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How to rearrange windows with keyboard shortcuts on windows 10

Benj Edwards is an Associate Editor for How-To Geek. For over 15 years, he has written about technology and tech history for sites such as The Atlantic, Fast Company, PCMag, PCWorld, Macworld, Ars Technica, and Wired. In 2005, he created Vintage Computing and Gaming, a blog devoted to tech history. He also created The Culture of Tech podcast and regularly contributes to the Retronauts retrogaming podcast. Read more.

If you run a multiple-monitor setup on your Windows 10 PC, it’s essential to know how to move windows between displays. With a few drags of the mouse or a simple keyboard shortcut, it’s easy to manage windows like a ninja. Here’s how.

Make Sure Extend Mode Is Enabled

To move windows between multiple monitors, Extend mode must be enabled. Extend mode spreads your desktop between all of your available displays, so it’s like having one gigantic virtual workspace.

To enable Extend mode, press Windows + P to open up the “Project” menu. Select “Extend” by clicking or using the arrow keys and the Enter key.

Note that if you plan to manage full-screen apps like games across multiple monitors, the game or app itself may have its own multi-display settings within the program. Be sure to check the game or application’s graphics settings for any options related to multiple displays.

Move Windows Using the Drag and Drop Method

Once you know that you’re using Extend mode, the most obvious way to move windows between monitors is by using your mouse. Click the title bar of the window you’d like to move, then drag it to the edge of the screen in the direction of your other display. The window will move to the other screen. To move it back to the first display, drag the window back in the opposite direction.

Move Windows Using The Keyboard Shortcut Method

Windows 10 includes a convenient keyboard shortcut that can instantly move a window to another display without the need for a mouse.

  • If you want to move a window to a display located to the left of your current display, press Windows + Shift + Left Arrow.
  • If you want to move a window to a display located to the right of your current display, press Windows + Shift + Right Arrow.

This keyboard method works for two or more monitors, and once a window reaches the end of the last monitor in the chain while moving it, the window will wrap around and appear on the first one.

Benj Edwards is an Associate Editor for How-To Geek. For over 15 years, he has written about technology and tech history for sites such as The Atlantic, Fast Company, PCMag, PCWorld, Macworld, Ars Technica, and Wired. In 2005, he created Vintage Computing and Gaming, a blog devoted to tech history. He also created The Culture of Tech podcast and regularly contributes to the Retronauts retrogaming podcast. Read more.

Arranging your workspace in Windows 10 can sometimes feel like a tedious process with your mouse. Luckily, you can use many keyboard shortcuts to switch, snap, minimize, maximize, move, or resize windows.

Switch Between Windows

Windows 10 includes a handy shortcut often called the “task switcher.” It allows you to use your keyboard to quickly switch between active windows. Just press Alt+Tab any time, and thumbnails of all open windows will appear on your screen.

To cycle through the choices, press and hold Alt and press Tab until the window you’d like is highlighted. Release both keys and the window will be brought into the foreground.

You can also press Ctrl+Alt+Tab to open the task switcher. Then, use the arrow keys to select the window you want and press Enter.

The more sophisticated way to switch between windows is Task View. It takes up more of the screen and shows bigger previews of any open windows. To open Task View, press Windows+Tab.

From there, use the arrow keys to select the window you want to view, and then press Enter. The window you selected is brought to the foreground.

Minimize and Maximize

It’s easy to minimize or maximize a window using just your keyboard. Minimizing hides a window from view, while maximizing enlarges the window so it occupies the largest possible area onscreen. You can also minimize all windows simultaneously so you can see the desktop.

Use the following shortcuts:

  • Minimize the current window: Windows+Down Arrow.
  • Maximize the current window: Windows+Up Arrow.
  • Minimize all windows: Windows+M.
  • Minimize all windows and show the desktop: Windows+D. (This works on stubborn windows, too).
  • Minimize all windows except the current one: Windows+Home.
  • Restore all minimized windows: Windows+Shift+M.

You can also enlarge a window without completely maximizing it. If you want to stretch the height (but not the width) of the current window to the top and bottom of the screen, press Windows+Shift+Up Arrow. Note that this shortcut doesn’t work if the window is snapped to the quarter-view position we cover below.

Snap Windows to Halves or Quarters

If you’re juggling multiple windows and want to use keyboard shortcuts to arrange them precisely onscreen, you’re in luck! It’s easy to position two windows into perfect halves, or four windows into quarters on the screen.

First, press Alt+Tab or use your mouse to bring the window you want to reposition into focus. From there, decide which portion of the screen you want that window to occupy.

You can then use the following shortcuts to position two windows into halves:

  • Maximize on left: Windows+Left Arrow.
  • Maximize on right: Windows+Right Arrow.

To position four windows into quarters (each will fill 1/4 of the screen), you can use a sequence of two shortcuts. These sequences assume the window hasn’t already been snapped to the left or right half of the screen.

Here’s how to do it:

  • Upper-left quarter: Windows+Left Arrow, and then Windows+Up Arrow.
  • Lower-left quarter: Windows+Left Arrow, and then Windows+Down Arrow.
  • Upper-right quarter: Windows+Right Arrow, and then Windows+Up Arrow.
  • Lower-right quarter: Windows+Right Arrow, and then Windows+Down Arrow.

Move a Window Precisely

You can use your keyboard to move a particular window to a certain spot onscreen. First, press Alt+Tab to pick the window you want to move.

When the window is selected, press Alt+Space to open a small menu in the upper-left corner. Press the arrow key to select “Move,” and then press enter.

