Categories
Design

How to quickly reboot directly from windows 7 to xp vista or ubuntu

Lowell is the founder and CEO of How-To Geek. He’s been running the show since creating the site back in 2006. Over the last decade, Lowell has personally written more than 1000 articles which have been viewed by over 250 million people. Prior to starting How-To Geek, Lowell spent 15 years working in IT doing consulting, cybersecurity, database management, and programming work. Read more.

One of the biggest annoyances with a dual-boot system is having to wait for your PC to reboot to select the operating system you want to switch to, but there’s a simple piece of software that can make this process easier.

This guest article was written by Ryan Dozier from the Doztech tech blog.

With a small piece of software called iReboot we can skip the above step all together and instantly reboot into the operating system we want right from Windows. Their description says:

“Instead of pressing restart, waiting for Windows to shut down, waiting for your BIOS to post, then selecting the operating system you want to boot into (within the bootloader time-limit!); you just select that entry from iReboot and let it do the rest!”

Don’t worry about iReboot reconfiguring your bootloader or any dual boot configuration you have. iReboot will only boot the selected operating system once and go back to your default settings.

Using iReboot

iReboot is quick and easy to install. Just download it, link below, run through the setup and select the default configuration. iReboot will automatically figure out what operating systems you have installed and appear in the taskbar. Go over to the taskbar and right click on the iReboot icon and select which operating system you want to reboot into.

This method will add a check mark on the operating system you want to boot into.

On your next reboot the system will automatically load your choice and skip the Windows Boot Manager. If you want to reboot automatically just select “Reboot on Selection” in the iReboot menu.

To be even more productive, you can install iReboot into each Windows operating system to quickly access the others with a few simple clicks.

iReboot does not work in Linux so you will have to reboot manually.

Then wait for the Windows Boot Manager to load and select your operating system.

Conclusion

iReboot works on Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7 as well as 64 bit versions of these operating systems. Unfortunately iReboot is only available for Windows but you can still use its functionality in Windows to quickly boot up your Linux machine. A simple reboot in Linux will take you back to Windows Boot Manager.

Editor’s note: We’ve not personally tested this software over at How-To Geek, but Neosmart, the author of the software, generally makes quality stuff. Still, you might want to test it out on a test machine first. If you’ve got any experience with this software, please be sure to let your fellow readers know in the comments.

Lowell is the founder and CEO of How-To Geek. He’s been running the show since creating the site back in 2006. Over the last decade, Lowell has personally written more than 1000 articles which have been viewed by over 250 million people. Prior to starting How-To Geek, Lowell spent 15 years working in IT doing consulting, cybersecurity, database management, and programming work. Read more.

One of the biggest annoyances with a dual-boot system is having to wait for your PC to reboot to select the operating system you want to switch to, but there’s a simple piece of software that can make this process easier.

This guest article was written by Ryan Dozier from the Doztech tech blog.

With a small piece of software called iReboot we can skip the above step all together and instantly reboot into the operating system we want right from Windows. Their description says:

“Instead of pressing restart, waiting for Windows to shut down, waiting for your BIOS to post, then selecting the operating system you want to boot into (within the bootloader time-limit!); you just select that entry from iReboot and let it do the rest!”

Don’t worry about iReboot reconfiguring your bootloader or any dual boot configuration you have. iReboot will only boot the selected operating system once and go back to your default settings.

Using iReboot

iReboot is quick and easy to install. Just download it, link below, run through the setup and select the default configuration. iReboot will automatically figure out what operating systems you have installed and appear in the taskbar. Go over to the taskbar and right click on the iReboot icon and select which operating system you want to reboot into.

This method will add a check mark on the operating system you want to boot into.

On your next reboot the system will automatically load your choice and skip the Windows Boot Manager. If you want to reboot automatically just select “Reboot on Selection” in the iReboot menu.

To be even more productive, you can install iReboot into each Windows operating system to quickly access the others with a few simple clicks.

iReboot does not work in Linux so you will have to reboot manually.

Then wait for the Windows Boot Manager to load and select your operating system.

Conclusion

iReboot works on Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7 as well as 64 bit versions of these operating systems. Unfortunately iReboot is only available for Windows but you can still use its functionality in Windows to quickly boot up your Linux machine. A simple reboot in Linux will take you back to Windows Boot Manager.

Editor’s note: We’ve not personally tested this software over at How-To Geek, but Neosmart, the author of the software, generally makes quality stuff. Still, you might want to test it out on a test machine first. If you’ve got any experience with this software, please be sure to let your fellow readers know in the comments.

Here is what I want.

I have dual boot laptop (Windows 10 (Primary) and Ubuntu (Secondary)). Now whenever I boot into Linux Ubuntu, next time windows takes a lot of Time (maybe a few seconds) to boot.

I want to make my Laptop Boot directly Windows 10 (Which I can do easily). But I want you guys help me in creating such a pen drive which will directly boot into dev/ssd2 i.e. Ubuntu.

So whenever I want to boot Linux Ubuntu I will just put that pen drive into Laptop and my computer will open UBUNTU.

1 Answer 1

I have tried to nearly make it with below steps.

i don’t find any benefit from this method but this method is targeted to achieve nearly the goal in your question.

i have tried it on my dummy system for doing practicals. Backup is highly recommended.

I used
1. windows10 bootable USB stick.
2. Ubuntu 18.04.1 bootable USB stick.
3. Empty USB stick of 32gb to install Ubuntu on it.

sda-120gb SSD
sdb-bootable Ubuntu installation USB stick
sdc-usb stick where i installed Ubuntu.

I have installed windows10 on my single ssd. (sda)
installed Ubuntu 18.04.1 on the same ssd. (device for boot loader sda)
installed Ubuntu 18.04.1 on the 32gb USB Stick. (device for boot loader sdc)

while installing Ubuntu on this stick, i have created 100mb efi partition on this stick and remaining space for ext4 /.

