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How to remember electrical resistor color codes

Last Updated: February 5, 2020

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Resistor color codes are something that every electronics hobbyist should remember. The old mnemonic was rather, well, disturbing, and a conscientious person would never recite it. Anyway, on with the better one! Write this down in a prominent place and you’ll have it committed to permanent memory in no time!

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

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How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

In a previous article, we have seen the basics information about resistors with their colour bands.

Each resistor has a specific resistance value as per designing colour band. And it depends upon the colour code/band printed on the resistor.

Before using any resistor in an electronic circuit, you need to find out the first resistance value of the resistor.

Let’s see in details,

How to calculate Resistance using colour code?

The colour bands on the resistor are used to identify the value and tolerance or resistance.

The power rating of the resistor depends upon the physical size of the resistor.

We consider as, a resistor consists of four different color bands (A, B, C, and D printed on the resistor body) as shown in the below figure.

The first of three different colour band (A, B, C) shows a different value of resistance. And the last band (D) shows the tolerance of resistance in percentage.

Firstly, you should refer the resistor colour band table given below.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Note: I know, it is not easy to remember the value corresponding to each color band. You can use this simple phrase to remember the sequence color band and its values.

Here, each band position and its colour has specific significance to calculate resistance value.

Band A: A first colour band (A) represents the first digit of the numerical value of the resistance. (Says x)

Band B: The second colour band (B) represents the second digit of the numerical value of resistance. (Says y)

Band C: Third colour band (C) is the decimal multiplier and gives the number of zero after two digits. (Says z)

Band D: The fourth band (D) or last band shows the tolerance in percentage (%). (Says p)

So the final formula you can use to calculate resistance:

Example of Resistor Colour Code:

Consider, a resistor is having four different colour bands red, brown, orange, and gold respectively as shown in the below diagram.

Firstly choose the value of colour from the table.

Red Brown Orange Gold
2 1 1000 5%

First Step:

The Red band of the resistance value is 2 and the brown band of the resistance value is 1 from the table.

The first two digits of the band show the value of resistance 2 and 1 i.e. 21

Second Step:

From the table, the third orange band has value 1000. Multiply this value to 21 i.e. 21×1000=21000 Ω.

Third Step:

Last is the Gold band having tolerance value in 5% (0.05) from the table. The 5% tolerance resistor may have a maximum and minimum value of resistance.

  • for maximum resistance value, 21kΩ or 21000Ω + 5% = 22,050Ω
  • for manimum resistance value, 21kΩ or 21000Ω – 5% = 19,950Ω

Finally, we get the final value of resistance is in the range of 22,050 to 19,950 Ω.

Once you know to calculate resistance using colour Code of resistors, it will be easy for you to design and using resistors in the electronics circuit.

If you have any queries, you can hit the comment in given comment.

Electrical Related Read:

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This calculator will help you identify the value, tolerance and temperature coefficient of a color coded resistor by simply selecting the bands colors. It will also calculate the minimum and maximum values based on the tolerance ratio. This calculator supports resistors with 3, 4, 5, and 6 bands.

How to use?

To use the calculator, follow these easy steps:

  1. Select the number of bands on the resistor you are trying to identify.
  2. For each band, select the matching color in the table column indicating the band number.
  3. The resistance value will be calculated and shown along with the minimum and maximum values.

Resistor Color-coding

Color-coding is a method used to indicate the resistive value, tolerance, and temperature coefficient of resistors with low wattage rating because of their small size. Color bands are used because they can be easily and cheaply printed on a small electronic component. Color-coding is also used for capacitors, inductors and diodes.

When the resistor body surface is large enough, as in large wattage resistors, the resistance value, tolerance, and wattage are usually printed on the body of the resistor. Surface mounted resistors (SMD) use another coding system that uses alphanumeric codes printed on its surface instead of color codes.

The coding is defined in the international standard IEC 60062:2016. It describes the coding standard for both resistors and capacitors.

Reading Color Codes

Resistors cases usually have three to six bands that indicate their resistance, tolerance and sometimes their temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). The bands are read from left to right. The reading direction is not always clear. To distinguish the reading direction, the tolerance band width is sometimes printed with 1.5 – 2 times the width of other bands. A larger gap between the tolerance band and the other bands is sometimes noticeable. If a gold or silver band is present, then they must be at the right end since they are never used for significant digits. It is always better to check the manufacturer’s documentation or use a multimeter to get the exact resistance value.

In a three-band resistor, the first two bands represent the first two significant digits followed by one band for the multiplier. Since no tolerance band is available, the tolerance will always be ±20%.

In a four-band resistor, which is the most common, the first two bands also represent the first two significant digits. The third band represents the multiplier. The fourth band represents the tolerance.

In a five-band resistor, the first three bands represent the first three significant digits. The fourth band represents the multiplier. The fifth band represents the tolerance.

In a six-band resistor, the first five bands have the same representation as a five-band resistor followed by one extra sixth band that represents the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR).

Tolerance

Tolerance is the percentage of error between the actual measured resistive value and the stated value. This is due to the manufacturing process and it is expressed as a percentage of its preferred value

Calculating

To calculate the resistance value, you need to group the values of the significant digits bands — i.e., the values of the first two or three bands from the left, depending on the total number of bands. Then you need to multiply that value by the multiplier to get the resistance value of the resistor.

Let’s take for example a four-band resistor with the following band colors: Violet Green Yellow Gold

Since it is a four-band resistor, the first two bands (violet and green) will indicate the significant digits which are, according to the table above; 75.

We then multiply that number by the multiplier indicated with the 3 rd band (yellow) which has the value of; x10 4 = 10000.
The result of the multiplication will be: 75 x 10000 = 750000Ω = 750kΩ.

The fourth band (gold) will indicate the tolerance which in our example is: ±5%
To calculate the minimum and maximum resistance values, we multiply the resistance value by the tolerance percentage to come up with the following values:
Minimum = 750000 – (750000 x 5/100) = 750000 – 37500 = 712500 = 712.5kΩ
Maximum = 750000 + (750000 x 5/100) = 750000 + 37500 = 787500 = 787.5kΩ

Exceptions

A zero-ohm resistor is a resistor having a single black band. Its resistance is approximately zero and it is used to connect two traces on a printed circuit board (PCB). Is it used in automated PCB assembly where using the same equipment used to mount other resistors is easier than using a separate machine to install a wire jumper.

Resistors manufactured for military use, may include an additional band indicating the failure rate.

trap_lord

Hi, I’m taking an electronics test, and our teacher informed us there will be quite a few questions on resistor color bands. On these questions we will be asked to determine its nominal value, and its upper and lower possible values. My concern is if I’ll be able to memorize the large color code. Any tips?

Edit: Only working with 4-color band resistors

Can you make an easy sentence with “BBROYGBVGW” and study it by heart? That would represent the color code from zero to nine of the resistor. During our electronics course someone did figure out a bad sentence I dont like to mention it here.

trap_lord

WBahn

There are several mnemonics you can use. Some of them are easier to remember than others, particularly if you don’t mind ones that are VERY politically incorrect.

But the one I always found made the most sense is just to think of it in terms of how it most likely actually came about.

What are the colors of the rainbow: ROY-G-BIV. Now, remember that Indigo was removed so be sure to skip it. That gives you six colors, in order. To get the rest we add four colors, two on each side, that go from black to white. On the low side, we add black and brown, then our six rainbow colors, then we add gray and white.

For the tolerance bands, we have none, silver, and gold. These are in order of most valuable, namely 20%, 10%, 5%.

That’s exactly how I do it, but that sequence was learned across time. First I knew the BOY-G-BIV from grade school, then I memorized Black, brown, gray, white, gold silver. That might be less natural to a person who didn’t learn the rainbow thing as a child. Just sayin’. It’s my method too, but I never suspected that I invented the best method purely by chance.

Any other people have a method?

trap_lord

There are several mnemonics you can use. Some of them are easier to remember than others, particularly if you don’t mind ones that are VERY politically incorrect.

But the one I always found made the most sense is just to think of it in terms of how it most likely actually came about.

What are the colors of the rainbow: ROY-G-BIV. Now, remember that Indigo was removed so be sure to skip it. That gives you six colors, in order. To get the rest we add four colors, two on each side, that go from black to white. On the low side, we add black and brown, then our six rainbow colors, then we add gray and white.

For the tolerance bands, we have none, silver, and gold. These are in order of most valuable, namely 20%, 10%, 5%.

That’s exactly how I do it, but that sequence was learned across time. First I knew the BOY-G-BIV from grade school, then I memorized Black, brown, gray, white, gold silver. That might be less natural to a person who didn’t learn the rainbow thing as a child. Just sayin’. It’s my method too, but I never suspected that I invented the best method purely by chance.

Electronic Color Code- Capacitor, Resistor Color Code

To understand and know the ratings and values of electronic components is very important for any electronics beginner or DIY project lovers. Today, Electronic Color Code is considered to be the best coding system, which helps to know the values of different electronic components like capacitors, resistors etc. This coding system was developed by Radio Manufacturers Association in 1920 and was published as EIA-RS-279 and now the current international standard is IEC 60062.

Resistor Color Code

Resistor color code is one of the electronic color code used to know the values of leaded resistors. This type of electronic color code was used from years and even today resistor color codes is considered to be the best and apt method. Usually printing the resistors values in figures is not a good method since it will get erased during the handling process. So we make use of resistor color codes chart to determine the value of the resistors.