Use the arrow keys to move the window where you want it onscreen, and then press Enter.

This trick works even if the window you want to move is hidden and you can’t find it with your mouse.

Moving Windows Between Displays

If you use multiple monitors and you’ve extended your desktop between them, you can quickly move the active window between displays. To do this, press Windows+Shift+Left or +Right Arrow.

Window Management Cheat Sheet

Here’s a handy cheat sheet of everything we covered above. Practice these, and you’ll be a window ninja in no time:

  • Alt+Tab: Open task switcher.
  • Windows+Tab: Open Task View.
  • Windows+Down Arrow: Minimize window.
  • Windows+Up Arrow: Maximize window.
  • Windows+M: Minimize all windows.
  • Windows+D: Display desktop.
  • Windows+Home: Minimize all windows except the active one.
  • Windows+Shift+M: Restore all minimized windows.
  • Windows+Shift+Up Arrow: Stretch window to the top and bottom of the screen.
  • Windows+Left Arrow: Maximize the window on the left side of the screen.
  • Windows+Right Arrow: Maximize the window on the right side of the screen.
  • Windows+Shift+Left or Right Arrow: Move a window from one monitor to another.

If you want even more keyboard-shortcut magic, check out these additional shortcuts for Windows 10, as well as some for web browsers, and text-editing.

If you like to use a keyboard, you may want to know how to move a window with keyboard rather than your mouse in the Windows operating system. In this post, you can know three common methods for moving a window.

Move Window with Keyboard

When using your computer, you may want to move the window. Usually, you choose to use a mouse to drag the window easily. But some prefer to use a keyboard to move the window.

Since Windows 7, the operating systems offer the keyboard support for moving and arranging application windows. Well then, how to move a window with keyboard?

In the following part, MiniTool Solution will tell you how to do this work in small increments to an exact place that you want, how to move a window to the right or left, and how to move a window to another monitor.

Ways to Move Windows with Keyboard

Incremental Move

This way is only available for windows that are not fully maximized. If the window is maximized, you cannot move the window. Just follow these steps below to start the window moving:

Step 1: Click the window or you can use the keyboard shortcut – Alt + Tab and let the window that you want to move active.

Step 2: Then, press Alt + Spacebar and you can see a small menu

Step 3: Press M (equal to selecting the Move option) and the mouse cursor will turn into a cross with arrows and move to the title bar of the window. Now, you can use the left, right, up, and down arrow keys on your keyboard to move the window to another position.

Step 4: Press Enter to exit the move mode.

Snap an App Window

In Windows, there is a feature that allows you to snap the window to the right or left side of the computer screen. When dragging the window to the left or right, it will automatically snap to the side and resize.

Here are two keyboard shortcuts to move window:

  • Win + Left Arrow: snap the window to the left
  • Win + Right Arrow: snap the window to the right

Besides, there are some other keyboard shortcuts to manipulate the active window:

  • Win + Home: minimize all windows except the foreground window
  • Win + Up Arrow: maxmize a window
  • Win + Down Arrow: minimize the window if the window is not maximized, or else, it restores the window to its original size
  • Win + Shift + Up: maximize a window vertically

Move Window to Another Monitor

If you want to move your window between multiple monitors, use these keyboard shortcuts:

  • Win + Shift + Left Arrow: move a window to the monitor on the left
  • Win + Shift+Right Arrow: move a window to the monitor on the right

Bottom Line

How to move window with keyboard? After reading this article, you know some effective ways and just follow one of them based on your situation to start the moving operation.

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About The Author

Vera is an editor of the MiniTool Team since 2016 who has more than 5 years’ writing experiences in the field of technical articles. Her articles mainly focus on disk & partition management, PC data recovery, video conversion, as well as PC backup & restore, helping users to solve some errors and issues when using their computers. In her spare times, she likes shopping, playing games and reading some articles.

Control your Windows 10 laptop or desktop computer with these commands

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What to Know

  • Tap the Windows key to open and close the Start Menu. Windows+E opens File Explorer. Windows+L immediately locks the screen.
  • Tap Windows+G to open the Xbox Game bar, or Windows+K to activate the Connect menu for Bluetooth and other devices.
  • Windows+Left (or Right) arrow: Snap an app or window to the left or right side of the screen. Ctrl+C to copy; Ctrl+V to paste; Ctrl+Z to undo.

This article lists several Windows 10 keyboard shortcuts, sometimes referred to as Windows hotkeys. The shortcuts are set combinations of key presses that can activate specific operating system commands to streamline your workflow and increase productivity.

Windows 10 System Hotkeys

These Windows 10 keyboard shortcuts can be used to turn a Windows 10 device on or off, lock it, or activate certain menus.

Windows: Tapping the Windows key by itself will open and close the Windows 10 Start Menu.

Windows+A: Opens the Action Center which is usually activated by clicking on the notifications icon in the lower-right corner of the screen or by swiping in from the right side with your finger.

Windows+E: Opens File Explorer.

Windows+G: This combination opens the Xbox Game bar while playing a video game on your Windows 10 computer or laptop.

Windows+I: Opens Settings.

Windows+K: Activates the Connect menu for linking your Windows 10 device to something else via Bluetooth.

Windows+L: Immediately locks your Windows 10 device and returns you to the Sign-in screen. This is especially useful if you need to quickly hide what you’re doing from someone else or need to leave your desk for a few minutes.

Windows+Spacebar: Cycle through your language and keyboard options.

