop computer.

The easiest way to create a recovery disk is on your Chrome device; since the recovery tool will download the correct disk image for your Chrome device automatically, while if you create the recovery disk on your computer you will have manually select the correct recovery image, you may select the wrong image.

If you rather create the recovery disk on your computer, you can find the download links for the recovery tool on the Chrome OS help site.

Plug your USB Flash Drive or SD card into your Chrome device. Navigate to chrome://imageburner. Start the recovery tool and follow the on-screen instructions. The process will wipe your USB Flash Drive/SD Card and download the latest image. Once its completed, your recovery disk is ready to go.

Forcing a Recovery

If you want to wipe your Chromebook and restore to a clean stable state, you first need to reset your Chrome device.

A small button can be found underneath your Chrome device, you will need a pin or a paper clip to press the button. Hold the button down, and turn on your Chrome device. You should see the Chrome OS recovery error message appear.

Insert your recovery disk, and it should start recovering Chrome OS to factory state.

Home » Chrome OS » How To Create a Chromebook Recovery Image

Keeping your Internet browser up-to-date is important for security and ensures that web pages load properly and you have all the newest features. We also recommend updating any plug-ins, extensions, or other add-ons installed in your browser. Use the System Information script to detect and update your browser plug-ins. You don’t need to pay to update your browser.

Edge is the default Internet browser for Microsoft operating systems, and Safari is the default Internet browser for macOS.

To proceed, select the browser you want to update from the list below and follow the instructions.

  • Google Chrome
  • Mozilla Firefox
  • Microsoft Edge
  • Internet Explorer
  • Safari
  • Opera
  • Other browsers

Google Chrome

Google Chrome updates automatically as new iterations are released to the public. To verify Chrome is at the latest version or update it manually, follow the steps below.

  1. Open the Google Chrome browser.
  2. Click the Customize and control Google Chrome button in the screen’s upper-right corner.
  3. In the drop-down menu that appears, move your mouse cursor over Help.
  1. In the side menu that appears, select About Google Chrome.
  1. In the next window, Chrome automatically checks for updates and displays the current version. If updates were installed, click the Relaunch button to restart the browser.

Chrome on an Android tablet or phone

On an Android tablet or phone, the Chrome browser should get updated automatically, like other apps. However, if automatic updates are not working, open the Google Play app to check for an updated Chrome browser version.

Mozilla Firefox

Mozilla Firefox should automatically download updates and prompt you when they are available to install. To verify that Firefox is at the latest version or update it manually, follow the steps below.

  1. Open the Mozilla Firefox browser.
  2. Click the Open Application Menu button in the upper-right corner of the screen.
  3. In the menu that appears, click the Help option at the bottom.
  4. Select About Firefox from the Firefox help side menu.
  1. In the window that appears, Firefox automatically checks for updates and displays the current version. If updates were installed, click the Restart to Update Firefox button.

Microsoft Edge

Microsoft Edge updates automatically as new versions are released to the public. To verify Edge is at the latest version or update it manually, follow the steps below.

  1. Open the Microsoft Edge browser.
  2. Click the Settings and more icon in the upper-right corner of the browser window.
  3. In the drop-down menu that appears, near the bottom, move the mouse cursor over Help and feedback, and select About Microsoft Edge from the side menu.
  1. When the next window opens, Edge updates automatically if it isn’t at the most recent version.
  1. If Edge was updated, click the button to refresh the browser.

Internet Explorer

Microsoft updates Internet Explorer using its Windows Update feature. As long as you regularly install Windows updates from Microsoft, the latest version of Internet Explorer is installed.

To manually check for and install Windows updates, follow the steps below.

  1. Press the Windows key , type Check for updates, and press Enter .
  2. In the middle of the window that appears, under the Windows Update section, click Check for updates.

Older versions

If you do not have Windows automatic updates enabled on Windows 8 and earlier versions, you must manually update Internet Explorer on your computer by following the steps below.

  1. Open the Control Panel.
  2. Open the Windows Update utility.
  3. In the left navigation pane, click the Check for updates link.
  4. You can choose to install all available updates or select the updates you want to install.

Safari

If you have Apple updates turned on, Safari should stay up-to-date automatically. To verify Safari is at the latest version or update it manually, follow the steps below.

  1. Open the Apple menu by clicking the Apple icon in the upper-left corner of the desktop.
  2. Select App Store from the drop-down menu that appears.
  1. In the window that appears, click the Updates selector button at the bottom of the left navigation pane.
  2. Find Safari and click Update (or click Update all to update every app).

Safari on iPad or iPhone

On an iPad or iPhone, the Safari browser should automatically get updated, like other apps. However, if automatic updates are not working, open the App Store and check the Updates section to see if a Safari update is available to download.

Opera

Opera should update itself automatically. However, if you want to check the version or update it manually, follow the steps below.

  1. Open the Opera web browser.
  2. Click the Opera icon in the top-left corner of the window.
  3. In the drop-down menu, move your mouse cursor over the Help selector, and click About Opera from the side menu that appears.
  4. In the next window, Opera automatically checks for updates and displays the current version. If updates were installed, click the Relaunch now button to restart the browser.

Other browsers

There are other Internet browsers available, but we cannot provide the steps to update every one of them. If your browser is not listed above, the following list has some general tips for updating your browser.

  • Check the Help or Settings menu or look in the browser’s main menu for a Help section. The update utility for a browser is often located there.
  • If no Help section is found, check the browser’s main menu for a section labeled Update or Upgrade.
  • If you cannot find a Help, Update, or Upgrade section in your browser, visit the browser developer’s website for further information.

If you’re the owner of a Kindle device made in 2012 or earlier and you missed the deadline to update your device before it lost connectivity, here’s how to get it working again.

Nicole Cozma has an affinity for Android apps and devices, but loves technology in general. Based out of the Tampa Bay Area, she enjoys being a spectator to both sunsets and lightning storms.

If your Kindle was made in 2012 or earlier, Amazon wants your device to be on the latest version of its software. If you missed the March 22 deadline to get an over-the-air update, you’ll have to update your device manually. Here’s how.

Find out if your Kindle is up-to-date

For users who stay connected to Wi-Fi, the update may have already installed. You can find out if your Kindle is on the latest version by going to Menu > Settings. Take note of the version number at the bottom of the screen and cross-check with Amazon’s help page.

Alternatively, you’ll know it’s out-of-date if you received this jarring message: “Your Kindle is unable to connect at this time. Please make sure you are within wireless range and try again. If the problem persists, please restart your Kindle from the Menu in Settings and try again.”

Didn’t update in time? Do a manual update

At this point, you’ll need to update your device manually. It’ll require you to grab a USB cable and do the install with your Kindle connected a computer. Here’s how:

  • Go to this Amazon help page, find your device and click the link in the neighboring column to download the update. Use the above instruction to find out which software your device is currently running. In some cases, you might need to download and install more than one update.
  • Plug your Kindle into your computer. Once it appears as a drive, drag and drop the update file to your Kindle. (Not a subfolder, just the top-level Kindle drive.)
  • Eject your Kindle and disconnect the USB cord.
  • On your Kindle, go to Menu > Update your Kindle. Your Kindle will let you know when the update is complete.