Resistor Color Code Chart

The figure below shows the resistor color codes chart. The chart helps to determine the resistance and tolerance values of the resistors. Tolerance defines how much the measured actual resistance value is different from the theory value.

This resistor color chart is commonly used to find the resistance values when the color bands are known. An easy way to remember the code chart is to use different mnemonics like

  • Bad beer rots our young guts but vodka goes well – get some now
  • Blacky Browny Ran Over Your Garden But Violet Grey Walk

Where the bold letters represent Black, Brown, Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet, Grey, White 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.

General steps involved to read resistors by using electronic color code

Step1: Position the resistor in such a way that the tolerance band (Gold, Silver) face to the right.

Step2: Read the color bands of the resistor from left to right.

Step3: Change the colors to the coded number by using the resistor color codes chart.

Step4: Determine the tolerance value of the resistor.

Step5: Decode the resistor value.

Electronic Color Code for 4 band resistors

Four band resistors are the common type of lead resistors we usually see and use in different lab experiments and projects. These resistors have first two bands for resistance value, third as multiplier band and fourth as tolerance band. In the example given in the figure below Brown, Black, Red and Gold are the color bands of the resistor. From the resistor color codes chart, the value for each color band is obtained as Brown (1), Black (0), Red (Multiply by 100) and Gold (Tolerance 5%). So the resistance will be 1 Kilo ohm +/- 5%.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Electronic Color Code for 5 band resistors

Resistors having more precision have an extra band. In such resistors, the first three bands indicate resistance values. While the fourth band represents the multiply factor and the fifth band represents the tolerance band. For example: Red (2), Green (5), Yellow (4), Black (Multiply by 1), Brown (Tolerance +/- 20%). So the resistance value will be 254 +/-20%.

Sometimes in 5 band resistors, the fourth band will be gold or silver. In such a case, the first two bands will be representing the resistance values, the third band will represent the multiply factor, the fourth band will be the tolerance band and the fifth band will be representing the temperature coefficient.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Electronic Color Code for 6 band resistors

Inorder to represent the temperature coefficient, some resistors have 6 bands. For example, consider the resistor with orange (3), red (2), brown (1), green (Multiply by 100K), Brown (Tolerance 1%), Red (Temperature Coefficient 50ppm/K). An exception is that in some military applications the 6 th band represents the failure rate.

How to Read Capacitor Codes

Method1:

  • Similar to resistors some capacitors make use of color codes to indicate their value. There will be usually 5 bands on the capacitor. The first and second band will represent a number of the capacitor color code chart. Third band is the multiplier band; fourth band represents the tolerance while the fifth band represents the voltage.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Method2:

  • Some large capacitors will indicate their value on the capacitor itself. For example 47µF means 47 microFarads.

Method3:

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

In smaller body capacitors sometimes, µF or pF will not be written. Only the value will be indicated on the capacitor. In such a case,

  • If the capacitor has a two digit number as the value, then the value will be in picoFarads. For example if the capacitor has value 47 printed on it, it means 47pF.
  • If the capacitor has a three digit number as the value, then first two digits represent the capacitance value in picoFarads. While the third digit is the multiplier. If the multipler band has a value from (1 to 7), then multiply by the corresponding number of zeros. It means that if the multiplier band has a value of 5, then multiply by five zeros. Now, if the multipler band has a value 0, then multiply by 1. For a value of 8 or 9 in the multipler band, multiply by 0.01 for 8 and 0.1 for 9. For example: Consider a capacitor with the value 103. It means that the capacitor has a value of 10pF with a multiplier of 3 (means multiply by 1000). So the actual value of the capacitor is 10000pF or 0.01µF.

Method 4: How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

  • Digit Character Digit Codes: If the capacitor has a value printed as 1n0, then the first digit represents the value before decimal point and n represents the unit i.e., nanoFarad. While the digit ‘0’ represents the value after the decimal point. So the capacitance value is 1.0nF.

Method 5:

  • Sometimes capacitors come with values like 470K. This reads 47 as the capacitance value in pF, ‘0’ represents the multiplier (multiply by 1) and K represents tolerance value. So the actual value of the capacitor is 47pF with 10% tolerance.

Last but not the least; the above methods can be used for reading resistor and capacitor values.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Introduction

Before going into the details of explaining resistor color code charts, I would like to spend a few minutes explaining the basics of resistance for beginners in a simple and clear manner. In the latter sections of this article I have explained the detailed procedure of calculating the resistance of an actual resistor using colour code combination analysis

Resistance of a substance is the property due to which it opposes the flow of electricity through it. Some substances such as metals, acids and salt solutions are very good conductors of electricity. Amongst metals silver, copper and aluminium are very good conductors. This is because of loosely attached electrons in their atoms. When the potential difference is applied these electrons attain a motion and while passing through the atoms of the conductors collided with other electrons generate heat. Whereas some substances such as bakelite, mica, glass and rubber and PVC provide relatively greater hindrance to the passage of electrons through them and are termed as Poor conductors.

Some substances such as paper cotton, mineral oil free from water and acid, ceramic, porcelain and asbestos provide great hindrance to the passage of passage to the electricity as termed as insulators

Units of Resistance

Unit of resistance is Ohm –A conductor is said to have resistance of one ohm if it allows a current of one Ampere to flow through it when a potential difference of one volt is applied across its ends.

The resistance of a conductor depends upon the following :-

  1. Directly proportional to the length of the conductor.
  2. Inversely proportional to the area of cross section
  3. Nature of material
  4. Temperature of conductor

Now the questions is how do you check the resistance of a resistor without having an ohm-meter. Well you just need to figure out the meaning of the color coding printed on the resistors and here is how to go about reading resistor colour codes

Resistor Colour Codes Explained

The various lines of colour code are allotted a specific value and these are given as follows in this list

  1. B-Black 0
  2. B –Brown 1
  3. R –Red 2
  4. O –Orange 3
  5. Y – Yellow 4
  6. G – Green 5
  7. B – Blue 6
  8. V – Voilet 7
  9. G -GREY 8
  10. w – White 9

This has also been shown more colourfully in the adjoining diagram where you can also see the actual colours along with their values

Calculating Resistance from Codes

The above chart also shows a lot more information than showing the values assigned to each colour. As you can see in this picture of an actual resistor that the coding shows the values on one end and the tolerance at another end which is spaced at a greater distance than normal spacing between the code lines.

Just remember that the 1st stripe is counted as the one which is at the other end than the tolerance strip. You have first value strips and the multiplier strips. so if you see the example of this actual resistor its value comes out to be as calculated below

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

first stripe is brown, then orange, then black

so from the table this comes as 1, 0 and 1000 (multiplier) so the value is

10,000 ohms or 10 K-ohms plus the last line shows the tolerance of the resistor

4th Stripe

As explained above the fourth stripe is the measure of tolerance of the resistor which means how much does the resistance change under varying operational conditions such as temperature etc. This is not a great necessity and an average resistor has sufficient tolerance to work satisfactorily in required marine circuits. High level of tolerance is rarely required except in specialized circuits which is beyond the scope of discussion here. If there is no tolerance band present it means that the tolerance is within a standard range of plus-minus 20%

Acronym Definition
BBROYGBVGW Bad Booze Rots Our Young Guts, But Vodka Goes Well (mnemonic for resistor color code)
BBROYGBVGW Bad Boys Race Our Young Girls But Violet Generally Wins (mnemonic for resistor color code)
BBROYGBVGW Black Brown Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Violet Grey White (electronic resistor color code sequence)
BBROYGBVGW Better Be Right Or Your Great Big Venture Goes West (mnemonic for resistor color code)
BBROYGBVGW Bad Beer Rots Our Young Guts But Vodka Goes Well (mnemonic for resistor color code)
BBROYGBVGW Bye Bye Rosie, Off You Go, Bristol Via Great Western (mnemonic for resistor color code)
BBROYGBVGW B.B. Roy of Great Britain Has a Very Good Wife (mnemonic for resistor color code)

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How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

The Color Codes used on resistors in carbon, carbon film and metal film types are widely used and a ‘must learn’ for electronics engineers. Resistors are usually very tiny and it is difficult to print resistance values on them. So, color bands are printed on them to represent the electrical resistance. These color bands are known as resistor color code.

Resistors are available in a range of different resistance values from fractions of an Ohm (Ω) to millions of Ohms.

Values of resistance, tolerance, and wattage rating are generally printed onto the body of the resistor as numbers or letters when the resistor’s body is big enough to read the print, such as large power resistors. In most cases, when the resistor is small such as a 1/4 W carbon or film type, these specifications will be color-coded. These colored painted bands produce a system of identification generally known as Resistor Color Code.

All leaded resistors with a power rating up to one watt are marked with color bands. They are given by several bands and together they specify the resistance value, the tolerance rate, and sometimes the reliability or failure rates. The number of bands present in a resistor varies from three to six.

The tolerance values represent by how much the resistance can vary from its mean value in terms of percentage. A gold band represents the lowest variation, so be sure to buy these at the electronics store. The value of the given resistance is: 22 Ω ± 5% . The tolerance of the resistor can be calculated as follows:

Tolerance=Value of resistor × value of tolerance band

= 22 Ω × 5% = 1.1 Ω

This means that the 22 Ω resistors with a tolerance value of 1.1 Ω could range from the actual value as much as 23.1 Ω to as little as 20.9 Ω. It is important to note that the band next to the tolerance band represents the multiplier. All the bands to the left of this band represent the significant digits. There can be more than two such bands.