Windows 10 App Keyboard Shortcuts

These keyboard commands can be a convenient way to open, close, or control specific Windows 10 apps.

Windows+D: This hides all of the open apps and takes you directly to the Windows 10 desktop. Using this command a second time will display all of your open apps again.

Windows+M: Minimizes all open apps and windows.

Windows+Left arrow: Snaps an app or window to the left side of the screen.

Windows+Right arrow: Snaps an app or window to the right side of the screen.

Windows+Up arrow: Maximizes all open apps and windows that have been minimized.

Windows+Down arrow: Minimizes all apps and windows.

Ctrl+Shift+Esc: Opens Task Manager. This is used to show you all apps that are currently running and how much processing power they’re using.

Alt+Tab: Displays all open apps and lets you switch between them quickly.

Ctrl+Alt+Tab: Shows all open apps.

Windows+0 (zero): Opens the Windows 10 Sticky Notes app.

Windows 10 Clipboard Shortcut Keys

Copying and pasting text and media by right-clicking with your mouse is effective but these Windows 10 keyboard shortcuts are much faster.

Ctrl+X: Cuts the highlighted items.

Cut is essentially the same as Copy but also removes the original.

Ctrl+V: Pastes the cut or copied content.

Ctrl+A: Selects all content within an app or open window.

PrtScn: Copies an image of the entire screen to your device’s clipboard. This can then be pasted into an image editing app such as Photoshop.

Some keyboards may have a Print Screen button instead of a PrtScn one. They both perform the same function.

Windows+PrtScn: Takes an image of the entire screen and saves it to your Windows 10 device’s Screenshots folder.

Cortana Keyboard Shortcuts

Cortana is Microsoft’s virtual assistant that works in much the same way as Apple’s Siri and Amazon’s Alexa. Cortana is built directly into the Windows 10 operating system and can typically be activated by clicking or tapping on the circular Cortana icon in the Taskbar next to the Windows icon.

Windows 10’s digital assistant can also be controlled with these keyboard commands.

Windows+S: Opens Cortana.

Windows+C: Open Cortana in listening mode. This opens Cortana and immediately allows you to speak to it without having to press the microphone button.

This particular shortcut is disabled by default on all Windows 10 devices. You can activate its functionality by doing the following.

Press Windows+I to open the Settings app.

Select Cortana.

Select the switch below the text that says Let Cortana listen for my commands when I press the Windows logo key + C. If it says On, the Windows+C keyboard shortcut will now work.

Miscellaneous Keyboard Shortcuts

Here are some extra hotkeys that are convenient and can save you time.

Ctrl+Z: This will undo the previous action in most apps.

Ctrl+Shift+N: Creates a new folder in File Explorer.

Window+. or ; (semicolon): Brings up the emoji box. This is incredibly useful when typing in an app that has no built-in emoji or emoticon options.

Benj Edwards is an Associate Editor for How-To Geek. For over 15 years, he has written about technology and tech history for sites such as The Atlantic, Fast Company, PCMag, PCWorld, Macworld, Ars Technica, and Wired. In 2005, he created Vintage Computing and Gaming, a blog devoted to tech history. He also created The Culture of Tech podcast and regularly contributes to the Retronauts retrogaming podcast. Read more.

If you use virtual desktops on Windows 10, these keyboard shortcuts will give you more control and speed up your Windows experience.

Virtual Desktop Shortcuts

Just like most Windows 10 features, you can control several aspects of your virtual desktops without a mouse. At this writing, you can use the following keyboard shortcuts to manage your virtual desktops:

  • Windows+Tab: Open Task View.
  • Windows+Ctrl+D: Create a new virtual desktop.
  • Windows+Ctrl+Left or Right Arrow: Switch between virtual desktops.
  • Windows+Ctrl+F4: Close the current virtual desktop.
  • Esc: Close Task View.

Let’s take a closer look at each of these.

Windows+Tab: Open Task View

To quickly open the Task View screen, just press Windows+Tab. A screen appears with thumbnails of each of your virtual desktops, as well as thumbnails of any applications that are running on the currently selected virtual desktop. You can also open this window by clicking the Task View button on the task bar.

In Task View, use the Tab key to move the cursor between the list of virtual desktops at the top, and the application window thumbnails below. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor, and then press Enter to select the desktop or application window you want to manage.

Windows+Ctrl+D: Create a New Virtual Desktop

To quickly create a new virtual desktop, press Windows+Ctrl+D at any time, and you’ll be taken to the new desktop immediately. Alternatively, you can click “New Desktop” in Task View.

Windows+Ctrl+Left or Right Arrow: Switch Between Desktops

Press Windows+Ctrl+Left Arrow to switch to a lower-numbered virtual desktop, or Windows+Ctrl+Right Arrow to switch to a higher-numbered one. For example, if you’re on Desktop 3 and want to switch to Desktop 4, you would press Windows+Ctrl+Right Arrow.

Windows+Ctrl+F4: Close the Current Virtual Desktop

To close the current virtual desktop, press Windows+Ctrl+F4. Any windows you have open on a desktop you close will then appear on the virtual desktop numerically just above the one you closed.

For example, if you’re running Notepad on Desktop 3, and you then close Desktop 3, Notepad will appear on Desktop 2. You can also close a virtual desktop in Task View by clicking the “X” on the thumbnail.

Esc: Close Task View

If Task View is open, and you don’t want to switch to another virtual desktop, just press Esc. You’ll then return to the desktop you were viewing when you opened Task View.

