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How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero. Read more.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

The #DeleteFacebook campaign is a pretty clear call to action, but most people saying they want to delete their account never do. Why? Because Facebook is really hard to get rid of. If you want to rid yourself of Facebook, I’m going to tell you how, but you probably won’t do it.

How to Delete Your Facebook Account

Deleting your Facebook account is technically simple. Head to the account deletion page, click the “Delete My Account” button, enter your password and a captcha, and boom, it’s done.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

Okay, not quite. There’s a 14 day cooling down period where you can log into your account and stop the deletion process. Don’t log in for two weeks and it’s gone for real. All your account data will be deleted from Facebook’s servers (although it can take up to 90 days to be fully removed) so it’s probably a good idea to grab a backup first.

But deleting Facebook is really only one part of getting rid of Facebook. The hardest bit is replacing the things you actually use Facebook for.

Keeping Up to Date With Friends and Family

During Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony before the US Senate, he repeatedly denied that Facebook was a monopoly. He couldn’t, however, name a single largest competitor. While Instagram (a Facebook property), Twitter (the mad ramblings of people who shouldn’t be let near keyboards), and Snapchat (a digital playground for teens that Facebook is slowly strangling to death) are all technically social networks, they don’t fill the same roll.

Sure, some people might announce their engagement or new baby on Instagram, but they’re much more likely to do it on Facebook. It’s how I told my extended circle of friends that my granny had died—it was the simplest way to reach them all.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

There is nothing out there right now that replaces this, short of just ringing around all your friends and family and asking them, “What’s up?” I travel for most of the year, so Facebook is how I keep tabs on what’s going on at home. It’s just not realistic to keep in constant contact with other people leading their own lives 3000 miles away.

And yes, it’s true that things like Google+ still exist, but for a social network to be useful, the people with whom you want to communicate need to participate. And most of them aren’t going to switch to using something else just because you want to delete Facebook from your life.

Now don’t get me wrong, Facebook’s News Feed is far from perfect. In fact, their algorithm is pretty broken—though you can make it less annoying. The thing is, for most people, the positives outweigh the negatives.

Oh, and good luck remembering birthdays.

Messaging Your Friends and Family

Facebook Messenger is an incredibly popular messaging service. It—alongside WhatsApp (another Facebook-owned service)—are how billions of people communicate every day. Huge numbers of my friends don’t have any other contact details for me, not even my email address.

While your situation might not be quite as extreme, there’s a good chance that some of the people you communicate with almost exclusively use Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp.

iMessage is a great alternative if everyone you’re chatting with has an iPhone, but SMS is a pretty poor option. Those texts can also get quite expensive if you’re sending them internationally.

There are other messaging apps like Telegram, but good luck getting your entire family to sign up.

Managing Teams and Clubs

Facebook Groups have become the de facto way for a lot of teams, clubs, and societies to interact with their members. Since everyone has Facebook, why would they not use it?

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

Again, there are alternatives like Teamer and Teamstuff, but the problem is getting people to use them. Having a Teamer account doesn’t do you much good if everyone else is organizing things in a Facebook Group. If you’re the one responsible for setting things up, you might be able to force it. But if you’re joining an existing club, all I can do is wish you good luck in your foolish endeavors to convert them.

An Easy and Secure Way to Log In

Passwords suck. Breaches of large companies are an increasingly regular event and, because people are absolutely terrible about using the same passwords for multiple services, those passwords often can be used to log in to other accounts. We’re big fans of password managers here at How-To Geek, but they can be awkward to get started with.

The Log In With Facebook button is a great way to instantly have a more secure account on a website. When 150 million MyFitnessPal login details were leaked last month, the people who had logged in with Facebook were much better protected.

You could set up a private Facebook account with only the barest of your personal details—or possibly an anonymous Twitter account—but that defeats the purpose of getting rid of Facebook. They can still track your activity around the web if you’re logged in to your account.

Shouting Into the Void

This one’s a bit petty, but it’s absolutely true. Sometimes when you’ve had a terrible day (or an amazing day) you just want to tell everyone you can. It’s as cathartic as it is narcissistic. I’ve been using Facebook’s On This Day to purge some of the more embarrassing instances from my past but I can’t pretend I didn’t feel better for posting them at the time.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

Plus, call Likes “fake internet points” all you like, but when something happens, they are still a tangible reminder that people you know and like have seen it, and care enough to show you that they care.

Maybe you’re so big on privacy that you’ve never posted a single thing on Facebook, but I doubt it. And I highly doubt you’ve never posted a comment you thought was witty or a picture you were proud of, and then checked back 20 mins later to see how many likes it had. It’s okay, it’s only human.

Everyone loves to hate Facebook, but very few people actually go without. Feel free to delete it, but good luck putting up with all the nagging from your friends and family to rejoin. And if you do go, remember that it’s tradition to post a long Facebook post announcing it. It doesn’t count if you don’t. And it’s not nearly as funny when you come back.

This is the tough love you were looking for.

Vice President of Content / CNET

Sharon Profis is Vice President of Content CNET.

You have a gambling addiction. A pretty serious one, actually.

You rise each day and take a trip to Mark Zuckerberg’s bustling casino. You arrive, hoping you might see familiar faces, but all the other gamblers are people you don’t give a crap about. You shrug and head to a slot machine. You crank the lever for the thousandth time, cross your fingers and hope for a win.

Surprise: You’re still a loser. But you’ll be back in an hour — maybe your luck will change.