The humble resistor is a key component of many renewable energy systems. They are designed to resist electricity and can, therefore, be used to supply the correct voltage or a suitably limited current to the various components in an electric circuit. Because resistors are so small too small to print numerical resistance values on they are instead marked with four, five, or (less commonly) six colored bands. Each color represents a different number and so the value (in Ohms) of the resistor can easily be calculated.

An international resistor color code scheme was developed many years ago as a simple and quick way of identifying a resistor’s ohmic value no matter what its size or condition. It consists of a set of individual colored rings or bands in spectral order representing each digit of the value of the resistor.

The resistor color code markings are always read one band at a time starting from the left to the right, with the larger width tolerance band oriented to the right side indicating its tolerance. By matching the color of the first band with its associated number in the digit column of the color chart below the first digit is identified and this represents the first digit of the resistance value.

Resistor Color Code Chart –

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Colors on the resistor like brown, red, green, blue, and violet are used as tolerance codes on 5-band resistors only. The blank (20%) “band” is only used with the “4-band” code (3 colored bands + a blank “band”).

Following are the ways to understand which end of the resistor must be used for reading the color codes:

Most of the resistors have color bands grouped closer at one end. Hold the resistor with these grouped bands to our left. Always read the resistor from left to right.

Resistors never have a metallic band on the left. If the resistor has either gold or silver band on either end, then the tolerance of the resistor is 5% or 10%. This band of the resistor must be position on the right and the color code must be read from left to right.

Resistors range from 0.1 Ohm to 10 Mega-ohms. For a four-band resistor, the third color will always be blue i.e. 106 or less and for a five-band resistor, the fourth color will always be green i.e. 105 or less.

There are many mnemonic phrases to help us to remember the order of the colors:

Black Brown Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Violet Gray White…which correspond to the values 0-9.

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How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

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Nice article. It’s very helpful to me. Thank you for share with us. Can you please check my color code collection.

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Carbon resistors are color coded- that is, they have several color bands painted around the body near one end- to identify their ohmic values. Other types of resistors are not color-coded; instead, they have their ohmic values and, sometimes, identifying part numbers printed on them. The code has been established by the Electronics Industries Association (EIA) and appears in Table 1.

Color First
Band
Second
Band
Multiplier Tolerance
Black 0 0 \[\times <<10>^<0>>\]
Brown 1 1 \[\times <<10>^<1>>\] $\pm 1$ %
Red 2 2 \[\times <<10>^<2>>\] $\pm 2$ %
Orange 3 3 \[\times <<10>^<3>>\]
Yellow 4 4 \[\times <<10>^<4>>\]
Green 5 5 \[\times <<10>^<5>>\]
Blue 6 6 \[\times <<10>^<6>>\]
Violet 7 7 \[\times <<10>^<7>>\]
Grey 8 8 \[\times <<10>^<8>>\]
White 9 9 \[\times <<10>^<9>>\]
Gold \[\times 0.1\] $\pm 5$ %
Silver \[\times 0.01\] $\pm 10$ %
No color $\pm 20$ %

Table.1: Standard Resistor Color Code

Using the color code

The use of the code can be understood by referring to the resistor shown in figure 1.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Fig.2: Color-Coded Carbon Composition Resistor

The first two bands of the resistor represent the first and second significant numbers and are brown and black, which, from Table 1, represent 1 and 0, respectively. The multiplier band is red, which indicates that two zeros must be added. Therefore, the resistor’s ohmic value is 1000 ohm, which frequently written as 1 kΩ (k=1000).

The tolerance band is Gold, which represents $\pm 5$% (see Table 1). Consequently, any value between 950 and 1050 ohm is within the tolerance range and is satisfactory.

Example

Determine the ohmic value of the carbon resistor with color bands given in the following figure.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Fig.3: Color-Coded Carbon Composition Resistor for Example

Solution

If we consider the tolerance value then,

For minimum resistance value:

\[\begin & =47k\Omega -47k\Omega *0.05 \\ & =47k\Omega -2.35k\Omega \\ & =44.65k\Omega \\\end\]

For maximum resistance value:

\[\begin & =47k\Omega +47k\Omega *0.05 \\ & =47k\Omega +2.35k\Omega \\ & =49.35k\Omega \\\end\]

Consequently, any value between $44.65k\Omega $ and $49.35k\Omega $ is within the tolerance range and is satisfactory.

Resistors less than 10 Ω

The third color band for resistors under 10 Ω will be either gold or silver, which indicates a multiplying value of 0.1 or 0.01, respectively.

Example

What is the ohmic value of a resistor whose color code is blue, gray, gold and silver?

Solution

From Table (1), Blue (6), Grey (8), and Gold (*0.1) gives 6.8 ohms, and silver indicates$\pm 10$ %.

For more exacting requirements, resistors are available in 1% and 2 % tolerances. These resistors have brown or red fourth band, respectively. For equipment requiring high reliability, resistors having a fifth color band are used. The procedures are analogous to the former system; the exclusive difference is the total number of digit bands. The first 3 bands will constitute the value, the 4th band will represent the multiplier and the 5th band will provide the tolerance value.

For 5 bands resistors, Table 1 can be modified as:

Color First
Band
Second
Band
Third
Band
Multiplier Tolerance
Black 0 0 0 \[\times <<10>^<0>>\]
Brown 1 1 1 \[\times <<10>^<1>>\] $\pm 1$ %
Red 2 2 2 \[\times <<10>^<2>>\] $\pm 2$ %
Orange 3 3 3 \[\times <<10>^<3>>\]
Yellow 4 4 4 \[\times <<10>^<4>>\]
Green 5 5 5 \[\times <<10>^<5>>\]
Blue 6 6 6 \[\times <<10>^<6>>\]
Violet 7 7 7 \[\times <<10>^<7>>\]
Grey 8 8 8 \[\times <<10>^<8>>\]
White 9 9 9 \[\times <<10>^<9>>\]
Gold \[\times 0.1\] $\pm 5$ %
Silver \[\times 0.01\] $\pm 10$ %
No color $\pm 20$ %

Table.2: Standard Resistor Color Code for 5 band Resistors

Whereas the prototype for 5-band resistances is:

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Fig.4: Color-Coded Carbon Composition Resistor for 5 Bands

As we can see that first 3 bands constitute the value, the 4th band represents the multiplier and the 5th band provides the tolerance value.

Example

Determine the ohmic value of the carbon resistor with color bands given in the following figure.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Fig.5: Color-Coded Carbon Composition Resistor for Example

“Color coding” is used in electronics to identify between different components. In the case of resistors, color coding is used to identify a specific resistance value, for example a 100 ohms resistor or a 1 kilo ohms resistor with 5% tolerance. Electronic components like resistors are very small in size and its difficult to print its value directly on to the component surface. Hence a standard was formed in 1920 by then Radio Manufacturers Association (now part of EIA – Electronic Industries Alliance) to identify values and ratings of electronic components by printing color codes on them. Color coding technique makes it easy to print values (based on color codes) on small components, such as resistors and facilitates cost effective manufacturing.

This technique of “color coding” has 2 disadvantages. The first one appeals to general users where it becomes difficult to distinguish between colors (for example “Red” and “Brown” ) when the component is over heated. But this is not a major concern as the exact value can be easily identified using a multimeter (in case of confusion). The next drawback is for a specific group of people – color blind people can not identify the device using color codes. However they too can depend on multimeter to identify resistance values. –>

How to Identify Resistor Color Code

The figure below shows the layout of the bands, the multiplier and the tolerance value of a resistor. For a 6-band resistor, an additional temperature coefficient band is provided.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

The gap between the multiplier and the tolerance specifies the left and right side of the resistor. So here are the key points;

4 band resistor – has 3 color bands on left side and one color band on right side. First two bands represent significant digits, the 3rd band represents multiplier and the fourth band on right side represents tolerance.

5 band resistor – has 4 color bands on left side and one color band on right side. Here the first 3 color bands represent significant digits, fourth one represent multiplier and the 5th one on right side represents tolerance.

6 band resistor – has 4 color bands on left side and 2 color bands on right side. Here the first 3 color bands represents significant digits, fourth one represents multiplier, 5th one represents tolerance and the 6th one represents temperature coefficient of the resistor.

In a 4-band resistor, the first two bands represent the first two digits of the resistor. The multiplier band indicates the value that is to be multiplied with the first two digits. The tolerance band after the multiplier band indicates the range of accuracy of the resistor. It is represented in units of percentage. In case of 5 band resistor, the decimal multiplier will be assigned to the fourth band and tolerance value will be assigned to the fifth band. Finally in case of a 6 band resistor, the last band (i.e 6th band) represents temperature coefficient. .The sixth temperature coefficient band increases the precision of the resistance value. Temperature coefficient tells us the behavior of resistor under different heating conditions (means the variation in resistance values under normal conditions and over heated conditions)It is defined in units of ppm/K.