Moving a Window Between Virtual Desktops

Currently, there aren’t any keyboard shortcuts to move an application window from one virtual desktop to another. For now, if you want to do this, activate Task View. Then, drag and drop the window’s thumbnail onto another virtual desktop’s thumbnail with your mouse.

It will appear there instantly. You can also right-click a window’s thumbnail, and then select a destination in the “Move to” menu.

Judging from posts to online forums, a keyboard shortcut to manage this task is very much in demand, so it (and others) might appear in future versions of Windows.

You can customize keyboard shortcuts (or shortcut keys) by assigning them to a command, macro, font, style, or frequently used symbol. You can also remove keyboard shortcuts. You can assign or remove keyboard shortcuts by using a mouse or just the keyboard.

Use a mouse to assign or remove a keyboard shortcut

Go to File > Options > Customize Ribbon.

At the bottom of the Customize the Ribbon and keyboard shortcuts pane, select Customize.

In the Save changes in box, select the current document name or template that you want to save the keyboard shortcut changes in.

In the Categories box, select the category that contains the command or other item that you want to assign a keyboard shortcut to or remove a keyboard shortcut from.

In the Commands box, select the name of the command or other item that you want to assign a keyboard shortcut to or remove a keyboard shortcut from.

Any keyboard shortcuts that are currently assigned to that command or other item appear in the Current keys box, or below the box with the label Currently assigned to.

To assign a keyboard shortcut do the following:

Begin keyboard shortcuts with CTRL or a function key.

In the Press new shortcut key box, press the combination of keys that you want to assign. For example, press CTRL plus the key that you want to use.

Look at Current keys (or Currently assigned to) to see whether the combination of keys is already assigned to a command or other item. If the combination is already assigned, type a different combination.

Important: Reassigning a combination of keys means that you can no longer use the combination for its original purpose. For example, pressing CTRL+B changes selected text to bold. If you reassign CTRL+B to a new command or other item, you will not be able to make text bold by pressing CTRL+B unless you restore the keyboard shortcut assignments to their original settings by selecting Reset All at the bottom of the Customize Keyboard dialog box.

Note: If you use a programmable keyboard, the key combination CTRL+ALT+F8 might already be reserved for initiating keyboard programming.

Remove a keyboard shortcut

In the Current keys box, select the keyboard shortcut that you want to remove.

Use just the keyboard to assign or remove a keyboard shortcut

Press ALT+F, T to open the Word Options dialog box.

Press DOWN ARROW to select Customize Ribbon.

Press the TAB key repeatedly until Customize is selected at the bottom of the dialog box, and then press ENTER.

In the Categories box, press DOWN ARROW or UP ARROW to select the category that contains the command or other item that you want to assign a keyboard shortcut to or remove a keyboard shortcut from.

Press the TAB key to move to the Commands box.

Press DOWN ARROW or UP ARROW to select the name of the command or other item that you want to assign a keyboard shortcut to or remove a keyboard shortcut from.

Any keyboard shortcuts that are currently assigned to that command or item appear in the Current keys box, or below the box with the label Currently assigned to.

To assign a keyboard shortcut do the following:

Begin keyboard shortcuts with CTRL or a function key.

Press the TAB key repeatedly until the cursor is in the Press new shortcut key box.

Press the combination of keys that you want to assign. For example, press CTRL plus the key that you want to use.

Look at Current keys (or Currently assigned to) to see whether the combination of keys is already assigned to a command or other item. If the combination is already assigned, type a different combination.

Important: Reassigning a combination of keys means that you can no longer use the combination for its original purpose. For example, pressing CTRL+B changes selected text to bold. If you reassign CTRL+B to a new command or other item, you will not be able to make text bold by pressing CTRL+B unless you restore the keyboard shortcut assignments to their original settings by selecting Reset All at the bottom of the Customize Keyboard dialog box.

Press the TAB key repeatedly until the Save changes in box is selected.

Press DOWN ARROW or UP ARROW to highlight the current document name or template in which you want to save the keyboard shortcut changes, and then press ENTER.

Press the TAB key repeatedly until Assign is selected, and then press ENTER.

Note: If you use a programmable keyboard, the key combination CTRL+ALT+F8 might already be reserved for initiating keyboard programming.

To remove a keyboard shortcut

Press the TAB key repeatedly until the Save changes in box is selected.

Press DOWN ARROW or UP ARROW to highlight the current document name or template in which you want to save the keyboard shortcut changes, and then press ENTER.

Press the SHIFT+TAB key repeatedly until the cursor is in the Current keys box.

Press DOWN ARROW or UP ARROW to select the keyboard shortcut that you want to remove.

Press the TAB key repeatedly until Remove is selected, and then press ENTER.

Use Snap to arrange all your open windows using the mouse, keyboard, or the Snap Assist feature.

Snap with a mouse

Select the title bar of the window you want to snap and drag it to the edge of your screen. An outline indicates where the window will snap to when you drop it. Drag it to the left or right side of your screen, depending on where you want to snap it to.

Snap with a keyboard

Select the window you want to snap and press the Windows Logo Key + Left Arrow or the Windows Logo Key + Right Arrow to snap the window to the side of the screen where you want it to be. You can also move it to a corner after snapping it. With the window selected, press the Windows Logo Key + Up Arrow or the Windows Logo Key + Down Arrow to get it into the desired corner. The window is then in its smallest possible state, which is a quarter of the screen. Then you can select the screen and use the Windows Logo Key + Arrow Keys to move it wherever you want.