Whether you realized it on your own or watched a TED talk, Facebook could be taking a toll on your mind, career and friendships. Depending on your age, you’re likely spending 6-7 hours per week swiping through news (fake and real) and baby photos. And last weekend’s news that data analyst firm Cambridge Analytica received misappropriated Facebook data from 50 million profiles might leave you wondering how much you should be sharing.

Here are some other things you could do for an hour per day:

  • Learn a new language
  • Call a few friends or family members
  • Exercise
  • Cook a meal
  • Read a book or the news

If you’re thinking, “I want that! Help!” you’ve come to the right place.

Step 1: Stop over-thinking it

Worried about losing touch with old friends? Don’t. If you were actually friends — not mutual stalkers — you would be chatting over a cup of coffee right now.

What about networking? I get it, you don’t want to talk to someone you met at a work function over the phone. Here are some other modern options for you: texting and email. (Whew, that was a close one.)

And all those groups you’re in? Well, there are simply some things you’re going to have to give up. Think about the trade-off — you’re getting an hour per day (on average) back. That’s 365 hours per year. That’s a lot of hours over the course of a lot of years. You’re welcome.

But I use messenger! Not sure if you’ve heard but most people have a phone number that you can send text messages to. There’s also WhatsApp. (Also, you can deactivate your account and still use Messenger. More on that later.)

Step 2: Disconnect those apps (like Spotify)

You’ve probably used Facebook to log into other apps and services dozens of times. And why not? It makes signing up for new things super fast.

Problem is, those logins inadvertently burrowed you deeper into Facebook’s grasp. It’s reversible, but it’ll require some time to undo. Here’s how:

  • Make a list of all the apps you log into using Facebook. One way to figure this out is to go to Facebook (desktop) >Settings >Apps. Scroll through this list and make note of the apps and websites you still use.
  • One by one, log into those apps. Visit the Settings page and find the option to disconnect from Facebook. This process varies quite a bit, so you might want to Google “disconnect Facebook from [insert app here]” to speed things up.

It was once nearly impossible to disconnect Facebook from Spotify, but the company recently made it much easier. In Spotify, go to Settings and choose the option to disconnect from Facebook. Now log off. In the login window, hit “Reset Password.” Follow the instructions, and you’re golden.

Step 3: Download all your memories

You probably want to keep all your photos, posts, friends and all the other data you accumulated on Facebook. Luckily, saving all that data is really easy.

Go to Facebook (desktop) and head to Settings. In that first window, hit “Download a copy of your Facebook data.” Follow the instructions and wait while Facebook emails you a downloadable file.

If you change your mind, you can get it back within 30 days

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

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What to Know

  • Go to Settings >Your Facebook Information. Next to Deactivation and Deletion, select View >Delete Account >Continue to Account Deletion.
  • Next, click Delete Account. Enter your password, click Continue, and confirm the deletion.
  • If you change your mind, log in to Facebook within 30 days and confirm that you want to cancel the account deletion.

This article explains how to permanently delete your entire Facebook account, along with factors to consider before taking this step. It’s a different process from deleting a specific page from your account or closing a group you’ve set up.

How to Permanently Close Your Entire Facebook Account

These instructions apply to Facebook accessed via a web browser on a desktop computer. Need to do this from your phone instead? Here’s how to do that on an Android and what to do on an iPhone.

From your browser, follow these steps to finally end your relationship with Facebook:

On the Facebook home screen, click the downward arrow in the upper-right corner.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

In the menu that appears, select Settings & Privacy > Settings. (Note: You might need to select Settings & Privacy first to find Settings.)

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

When the General Account Settings screen appears, click Your Facebook Information on the left navigation bar.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

In the information that appears on the screen, select View next to Deactivation and Deletion.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

On the next page, select Delete Account and then click Continue to Account Deletion. (Note: This area previously showed as Permanently Delete Account as shown in the image; Delete Account is the current wording.)

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

A new screen gives you the option to Deactivate Account or to Download Info. If you have not yet downloaded the personal information (pictures, chat histories, posts, etc.) that you want to keep, choose Download Info and wait for the download to complete. Otherwise, click Delete Account.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

Be sure you really want to delete your Facebook account before you do it. After 30 days, you cannot recover a deleted account.

Enter your password when prompted and then click Continue.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

You’re prompted again to confirm you want to delete the account. Click Delete Account.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

Your account will be temporarily deleted, and you are returned to the log-in screen.

What to Consider Before Deleting Facebook

Before you delete your Facebook account, take some time to consider what you might lose by deleting it. For example, do you have pictures that only exist on Facebook? Or what about other accounts (like Instagram or Pinterest) that may be tied to your Facebook log-in information to access?

If you’re not sure how entwined Facebook is in your digital world, it might be a better idea to deactivate it first to get a sense of what accounts and passwords you’ll need to change before you completely cut the service off.

If you’re sure you’re ready to delete your account, at the very least you should have a backup of the data you have stored on Facebook. This could be anything from your pictures to chat histories and even friends lists. You’ll have the option to choose what data to download once you start the process.

If you change your mind about deleting your account within the 30-day deletion window, you can log back into Facebook and confirm that you want to cancel deleting the page. The page will then be restored. After 30 days, the account and all the data in the account will be permanently deleted.

Fred Ruckel was an advertising guy. At 25, he started his own agency, and over 12 years he developed commercials for the Super Bowl, Lays and Pepsi. But he never considered himself a Mad man. “I’ve always been an inventor,” he says. A tinkerer. An explorer. He was a guy with ideas but no time to pursue them. So in 2011, his wife, Natasha, gave him the gift of a lifetime: Quit your job, she said. She’d cover the bills while he built a new career. Ruckel immediately went to his business partner and said, “I’m out. I’m going to go change my life.”