Resistor Color Code Chart

We have presented 3 charts below – which are exactly resistor color code charts for 4 band, 5 band and 6 band resistors respectively. –>

4-Band Resistor Color Code Identification

Let us consider the color code for the resistor with the bands BROWN-BLACK-RED-GOLD. Brown corresponds to the value ‘1’ in the color chart. Black represents ‘0’ and Red represents the multiplier ‘100’. Thus the value of the resistance to the corresponding color code is 10*100 = 1000 ohms or 1 kilo ohm with the tolerance band being Gold which represents a tolerance of +/- 5%. Thus the actual value of the 1 kilo ohm can be between 950 ohms and 1050 ohms.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Band 1 – First digit value of resistor

Band 2 – Second digit value of resistor

Band 3 – Decimal Multiplier

Band 4 – Tolerance Value

5-Band Resistor Color Code Identification

Let us consider the color code for the resistor with the bands YELLOW-VIOLET-BLACK-BROWN-GREY. Yellow corresponds to the value ‘4’ in the color chart. Violet represents ‘7’ and Black represents the value ‘0’. Brown represents the multiplier ‘10’. Thus the value of the resistance to the corresponding color code is 470*10 = 4700 ohms or 4.7 kilo ohm with the tolerance band being Grey which represents a tolerance of +/- 0.05%.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Band 1 – First digit value of resistor

Band 2 – Second digit value of resistor

Band 3 – Third digit value of resistor

Band 4 – Decimal Multiplier

Band 5 – Tolerance Value

6-Band Resistor Color Code Identification

Here also, if we can consider the same color code used for the 5-band, with an additional temperature coefficient band with a blue color. This shows that the resistor has a value of 4.7 kilo ohms, with tolerance +/- 0.05% and with a temperature coefficient of 10 ppm/K.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Band 1 – First digit value of resistor

Band 2 – Second digit value of resistor

Band 3 – Third digit value of resistor

Band 4 – Decimal Multiplier

Band 5 – Tolerance Value

Band 6 – Temperature Coefficient

Note:- Nowadays with advances in printing technology, its possible to print numeric values on small components as well. If you look at an SMD resistor (surface mount), you will see the resistance value printed directly on the surface of the resistor.

If there are four bands then the first two are the value of the two most significant digits, the third is the multiplier, and the fourth is the precision. If there are five bands then the first three are the value of the three most significant digits, the fourth is the multiplier, and the fifth is the precision. Use the resistor color code chart below to determine how to read a color coded resistor.

For example take the following resistor which has bands Green , Blue , Yellow , and Gold . Since there are four bands the third band is the multiplier and the fourth band is the tolerance. Looking at the chart below:

Green = 5 (tens place)

Blue = 6 (ones place)

Understanding the value. Put the 5 and 6 together for 56 then multiply by 10KΩ – 56*10KΩ=560kΩ.

Understanding the tolerance. The tolerance is +/-5% – 560kΩ*5%=28kΩ which means the resistor may be 28kΩ lower or higher than the stated value. 560kΩ-28kΩ=532kΩ. 560kΩ+28kΩ=588kΩ. So the acceptable resistance of this resistor is between 532KΩ and 588KΩ.

Above is an example of a 5 band resistor. They are usually higher precision resistors. In this case the band colors are red , orange , violet , black , and brown .

Red = 2 (hundreds place)

Orange = 3 (tens place)

Violet = 7 (ones place)

Mnemonics for remembering color codes. Mnemonics are the only way I can remember the color codes but times have changed in the 20+ years since my instructor told me the mnemonic for remembering resistor color codes and it would be too offensive for this site today. However when I began researching modern mnemonics used to remember resistor color codes in schools I didn’t find any of them nearly as effective. So here is a good list of various mnemonics for remembering resistor color codes from Wikipedia.

Standard Ohm Resistor Values for 5% Tolerance

We know from our previous post that what is is resistor? This article is about how to calculate resistor value using color code. When comes to measure the value of resistor we can do that by several ways. One way is to use Multimeter. But one can also read value of resistor by using Color Code Menthod (in case of through hole type) or simply by having reference of Number Marking (in case of surface mount type). I assume you probably have used multimeter in your school. So we are going to color code method in detail.

Color Coding in Resistors

In through hole resistors, resistance is caluclated by color bands marked on their body. The color bands present on resistors may vary from 4 to 6. The meaning (value) of these color bands is listed below .This table can be referred for calculating value of axial as well as radial lead type through hole resistors.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes Resistor Color Code Chart

The following picture shows position of color bands on axial and radial lead type resistors.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes Postion of Color Band on Resistor

In case of axial lead resistors, the reading direction of color band can be selected from observation as,

  • The position of 1 st band is closest to lead and there is a space between color value band and tolerance band. This method will work for almost all type of axial lead resistors
  • The most accurate method is to follow manufacturer’s documentation (e.g. datasheet)

The picture below shows four different resistors. Each of these, resistor have different color bands. Their resistance value is calculated as follows.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes Calculate resistor value using color code

Important to Note

  • Tolerance means percentage error in value of resistance.
  • Temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR): This band is for specialized resistors. It is change in resistance per degree celcius of temperature change. For a change of 10 o C in temperature the resistance can change for 0.1%. Unit is ppm/ 0 c (parts per million per degree centigrade)
  • Exception to color bands: In military equipments extra color band (Reliability band) on resistors specifies failure rate (in %) per 1000 Hrs of service. The failure rate for different colors is, Brown – 1%, Red – 0.1%, Orange – 0.01%, Yellow – 0.001%. Resistor having only single black band is called as zero-ohm resistor. It is used as a wire ( act as a jumper) to connect traces on a printed circuit board (PCB).

This is it for this post, I believe now you know how to calculate resistor value using color code. There is a lot we can write and argue, because of such a vast topic but I leave it here. In next post, we’ll learn about use of pull-up and pull-down Resistor in electronic circuit .

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1. A resistor value of 100kΩ has what colors?

2. What color bands will appear on a 33kΩ resistor?

About This Quiz & Worksheet

The quiz/worksheet combo is a tool you can access to review your understanding of finding the color code of a 1k ohm resistor. Colors used to code a 470k ohm resistor and resistor value are some topics you will be quizzed on.

Quiz & Worksheet Goals

You can test your understanding of:

  • Finding the value of a given resistor
  • Color bands that appear on a 33k ohm resistor
  • Colors used in a 100k ohm resistor

Skills Practiced

You can gain access to the quiz and worksheet to practice the following skills:

  • Reading comprehension – ensure that you draw the most important information from the lesson on color codes on resistors
  • Knowledge application – use your knowledge to answer questions about colors of different resistors given their values
  • Information recall – access the knowledge you have gained about finding the value of different resistors

Additional Learning

How to Find the Color Code of a 1k Ohm Resistor is a lesson you can use to cover the following objectives any time:

  • Determine what a ‘resistor’ is
  • Learn how to code different resistors
  • Review the resistor color code
  • Read the acronym for remembering the code
  • Know what the multiplier band is

Whether you are someone who has had decent exposure to electronics or possess a four-year baccalaureate in Electrical Engineering, wherever you lie on this spectrum, you have at least come across the word “resistor”. The name of this electronic element gives away its functionality. However, do you know how a resistor works and its different applications and purposes? If you don’t, not to fear. First, let’s take a look at the theory of operation of a resistor.

Theory of Operation

A resistor is considered to be a passive two-terminal element that introduces a certain level of resistance into the electrical circuit. The primary roles that a resistor plays in any given electrical circuit are to reduce the flow of current, divide voltage level and adjust the signals, among many other uses.

V=I*R

The fundament electrical law, known as Ohms Law, has a fundamental connection to resistors in general. This is because the ideal resistor is dictated by its relationship to Ohm’s law, which is demonstrated as follows:

(Photo Credit: Sbyrnes321/Wikimedia Commons)

Ohms Law states that the voltage across a resistor is proportional to the current flowing through it, where R remains as the constant of proportionality. Another practical way to visualize this is to compare the electric current with a hydraulic analogy. Let’s assume a tank that has a clogged pipe. The clogged pipe has a smaller pathway for the water to flow. This means that the amount of force required for the water to flow out of the pipe is more significant. However, if the pipe were not clogged, then the water would flow through smoothly. This can be similarly compared to a resistor with a high level of resistance. In that case, the voltage required to push a certain amount of current would be higher than a resistor that has a lower resistor, in which case less voltage is needed to move the same amount of current.

Types of Connections

Now that we have some idea as to how an individual resistor works concerning voltage and current, let’s take a look at how a specific connection of a certain number of resistors behaves. There are two fundamental connections in which electrical components are connected within the circuit: series and parallel.

Resistors in parallel

A series circuit also has other names, such as current-coupled or a daisy-chained couple. The current in a series circuit passes through every part (or component) of the circuit. Therefore, we can safely conclude as a rule of thumb that all resistors in a series connection have the same current flowing through them. The main characteristic of a series circuit is that it has only one path through which the electric current can flow. If there is an opening or broken section in any part of the circuit, it causes the entire circuit to stop working. To provide a classic example, let’s take the case of Christmas lights. Even if one of the bulbs’ fuses goes out or is removed, the entire chain of bulbs stops working.

(Photo Credit: Omegatron/Wikimedia Commons)

Resistors in Series

In the case of a parallel circuit, there are two or more components that are connected in parallel with one another. In such a case, the potential difference across all the resistors connected in parallel will be the same, and they also have identical polarities. The current, however, is calculated differently. The total current is the sum of the currents flowing through the individual resistors in an electrical circuit. The advantage that parallel connections in a circuit have is that even if one of the components of the circuit must be taken out or has stopped working, the entire circuit can continue to work.