Important is, when installing Ubuntu on USB stick (sdc) i choose boot-loader for installation as sdc. which was this USB stick.

now grub is controlled by this stick. if i remove this stick, system will come up with grub prompt.

i have to type “exit” to boot to windows10.

if the stick is present it will give the options where i can select Ubuntu which is on my ssd. if i remove the stick and start the system, it will come up with grub prompt again where i have to type “exit” to boot to windows10.

Once i am Ok with the setup, i have edited the /etc/default/grub file on sdc so that when i insert this usb and start, system directly boots to Ubuntu on SSD without even showing grub.

what to do if i need the default dual boot system back?

remove the usb (sdc)
log on with live USB.
reinstall grub on the ssd where windows10 & Ubuntu are installed.

  1. open GParted from live session and see what are the partition numbers of efi & ext4 /. mine are sda2 and sda5 respectively.

sudo mount /dev/sda5 /mnt # mounting root partition.

for i in /sys /proc /run /dev; do sudo mount –bind “$i” “/mnt$i”; done # binding the required folders

The other day I decided to upgrade and rebuild my test PC. This is simply a machine I can use for installing and trying out software as well as trying slightly more adventurous things out I wouldn’t, or couldn’t do on my normal machine. Sometimes a virtual machine might do the job, but often there’s no substitute for getting the required tasks done on real hardware for the most accurate results. Some of you will probably have an old second PC or laptop and use it in a similar way.

One thing you do want when using a system that you know is going to have issues, is a complete backup of the operation system. The System Restore option or snapshot software like Comodo Time Machine might get things back running, but there’s nothing like restoring the Windows installation to a known completely clean and stable state.

Bearing that in mind, I made a bootable USB stick and created some backups using EaseUs Todo Backup Workstation. Unfortunately, I put the recovery files on a slow stick and it took forever to boot into the backup software. It was then I remembered that there exists the ability to take an ISO image and get it to boot from hard drive using the Windows Vista and 7 Boot Manager. This would make booting into the recovery environment far quicker and also removes the need to use a CD or plug in a USB stick every time.

The software I used to achieve this is EasyBCD from Neosmart Technologies and it’s free for non commercial use. EasyBCD has a large amount of options for editing and creating entries for the Windows Bootloader and has helped me out quite a few times. Although the program does not come as a portable version, you can simply create your own by opening the installer and extracting it with 7zip.

There are also options to mount Virtual Hard Disk images, WinPE Ram disks, Floppy images and Raw disk / partition images. The option to be looked at here is the ISO function which will put an entry into the boot menu and then boot from the ISO you have selected. Firstly start the program, you will begin in the View settings window which shows the current entries in the Boot Manager.

As incorrectly making changes to the Boot menu could potentially cause none of your operating systems to boot, it’s a good idea to make a backup of the Bootloader settings first. Click ‘BCD Backup/Repair‘, choose a location to save the backup to and then click ‘Backup settings‘.

To create the ISO Boot Manager entry:

1. Click the ‘Add New Entry‘ button.

2. In the Portable/External Media window click the ISO tab.

3. In the Name: box, enter the text to appear on the Windows boot menu

4. For the Mode: dropdown, use Load from memory if your ISO is relatively small (less than

200MB). Select Run from Disk for anything bigger.

5. Point to the ISO file you want to boot from in the Path: box. Make sure not to move or rename the file after adding it to the menu or it obviously won’t boot.

6. Click Add Entry.

If you go back to the View settings window, the new entry should now be entered into the list. There will be a new folder called ‘NST’ created in the root of the partition where the Bootloader is located, make sure not to delete it. Close EasyBCD.

Now when you reboot your Vista or Win 7 machine the options will be visible on the Windows Boot Manager and are selectable like any other option. You may have to scroll down to see all the entries if you have entered quite a few.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Do be aware that not all ISO’s will work using this boot method and Linux distro’s are known to be a little troublesome. All the images in the above screenshot worked fine, but for example, Parted Magic did not work from Hirens Boot CD but works fine using its own standalone image. The Hiren MiniXP and the older Hiren version of RIP Linux work OK though. Kaspersky Rescue Disk 10 did not work. Although I have not tried this myself, I have heard of someone successfully mounting and installing Windows 7 using this method. It is simply a case of try it and see.

This method is obviously dependent on being able to get to the Windows Boot Manager in the event of a system crash. It is highly recommended NOT to try this on your main / only machine if you are not 100% confident you know what you are doing.

Step1: Creating Rescue USB Drive

First, we need create a rescue USB drive which can boot the computer. Please follow the steps,

Run PowerISO rescue media utility. You can download it here. On Windows Vista or above operating system, you may need confirm the UAC dialog to continue.

Insert the USB drive you intend to boot from.

The utility will allow you choose Windows PE architecture and version. It is suggested to select 32-bit architecture and Windows PE 3.11. Click “Next” to continue.

Select USB drive for output device, and select the correct drive from the list. Click “Next” to continue.

The utility will start creating rescue USB drive. It will check necessary component and automatically download missing component from the server.

Please notice that all existing data on the USB drive will be destroyed during this step. The program will alert you before writing the USB drive. Click “OK” to continue.

When it’s done, copy the Windows XP setup files to the USB drive. Please note that you’ll only need the i386 folder.

If no errors occurred in the above process, you should now be all set to setup Windows XP from USB drive!

Step 2: Configuring the BIOS

You should now reboot and go into the BIOS configuration to boot from USB. Instructions for doing so vary wildly from system to system, but generally entail the following:

Reboot the system.

While booting (before Windows starts loading), get into the BIOS configuration screen by hitting something like F1, F2, Delete or Escape. Hotkey instructions are generally provided on the screen.

Go to the section that contains your boot devices.

With your USB drive plugged in, the USB drive should be listed. If it isn’t, your system might not support booting from USB. Assuming that it is supported (as is the case with virtually all modern hardware), promote your USB drive to the primary boot device.