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)Photographs by David Yellen Fred Ruckle at his home workshop, where he makes his cat toys.

He opened a production studio. He sunk $30,000 into an app. He experimented. And on Valentine’s Day 2015, as his wife was playing the piano at home, he watched their cat, Yoda, discover a new toy: a rug under the couple’s drum set. It had become rippled, and Yoda swatted at the resulting funny shapes. Ruckel knew: This was it.

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Why Is It So Hard to Surrender my Life to Christ?

I deeply understand how tough it can be to truly surrender your life to Jesus. I struggled with this personally and as a pastor for many years. Yeah, this is a journey, on the one hand. What you need to really understand is what’s behind your lack of surrender. Why is it that you’re afraid? That’s what you want to get after. And my experience is, most of us don’t believe God is good. In other words, I will surrender to someone that I know has my best interest in mind. And so, really, the issue isn’t surrender, the issue is unbelief.

And I have to tell you a couple of resources that helped me. Number one, a little book called The Knowledge of the Holy by A.W. Tozer. It’s on the attributes of God. If you’ve never read the chapter on the goodness of God, just flat out read it. I mean, I read it like every day for about 30 days and then every week for about ten years just to get in my head that God is for me. He’s good.

Second is I tried to experiment. You might want to try this, is I read through the Gospel of John, and you know how we tend to read and we’re sort of the disciple and there’s the bad guys and the sinners, but I’m listening to Jesus and I’m one of His followers? Well, I read through it and every time there was sort of a person on the outside, I’d put my name in there. And so I got to experience how Jesus responds to people that have messed up and have done some bad things and aren’t very responsive. And that began to help me to realize, this is how He feels about me.

And then the final thing I do have to tell you is there is no halfway house. I mean, He is God. He is Lord. And don’t start convincing yourself that I can sort of partly surrender. I mean, if you’re married, I don’t know anyone’s mate who says, you know, I would like about 80% of your loyalty, but 20% with some other people is okay. That doesn’t work. It doesn’t work with people, it doesn’t work with God. If you’re in subtle, mild rebellion and think that you can just sort of stay away from God that way, He will bring what I call the velvet vice of disciple. You know, He loves you so much He’ll allow some circumstances and maybe some relationships to start going in directions to really get your attention. He loves you, He’s for you. Tell Him, I want to surrender, help me, and He will.

Download the Free MP3, How to Give God What He Wants the Most from the series True Spirituality.

How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

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    • Feb. 11, 2008

    Are you a member of Facebook.com? You may have a lifetime contract.

    Some users have discovered that it is nearly impossible to remove themselves entirely from Facebook, setting off another round of concern over the popular social network’s use of personal data.

    While the Web site offers users the option to deactivate their accounts, Facebook servers keep copies of the information in those accounts indefinitely. Indeed, many users who have contacted Facebook to request that their accounts be deleted have not succeeded in erasing their records from the network.

    “It’s like the ‘Hotel California,’ ” said Nipon Das, 34, a director at a biotechnology consulting firm in New York who tried, unsuccessfully, to delete his account this fall. “You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.”

    It took Das about two months and several e-mail exchanges with Facebook’s customer service representatives, to erase most of his information from the site – which finally occurred after he sent an e-mail threatening legal action. But even after that, a reporter was able to find Das’s empty profile on Facebook and successfully sent him an e-mail message through the network.

    In response to difficulties faced by ex-Facebook members, a cottage industry of unofficial help pages devoted to escaping Facebook has sprung up online – both outside and inside the network.

    The technological hurdles set by Facebook have a business rationale: they allow ex-Facebookers who choose to return the ability to resurrect their accounts effortlessly.

    According to an e-mail message from Amy Sezak, a spokeswoman for Facebook, “Deactivated accounts mean that a user can reactivate at any time and their information will be available again just as they left it.”

    But it also means that disenchanted users cannot disappear from the site without leaving footprints. Facebook’s terms of use state, “You may remove your user content from the site at any time,” but also add, “you acknowledge that the company may retain archived copies of your user content.” And its privacy policy says that after someone deactivates an account, “removed information may persist in backup copies for a reasonable period of time.”

    Facebook’s Web site does not inform departing users that they must physically delete information from their account in order to fully close it – meaning that they may unwittingly leave anything from e-mail addresses to credit card numbers sitting on Facebook servers. Only people who contact Facebook’s customer service department are informed that they must painstakingly delete, line by line, all of the profile information, messages and group memberships they ever created within Facebook.

    “Users can also have their account completely removed by deleting all of the data associated with their account and then deactivating it,” Sezak said in her message. “Users can then write to Facebook to request their account be deleted and their e-mail will be completely erased from the database.”

    Business & Economy: Latest Updates

    • The maker of the gun used in the school massacre got $3.1 million in pandemic aid.
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    • Today in On Tech: Internet drama in Canada. (Really.)

    But even users who attempt to delete every piece of information they have ever written, sent or received via the network have found their efforts stymied to leave Facebook permanently. Other social networking sites like MySpace and Friendster, as well as online-dating sites like eHarmony.com, may require departing users to confirm their wishes several times – but in the end they offer a delete option.

    “Most sites, even online dating sites, will give you an option to wipe your slate clean,” Das said.

    Das, who joined Facebook on a whim after receiving invitations from friends, tried to leave after realizing that most of his co-workers were also on the site. “I work in a small office,” he said. “The last thing I want is people going on there and checking out my private life.”