(Photo Credit : Omegatron/Wikimedia Commons)

Resistor Color Codes and Types

(Photo Credit: Nimal udayanga/Wikimedia Commons)

If you’ve ever picked up an axial lead resistor, you have likely observed a band of colors around it. Those colored bands are in place to impart vital information about the resistor:

  1. The first band indicates the first significant digit of the resistor value.
  2. The second band indicates the second significant digit in the resistor value.
  3. The third band serves as the decimal multipliers.
  4. The fourth band indicates the tolerance level of the resistor, which shows what level above which the resistor can still function normally.
  5. Sometimes, a fifth band might be present, which symbolizes the temperature coefficient of the resistor.

Resistors come in different forms, such as fixed and alternating resistors. Fixed resistors have a resistance that is fixed and does not change over time; for example, the axial metal resistor, as shown above. The alternating resistors are those who can alternate their resistance within a certain range. The classic example of an alternating resistor is a potentiometer. A potentiometer is a three-terminal resistor with a sliding or rotating contact that forms an adjustable voltage divider. If only two terminals are used—one end and the wiper—it acts as a variable resistor or rheostat. Finally, we can conclude that resistors serve as the fundamental electronic component in almost all electrical circuits.

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Resistors resist the flow of electrical current. Each one has a value that tells how strongly it resists current flow. This value’s unit is the ohm, often noted with the Greek letter omega: Ω.

The colored bands on a resistor can tell you everything you need to know about its value and tolerance, as long as you understand how to read them. The order in which the colors are arranged is very important, and each value of resistor has its own unique combination.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Here is an example that shows how the table and resistor shown above can be used to figure out a resistor value by proving that yellow-violet-brown is really 470 Ω:

  • The first stripe is yellow, which means the leftmost digit is a 4.
  • The second stripe is violet, which means the next digit is a 7.
  • The third stripe is brown. Since brown is 1, it means add one zero to the right of the first two digits.

Yellow-Violet-Brown = 4-7-0 = 470 Ω.

Although the first two bands are fairly straightforward, the third and fourth bands might require a bit more explanation.

Resistor values can get to be very high in number, and there often isn’t enough space to use a band for every digit. To get around this, the third band indicates that a certain number of zeros should be added after the first two digits to make up the full resistor value. In the example above, the third stripe is brown, indicating that a single zero should be added to the right of the first two digits.

If you want to go deeper into the math, this third band is officially referred to as a multiplier. The color of the band determines the power of 10 you need to multiply the first two resistor digits by. For example an orange third band with a digit value of 3 would indicate a multiplier of 10 3 , though you can also just think of this as telling you to “stick 3 zeros on the end”.

  • Brown-black-orange resistor.
  • Brown = 1, black = 0, orange multiplier = 10 3
  • 10 x 10 3 = 10000, which is the same as 10 + three zeros = 10000.

Notice that however you decide to think about it, the result ends up being the same.

The fourth color band indicates the resistor’s tolerance. Tolerance is the percentage of error in the resistor’s resistance, or how much more or less you can expect a resistor’s actual measured resistance to be from its stated resistance. A gold tolerance band is 5% tolerance, silver is 10%, and no band at all would mean a 20% tolerance.

  • A 220 Ω resistor has a silver tolerance band.
  • Tolerance = value of resistor x value of tolerance band = 220 Ω x 10% = 22 Ω
  • 220 Ω stated resistance +/- 22 Ω tolerance means that the resistor could range in actual value from as much as 242 Ω to as little as 198 Ω.

Some projects require your measurements to be more precise than others, and for this reason the tolerance band is useful in identifying which resistor will give you a more accurate resistance reading. The smaller the tolerance percentage is, the higher the precision in your measurements.

How to Read Resistor Color Code

How to Read Resistor Color Code

  • Resistance is measured in units called ohms.
  • Wire wound resistors normally have their values in ohms and tolerance in percent stamped on them.
  • For carbon or composition resistors a color code is used.

The resistance values, for several years, have been coded by three colored bands painted around the body of the resistors. If the tolerance is either 5 or 10 percent, a fourth color bond is added. The position of the bands is shown below.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

  • The first two colors tell the first two digits in the resistance value.
  • The third band tells how many zeros follow the first two digits.
  • Sometimes a fourth band is present. This band tells the tolerance and will be either gold or silver. A gold band means 5% tolerance, silver 10%, and no fourth band, 20%. The tolerance band tells how close the resistance should be to the value shown by the other three bands.

The Producer of Reading the band is given below.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

The Blue-Red-Orange bands signify 62 followed by three zero and would be read as 62000 ohms +-20%.

We hope that this post “How to Read Resistor Color Code” will help you in your preparation. if you have any suggestion and request, you can tell us through the comment here.

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Electronic Color Code- Capacitor, Resistor Color Code

To understand and know the ratings and values of electronic components is very important for any electronics beginner or DIY project lovers. Today, Electronic Color Code is considered to be the best coding system, which helps to know the values of different electronic components like capacitors, resistors etc. This coding system was developed by Radio Manufacturers Association in 1920 and was published as EIA-RS-279 and now the current international standard is IEC 60062.

Resistor Color Code

Resistor color code is one of the electronic color code used to know the values of leaded resistors. This type of electronic color code was used from years and even today resistor color codes is considered to be the best and apt method. Usually printing the resistors values in figures is not a good method since it will get erased during the handling process. So we make use of resistor color codes chart to determine the value of the resistors.

Resistor Color Code Chart

The figure below shows the resistor color codes chart. The chart helps to determine the resistance and tolerance values of the resistors. Tolerance defines how much the measured actual resistance value is different from the theory value.

This resistor color chart is commonly used to find the resistance values when the color bands are known. An easy way to remember the code chart is to use different mnemonics like

  • Bad beer rots our young guts but vodka goes well – get some now
  • Blacky Browny Ran Over Your Garden But Violet Grey Walk

Where the bold letters represent Black, Brown, Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet, Grey, White 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.

General steps involved to read resistors by using electronic color code

Step1: Position the resistor in such a way that the tolerance band (Gold, Silver) face to the right.

Step2: Read the color bands of the resistor from left to right.

Step3: Change the colors to the coded number by using the resistor color codes chart.

Step4: Determine the tolerance value of the resistor.

Step5: Decode the resistor value.

Electronic Color Code for 4 band resistors

Four band resistors are the common type of lead resistors we usually see and use in different lab experiments and projects. These resistors have first two bands for resistance value, third as multiplier band and fourth as tolerance band. In the example given in the figure below Brown, Black, Red and Gold are the color bands of the resistor. From the resistor color codes chart, the value for each color band is obtained as Brown (1), Black (0), Red (Multiply by 100) and Gold (Tolerance 5%). So the resistance will be 1 Kilo ohm +/- 5%.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Electronic Color Code for 5 band resistors

Resistors having more precision have an extra band. In such resistors, the first three bands indicate resistance values. While the fourth band represents the multiply factor and the fifth band represents the tolerance band. For example: Red (2), Green (5), Yellow (4), Black (Multiply by 1), Brown (Tolerance +/- 20%). So the resistance value will be 254 +/-20%.

Sometimes in 5 band resistors, the fourth band will be gold or silver. In such a case, the first two bands will be representing the resistance values, the third band will represent the multiply factor, the fourth band will be the tolerance band and the fifth band will be representing the temperature coefficient.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Electronic Color Code for 6 band resistors

Inorder to represent the temperature coefficient, some resistors have 6 bands. For example, consider the resistor with orange (3), red (2), brown (1), green (Multiply by 100K), Brown (Tolerance 1%), Red (Temperature Coefficient 50ppm/K). An exception is that in some military applications the 6 th band represents the failure rate.

How to Read Capacitor Codes

Method1:

  • Similar to resistors some capacitors make use of color codes to indicate their value. There will be usually 5 bands on the capacitor. The first and second band will represent a number of the capacitor color code chart. Third band is the multiplier band; fourth band represents the tolerance while the fifth band represents the voltage.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Method2:

  • Some large capacitors will indicate their value on the capacitor itself. For example 47µF means 47 microFarads.

Method3:

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

In smaller body capacitors sometimes, µF or pF will not be written. Only the value will be indicated on the capacitor. In such a case,

  • If the capacitor has a two digit number as the value, then the value will be in picoFarads. For example if the capacitor has value 47 printed on it, it means 47pF.
  • If the capacitor has a three digit number as the value, then first two digits represent the capacitance value in picoFarads. While the third digit is the multiplier. If the multipler band has a value from (1 to 7), then multiply by the corresponding number of zeros. It means that if the multiplier band has a value of 5, then multiply by five zeros. Now, if the multipler band has a value 0, then multiply by 1. For a value of 8 or 9 in the multipler band, multiply by 0.01 for 8 and 0.1 for 9. For example: Consider a capacitor with the value 103. It means that the capacitor has a value of 10pF with a multiplier of 3 (means multiply by 1000). So the actual value of the capacitor is 10000pF or 0.01µF.

Method 4: How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

  • Digit Character Digit Codes: If the capacitor has a value printed as 1n0, then the first digit represents the value before decimal point and n represents the unit i.e., nanoFarad. While the digit ‘0’ represents the value after the decimal point. So the capacitance value is 1.0nF.

Method 5:

  • Sometimes capacitors come with values like 470K. This reads 47 as the capacitance value in pF, ‘0’ represents the multiplier (multiply by 1) and K represents tolerance value. So the actual value of the capacitor is 47pF with 10% tolerance.