Exit from the BIOS configuration, saving all changes.

Please notice that you can seriously screw up your system by providing incorrect BIOS settings!

Step 3: Booting from rescue USB drive

Assuming that you properly configured your BIOS and your USB drive supports booting, your computer should now boot from the the rescue USB drive. Depending on the speed of your USB drive, this may take a while.

If it isn’t working, then double-check the following before making a scene:

Is your BIOS properly configured for booting from the USB device? (Is the USB device listed and does it have top priority?)

Have you correctly prepared the USB drive in step one? (Restart the procedure.)

Does your USB drive properly support being booted from? (Try another one!)

Step 4: Prepping the Hard Disk

You need to make sure that your hard drive is partitioned and formatted properly. Especially if you’ve had Linux or some other operating system on it, you’ll need to repartition and format it. The rescue drive contain file manager and command line utility. You can launch DiskPart for disk partitioning and formatting from the command utility.

If you are sure that your hard drive is set up properly (i.e. it has only run Windows, it contains a valid FAT or NTFS partition) then you can safe yourself the hassle and skip this step.

Window XP doesn’t support GPT partition. If your hard drive is partitioned in GPT mode, you also need repartition and format the disc.

To repartition and format (This procedure will destroy any data on the hard drive):

Click the icon on task bar to launch a command line Window.

Enter DiskPart to run the built-in disk management utility.

Enter the commands needed to repartition and format your drive. For example, try the following:

select disk 0 (select the first disk. On your computer, disk 0 may not be the correct disk, you can use “list disk” to find the correct disk.)

clean (purges the entire drive, essentially resetting it)

create partition primary (creates a single partition from the entire disk)

select partition1 (select the partition created)

format fs=ntfs quick (format the partition to NTFS system, and do a quickly format)

assign (assign the partition a drive letter)

exit (quits DiskPart).

Step 5: Launching Windows XP Setup from USB drive

With your drive all ready, you can now launch the Windows XP setup with a few custom parameters. Let’s assume that the files are available at E:\i386.

Plugging in a device now won’t work. Remember that all USB devices will need to be plugged in right from the start while using the rescue drive.

Run the following command:

Run E:\i386\winnt32.exe /syspart:C: /tempdrive:C: /makelocalsource. Replace C: with the drive you want to install Windows to.

Proceed with the installation. If asked to convert the installation volume to NTFS, answer No. The setup program incorrectly believes that your USB drive (if is formatted as FAT) needs conversion.

The setup program will then silently close, which might make you think that something went wrong. Don’t worry though.

Step 6: Continue Windows XP Setup from Hard disk

Reboot your system.

Unplug USB drive during post stage.

Change your BIOS settings back to boot from hard disk again as needed.

You can now continue to finish setting up Windows XP.

I have Windows 10 HOME installed on my system. After I installed Windows 10 HOME, I installed Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on a separate partition so that I could dual boot.

I removed Ubuntu 14.04 LTS by deleting the partition it was installed on. Now I am unable to start my system. At boot, my system stops at the Grub command line.

I want to boot to my Windows 10 installation which I haven’t removed from my system.

This is displayed at startup:

How can I boot my Windows partition from this grub command?

10 Answers 10

Just enter the command exit . It should take you to another menu that makes you select the Windows bootloader.

Worked on Lenovo Y50

The following worked for me with a GPT partitioned disk.

Note that you can enter a command line from the grub boot menu and just type commands as above to test out different combinations.

You need to enter the id of the EFI boot partition (not the windows partition) for the set root= command.

In the command line grub mode ls will list the hard drive partitions, help lists available commands.

Once you have set the root correctly you can ls / to view files and directories to find the correct path to the windows boot manager if it is not in the default location.

To boot to Windows, if Windows is installed on first drive/partition, enter in grub command line, then boot:

Guesing you have an UEFI device, the windows bootloader is still installed. You can select it back in UEFI setup menu under boot, where you will prbably have two options (GRUB and the old default as the second), delete the first one or switch the order.

This answer is for those with UEFI who have deleted the Ubuntu partitions before removing grub

You will be doing this from Windows 10. No bootable media required.

Where bootrec /fixmbr , bootsect /nt60 and the Ubuntu live with the boot-repair suggestions have failed, this has worked for me:

(This answer borrowed verbatim from here)

  1. Run a cmd.exe process with administrator privileges
  2. Run diskpart
  3. Type: list disk then sel disk X where X is the drive your boot files reside on
  4. Type list vol to see all partitions (volumes) on the disk
  5. Select the EFI volume by typing: sel vol Y where Y is the SYSTEM volume (this is almost always the EFI partition)
  6. For convenience, assign a drive letter by typing: assign letter=Z: where Z is a free (unused) drive letter
  7. Type exit to leave disk part
  8. While still in the cmd prompt, type: Z: and hit enter, where Z was the drive letter you just created.
  9. Type dir to list directories on this mounted EFI partition
  10. If you are in the right place, you should see a directory called EFI
  11. Type cd EFI and then dir to list the child directories inside EFI
  12. Type rmdir /S ubuntu to delete the ubuntu boot directory

Assuming you only ever had two operating systems (Win 10 & Ubuntu) you should now be able to boot directly to Windows without hitting the black grub screen.

This is an install tech-recipe for Windows XP. It describes how to install Windows XP from the hard drive.

Requirements:
Windows 98SE Boot Diskette w/smartdrv.exe
Windows XP saved to hard drive (You need to have a separate FAT32 partition where XP install files are saved.)

Use the following steps to install Windows XP from the hard drive:

1. First, copy your Windows XP Setup CD contents to your hard drive. I recommend saving the XP install files/folders to a partition separate from where you are going to install XP. (e.g., Have setup files at d:\winxp\, and then install XP to c:\ drive.)