    The stakes remain balanced between profit and alienating users for Facebook, which claims about 64 million users worldwide (MySpace has an estimated 110 million monthly active users). The network is still trying to find a way to monetize its popularity, mostly by allowing marketers access to its wealth of demographic and behavioral information. The retention of deactivated accounts on Facebook’s servers seems like another attempt to hold on to as much demographic information as possible.

    “The thing they offer advertisers is that they can connect to groups of people,” said Alan Burlison, 46, a British software engineer who had trouble deleting his account. “I can see why they wouldn’t want to throw away anyone’s information, but there’s a conflict with privacy.”

    Burlison succeeded in removing his account only after he complained to the British media, the British Information Commissioner’s Office and the TrustE organization, an online privacy network that has certified Facebook.

    “It was quite obvious that no amount of prodding from me on a personal level was going to make a difference,” he said. His account finally deleted only after he e-mailed Facebook executives a link to the video of his television interview with Channel 4 News in Britain.

    His complaint spurred the British information office, a privacy watchdog organization, to investigate Facebook’s data-protection practices, the BBC reported last month. In response, Facebook issued a statement saying that its policy was in “full compliance with U.K. data protection law.”

    A spokeswoman for TrustE called Facebook’s account deletion process “inconvenient,” but said Facebook was “being responsive to us, and they currently meet our requirements.”

    “I thought it was kind of strange that they save your information without telling you in a really clear way,” said Magnus Wallin, a 26-year-old patent examiner in Stockholm who founded the Facebook group “How to Permanently Delete Your Facebook Account.” The group currently has almost 4,300 members and is steadily growing. Still, he is not ready to take his own advice.

    “I don’t want to leave yet. I actually find it really convenient,” he said. “But someday when I want to leave, I want it to be simple.”

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    Remember the days when passwords were only a few letters long and something simple and easy to remember like ladybug? Tap or click here for new rules to creating the best passwords. Those days are gone, but even if you’ve abandoned old accounts, they still likely exist.

    Those old accounts you’ve forgotten about are still lurking around. Even if you no longer use them, they are a prime target for hackers looking to steal your information.

    Even if you’ve moved or changed your details since your original email accounts, hackers can still do odd things with your credentials. Let’s take a look at how to locate them and delete them for good.

    A step towards getting your real information

    Your old online accounts like Myspace might not have payment information tied to it. So why would criminals want to break into those old accounts? One reason is to get as much personal information about you as possible. That way, they can use it for more nefarious acts, like identity theft.

    Each piece of the puzzle they get makes it easier for them to hack the next account and then the next until they hit the jackpot and get your current passwords or credit card information. It’s best to cut them off at the knees, find those old accounts and get rid of them forever.

    Your daily dose of tech smarts

    Learn the tech tips and tricks only the pros know.

    You’ve likely heard that Facebook was hit with a seemingly endless storm of pornographic and violent images , from Justin Bieber blow jobs to mangled dogs. What you may not have heard is how you can avoid it. Here’s how you, your friends, and your grandparents can avoid the storm of Facebook filth by basically doing nothing.

    How to Avoid the Problem

    Facebook has been proactively removing the unpleasant images from user feeds and profiles, but they aren’t gone entirely. You’ll have to take a proactive approach if you want to avoid the array of erect penises currently lurking in the shadows. Fortunately, this is pretty simple: don’t click on links if you’re not sure you know what they do. The regular Facebook interface is safe, of course, and so are any Facebook apps you’ve already installed.

    What you want to avoid are links that read “check out how many people viewed your profile” and promise to show you something that you just won’t believe. (Having seen some of the images, I can assure you they are actually rather believable, or even beliebable in a few cases.) Basically, if you’re reasonably paranoid about the links you click you should be safe.

    UPDATE: It seems another primary cause of this problem is that people have been copying and pasting malicious links into their browser. If someone asks you to do that, don’t!

    What To Do If You’ve Fallen Victim

    In the event you make the mistake of clicking a bum link, or think you may have clicked a bad link in the past, change your password right away. While you’re at it, be sure to make it a secure password like a multi-word phrase , a password based on a system you design , a password based on word association , or one you simply can’t remember .

    Why Multi-word Phrases Make for More Secure Passwords Than Incomprehensible Gibberish

    We’ve always argued that the most secure password is one you don’t even know, and is basically…

    You’ll also want to check the apps you currently have installed. You can do this by clicking on the little down-facing arrow in the upper right corner of the page, clicking on Account Settings, and then choosing the Apps section. If you see an app that doesn’t belong or you simply don’t recognize, click the x across from its name to delete it.

    If you do all of this, you should be nice and safe. Happy Facebooking, and enjoy your freedom from porn!

    You can follow Adam Dachis, the author of this post, on Twitter , Google+ , and Facebook . Twitter’s the best way to contact him, too.

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    After a year mostly spent at home channeling Marie Kondo, I bet you’re like me, and every drawer, closet, and room is organized. Now, let’s tackle your digital life.

    While you’re cleaning things up, tell your digital assistants — looking at you, Siri and Alexa — to butt out. Tap or click to stop smart speakers, social media sites and even your computer from listening to your every word.

    Here are seven more ways to get your digital life in ship shape.

    1. Clean up your browser

    Your browser doesn’t just store your passwords and favorite sites. There are also browser cookies, the trackers that follow you around the web and power the ads and content you see. Plus, your internet history, cache, and download history could be clogging things up.