Snap with Snap Assist

Snap Assist appears after you’ve snapped a window but have a lot of available space on your screen. Any other open windows are displayed in that space as thumbnails.

To use Snap Assist, click the thumbnail of the window you want to open. If you have two windows displayed side-by-side, you can resize both windows simultaneously by selecting and dragging the dividing line. Resize the window on one side to the size you want it to be, and then release the mouse button. The other window will resize itself to fit alongside the first one, so you won’t have any empty screen space.

Note: Snap Assist is only available for two app windows at a time on Windows 11 SE. Learn more

Snap groups

When working on a specific task, it can be useful to have two or more open apps or windows that create a snap group. You can open another app if you’re interrupted and then, when you want to get back to the snap group later, hover over one of your open apps in the taskbar to find it.

Snap layouts

To optimize your screen space and your productivity, hover over a window’s maximize button or select a window and press Win+Z, then choose a snap layout.

Use Snap to arrange all your open windows using the mouse, keyboard, or the Snap Assist feature.

Snap with a mouse

Select the title bar of the window you want to snap and drag it to the edge of your screen. An outline indicates where the window will snap to when you drop it. Drag it to the left or right side of your screen, depending on where you want to snap it to.

Snap with a keyboard

Select the window you want to snap and press the Windows Logo Key + Left Arrow or the Windows Logo Key + Right Arrow to snap the window to the side of the screen where you want it to be. You can also move it to a corner after snapping it. With the window selected, press the Windows Logo Key + Up Arrow or the Windows Logo Key + Down Arrow to get it into the desired corner. The window is then in its smallest possible state, which is a quarter of the screen. Then you can select the screen and use the Windows Logo Key + Arrow Keys to move it wherever you want.

Snap with Snap Assist

Snap Assist appears after you’ve snapped a window but have a lot of available space on your screen. Any other open windows are displayed in that space as thumbnails.

To use Snap Assist, click the thumbnail of the window you want to open in the empty space on your screen. If you have two windows displayed side-by-side, you can resize both windows simultaneously by selecting and dragging the dividing line. Resize the window on one side to the size you want it to be, and then release the mouse button. The other window will resize itself to fit alongside the first one, so you won’t have any empty screen space.

Use the Windows key plus the left or right arrow keys to snap a window to the side.

Last week I explained how to arrange applications and File Explorer windows on the screen by using the mouse to snap them into position. If you use these techniques regularly, it pays to memorize the associated keyboard shortcuts, all of which involve the Windows key and the four arrow keys..

Windows key + left/right arrow Use this combination to snap the current window to the selected side of the display. If the window is already snapped, this shortcut “unsnaps” the window and cycles through all three combinations: left, unsnapped, right.

Windows key + up/down arrow Use this combination to cycle through maximized, restored, and minimized states for the current unsnapped window.

If you have multiple displays, the Windows key + left/right arrow combinations cycle through all monitors, in order. So if you select a window on the left display and press Windows key + right twice in succession, it will snap to the left side of the monitor on the right.

Windows 10 supports four window snap positions per monitor, one for each corner. Snapping a window into one of these quadrants with keyboard shortcuts takes a double move: Windows key plus left/right arrow, followed by Windows key + up/down arrow. To snap a window into the upper-left quadrant, for example, press Windows key + left arrow and then, while continuing to hold down the Windows key, press the up arrow.

Next week: Another Windows 10 tip from Ed Bott

ed bott

What to expect from the Windows 10 Anniversary Update

The unconventional evolution of Windows 10 continues with the upcoming release of the Anniversary Update, version 1607. It’s not just a service pack. Here’s what’s new.

VIDEO: Windows 7 users are more exposed to ransomware, says Microsoft

During your busy day you might find yourself opening or re-opening specific software repeatedly. While there’s nothing wrong with a shortcut on the desktop or using pinned taskbar shortcuts, custom shortcuts can really cut down the amount of time you spend hunting and opening software. After all, your keyboard is in front of you at all times – why not use it? Here are some options for you to create custom keyboard shortcuts in Windows 10.

Utilising Your Pinned Applications

If you use pinned applications on your taskbar, you may be surprised to learn that you’ve already set up hotkeys for them! All you have to do is hold down the Win key on your keyboard and push the number that corresponds to the position of the app on your taskbar like, for instance, in this picture.

If you pressed “Windows Key + 1.” you’d open Internet Explorer. If you did “Windows Key + 2,” you’d open Windows Explorer, and “Windows Key + 3” wouldopen the Store app. This means that apps pinned to your taskbar already have their own shortcut for it! You can pin apps either by right-clicking a shortcut and clicking “Pin to Taskbar” or right-clicking an app already on the taskbar and pinning it that way instead.

Creating a Shortcut

But what if you don’t want to pin software to your taskbar? Thankfully, Windows 10 has custom shortcuts functionality outside of pinned taskbar apps. All you need is a shortcut on hand, and you’re good go to.

First, right-click the shortcut of the program you want to make a shortcut for. Click Properties.

Then, click on the “Shortcut” tab if you’re not taken to it by default.

Here you’ll see a range of different options to change. The one you’re looking for is called “Shortcut key” and should be set to “None.” Click within the box that says “None,” then press a character key on your keyboard. Windows 10 should automatically create a “Ctrl + Alt” combination with the key that you just pressed. Make sure to test the shortcut before you set it, as something else might already be using that specific shortcut combination!

Once you OK out of the window, you’ll be able to press the key combination you defined to launch the app.

What If There’s No Shortcut?