2. Now, boot your PC with the Windows 98 SE boot disk with smartdrv.exe on the floppy (This increases data transfer speed by ten-fold in DOS.). You do not need to boot with CD support since you are installing XP from the files on your hard drive (in my example, D:\winxp\).

3. At the command prompt, format the partition where you are installing XP (e.g., the c:\) by typing: format driveletter:. Replace the drive letter with the drive (e.g., format c:). Then go through the prompts.

4. Once that finishes, change drives to the drive with XP on it.
In my example, D: then Enter.
Then: CD WINXP (change directory to winxp folder) and Enter

Now, enable smartdrv by typing smartdrv and then type it again. The second time you type it and hit Enter, it will show the status of the drives and cacheing.

5. Now, change the directory to the i386 folder by typing cd i386 (In my example, this folder’s full path would be D:\winxp\i386\.).
Then type winnt to start the installation.

Finally, install XP as usual.

Now you are probably asking yourself, “Why would I do this or need to know this?” Well, I re-install my OS quite a bit. I get bored or it gets too cluttered. I just format and re-install. I do not really have to backup my files since I have my “my documents” folder located on a separate partition. [I have two hard drives: hd1: c: (winxp files, program files) d: (pure program files only) hd2 m: (my music, games) j: (my documents folder) r: (ripping folder).]

Jimmy Selix is an early adopter that loves to be one of the first on the block to have the latest and greatest in technology and gadgets. Another love of his is being able to share his knowledge to others seeking it. Feel free to drop any comments or questions that you may have.

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times and Reader’s Digest, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

Linux’s GRUB2 boot loader can boot Linux ISO files directly from your hard drive. Boot Linux live CDs or even install Linux on another hard drive partition without burning it to disc or booting from a USB drive.

We performed this process on Ubuntu 14.04 — Ubuntu and Ubuntu-based Linux distributions have good support for this. Other Linux distributions should work similarly.

Get a Linux ISO File

This trick requires you have a Linux system installed on your hard drive. Your computer must be using the GRUB2 boot loader, which is a standard boot loader on most Linux systems. Sorry, you can’t boot a Linux ISO file directly from a Windows system using the Windows boot loader.

Download the ISO files you want to use and store them on your Linux partition. GRUB2 should support most Linux systems. if you want to use them in a live environment without installing them to your hard drive, be sure to download the “live CD” versions of each Linux ISO. Many Linux-based bootable utility discs should also work.

Check the Contents of the ISO File

You may need to look inside the ISO file to determine exactly where specific files are. For example, you can do this by opening the ISO file with the Archive Manager/File Roller graphical application that comes with Ubuntu and other GNOME-based desktop environments. In the Nautilus file manager, right-click the ISO file and select Open with Archive Manager.

Locate the kernel file and the initrd image. If you’re using a Ubuntu ISO file, you’ll find these files inside the casper folder — the vmlinuz file is the Linux kernel and the initrd file is the initrd image. You’ll need to know their location inside the ISO file later.

Determine the Hard Drive Partition’s Path

GRUB uses a different “device name” scheme than Linux does. On a Linux system, /dev/sda1 is the first partition on the first hard disk — a means the first hard disk and 1 means its first partition. In GRUB, (hd0,1) is equivalent to /dev/sda0. The 0 means the first hard disk, while the 1 means the first partition on it. In other words, in a GRUB device name, the disk numbers start counting at 0 and the partition num6ers start counting at 1 — yes, it’s unnecessarily confusing. For example, (hd3,6) refers to the sixth partition on the fourth hard disk.

You can use the fdisk -l command to view this information. On Ubuntu, open a Terminal and run the following command:

You’ll see a list of Linux device paths, which you can convert to GRUB device names on your own. For example, below we can see the system partition is /dev/sda1 — so that’s (hd0,1) for GRUB.

Create the GRUB2 Boot Entry

The easiest way to add a custom boot entry is to edit the /etc/grub.d/40_custom script. This file is designed for user-added custom boot entries. After editing the file, the contents of your /etc/defaults/grub file and the /etc/grub.d/ scripts will be combined to create a /boot/grub/grub.cfg file — you shouldn’t edit this file by hand. It’s designed to be automatically generated from settings you specify in other files.

You’ll need to open the /etc/grub.d/40_custom file for editing with root privileges. On Ubuntu, you can do this by opening a Terminal window and running the following command:

Feel free to open the file in your favorite text editor. For example, you could replace “gedit” with “nano” in the command to open the file in the Nano text editor.

Unless you’ve added other custom boot entries, you should see a mostly empty file. You’ll need to add one or more ISO-booting sections to the file below the commented lines.

Here’s how you can boot an Ubuntu or Ubuntu-based distribution from an ISO file. We tested this with Ubuntu 14.04:

menuentry “Ubuntu 14.04 ISO” <
set isofile=”/home/name/Downloads/ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64.iso
loopback loop (hd0,1)$isofile
linux (loop)/casper/vmlinuz.efi boot=casper iso-scan/filename=$ quiet splash
initrd (loop)/casper/initrd.lz
>

Customize the boot entry to contain your desiredmenu entry name, the correct path to the ISO file on your computer, and the device name of the hard disk and partition containing the ISO file. If the vmlinuz and initrd files have different names or paths, be sure to specify the correct path to those files, too.

(If you have a separate /home/ partition, omit the /home bit, like so: set isofile=”/name/Downloads/$).

Important Note: Different Linux distributions require different boot entries with different boot options. The GRUB Live ISO Multiboot project offers a variety of menu entries for different Linux distributions. You should be able to adapt these example menu entries for the ISO file you want to boot. You can also just perform a web search for the name and release number of the Linux distribution you want to boot along with “boot from ISO in GRUB” to find more information.

If you want to add more ISO boot options, add additional sections to the file.

Save the file when you’re done. Return to a Terminal window and run the following command:

The next time you boot your computer, you’ll see the ISO boot entry and you can choose it to boot the ISO file. You may have to hold Shift while booting to see the GRUB menu.