Last but not the least; the above methods can be used for reading resistor and capacitor values.

This calculator solves for 4, 5 or 6 band resistors and is quite simple to use. To calculate a four band resistor value, use the middle four “drop” boxes then click on the “Calc 4 Band” button. For a five or six band resistor, you can use all six boxes but all 6 do not necessarily have to be used – the “Temperature Coefficient” box, for example. After you have selected the 6 “drop box” choices, remember to click the “Calc 5 Band” button for your answer.
If you have calculated a 5 or 6 band resistor, and go back to calculating a 4 band resistor, the two drop boxes on the ends (far left and far right) will not clear but this is perfectly all right. When calculating 4 band resistors, the values of the drop boxes on the ends do not enter into the calculations in any manner.

Four Band Resistors Resistors are electronic components that oppose the flow of electricity and the resistance is measured in ohms. For larger values, kilohms (1,000 ohms) and megohms (1,000,000 ohms) are used. For example 3,300 ohms equals 3.3 kilohms or just 3.3 k and 1,500,000 ohms equals 1.5 megohms or 1.5 meg.

Color “bands” are used to indicate the resistance value with each color signifying a number and these color bands are grouped closer to one end of the resistor than the other.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color CodesAs can be seen in the above 4 Band Resistor Color Codes chart, the first two color bands have values of brown = 1, red = 2, orange = 3 and so on.

The third color band is the multiplier of the first 2 bands. Here, black is 1, brown is 10, red is 100 and so on. Putting this in other words, the value of the third band (the multiplier) is the number 10 raised to the power of the color code. For example, red in the third band is 10² or 100.
This third band also has 2 new colors where gold = .1 and silver = .01.

The 4th band is the resistor’s tolerance and shows how precisely the resistor was manufactured. Gold = 5%, silver = 10% and no band whatsoever = 20%.

Now that we know the values of each color, let’s try calculating a few examples of resistance values.

Looking at resistor #1, we see the colors red red green gold .
The Color Codes chart “translates” this into 2 2 and 100,000
which equals 2 2 ×100,000 or 2,200,000 ohms and don’t forget the gold 4th band which indicates a 5% tolerance.

Resistor #2 has the colors orange orange yellow silver which “translates” into 3 3 ×10,000 or 330,000 ohms and a tolerance of 10%.

Resistor #3 has the colors yellow violet silver meaning 4 7 ×.01 or .47 ohms and no fourth band indicates a 20% tolerance.

Five Band Resistors
Use the 5 Band Chart to solve these next problems.
For resistor 4, we see the first 3 bands are violet, green and red which “translate” into 7, 5 and 2. Looking at the fourth band (the multiplier), we see it is brown and has a value of 10.
So, the resistance value is 7 5 2 × 10 which equals 7,520 ohms or 7.52 K ohms.
Band 5 is red which indicates a 2 per cent tolerance and a brown sixth band means that the temperature coefficient is 100 parts per million (ppm).

Examining resistor 5, the first 3 bands are brown, black and blue and the fourth band (the multiplier) is green. So, these colors convert into 1 0 6 × 100,000 which calculates to 10,600,000 ohms or 10.6 Meg ohms.
The brown 5th band and the red 6th band mean that the resistor has a 1% tolerance and a 50 ppm temperature coefficient.

If you’ve read these instructions, you probably have a good understanding of determining a resistor’s value from its colors. Then again, there’s always the calculator which makes things much easier to solve.

A related resistor calculator can be found here: Resistors In Parallel

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

(20%) “band” is only used with the “4-band” code (3 colored bands + a blank “band”).

S teps For calculation of Resistor value.

  1. First you need to check resistor band.
  2. hold the resistor in your hand and read the resistor from left band to right band need to check resistor band .
  3. Starting First, second and third band color are defined the significant value of resistor. these values are given in chart.
  4. Fourth color band is defined the multiplier value so use color and multiply the this value
  5. fifth color band id used for tolerance. it is defined the error between measured value and stated value that means tolerance percentage of error of stated value is consider.
  6. Sixth color band is used for temperature coefficient.

How to know that which band is first,

  • Some Resistors have stating bands are closed. so hold the resistor in your hand and start reads the resistor from left side to right side.
  • The resistor can not started from silver and gold band color.

Resistor colored
first band color is Blue , digit – 6
Second band color is Red , digit – 2
third band color is Green , digit -5
fourth band color is Silver , multiplier value – 0.01
Fifth band color is Blue Tolerance – + 0.25%

The value of resistor = 625X0.01+ 0.25 % = 6.25 + 0.25% ohm

Resistor colored
first band color is Orange , digit – 3
Second band color is Brown , digit – 1
Third band color is Silver , multiplier value – 0.01
Fourth band color is green Tolerance – + 0.5%

The value of resistor = 31X0.01+ 0.5 % = 3.1 + 0.5% ohm

Resistor colored
first band color is Blue , digit – 6
Second band color is Brown , digit – 1
Third band color is Silver , multiplier value – 0.01

The value of resistor = 61X0.01 = 6.15 ohm 20%

1. What is the value of the electrical resistance of the resistor with color rings as follows:
a. Yellow, purple, red, and gold
b. orange, white, brown, and gold
c. green, blue, yellow, and silver
d. brown, black, green, and colorless
e. red, red, red, and gold

2. What color rings on the body of the resistor, the value of resistance mentioned below (ignoring the value of tolerance)?
a. 33 Ω; b. 200 kΩ; c. 750 Ω; d. 43 kΩ; e. 1.2 MΩ

Completion:
1. a. yellow = 4
purple = 7
red = 2
gold = ± 5%
write ‘4 ‘and ‘7’, then follow these two numbers with 2 digits ‘0 ‘. The results obtained are 4700 Ω or 4.7 kΩ with a tolerance ± 5%

b. orange = 3
white = 9
brown = 1
gold = ± 5%
results obtained is 390 Ω with a tolerance ± 5%

c. Green = 5
blue = 6
yellow = 4
Silver = ± 10%
results obtained are 560,000 Ω or 560 kΩ with a tolerance ± 10%

d. brown = 1
black = 0
Green = 5
colorless = ± 20%
results obtained are 1000000 Ω or 1 MΩ with tolerance ± 20%

e. red = 2
red = 2
red = 2
gold = ± 5%
results obtained is 2200 or 2.2 kΩ with a tolerance ± 5%

2. a. 33 Ω = 33 x 10 0
3 is orange
3 is orange
0 is black
So ring colors are orange, orange, black.

b. 200 kΩ = 200,000 Ω = 20 x 10 4
2 is red
0 is black
4 is yellow
So ring the colors are red, black, yellow.

c. 750 Ω = 75 x 10 1
7 is purple
5 is green
1 is brown
So ring colors are purple, green, brown.

d. 43 kΩ = 43,000 = 43 x 10 3
4 is yellow
3 is orange
3 is orange
So ring colors are yellow, orange, orange.

e. 1.2 MΩ = 1200 kΩ = 1,200,000 Ω = 12 x 10 5
1 is brown
2 is red
5 is green
So ring colors are brown, red, green.

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Thursday, 8 January 2015

Resistor Colour Code of learn .

HOW TO REMEMBER THE COLOUR CODE

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Resistance colour value

black 0
brown 1
red 2
orange 3
yellow 4
green 5
blue 6
violet 7
gray 8
white 9
silver -2
gold -1

Here are some common ways to remember the colour code:

Resistance is measured in OHMs.

Resistors have RESISTANCE and the main purpose of a resistor is to reduce the CURRENT FLOW.

“Ohm.” but this symbol is not available on some word-processors, so the letter “R” is used.
The letter “E” is also sometimes used and both mean “Ohms.”

A one-ohm resistor is written “1R” or “1E.” It can also be written “1R0” or “1E0.”

A resistor of one-tenth of an ohm is written “0R1” or “0E1.”
The letter takes the place of the decimal point.
10 ohms = 10R
100 ohms = 100R
1,000 ohms = 1k (k= kilo = one thousand)
10,000 ohms = 10k
100,000 ohms = 100k
1,000,000 ohms = 1M (M = MEG = one million)

Every resistor is identified by colour bands on the body, but when the resistor is a surface-mount device, numbers are used and sometimes letters.
You MUST learn the colour code for resistors.

Reading 4-band resistors.
The most “common” type of resistor has 4 bands and is called the 10% resistor.
It now has a tolerance of 5% but is still called the “10% type” as the colours increase by 20% so that a resistor can be 10% higher or 10% lower than a particular value and all the resistors produced in a batch can be used.

The first 3 bands produce the resistance and the fourth band is the “tolerance” band. Gold = 5%
(Silver =10% but no modern resistors are 10%!! – they are 5% 2% or 1%

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Color markings on a Capacitor defines its value. You only need to know How to read Capacitor Color Marking Values, its calculation and Identification Codes. This post will give you a brief idea about how to decode capacitor color markings with example.

There are some capacitors in market which has its capacitance printed on it. For example – Electrolytic capacitors. But what about those who have only a number marking printed on it? Or a color marking on it? A Capacitor number or its color stripes can provide us many useful information concealed in it.

Lets revive the basics first. The conversion of Farad to Micro Farad, Nano Farad and Pico Farad is as follows: –

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color CodesFig. 1 – Conversion Chart of Farad

We should divide the decoding procedure into two parts for less confusion i.e.