But what if you can’t find a shortcut for what you want to open? Perhaps it’s buried somewhere in your files, or it’s a system-based application which naturally doesn’t have shortcuts on the desktop. How do you make a keyboard shortcut for it?

To do this, we need to open the Applications folder. You can do this by opening the Run window (You can do so with Win + R – there’s another shortcut for you!) and typing shell:AppsFolder into the box and clicking OK.

This will show you a huge list of executables, including applications which don’t usually have shortcuts on the desktop. You can sort them by name if you want to find the one you’re looking for faster. Once you’ve found it, however, you’ll come across a snag; when you right-click an application, no “Properties” option appears!

However, if you look through the menu, you’ll find “Create shortcut.” If you click this, you can then create a shortcut that appears on your desktop. You can then set a hotkey for it through the usual method.

Keeping It Short

Creating custom keyboard shortcuts for Windows 10 can make opening applications really easy. Thankfully, it’s not difficult whatsoever, and if you have pinned software on your taskbar, you already have some set up!

How often do you use keyboard shortcuts in work or daily life? How do you set them up? Let us know below.

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Windows 10 comes with a number of keyboard shortcuts to help people with their daily and repetitive tasks. Here’s the list of the most common Windows 10 keyboard shortcuts.

  • Keyboard shortcuts in Windows 10
  • Virtual desktop management keyboard shortcuts
  • Keyboard shortcuts for Snap Assist
  • Keyboard shortcuts for the Xbox App

What are keyboard shortcuts in Windows 10?

[Windows Key] + [A]: Activate Action Center.

[Windows Key] + [C]: Trigger a voice search with Cortana.

[Windows Key] + [S]: Trigger a classic search with Cortana.

[Windows Key] + [D]: Show desktop.

[Windows Key] + [,]: Peek at desktop.

[Windows Key] + [E]: Open File Explorer.

[Windows Key] + [I]: Open Windows 10 Settings.

[Windows Key] + [K]: Connect to wireless audio device or display.

[Windows Key] + [H]: Display the Sharing options (right-pane).

[Windows Key] + [L]: Lock your current session.

[Windows Key] + [P]: Project a screen.

[Windows Key] + [R]: Open the Run command.

[Windows Key] + [X]: Open the Power User menu.

[Windows Key] + Arrow keys ([Left], [Right], [Up] or [Down]): Snap app window at the corner of your screen.

What are virtual desktop management keyboard shortcuts?

[Windows Key] + [Tab]: Open Task View.

[Windows Key] + [Ctrl]+ [D]: Create a new virtual desktop.

[Windows Key] + [Ctrl] + [F4]: Close a virtual desktop.

[Windows Key] + [Ctrl] + Arrow keys ([Left] or [Right]): Switch between virtual desktops.

[Windows Key] + [Shift] + Arrow keys ([Left] or [Right]): Move apps from one virtual desktop to another.

What are keyboard shortcuts for Snap Assist?

Use the [Windows] + Cursor keys ([Up], [Down], [Left] or [Right]) to reposition snapped windows.

What are keyboard shortcuts for the Xbox App?

Use these shortcuts to control the Game DVR feature of the Xbox app:

[Windows Key] + [G]: Open the Game bar.

[Windows Key] + [Alt] + [G]: Record current app screen.

[Windows Key] + [Alt] + [R]: Start/Stop Recording.

[Windows Key] + [Alt] + [Print Screen]: Take screenshots.

[Windows Key] + [Alt] + [T]: Show/hide recording timer.

[Windows Key] + [Alt] + [M]: Enable/disable audio recording (microphone).

Microsoft Windows 10 now comes with several additional keyboard shortcuts that primarily address ‘snapping’ multiple programs side-by-side, monitor management, and Virtual Desktops. Having this shortcut cheat sheet can help make learning these new features a simpler process.

Windows 10 keyboard shortcuts include a whole new set features that can make your workflow simple and more proficient. Below is a chart; or cheat sheet if you will, of the newest keyboard shortcuts to make your life easier when working with Windows 10 more.

For an off-line version of keyboard shortcuts provided Microsoft for Windows 10 users, head over to the Microsoft download page.

To summarize the the image below, this table includes the Windows 10 keyboard shortcuts:

New Features

Keyboard Shortcut Function
Windows Key + A Open Action Center
Windows Key + C Open Cortana in listening mode (for voice commands)
Windows Key + S Search / Launch Cortana (listening mode)
Windows Key + I Open Settings App
Windows Key + Tab Open Task View
Windows Key + Ctrl + D Open New Virtual Desktop
Windows Key + Ctrl + F4 Close the Current Desktop
Windows Key + Ctrl + → Switch between Virtual Desktops (right)
Windows Key + Ctrl + ← Switch between Virtual Desktops (left)

Standard Features

Keyboard Shortcut Function
Windows Key Open / Close Start Menu
Windows Key + X Open / Close Start Menu Content (same as right-click)
Windows Key + → Snap Current Window Right
Windows Key + ← Snap Current Window Left
Windows Key + E Launch File Explorer
Windows Key + L Lock the Desktop
Alt + PrtScn Copy Screenshot to Clipboard
Windows Key + PrtScn Copy Screenshot to ‘Computers > Pictures > Screenshots’

Browser Shortcuts

Keyboard Shortcut Function
Ctrl + T Open new Tab
Ctrl + D Bookmark Page
Ctrl + L Highlight Current URL in Address Window
Ctrl + Tab Step through Open Browser Tabs
Ctrl + Enter Add ‘.com’ to end of URL (i.e., google > Ctrl + Enter)

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Keyboard shortcuts are keys or combinations of keys that provide another way to do something that you’d typically do with a mouse.