    Tech news that matters to you, daily

    Privacy, security, the latest trends and the info you need to live your best digital life.

    A free program called CCleaner helps you sort out the cookies and archives you don’t really need. When you download the app, you can focus on a specific browser you would like to clean up. CCleaner analyzes its backlog of information and lists the data that seems unnecessary.

    2. Speed up your smartphone

    You remember to clear your cluttered computer from time to time, but what about your smartphone? Our phones are essentially handheld computers, and when they overflow with useless information, their operations can also slow down. Think overburdened call logs, search history, and saved texts.

    For Android users, try Clean Master or Magic Toolbox. You can use these apps to clean out junk files, clean your cache, delete cookies, wipe out temporary files. Note: Both are free to use but ad-supported.

    iPhones don’t have an equivalent app, but clearing your cache is simple. Tap or click here and scroll down to “Clear that cache.”

    3. Remove duplicate photos

    Digital photos are easy to shoot, upload, and copy, handy in almost every respect, especially if you grew up lugging rolls of film to the one-hour photo lab. The downside is that you may end up with multiple copies of the same picture.

    The trick is to delete redundant photos without losing the original image safely. This is the premise behind Remo Duplicate Photos Remover, which is designed to filter through your photo collection in search of double-takes. It works with Android and iPhones.

    4. Delete old accounts you no longer use

    You know by now, the more online accounts you have, the more at risk you are when hackers come calling. With a new data breach around every corner, your usernames and passwords are in high demand.

    You can delete your unwanted accounts, but that’s not always easy. Sites like Pinterest and Evernote are nearly impossible to erase from your digital life. Other sites hide their delete links, meaning you have to dig pretty deep to find them.

    That’s where JustDelete.Me comes in. The site has a directory of links to get rid of hundreds of various accounts. This makes deleting old accounts so much easier.

    5. Scan your app list

    Here’s an item to add to your quarterly to-do list: Audit your apps. This frees up valuable digital real estate and protects you from yet another developer who wants to get their hands on your data.

    Scroll through your app list. You’ll find at least a couple you no longer use. Do you have multiple perform the same function? What about a game you gave up long ago or a loyalty app for a company that went out of business?

    Before you just hit the big X, you need to know the right steps to take. Tap or click here for a step-by-step guide for deleting apps and their data the right way.

    6. Catalogue your physical belongings

    You may be the type of person who likes to keep track of every ironing board and lampshade in the house, or you may want to compile a report for insurance companies, so there is no question whether something has been stolen or lost.

    The Encircle app works on iOS and Android and was created to take inventory of your worldly possessions. Just take a photo of each valuable object, then attach notes to the image, including its original cost, relevant serial numbers, and even appraisals. It makes the process a breeze.

    7. Sell your second-hand stuff online

    By now, you have probably had lots of computers, smartphones, tablets, and other gadgets. When you upgrade, the older one just sits around. Why not make some extra money?

    Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace aren’t the best places to turn to with all the scams and false advertisements going around. And who wants to haggle with someone over the price or find a place to meet?

    A safer, more reliable option is DeCluttr. They purchase from you directly, so you don’t need to create a listing, write a description, or negotiate. You don’t need to include the original box, charger, or accessories, either. Who has those anyway?

    NEED A HAND WITH SLOW WI-FI, BUYING QUESTIONS OR A PROBLEM YOU CAN’T CRACK? Post your tech questions for concrete answers from me and other tech pros. Visit my Q&A Forum and get tech help now.

    What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television, or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

    There’s a new victim of identity fraud every two seconds, according to a study by Javelin Strategy & Research.

    And of course the massive Equifax data breach continues to be a concern for Americans on a daily basis — and will be for a long time — after criminals got their hands on the most sensitive and personal information belonging to roughly 150 million people.

    Take a step back to think about it: Almost everything you do on a daily basis — from swiping a debit card to simply using a smartphone — can cause your information to be exposed to criminals, making you vulnerable to all kinds of dangerous scams, including identity theft.

    Increasing risk of identity theft, fraud

    The digitally connected world we live in today has made it easier than ever for crooks to not only find your information, but also convince you to hand it over to them — whether by pretending to be someone you trust or threatening you with some type of malicious activity.

    With the rise of data breaches and increasing number of new scams being carried out via text, email, phone calls, social media — you name it — it’s critical that you take steps to protect yourself, your money and your identity.

    The dangers of sharing personal info on social media

    So many Americans are sharing a shocking amount of personal data on social media without giving a second thought to how they might be inviting cyber criminals into their lives. Here’s what a Visa survey found:

    • Almost half of respondents disclose their birthday on social media.
    • 29% share their phone number.
    • 20% list their home address.
    • 14% list their mother’s maiden name.
    • 7% post their Social Security number on social media!

    If you’re doing any of these things, take the info down right now! Any single piece of this info could help a crook steal your identity and wreak financial havoc in your life.

    In addition to the threat of hackers, removing certain information from social media and other sites is crucial if you don’t want potential employers or other people getting access to all the details of your personal life!

    And of course social media isn’t the only threat—- in some cases, your personal info is just one Google search away.

    [anvplayer video=”4194259″ station=”998267″]

    You may never be able to completely erase your digital footprint, since so much is already out there about pretty much everyone.

    However, there are ways for you to reduce the amount of info out there about you, and in some cases, remove yourself from certain databases.