If you see an error message or a black screen when you attempt to boot the ISO file, you misconfigured the boot entry somehow. Even if you got the ISO file path and device name right, the paths to the vmlinuz and intird files on the ISO file may not be correct or the Linux system you’re booting may require different options.

Lowell is the founder and CEO of How-To Geek. He’s been running the show since creating the site back in 2006. Over the last decade, Lowell has personally written more than 1000 articles which have been viewed by over 250 million people. Prior to starting How-To Geek, Lowell spent 15 years working in IT doing consulting, cybersecurity, database management, and programming work. Read more.

A bootable USB drive is the best way to install or try Linux. But most Linux distributions—like Ubuntu—only offer an ISO disc image file for download. You’ll need a third-party tool to turn that ISO file into a bootable USB drive.

You’ll need to download an ISO file to do this—we’re going to use Ubuntu in our example, but this should work for quite a few different Linux distributions. Head to Ubuntu’s download page and download the version of Ubuntu you want—either the stable “Long Term Service” release or the current release. If you’re not sure which one to download, we recommend the LTS release.

Below, we’ll show you how to turn this ISO into a bootable flash drive on both Windows or an existing Linux system.

NOTE: This process creates a traditional live USB drive. When you run it, none of your chances (like installed programs or created files) will be saved for the next time you run it. For installing Linux to your PC, this is fine—but if you want a live USB that keeps your changes so you can use it regularly on different computers, you’ll want to check out these instructions instead.

How to Create a Bootable USB Drive on Windows

There are many tools that can do this job for you, but we recommend a free program called Rufus—it’s faster and more reliable than many of the other tools you’ll see recommended, including UNetbootin.

Download Rufus and run it on your Windows PC. The tool will open immediately—you don’t even have to install it.

Connect a USB drive with at least 2GB of free space to your Windows PC (this may vary depending on your distribution of choice). The contents of this drive will be erased, so back up any important files on the drive first. Click the “Device” box in Rufus and ensure your connected drive is selected.

If the “Create a bootable disk using” option is grayed out, click the “File System” box and select “FAT32”.

Activate the “Create a bootable disk using” checkbox, click the button to the right of it, and select your downloaded ISO file.

Once you’ve selected the correct options, click the “Start” button to begin creating the bootable drive.

You may be told you need newer SysLinux files. Just click the “Yes” button and Rufus will automatically download them for you.

Rufus will ask how you want to write the image. Just select the default option—“Write in ISO Image Mode (Recommended)”—and click “OK”.

You’ll be warned that all data on the USB drive will be erased. Click “OK” to continue if the drive has no important data on it. (If you forgot to back up your data, click “Cancel”, back up the data on the USB drive, and then run Rufus again.)

Rufus will create the bootable USB drive. You can click “Close” to close Rufus when it’s done.

Next, restart your computer and boot from the USB drive using these instructions. You can also take it to another computer and boot Ubuntu from the USB drive on that computer.

How to Create a Bootable USB Drive on Ubuntu

If you’re already using Ubuntu, you don’t need to do this from Windows. Just open the Dash and search for the “Startup Disk Creator” application, which is included with Ubuntu.

Provide a downloaded Ubuntu ISO file, connect a USB drive, and the tool will create a bootable Ubuntu USB drive for you.

Many other distributions have their own similar tools built-in, so you’ll have to check and see what your particular distribution has available.

#1 Brito

  • .script developer
  • 10610 posts
    • Location: boot.wim
    • Interests: I’m just a quiet simple person with a very quiet simple life living one day at a time..
    • European Union

    I am trying to installing Windows 8 on a stubborn laptop.

    This machine has no optical drives and the USB drive booting the Windows 8 pendisk just says “File not found” after the initial boot start whereas the identical pendisk works fine when used to install Windows 7 from USB.

    My last hope was installing Windows 7 to the laptop and then try to launch the Windows 8 installer from there. However this also fails to work when trying to run the setup.exe available on the root folder.

    Anyone has ideas regarding how to launch the Windows 8 installer while from within Windows 7?

    #2 MedEvil

  • .script developer
  • 7771 posts
  • Depends on which Win8 Version and which Win7 version.

    #3 Brito

  • .script developer
  • 10610 posts
    • Location: boot.wim
    • Interests: I’m just a quiet simple person with a very quiet simple life living one day at a time..
    • European Union

    I’m using a Windows 7 professional and Windows 8 release preview, both at 32bits.

    #4 cdob

  • Expert
  • 1469 posts
  • This machine has no optical drives and the USB drive booting the Windows 8 pendisk just says “File not found” after the initial boot start

    Which hardware do you use?

    Press Shift F10 to open command prompt.
    Launch diskpart and run “list volume”. Does exist USB drive?
    Disconnect and reconnect USB drive. Does exist USB drive now?

    Use dism and bcdboot to transfer Windows 8 files to internal hard disk.
    http://reboot.pro/16. _75#entry153514

    #5 Brito

  • .script developer
  • 10610 posts
    • Location: boot.wim
    • Interests: I’m just a quiet simple person with a very quiet simple life living one day at a time..
    • European Union

    My hardware is an old Panasonic ToughBook CF-29 Mk1 that came originally with Windows XP.

    My present host OS is Windows 7 and the DISM instructions seem to be valid only for Windows 8 hosts, or am I wrong?

    I have the impression that attempting to use the USB pendisk will only replicate the same errors as before. My goal is installing Windows 8 directly from the running Windows 7 onto another partition.

    #6 MedEvil

  • .script developer
  • 7771 posts
  • Oh you want to install into another partition. Thought you were talking about upgrading.

    Have you tryed the ‘NT6 fast installer’?

    #7 sbaeder

  • .script developer
  • 1338 posts
    • Location: usa – massachusettes
    • United States

    #8 cdob

  • Expert
  • 1469 posts
  • My present host OS is Windows 7 and the DISM instructions seem to be valid only for Windows 8 hosts, or am I wrong?