The following are common keyboard shortcuts in many of the Microsoft apps that come with Windows 10. This includes shortcuts for:

In many of these apps, shortcuts are also shown in a tooltip if you hold the mouse pointer over a button. In others, pressing the Alt or F10 keys shows available keyboard shortcuts. If a letter is underlined in a menu, press the Altkey and the underlined key together instead of choosing that menu item. For example, to create a new picture in Paint, press Ctrl + N.

Note: With a touch keyboard, you’ll need to press the Ctrl key to view some shortcuts.

Calculator keyboard shortcuts

Switch to Standard mode

Switch to Scientific mode

Switch to Graphing mode

Switch to Programmer mode

Switch to Date Calculation mode

Store in memory, in Standard mode, Scientific mode, and Programmer mode

Add to memory, in Standard mode, Scientific mode, and Programmer mode

Subtract from memory, in Standard mode, Scientific mode, and Programmer mode

Recall from memory, in Standard mode, Scientific mode, and Programmer mode

Clear current input (select CE)

Fully clear input (select C)

Navigate to the next UI item and give it focus

Selects UI item that has focus

Selects = in Standard mode, Scientific mode, and Programmer mode

Select +/- in Standard mode, Scientific mode, and Programmer mode

Select 1/x in Standard mode and Scientific mode

Select 2 √x in Standard mode and Scientific mode

Select % in Standard mode and Programmer mode

When history button is visible, selects the history button in Standard mode and Scientific mode

Move up in history list, memory list, and menu items

Move down in history list, memory list, and menu items

Select DEG in Scientific mode

Select RAD in Scientific mode

Select GRAD in Scientific mode

Select 2 x in Scientific mode

Select 10 x in Scientific mode

Select 10 x in in Scientific mode

Select sin -1 in Scientific mode

Select sinh in Scientific mode

Select sinh -1 in Scientific mode

Select tan in Scientific mode

Select tan -1 in Scientific mode

Select tanh in Scientific mode

Select tanh -1 in Scientific mode

Select cos in Scientific mode

Select cos -1 in Scientific mode

Select cosh in Scientific mode

Select cosh -1 in Scientific mode

Select sec in Scientific mode

Select sec -1 in Scientific mode

Select sech in Scientific mode

Select sech -1 in Scientific mode

Select csc in Scientific mode

Select csc -1 in Scientific mode

Select csch in Scientific mode

Select csch -1 in Scientific mode

Select cot in Scientific mode

Select cot -1 in Scientific mode

Select coth in Scientific mode

Select coth -1 in Scientific mode

Select y √x in Scientific mode

Select |x| in Scientific mode

Select ⌊x⌋ in Scientific mode

Select ⌈x⌉ in Scientific mode

Select log in Scientific mode

Select log yx in Scientific mode

Select dms in Scientific mode

Select ln in Scientific mode

Select e x in Scientific mode

Select Pi in Scientific mode

Select x 2 in Standard mode and Scientific mode

Toggles on/off F-E buttonin Scientific mode

Select exp in Scientific mode

Select x y in Scientific mode

Select x 3 in Scientific mode

Select n! in Scientific mode

Select mod in Scientific mode

Ctrl ++ on numpad

Graph zooms in while in Graphing mode

Ctrl +- on numpad

Graph zooms out while in Graphing mode

Select DWORD in Programmer mode

Select WORD in Programmer mode

Select BYTE in Programmer mode

Select HEX in Programmer mode

Select DEC in Programmer mode

Select OCT in Programmer mode

Select BIN in Programmer mode

Select QWORD in Programmer mode

Select letters A-F in Programmer mode while HEX is select

Select RoL in Programmer mode when Bit Shift is set to either “Circular” shift

Select RoR in Programmer mode when Bit Shift is set to either “Circular” shift

Select Lsh in Programmer mode when Bit Shift is set to “Arithmetic” or “Logical” shift

Select Rsh in Programmer mode when Bit Shift is set to “Arithmetic” or “Logical” shift

Multitasking is good at maximizing productivity, but sometimes focusing on one task at a time is the best way to improve maximizing efficiency. Here, keyboard shortcuts matter.

The method for switching to a full screen can differ from different applications. Besides, each time you use a shortcut, other shortcuts may be disabled.

Let’s see multiple full-screen keyboard shortcuts for Windows, Mac, Firefox, and Chrome users.

Table of Contents

Full-Screen Shortcuts For Windows

  • Windows key + Up arrow to Maximize the current window.
  • Windows key + Down arrow to Minimize the current window.
  • Windows key + Left arrow to Maximize the current window and move it to the left side of the screen.
  • Windows key + Left arrow to Maximize the current window and move it to the right side of the screen.
  • Windows key + Up arrow to Minimize the current window.
  • Windows key + M to minimize all the windows.
  • Windows key + D to display the desktop.
  • Alt + Enter is used when you are playing a game or watching a video and need to access it in full-screen mode but not in a window.

Other Useful Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Alt + Space together and then click S: Resize the screen.
  • Alt + Tab: Switch between the open applications.
  • Alt + F4: Close a program.
  • Ctrl + Shift + Esc: Open the Task Manager.
  • Ctrl + C: Copy selected items to clipboards.
  • Ctrl + X: Cut the selected items.
  • Ctrl + V: Paste the copied contents from the clipboard.
  • Ctrl + S: Saves a selected document.
  • Win key/ Ctrl + Esc: Open/close Start Menu.
  • Win key + E: Open the File Explorer.
  • Win key + G: Turn on the Game bar when a game is open.
  • Win key + I: Open the Settings app.
  • Win key + L: Lock the PC or switch accounts.
  • Win key + R: Open Run box.
  • Win key + S: Open Search box.