    A few ways to get started:

    • Deactivate all of your social media accounts. Just go to your account settings and there will be an option to “deactivate” your account — either temporarily or permanently. A few examples:
      • Facebook
      • Twitter
      • Instagram
      • Pinterest
      • LinkedIn (unless you’re job searching)
    • Deactivate/delete old email accounts.
    • Search yourself online: There could be old accounts, profiles and other information out there that you forgot about.
    • Delete search results: You can request for search engines to remove any information you find about yourself that you don’t want out there.
    • For accounts you can’t delete, fill in the required fields will false information — nothing real about you!
    • Unsubscribe from all email lists and text message alerts.
      • This tool will show you everything you’re subscribed to so you can easily remove yourself from whatever you don’t want.
    • Delete old emails that may contain any personal or sensitive info about you (like passwords or account numbers you forgot etc.)
    • Ask your phone company to make you “unlisted” so your info isn’t available online.

    Here are a few resources to help you protect yourself online:

    See all the latest scams here.

    7 effective ways to protect your money

    [anvplayer video=”4163882″ station=”998267″]

    How to play with a nearly blank or invisible name

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

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    Having no name in Among Us is a valuable trick, making it easier to go unnoticed. Unfortunately, a patch to the game made it impossible to play online with a blank name. You can still use a unique dot character to have nearly no name, but the blank name trick only works when playing Among Us locally instead of online.

    These instructions only work for the Android and iOS versions of Among Us, including emulating Among Us on Mac. The Windows version only allows letters and numbers for names, not special characters or punctuation.

    How to Have Nearly No Name in Among Us

    If you’re playing Among Us online and want to have no name, the closest you can get is to use a tiny character like a dot. Whatever character you choose will appear over your character’s head, making you slightly more noticeable than you would be with no name, but still possible to miss when things are moving fast.

    Here’s how to play Among Us with a nearly blank name:

    Copy this dot: “ㆍ”

    To copy and paste on mobile devices:

    Only copy the dot, not the quotation marks.

    Open Among Us, and tap ONLINE.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Tap the name field at the top of the screen.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Delete the current name.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    You may see Enter Name here or the last name you used on this device.

    Tap the blank name field, and select Paste.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Verify that you only pasted the dot from step one, then tap OK or the checkmark to proceed.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    If you pasted quotation marks as well, delete them before proceeding.

    Tap Create Game to start a game, Find Game to look for a public game, or enter a code to join a private game.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    When you start playing, your name will be a tiny dot.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    How to Have a Blank Name in Among Us in Local Games

    While it’s no longer possible to have no name while playing online, you can still have a blank name when playing a local game. It’s is an excellent way to get an edge on your friends when playing locally, but you’re unlikely to fool them for long.

    Here’s how to get a blank name in Among Us when playing locally:

    Copy this blank space: “ㅤ”

    Don’t copy the quotation marks, just the blank character between the quotation marks.

    Open Among Us, and tap LOCAL.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Tap the name field at the top of the screen.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Delete the current name.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Tap the name field, and paste the blank character from the first step.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Verify that you pasted only the blank character, and tap OK or the check mark to proceed.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    If you pasted anything else, delete it before moving on.

    Tap Create Game to host a local game, or select a local game from the list.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Start playing Among Us with no name.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Why Play Among Us With No Name?

    The only real advantage to playing with no name is to be a bit more difficult to notice or identify while you’re playing. Players accustomed to seeing a recognizable name above other players’ heads may become confused and gloss over a player with no name. It may make it easier for you to kill other players when you’re an imposter or make imposters more likely to pass over you.

    However, there are limits to the usefulness of playing with no name. While it may help a bit during a fast-paced game, you won’t fool attentive players. Other players can still call you out based on your color, the fact that you have no name, or by describing the dot or other special character you’ve used.

    Why Can’t You Play Among Us Online With No Name?

    Among Us developer Innersloth patched out the ability to play with a blank name in the game’s iOS and Android versions. The Windows version only allows names to contain letters and numbers. If the iOS and Android versions ever receive the same treatment, the option to play Among Us with a blank name or a dot for a name will be gone from the game altogether.

    Author

    PhD Student in Computer Science & Engineering, University of Washington

    Disclosure statement

    Amanda Baughan receives funding from Facebook.

    Partners

    University of Washington provides funding as a member of The Conversation US.

    Good-faith disagreements are a normal part of society and building strong relationships. Yet it’s difficult to engage in good-faith disagreements on the internet, and people reach less common ground online compared with face-to-face disagreements.

    There’s no shortage of research about the psychology of arguing online, from text versus voice to how anyone can become a troll and advice about how to argue well. But there’s another factor that’s often overlooked: the design of social media itself.

    My colleagues and I investigated how the design of social media affects online disagreements and how to design for constructive arguments. We surveyed and interviewed 257 people about their experiences with online arguments and how design could help. We asked which features of 10 different social media platforms made it easy or difficult to engage in online arguments, and why. (Full disclosure: I receive research funding from Facebook.)

    We found that people often avoid discussing challenging topics online for fear of harming their relationships, and when it comes to disagreements, not all social media are the same. People can spend a lot of time on a social media site and not engage in arguments (e.g. YouTube) or find it nearly impossible to avoid arguments on certain platforms (e.g. Facebook and WhatsApp).

    Here’s what people told us about their experiences with Facebook, WhatsApp and YouTube, which were the most and least common places for online arguments.

    Seventy percent of our participants had engaged in a Facebook argument, and many spoke negatively of the experience. People said they felt it was hard to be vulnerable because they had an audience: the rest of their Facebook friends. One participant said, on Facebook, “Sometimes you don’t admit your failures because other people are looking.” Disagreements became sparring matches with a captive audience, rather than two or more people trying to express their views and find common ground.