    Yes, Windows 7 dism dosn’t support apply. Use imagex from WAIK instead.

    Use bcdboot.exe from Windows 7.

    I have the impression that attempting to use the USB pendisk will only replicate the same errors as before.

    #9 TheHive

  • .script developer
  • 4184 posts
  • #10 Vortex

  • Advanced user
  • 294 posts
  • Remove the hard disc and connect it to another computer. Format the C drive and extract the following folders files from the Windows 8 .iso file to the root partition :

    Attach the hard disc to the laptop and the installation will start from the HD.

    #11 coder

  • Members
  • 63 posts
    • United States

    #12 ahmed_2009

    #13 agni

  • Tutorial Writer
  • 270 posts
    • Location: Bengaluru (Bangalore)
    • India

    You can try these instructions to install Windows 8 directly from Windows 7.

    These instructions are specific to Windows 7, but I think you can modify them for Windows 8.

    This method basically involves copying the contents of your Windows 8 Disc to your hard disk and adding a boot entry to your boot menu (on your hard disk) to load the bootmgr of Windows 8 setup.

    #14 edborg

  • .script developer
  • 387 posts
    • Italy

    I am trying to installing Windows 8 on a stubborn laptop.

    This machine has no optical drives and the USB drive booting the Windows 8 pendisk just says “File not found” after the initial boot start whereas the identical pendisk works fine when used to install Windows 7 from USB.

    My last hope was installing Windows 7 to the laptop and then try to launch the Windows 8 installer from there. However this also fails to work when trying to run the setup.exe available on the root folder.

    Anyone has ideas regarding how to launch the Windows 8 installer while from within Windows 7?

    Hi Nuno,
    If I’m not too late.

    I’ve just installed Win8 on a third partition of a dual boot (WinXP/Win7) notebook with no optical drive.

    First time I did it from Windows, as you want to do, by mounting the Win8Setup.iso to a virtual drive with VirtualCDRom.
    I ran setup.exe from the virtual drive in the host Windows and the setup started well.
    The only problem was that this way you can’t do a clean install, but are only allowed to upgrade an existing install (and need an extra 16 GB free on the partition).

    As I wanted a clean install besides WinXP and Win7, I transferred the content of the Win8Setup.iso to a partition of an USB HD and booted from that. Everything went well this way.

    As I couldn’t find an automated method for the transfer that recognized a partitioned USB, I had to do it manually this way:
    Used BootIce to write the proper PBR to a partition of an USB HD and to make it active.
    Copied to that partition all files from the virtual drive after making system and hidden files visible in the host Windows.
    I then booted from USB and chose clean install.

    Thread Tools
    • Show Printable Version
    • Subscribe to this Thread…
  • Display
    • Linear Mode
    • Switch to Hybrid Mode
    • Switch to Threaded Mode
  • Grub Triple Boot – Windows XP 7 Ubuntu

    Is there any way to have Grub directly launch these three os’s?

    My setup is a single drive with

    -hd2,0 – Windows XP
    -hd2,1 – Windows 7
    -hd2,2 – Ubuntu

    After intalling windows 7 i re-installed grub to 2,2.

    Grub will load 2,0 but not 2,1 directly, windows 7 has installed its loader to 2,0.

    I can go to 2,0 to launch XP or 7.

    I want to eliminate this extra bootloader so I can use grub to directly boot the three os’s.

    I suppose I need to fixboot C: with the xp disc to eliminate the loader on 2,0 and boot xp directly.

    Would I do the same with windows 7. fixboot c: ??

    I hope this mostly makes sense, Thanks for any tips.

    In the mean time I will edit the grub loader and windows loader defaults and time-outs. “Grub” to “Windows Bootloader” to “XP”. Still feels sloppy.

    Last edited by pepper454; May 6th, 2009 at 04:52 PM .

    Re: Grub Triple Boot – Windows XP 7 Ubuntu

    Based on what you said, I think you are absolutely right: if you want to boot all three OSes separately from Grub, you will need to start by doing a “fixboot” on the XP partition (make sure to run the “map” command first to check which is the drive letter for the XP partition, because it may not necessarily be “C”). After that, you’ll need to either move Windows 7 boot files from the XP partition back to the Windows 7 partition, or you could copy over a new set of boot files from a Windows 7 DVD. I would recommend following meierfra’s excellent tutorial on “How to fix Vista/Window 7 when the boot files are missing”, and that should help you get the Windows 7 partition fixed so you can boot it directly from Grub. Let me know how it goes or if you run into problems.

    Re: Grub Triple Boot – Windows XP 7 Ubuntu

    I’m currently setup on a 120GB with 30GB for XP,

    40GB for Windows 7, and

    40GB for Ubuntu. *I used ‘gparted’ after the fact of having XP and Ubuntu installed, so the /dev/sda order is a bit off. I moved Ubuntu to the end and fit 7 between XP and Ubuntu. Doing it again I’d create the XP, 7, and Ubuntu partitions ahead of time. So setup would be the same, but your /dev/sda? for Ubuntu would be different than mine.

    /dev/sda1 Windows XP
    /dev/sda2 (Extended)
    /dev/sda3 Windows 7
    /dev/sda5 Ubuntu
    /dev/sda6 Swap

    I installed XP first and then Ubuntu. During the Ubuntu install I chose to not load GRUB to the MBR but instead to /dev/sda5. I ran

    I rebooted to test that I could boot into both OSes using NT’s bootloader and all was well. Installed Windows 7 and all three OSes show up in it’s new bootloader.

    All three work and there’s only one menu to fuss with.

    EDIT – I realized I hadn’t booted into XP since installing Windows 7. After doing so, I noticed I get the second XP or Ubuntu login. :\

    Last edited by EvilRick; May 9th, 2009 at 04:24 AM .