Decoding of capacitor color marking

Decoding of capacitor number marking

In this post, we will discuss about: –

Decoding of Capacitor Color Marking

There are some capacitors which are color marked to specify the capacitance value, tolerance and voltage level. In such capacitors, the upper two color bands denote the first and second digit. The Third color band gives the tolerance value and the last band gives the working level of voltage. The chart for the same is placed below : –

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes Fig. 2 – Capacitor Color Codes

Let’s take an example to understand it in a better way.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Fig. 3 – An Example to Understand How to Read Capacitor Color Markings

In the above mentioned capacitor :

  • The first colour band is Brown. That means the first digit is 1.
  • The second colour band is Red. That means the second digit is 2.
  • The third colour band is Green. That means the number of zeros are 5.
  • The fourth colour band is white. That means the tolerance level of this capacitor is ± 10 %.
  • The last colour band is Yellow. That means the working voltage of this capacitor is 400v.

If we compile all the data, we can decode the capacitance value of this capacitor. The compiled data will be 12 x 10 5 pF ± 10 % tolerance.

Ratna is a B.E (Computer Science) and has work experience in UK Mainframe IT industry. She is also an active Web Designer. She is an author, editor and core partner at Electricalfundablog.

What is Resistor Color code?: Resistor color code is a system of color code which is imprinted physically in resistors ; used to indicate the values and specifications of the resistor.

A four or five color bands is usually imprinted on resistor’s outer surface which indicates the resistance value , Resistance tolerance and temperature coefficient of the resistor.

The color code is imprinted in bands in the outer layer of resistors as shown in the image:

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes resistors with color code

Resistor Color Code Chart:

Each color band on the resistor color code have their own significance or value.

A chart with the value of each color band is shown below:

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codesresistor color code

To remember the value of color coding used for carbon resistor, the following sentence is found to be of great help (where bold letters stand for code).

  1. B B ROY Great Britain Very Good Wife wearing GOLD SILVER
  2. Black Brown Rods Of Your Gate Becomes Very Good When Given Silver color.

Reading a Resistor Color Code:

To read a Color Code imprinted on a resistor we need to follow the following steps:

1. Take the resistor in hand with the color band with either color “Gold” or “Silver” or the color band with the largest spacing towards the right side of you as shown on the figure below:

resistor with color bands

2. Now Write down the value of Band “A” and “B” in a copy or paper , for eg. if “A” is violet and “B” is red then the write down “72”.

3. Now multiply the value with the multiplier value of the band “C”. for eg. if “A” is violet , “B” is red and “C” is green then multiply “72” with 10^5 which gives: 72 * 10^5. The value of the resistor is the Value thus obtained in ohms.

4. The fourth Band Signifies the tolerance of the resistor for eg: if “A” is violet , “B” is red , “C” is green and “D” is gold the actual value of the resistor is: 72 * 10^5 +/- 5% ohms.

Note: Sometimes resistors also have five bands as the color code in that case the first three bands signifies significant value the fourth one signifies the multiplier and the fifth band signifies it’s tolerance.

Similarly, For resistor value under 10 ohm, use is made of the fractional multiplier 0.1 (gold) and 0.01 (silver). When the third band is gold, the resistance value indicated by the first two bands is multiplied by 0.1. Example: Thus if the first and second band is red and green respectively and the third band is gold, the resistance value is 25 x 0.1 = 2.5 ohm. If the third band is silver, the resistance value indicated by first two band is multiplied by 0.01. Thus if the first and second band is red and green respectively and the third band is silver, the resistance value is 25 x 0.01 = 0.25 ohm.

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This lab demonstrates how to use the myDAQ or ELVIS II series to measure resistance (R), current (I), and voltage (V). LabVIEW and the NI ELVISmx virtual instruments are used in conjunction with the myDAQ or ELVIS II. The relationship between R, I, and V ( or Ohm’s Law V = IR ) is studied.

Resistors are the most common component f ound in all electrical and electronic circuits. Resistors are found in many shapes, sizes, and values. The most common shape is a two- lead cylinder component with leads coming out each end and color bands painted around the cylinder to indicate the nominal resistor value and its tolerance. Ohm’s law states that the voltage developed across a resistor is equal to the current flowing through the resistor times the value of the resistor or V = IR. Rearranging, the resistance is given by the ratio (V/I). Nominal resistance can be determined from the three colored bands closest together on the resistor, or read directly from a digital multimeter (DMM). The fourth band indicates your chosen resistor’s tolerance. It should have a tolerance less than 1% (brown), 2% (red), 5% (gold), or 10% (silver). Resistor tolerance is defined as the percentage difference between the measured resistance Rm and its nominal value Rn.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Figure 1: NI ELVISmx Digital Multimeter c onfigured as an ohmmeter

  • NI myDAQ or ELVIS II series
  • Red and Black DMM P robes (supplied)
  • Various Resistors: 47K, 10K, 10K Potentiometer
  • Solderless Breadboard (recommended)

Prerequisite Reference Material:

Resistor Color Codes:

Using the myDAQ Digital Ohmmeter DMM ( Ω

Using the myDAQ Digital Ammeter DMM (I):

Using the myDAQ Digital Voltmeter DMM (V):

Set Up Hardware:

Connect your myDAQ or ELVIS II board to the computer with the USB cable (supplied). Pick any three resistors and note the color bands. Read from the end band closest to the leads. The nominal resistance can be found using the color code in the Appendix at the end of this lab.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Figure 2: Banana jack connections for voltage or resistance measurements

Connect one of the resistors to your myDAQ or ELVIS using the supplied leads at the indicated inputs. Select the resistance function [Ω] button and change the mode ( Specify Range) to ( Auto). S ee Fig. 1. Press [Run] to view the resistance measurement on the display. Build the following circuit, which represents the voltage divider schematic that many sensor schematics follow:

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Figure 3: Voltage divider circuit

Now reconfigure the DMM front panel to read current by pressing the function ammeter [A-] button. Adjust the range to 20 mA.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Figure 4: Measurement settings for DMM c onfigured as an ammeter

Next connect leads from the myDAQ banana jack connections (Fig. 4) to your circuit (Fig. 3). Select the Run Continuously acquisition mode, and then press [Run] to make a measurement of the current flowing in your circuit:

I = ___________ mA

Remove the +5 V power lead. Set the myDAQ for DMM(V) for voltage measurement.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Figure 5: Measurement settings for DMM c onfigured a voltmeter

Change the myDAQ banana jack leads to the voltage positions (Fig. 5). In the circuit of Fig. 3, replace the probe leads with wire as a short (bypass). Place the voltage probe leads across a 10 kΩ resistor. Reconnect the +5 V power lead and make a voltage reading by pressing [Run]:

V = _______________ volts

Thus far, we have shown how to make measurements for resistance, current, and voltage using the Virtual Instrument DMM. But there is more! You can embed your resistance meter inside a LabVIEW program and create a new instrument. Normally, you would read the color codes to select a particular resistor value; then you would verify your selection with the DMM(Ω). A LabVIEW program called Resistance to Colors.vi takes the reverse approach by telling you what the color code on the resistor should be based on an actual resistance measurement of a LabVIEW embedded ohmmeter. Load and view the front panel of Resistance to Colors.vi.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Figure 6: Measurement and c olors of a n ominal 47 kΩ r esistor

Hook one of your resistors to the myDAQ or ELVIS banana jack leads, and click on [Run]. Try some other resistors.

The block diagram for this Resistance to Colors.vi is shown below:

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

Figure 7: LabVIEW block diagram for program Resistance to Colors.vi

The resistance measurement is made within a Digital Multimeter VI. It is found in Functions/Programming/Measurement IO/NI ELVISmx/NI ELVISmx Digital Multimeter. The resistance measurement, a double precision number, is converted in the sub-VI called Format Resistor.vi into a color index number for the first two numbers of the resistance and the exponential power. The colors are stored in an array of LabVIEW color boxes labelled ‘ ResistorColors’.

Example: R = 10000 Ω  1(Brown), 0(Black), and 3(Orange)

few days ago i bought few (about 500) resistors and i noticed that they have 5 color bands instead of 4. My question is how do i count them (which color is the tollerence) and how should i put them? Do they have a good or bad orientation like + or – ? I tried to use an online calculator but i dont know the first and the last band.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

5 Answers 5

There are only two possible ways to read the resistor’s color rings right to left or left to right. One of the two outer rings is the tolerance ring, the other rings indicate value. As others have stated, there is often a subtle difference in (location of) the tolerance ring, but not always too clear. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_color_code#Resistor_color-coding For cheap and easy to find resistors, the tolerance ring is often gold (5%, 4 band, E12) or red (2%, 5 band, E96)

If you have no clue about value nor tolerance you can decode both possibilities and then check them against the E96 preferred numbers. The one that matches E96 is the correct value. http://logwell.com/tech/components/resistor_values.html

Of course you may want to verify the found value with your multimeter.

In general the tolerance band is separated from the rest of the bands by a very slightly larger gap. It can be hard to tell sometimes.

Normally the band that’s over the end cap is the right-hand one, but that top row looks pretty ambiguous. The bottom ones are 220 ohms 1%, the top ones look like 220K 1%.

Measure them with an ohmmeter then check with what it should be- there’s only two combinations, and not many values have brown as the left band (the most common -1%- tolerance band for 5-band through-hole resistors).