    People also said that the way Facebook structures commenting prevents meaningful engagement because many comments are automatically hidden and cut shorter. This prevents people from seeing content and participating in the discussion at all.

    In contrast, people said arguing on a private messaging platform such as WhatsApp allowed them “to be honest and have an honest conversation.” It was a popular place for online arguments, with 76% of our participants saying that they had argued on the platform.

    The organization of messages also allowed people to “keep the focus on the discussion at hand.” And, unlike the experience with face-to-face conversations, someone receiving a message on WhatsApp could choose when to respond. People said that this helped online dialogue because they had more time to think out their responses and take a step back from the emotional charge of the situation. However, sometimes this turned into too much time between messages, and people said they felt that they were being ignored.

    Overall, our participants felt the privacy they had on WhatsApp was necessary for vulnerability and authenticity online, with significantly more people agreeing that they could talk about controversial topics on private platforms as opposed to public ones like Facebook.

    Very few people reported engaging in arguments on YouTube, and their opinions of YouTube depended on which feature they used. When commenting, people said they “may write something controversial and nobody will reply to it,” which makes the site “feel more like leaving a review than having a conversation.” Users felt they could have disagreements in the live chat of a video, with the caveat that the channel didn’t moderate the discussion.

    Unlike Facebook and WhatsApp, YouTube is centered around video content. Users liked “the fact that one particular video can be focused on, without having to defend, a whole issue,” and that “you can make long videos to really explain yourself.” They also liked that videos facilitate more social cues than is possible in most online interactions, since “you can see the person’s facial expressions on the videos they produce.”

    YouTube’s platform-wide moderation had mixed reviews, as some people felt they could “comment freely without persecution” and others said videos were removed at YouTube’s discretion “usually [for] a ridiculous or nonsensical reason.” People also felt that when creators moderated their comments and “just filter things they don’t like,” it hindered people’s ability to have difficult discussions.

    Redesigning social media for better arguing

    We asked participants how proposed design interactions could improve their experiences arguing online. We showed them storyboards of features that could be added to social media. We found that people like some features that are already present in social media, like the ability to delete inflammatory content, block users who derail conversations and use emoji to convey emotions in text.

    People were also enthusiastic about an intervention that helps users to “channel switch” from a public to private online space. This involves an app intervening in an argument on a public post and suggesting users move to a private chat. One person said “this way, people don’t get annoyed and included in online discussion that doesn’t really involve them.” Another said, “this would save a lot of people embarrassment from arguing in public.”

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Intervene, but carefully

    Overall, the people we interviewed were cautiously optimistic about the potential for design to improve the tone of online arguments. They were hopeful that design could help them find more common ground with others online.

    Yet, people are also wary of technology’s potential to become intrusive during an already sensitive interpersonal exchange. For instance, a well-intentioned but naïve intervention could backfire and come across as “creepy” and “too much.” One of our interventions involved a forced 30-second timeout, designed to give people time to cool off before responding. However, our subjects thought it could end up frustrating people further and derail the conversation.

    Social media developers can take steps to foster constructive disagreements online through design. But our findings suggest that they also will need to consider how their interventions might backfire, intrude or otherwise have unintended consequences for their users.

    [Get the best of The Conversation, every weekend. Sign up for our weekly newsletter.]

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Many people are frightened of radiation, thinking of it as an invisible, man-made and deadly force, and this fear often underpins opposition to nuclear power. In fact, most radiation is natural and life on Earth wouldn’t be possible without it. In nuclear power and nuclear medicine we’ve simply harnessed radiation for our own use, just as we harness fire or the medical properties of plants, both of which also have the power to harm. Unlike some toxins found in nature, humans have evolved to live with exposure to low doses of radiation and only relatively high doses are harmful. A good analogy for this is paracetamol – one tablet can cure your headache, but if you take a whole box in one go it can kill you.

    The Big Bang, nearly 14 billion years ago, generated radiation in the form of atoms known as primordial radionuclides (primordial meaning from the beginning of time). These now are part of everything in the universe. Some have very long physical half-lives, a measure of how long it takes for half of their radioactivity to decay away: for one radioactive form of thorium it is 14 billion years, for one of uranium 4.5 billion and one of potassium 1.3 billion.

    Primordial radionuclides are still present in rocks, minerals and soils today. Their decay is a source of heat in the Earth’s interior, turning its molten iron core into a convecting dynamo that maintains a magnetic field strong enough to shield us from cosmic radiation which would otherwise eliminate life on Earth. Without this radioactivity, the Earth would have gradually cooled to become a dead, rocky globe with a cold, iron ball at the core and life would not exist.

    Radiation from space interacts with elements in the Earth’s upper atmosphere and some surface minerals to produce new “cosmogenic” radionuclides including forms of hydrogen, carbon, aluminium and other well-known elements. Most decay quickly, except for one radioactive form of carbon whose 5,700-year half-life enables archaeologists to use it for radiocarbon dating.

    Primordial and cosmogenic radionuclides are the source of most of the radiation that surrounds us. Radiation is taken up from the soil by plants and occurs in food such as bananas, beans, carrots, potatoes, peanuts and brazil nuts. Beer for instance contains a radioactive form of potassium, but only about a tenth of that found in carrot juice.

    Radionuclides from food largely pass through our bodies but some remain for periods of time (their biological half-life is the time for our bodies to remove them). That same radioactive form of potassium emits high energy gamma rays as it decays which escape the human body, ensuring that we are all slightly radioactive.