    I have Windows 10 operating system on HP Pavilion laptop not very old. I have installed Linux Mint on another partition and both the operating systems work fine (I am able to use both of them).

    My problem is: Whenever I turn on the laptop, I am directly taken to Windows 10 and not given an option for Linux Mint.

    To boot into Linux Mint I have to each time press F9 to show boot options, and choose ‘Ubuntu’ after which I am shown the Linux Mint boot screen option (gives me option to boot into linux-mint compatibility and stuff) – and then choose Linux Mint 17.2 to boot in it.

    After pressing F9 , I get a menu -> Then I choose second option for Mint, the first is for Windows. (Can I change this priority order?)

    I have UEFI enabled (Legacy disabled) and Secure boot disabled. The boot priority is ‘OS boot manager’ and then USB, DISK etc. There is only OS boot manager, others are external device stuffs.

    I have searched for my problem, but couldn’t solve it. First I read about grub, this is my grub file I found at /etc/default/grub .

    These are some of the

    Then I tried live booting from pen drive and reinstalling grub from there by some commands, but it was giving me errors. (What I understood was I mounted Linux partition and installed grub over there) I tried some more commands mounting individually ‘chroot’ something but it was giving /cow error.

    I had this command sudo update-grub giving me following result in screen shot (which seems satisfactory :\ )

    This says Windows boot manager found.

    After choosing second option after F9 I am taken to menu where I can boot into Linux Mint as well as Windows from there (typical maroon background menu) I want this menu to appear at first whenever I start my laptop. Yes, I have fast-startup and hibernation stuff all disabled in Windows.

    8 Answers 8

    Sorry for this late answer. I faced this problem yesterday while installing Linux mint. Here is what you need to do

    In the bios setup(you get here by hitting f10 on my system just after switching the power button), as you have disabled the secure boot option( if you have not, then do it) go to the UEFI boot order options, select Windows boot manager(or something similar, I dont remember the name), press enter to open the sub menus

    Change to order of your boot loader keeping on top the Linux one( you can do this by pressing f5/f6). Save this by pressing f10. Ensure that the order is correctly saved by entering the sub menu once more

    Now save and exit the bios setup. That should do the trick. I again apologize for this late answer as this was my first dual boot and the very first problem I faced was this.

    This worked for me when I dual booted my system which was running windows 10 with Ubuntu. I hope making few changes the command given below will work for you:-)

    1. Run cmd as administrator
    2. Copy and paste the following command

    bcdedit /set path \EFI\ubuntu\grubx64.efi

    1. Restart your system. You will see the GRUB menu.

    It is NOT a mistake to use Linux with UEFI. All the contrary! And nowadays works perfect, offering a series of improvements and new functionality than BIOS. It’s time to jump into the 21th century, anyway.

    1. When in Linux, ensure that you have a full UEFI support: On a console/terminal run the efibootmgr – it should show you a list that would include what you see in the firmware setup.
      • If you don’t have efibootmgr, then your system is installed without UEFI support. Not so easy to fix, it’s easier to re-install.
        1. In the list of efibootmgr you should see the “ubuntu” option, showing that you have properly installed Mint under UEFI.
      • If you don’t see the ubuntu, then you installed before disabling the Legacy support and therefore it’s MBR/DOS-based. I suspect this is your case. The simplest is to re-install Linux. Otherwise, you can use the grub-glue-efi, grub-install and efibootmgr to make it.
      • If you see the ubuntu option, then you’ll notice that the BootOrder shows the label of Windows (e.g. Boot0005) as first. Use efibootmgr -o to change it.

    I had a similar problem with Win 8.1/Mint 17.2 on my UEFI enabled Acer laptop. This solution worked for me: In BIOS, change the boot priority to Ubuntu. This will bring you to the GRUB menu at startup and you can then choose to boot to Mint or Windows. Hope this works for you.

    I have an old HP 655 laptop. Boot menu looks exactly the same. I found out there is not a way to change UEFI boot order. There is not setting for this in bios. Also boot order set by bcdedit or efibootmgr is ignored. Windows always loads first.

    I found out solution is to set windows boot manager inactive:

    Replace 4 with your number of windows boot manager. Run efibootmgr again and you should see star disappear to mark inactivity.

    After my computer boots to grup boot menu and windows can be still chosen from that.

    Simple fix is there. install grub2win on windows and set as default then add new boot menu entry choose linux mint and choose the patition where u have installed mint. apply okay.after rebooting u can have option for both Windows and mint.Grub2win can be used for multiple linux and other Android os too

    On Lenovo computers (at least ThinkStation P340), disabling fast boot in BIOS solved this issue.

    Your biggest mistake was to install Linux in UEFI. While Windows works fine in both UEFI and Legacy/BIOS mode, Linux is much better off in Legacy/BIOS mode. Some people advise you to install Linux in UEFI mode, it does work sometimes, but sooner or later you are going to run into problems. Best solution is to use 2 separate physical drives, one for Windows, one for Linux. If that is not an option, as is the case for most laptops, what I do is start with a clean, empty unformatted drive, format and create partitions for both Windows (NTFS) and Linux (ext4 and swap) with GParted, which I use from a Live CD/DVD/USB of Linux. Next step, I always install Windows first, from a DVD or USB installer, force it to install in Legacy/BIOS mode, and after all Windows updates are done I install Linux in the previously created ext4 partitions. Since I assume your Windows was factory installed, as it is the case with all store bought desktop and laptop computers, you would need to shrink your drive “C” in Windows in order to create space for Linux. After that, boot from Linux Live CD/DVD/USB and create ext4 partitions and swap space for Linux, then proceed to install Linux. The Linux bootloader GRUB2 will see your Windows partition and include it in the boot menu options. DO NOT repair your Windows bootsector (bootloader) as it will screw up GRUB.

    Brief: The tutorial shows the steps to create a bootable Ubuntu USB in Windows. Instructions are valid for all versions of Ubuntu Linux and Windows.