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

It seems the 220R 1% is wrong. the top (red) band is farther from the other 4 than the bottom band (brown) that is closer to the other 4 bands, so, red will be the tolerance (2%). Looking at the photo I could almost say it is not 220R but 10kR 2%. The top resistor is very difficult to know what side band is the tolerance. The only great tip for 5 bands resistors, is that Black, Orange, Yellow and White are not tolerance, so in case of all bands being spaced equally and one of those colors being at the side band, it is the first digit of the value.

How to Remember Electrical Resistor Color Codes

If these are 1 percent tolerance resistors, which they probably are, the tolerance band will be brown. The tolerance band is the 5th band on one end of the resistor. Deductive logic: If there is a brown band on one end, and a different color band on the other end, the brown band is the tolerance band and the other band is the first number of the value.

Now, the value is a three digit number. The 4th band is a multiplier and the 5th band is the tolerance. The problem is a LOT of values start with “1” (100, 15, 150, 18, 18000, et cetera) which is a brown band. So you will have a brown band on each end. Grrrr. Keep your multimeter handy.

For example, it looks like some of your resistors in the picture are marked as follows: red-red-black-orange-brown. If these are 1 percent resistors, the brown band, per the deductive logic, is the 5th, tolerance band. The first three numbers are the three digut value: 220 (red-red-black). The 4th band is a multiplier: X1000 (orange). So these are 220 x 1000 resistors: 220,000 ohms. 220K ohms.

As some other persons said in their answers, a resistor is not a polarized device. There is no “+” or “-” orientation. You can insert a resistor into a circuit without worrying about which end of the resistor is which.

#http://www.codewars.com/kata/resistor-color-codes/train/python
“””
Resistors are electrical components marked with colorful stripes/bands to indicate both their resistance value in ohms and how tight a tolerance that value has. While you could always get a tattoo like Jimmie Rodgers to help you remember the resistor color codes, in the meantime, you can write a function that will take a string containing a resistor’s band colors and return a string identifying the resistor’s ohms and tolerance values.
The resistor color codes
You can see this Wikipedia page for a colorful chart, but the basic resistor color codes are:
black: 0, brown: 1, red: 2, orange: 3, yellow: 4, green: 5, blue: 6, violet: 7, gray: 8, white: 9
Each resistor will have at least three bands, with the first and second bands indicating the first two digits of the ohms value, and the third indicating the power of ten to multiply them by, for example a resistor with the three bands “yellow violet black” would be 47 * 10^0 ohms, or 47 ohms.
Most resistors will also have a fourth band that is either gold or silver, with gold indicating plus or minus 5% tolerance, and silver indicating 10% tolerance. Resistors that do not have a fourth band are rated at 20% tolerance. (There are also more specialized resistors which can have more bands and additional meanings for some of the colors, but this kata will not cover them.)
Your mission
The way the ohms value needs to be formatted in the string you return depends on the magnitude of the value:
For resistors less than 1000 ohms, return a string containing the number of ohms, a space, the word “ohms” followed by a comma and a space, the tolerance value (5, 10, or 20), and a percent sign. For example, for the “yellow violet black” resistor mentioned above, you would return “47 ohms, 20%”.
For resistors greater than or equal to 1000 ohms, but less than 1000000 ohms, you will use the same format as above, except that the ohms value will be divided by 1000 and have a lower-case “k” after it. For example, for a resistor with bands of “yellow violet red gold”, you would return “4.7k ohms, 5%”
For resistors of 1000000 ohms or greater, you will divide the ohms value by 1000000 and have an upper-case “M” after it. For example, for a resistor with bands of “brown black green silver”, you would return “1M ohms, 10%”
Test case resistor values will all be between 10 ohms and 990M ohms.
More examples, featuring some common resistor values
“brown black black” “10 ohms, 20%”
“brown black brown gold” “100 ohms, 5%”
“red red brown” “220 ohms, 20%”
“orange orange brown gold” “330 ohms, 5%”
“yellow violet brown silver” “470 ohms, 10%”
“blue gray brown” “680 ohms, 20%”
“brown black red silver” “1k ohms, 10%”
“brown black orange” “10k ohms, 20%”
“red red orange silver” “22k ohms, 10%”
“yellow violet orange gold” “47k ohms, 5%”
“brown black yellow gold” “100k ohms, 5%”
“orange orange yellow gold” “330k ohms, 5%”
“red black green gold” “2M ohms, 5%”
“””
olor = [‘black’, ‘brown’, ‘red’, ‘orange’, ‘yellow’,\
‘green’, ‘blue’, ‘violet’, ‘gray’, ‘white’]
value = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
tol =
def decode_resistor_colors(bands):
bands = bands.split(‘ ‘)
ohm, multiplier, unit = ”, ”, ‘ ohms, ‘
if len(bands) > 3:
if bands[3] == ‘gold’:
tolerance = tol[‘gold’]
else:
tolerance = tol[‘silver’]
else:
tolerance = tol[”]
for i in range(len(color)):
if bands[2] == color[i]:
multiplier = 10**value[i]
bands_1, bands_0 = bands[1], bands[0]
bands_1_0(bands_1, bands_0)
res = bands_1_0(bands_1, bands_0)*multiplier
if res >= 1000000:
res = str(res/1000000)
if res[-1] == ‘0’:
res = res[0:-2] + ‘M’
else: res = res + ‘M’
elif res >= 1000:
res = str(res/1000)
if res[-1] == ‘0’:
res = res[0:-2] + ‘k’
else: res = res + ‘k’
ohm = str(res) + unit + tolerance
return ohm
def bands_1_0(bands_1, bands_0):
for i in range(len(color)):
if bands_1 == color[i]:
bands_one = value[i]
if bands_0 == color[i]:
bands_zero = value[i]
ohm_value = int(str(bands_zero) + str(bands_one))
return ohm_value
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘brown black black silver’), ’10 ohms, 10%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘brown black brown gold’), ‘100 ohms, 5%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘red red brown’), ‘220 ohms, 20%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘orange orange brown gold’), ‘330 ohms, 5%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘yellow violet brown silver’), ‘470 ohms, 10%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘blue gray brown’), ‘680 ohms, 20%’)
print()
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘brown black red silver’), ‘1k ohms, 10%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘brown black orange’), ’10k ohms, 20%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘yellow violet orange gold’), ’47k ohms, 20%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘brown black yellow gold’), ‘100k ohms, 5%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘orange orange yellow gold’), ‘330k ohms, 5%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘red yellow red silver’), ‘2.4k ohms, 5%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘yellow white red silver’), ‘4.9k ohms, 10%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(“yellow violet red gold”), ‘4.7k ohms, 5%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(“white blue red gold”), ‘9.6k ohms, 5%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(“green blue orange”), ’56k ohms, 20%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘yellow violet yellow gold’), ‘470k ohms, 20%’)
print()
print(decode_resistor_colors(“brown black green silver”), “1M ohms, 10%”)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘brown brown green gold’), ‘1.1M ohms, 5%’)
print(decode_resistor_colors(‘violet white blue’), ’79M ohms 20%’))
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Try this mnemonic if you are trying to remember the resistor color codes:

Bad (0) Black
Beer (1) Brown
Rots (2) Red
Our (3) Orange
Young (4) Yellow
Guts (5) Green
But (6) Blue
Vodka (7) Violet
Goes (8) Grey
Well (9) White
(0.1) Gold
(0.01) Silver

Note: If you’re missing a tolerance band that implies that the tolerance is 20%.

Which end do you start reading the color bands?

There are usually two ways:

1) If one of the bands at the end of the sequence is further apart then that is the tolerance band – start from the opposite end.
2) If all the bands are closer to one side of the resistor then start from that end – the tolerance band is the last one your read.

2 Responses to “Beer and Vodka Can Help You Select a Terminating Resistor”

I like it. I will print this out to hang at my workbench at home in the garage. I’m not sure I will use the mnemonic but I need a color chart.

You really make it appear really easy along with your presentation but I in finding this matter to be actually something that I feel I would by no means understand. It sort of feels too complicated and extremely wide for me. I am having a look forward in your subsequent post, I will try to get the cling of it!

How to find the value of unknown resistor ? The electronic color coding is used to find out the value or rating of electronics component ,usually for resistor but also for capacitor ,inductor , diode and others

There are many types of resistor which is used in both the electrical and electronics circuit to control the flow of current or to produce a voltage drop in various possible ways .

To do this the actual resistor need to have some form of resistive or resistance values.

Resistor are available i the range of different values from the fractions of Ohm to Millions of Ohms

The resistor value ,tolerance value ,and wattage rating are generally printed on the body of resistor in no or letters

To find the value of Unknown resistor we should know that a carbon composition resistor have 4 to 6 band .The 5 band resistor is more precise than 4 band resistor because of the inclusion of third significant digit.The 6 th band resistor include the temperature coefficient

4 –Band 5-Band 6- Band
1 st Band 1 st Significant digit 1 st Significant digit 1 st Significant digit
2 nd Band 2 nd significant digit 2 nd significant digit 2 nd significant digit
3 rd band Multiplier 3 rd significant digit 3 rd significant digit
4 th Band Tolerance Multiplier Multiplier
5 th Band N/A Tolerance Tolerance
6tBand N/A N/A Temperature Coefficient

Mnemonics are created for easily memorize the sequence of color and the most popular Mnemonics is “ Big Boy Race Our Young Girl But Violet Generally Win “By using this Mnemonics we can find the value of unknown resistor