Full-Screen Shortcuts For Mac

Some easy ways can bring your Mac into full-screen mode.

  1. Click the green Full-Screen button on the top left of the window.
  2. Control + Command + F: Trigger full-screen mode.
  3. Press Esc or press Control + Command + F again can escape the full screen.

Switch Apps in Full-Screen Mode

  • Application Switcher: Press and hold the Command key and then press the Tab key until you find the app icon you want to switch, then release the key.
  • Ctrl + Left arrow or Right arrow: Move forth and back between full-screen apps.
  • Press the Mission Control key ( F3 key), move the cursor to the top of the screen, and then click one of the app thumbnails you want to switch at the top of the display.

Full-Screen Shortcuts For Firefox

Firefox has a convenient full-screen mode. The Firefox user interface doesn’t take up significant storage space, but the browsing experience is better in full-screen mode.

Keyboard Shortcuts

F11: For Windows and Linux

Command + Shift + F or Ctrl + Shift + F: For Mac

Enter the Full Screen Without Shortcuts

  1. Open the Firefox browser and click the three horizontal lines on the top right side of the toolbar.
  2. Click the full-screen button in Zoom.
  3. You can click the full-screen button again to exit the full-screen mode.

Full-Screen Shortcuts For Chrome

Google Chrome also has a full-screen mode, which hides distractions on the desktop, including the menu buttons, open tabs, bookmarks bar, and the operating system’s taskbar and clock. Chrome will take up all the space on your screen when it is in full-screen mode.

On Windows

Keyboard Shortcut: F11 or Fn + F11

Browser’s Menu:

  1. Open Google Chrome and select the menu icon, which is a three-dot at the top right corner.
  2. Select the square icon to the right on the Zoom section.

On Mac

Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl + Command + F

Browser’s Menu:

  1. Open Google Chrome and click View in the menu
  2. Click Enter Full Screen.

Or you can also:

  1. Open Google Chrome and select the green Full-Screen button at the top left corner to make a full window screen.
  2. Click it again to turn off the full screen.

Try it out!

To sum up, full-screen keyboard shortcuts differ in different devices and situations. The above shows how to make a full window screen on Windows, Mac, Firefox, and Chrome, respectively.

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Ever wished to shut down or sleep your computer with just the keyboard? If your mouse isn’t working properly, or if you just want to get more done, you could be on the lookout for a Windows sleep shortcut. We’ll show you how to put your Windows PC to sleep or shut it down using only the keyboard. With Windows 10 and Windows 11, there are several ways to execute this shortcut.

1. Use the Power User Menu Shortcut

A non-keyboard shortcut is the most reliable way to go to sleep in Windows 10 and Windows 11. Instead, it’s a flurry of keystrokes. Because it doesn’t require any setting and works with any application, this is the fastest way to put your computer to sleep in most cases.

The Power User Menu can be accessed by pressing Win + X. Shortcut keys for the menu’s settings will be highlighted in the text. The following keys can be used to put the computer to sleep or shut it down.

  • To shut off Windows, press the U key.
  • To restart, use the R button.
  • Pressing S will put Windows to sleep.
  • Use H to go into hibernation.
  • To log off, press I.

2. The Alt + F4 Sleep Mode Shortcut

Like clicking the X in the upper-right corner of a program, pressing Alt + F4 closes the current application window. It is possible to go to sleep on Windows 10 using the keyboard shortcut Alt + F4.

Use a keyboard shortcut such as Win + T, which positions the pointer at the top of the taskbar, to verify that no apps have the focus. Then, to bring up the Windows Shutdown dialog box, click Alt + F4.

Dropdown menus normally default to shutting down or going to sleep, depending on your system. Press Enter to confirm your selection if you’re OK with it. When you’re ready, press Enter after selecting another option with the up and down arrow keys.

3. Make Your Power Button Into A Sleep Shortcut

If you’re looking for an easy way to put your computer to sleep with just one button press, this is it.

Your computer will shut down automatically if you press the Power button on either your desktop computer or your laptop. The power button can be reassigned to put your computer to sleep if you use this feature infrequently.

Navigate to Settings > System > Power & sleep in Windows 10 to achieve this. If you can’t see the option for further power settings, stretch the window horizontally. When you click on it, the Control Panel’s Power Options window appears.

Access the Control Panel by typing “control” into the Start menu of Windows 11. Then click Power Options from the list in the upper right corner and change Category to Small icons if necessary.

Using the power buttons on the left side of each platform, you can select what they do.

On the following screen, you’ll notice an option for When I press the power button. To save your changes, change Sleep to this and click Save. Instead of shutting down your PC, you may now put it to sleep by pressing the physical Power button on it.

When I press the sleep button, there’s a place for that, too. This option is available if your computer has a sleep button.

4. Use Your Keyboard’s Sleep Key

There is a chance that your laptop keyboard (or desktop keyboard) has a Sleep button. By pressing this button, you can put your computer to sleep without having to create any custom shortcuts.

There may be a crescent moon or a Zz on the Sleep key, depending on your keyboard layout. You may need to hit another key while holding the Function or Fn key to gain access. In the event that you are unsure about how to proceed, refer to the guide.