    One of the first few steps for installing Ubuntu is to create bootable USB of Ubuntu.

    There are several free live USB creation tools available in Windows. You may use any of these free applications.

    In this tutorial, I’ll show two methods using two different applications for creating live Ubuntu USB:

    • Rufus (recommended)
    • Universal USB Installer

    With a live USB, you can try Ubuntu without installing it on your computer. You can, of course, use the same live USB to install Ubuntu on a computer as well.

    Let’s see the methods in detail.

    Creating a live bootable Ubuntu USB in Windows

    Before you start creating the bootable USB, let’s see get the essentials first.

    Getting things ready

    Make sure that you have the following:

    • A USB key (pen drive) with at least 4 GB of size with no important data on it (the USB key will be formatted)
    • Internet connection to download Ubuntu ISO (this could be done on any computer)
    • It would be a good idea to know if your system uses MBR or GPT (Rufus will create live USB accordingly)
    • You should also check if your system uses UEFI or legacy BIOS

    Download Ubuntu ISO

    ISO is basically an image file. You download this single file of around 2.4 GB and it consists of an “image” of Ubuntu Linux. You then use a tool to extract the content of the ISO file in a such a manner that you can boot the Ubuntu operating system from the USB itself.

    Go to the Ubuntu website and choose the version of your choice. You may choose Ubuntu LTS if you do not want to upgrade your system every six to nine months.

    ” data-medium-file=”https://itsfoss.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/download-ubuntu-300×122.png” data-large-file=”https://itsfoss.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/download-ubuntu-800×325.png” loading=”lazy” width=”1275″ height=”518″ src=”https://itsfoss.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/download-ubuntu.png” alt=”download ubuntu” data-lazy-srcset=”https://itsfoss.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/download-ubuntu.png 1275w, https://itsfoss.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/download-ubuntu-300×122.png 300w, https://itsfoss.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/download-ubuntu-800×325.png 800w, https://itsfoss.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/download-ubuntu-768×312.png 768w” data-lazy-sizes=”(max-width: 1275px) 100vw, 1275px” data-lazy-src=”https://itsfoss.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/download-ubuntu.png?is-pending-load=1″ srcset=”data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAIAAAAAAAP///yH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAIBRAA7″>

    You can also download Ubuntu via torrents from the alternative downloads link located on the same page.

    Method 1: Make a live Ubuntu USB with Rufus (recommended)

    Rufus is an excellent free and open source tool for making bootable Linux USB disks. On Windows, I prefer and recommend using Rufus.

    If you prefer videos to text, I have made this video to show the steps in action.

    Step 1: Download Rufus

    Go to the website of Rufus and download the .exe file:

    This is an exe file so you do not need to install Rufus. Just double-click on it to run it.

    Step 2: Creating the live Ubuntu USB

    Plug in your USB key (pen drive) to the computer. Now double click on the download Rufus exe file which should be in the Downloads folder.

    When you run Rufus with the USB plugged in, it automatically recognizes it. If there are more than one USB keys plugged in, please ensure to select the correct USB under Device.

    It may also automatically find the Ubuntu ISO. If not, you can always browse to the ISO by clicking on the SELECT button.

    I hope you have checked the partitioning scheme and BIOS type as I mentioned in the prerequisite section. Based on that, select the Partition Scheme and Target System in Rufus.

    Everything looks good? Hit the START button.

    You may be asked to choose how to write the image. Choose ‘Write in ISO Image mode’:

    Making Live Usb With Rufus

    It will take a few minutes to complete the process. You’ll see a green signal when the live USB is ready.

    I’ll show you how to boot from the live USB in a moment. Let’s see another method of creating bootable Linux USB.

    Method 2: Using Universal USB Installer for making bootable Linux USB

    Go to the project website and download the latest version of Universal USB Installer.

    Plugin the USB drive in the computer and run Universal USB Installer. You need to do the following things now:

    • Select Ubuntu under step 1
    • Browse to the location of downloaded Ubuntu ISO in Step 2 section
    • In Step 3, select the USB drive and also check the option to format it.

    It will present you with obvious warnings, click Yes.

    Wait for sometime for the process to complete. You can push it to background, if you like.

    That said, your Ubuntu USB should be created in few minutes.

    How to boot from live Ubuntu USB

    Once the live USB is created, you can proceed with testing Ubuntu in live mode. The bootable USB can be used on any system, not only on the one where you created it.

    Plug in the live USB on the desired computer. What you need to do is restart or power on your computer.

    At the screen that shows the logo of your system manufacturer, press the F2 or F10 or F12 key. You may try pressing all of them one by one if you are not sure of the key. But be quick when you do that otherwise it will boot into the operating system.

    This key is different for different brand of computers. Some may even use Esc or Del keys for this purpose.

    Quickly press F2, F10 or F12 keys at the screen showing your system manufacturer’s logo

    In the BIOS settings, normally, you should see a screen like this. Here, you use the arrow keys to move down to USB option and press enter to boot from the USB. Please note that the screen may look different in different systems.

    If things go right, you should see a screen like below that gives you the option to “Try Ubuntu without installing” and “Install Ubuntu”. Both methods will provide you the option to install Ubuntu.

    I prefer choosing “Try Ubuntu without installing”. That’s the live mode, and you can take the look and feel of the system. If you like it, you can choose to install Ubuntu. Note that if you make any changes to the live Ubuntu system like saving some files or installing applications, your changes will be lost if you boot from the live USB again.

    Please keep in mind that some systems may not allow you to boot from a bootable USB. If you see some error (like PCIe initialization on Dell systems) or cannot boot from the USB, you should disable secure boot and the try booting from the USB again.

    Considering that you are just starting, I advise to follow this beginner’s guide to Ubuntu and learn how to use Ubuntu. Let me know if you need some help.

    Like what you read? Please share it with others.