    Living with radioactivity

    Historically, we have been oblivious to the presence of radioactivity in our environment but our bodies naturally evolved to live with it. Our cells have developed protective mechanisms that stimulate DNA repair in response to damage by radiation.

    Natural radioactivity was first discovered by French scientist Henri Becquerel in 1896. The first artificial radioactive materials were produced by Marie and Pierre Curie in the 1930s, and have since been used in science, industry, agriculture and medicine.

    For instance, radiation therapy is still one of the most important methods for treatment of cancer. To increase the potency of therapeutic radiation, researchers are currently trying to modify cancer cells to make them less able to repair themselves.

    We use radioactive material for both diagnosis and treatment in “nuclear medicine”. Patients are injected with specific radionuclides depending on where in the body the treatment or diagnosis is needed. Radioiodine, for example, collects in the thyroid gland, whereas radium accumulates chiefly in the bones. The emitted radiation is used to diagnose cancerous tumours. Radionuclides are also used to treat cancers by targeting their emitted radiation on a tumour.

    The most common medical radioisotope is 99mTc (technetium), which is used in 30 million procedures each year worldwide. Like many other medical isotopes, it is manmade, derived from a parent radionuclide that itself is created from fission of uranium in a nuclear reactor.

    Radiation fear could boost fossil fuels

    Despite the benefits that nuclear reactors offer us, people fear the radiation they create either due to nuclear waste, or accidents such as Chernobyl or Fukushima. But very few people have died due to nuclear power generation or accidents in comparison to other primary energy sources.

    We worry that fear of radiation is harming climate mitigation strategies. For instance, Germany currently generates about a quarter of its electricity from coal, but considers nuclear dangerous and is closing down its remaining nuclear power stations.

    But modern reactors create minimal waste. This waste, along with legacy wastes from old reactors, can be immobilised in cement and glass and disposed of deep underground. Radioactive waste also generates no carbon dioxide, unlike coal, gas or oil.

    We now have the understanding to harness radiation safely and use it to our and our planet’s benefit. By fearing it too much and rejecting nuclear power as a primary energy source, we risk relying on fossil fuels for longer. This – not radiation – is what puts us and the planet in the greatest danger.

    (By Bill Lee, Bangor University and Gerry Thomas, Imperial College London)

    Follow HT Tech for the latest tech news and reviews , also keep up with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. For our latest videos, subscribe to our YouTube channel.

    Social media doesn’t always have to be so social

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    • Wichita Technical Institute
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    What To Know

    • On Facebook.com: Select the Messenger icon >Options (three dots) >Turn Off Active Status. Choose a visibility level and select Okay.
    • In the Facebook iOS/Android app: Go to Menu >Settings & Privacy >Settings >Active Status and toggle off Show when you’re active.
    • In the Messenger iOS/Android app: Go to Chats >profile picture >Active Status. Toggle off Active Status, then tap Turn Off to confirm.

    This article explains how to appear offline while using Facebook and Facebook Messenger so you can browse without others knowing you’re around. Instructions cover Facebook on the desktop as well as the Facebook and Messenger iOS and Android apps.

    How to Appear Offline on Facebook Using a PC or Mac

    When you’re on Facebook or Facebook Messenger, friends may notice that you’re online and think it’s a great time to send you messages. Here’s what to do if you prefer more privacy.

    Navigate to Facebook.com and select the Messenger icon.

    Select Options (three dots).

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Select Turn Off Active Status.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Choose Turn off active status for all contacts if you don’t want to be disturbed by anyone.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Select Turn off active status for all contacts except if you don’t want to be disturbed by most people, but want to be available to a select few. You can designate friends who can see your online status.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Choose Turn off active status for only some contacts if there are only a few people to whom you prefer to remain incognito.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Select Okay when you’ve made your selection. Your active status remains off until you turn it back on.

    How to Appear Offline on Facebook Using an iOS or Android Device

    You can manage whether you show as online or offline using the Facebook apps for iOS and Android.

    Tap Menu (three lines) in the lower-right corner (iOS) or upper-right corner (Android).

    Scroll down and tap Settings & Privacy.

    Tap Settings.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Scroll down to the Privacy section and tap Active Status.

    Tap the toggle next to Show when you’re active to turn it off.

    Tap Turn Off to confirm.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    In addition to being invisible to your Facebook friends at times, there are ways to block people from finding you on Facebook.

    How to Go Offline on the Facebook Messenger App

    Turn off Active Status directly from the Messenger app for iOS or Android, as well.

    From the Chats tab, select your profile picture.

    Tap Active Status.

    Toggle off Active Status, then tap Turn Off to confirm.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    After you turn off Active Status, you can still send messages and participate in conversations you already had going.

    Share:

    • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
    • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
    • Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)

    Do you venture onto Facebook multiple times a day? Did you install the app on your mobile device thinking it would make posting and liking easier than going through your browser?

    If you downloaded the Facebook app, you might be surprised to find that the app is not only a storage hog but a drain on your phone’s battery as well.

    While storage and battery issues may not be concerning initially, after long periods of using the Facebook app it will leave your device without enough storage or battery to perform other processes. Thankfully, there are ways to prevent Facebook from consuming your smartphone resources.

    Delete the Facebook app

    The Facebook app can take up a ton of storage on your phone. Even browsing the timeline adds temporary and cached files to your device which consumes valuable space.

    Clearing up these files is simple: Delete and re-install the app. Don’t worry, you won’t lose any of your data, and all you have to do is sign back in.

    To remove the Facebook app on an iPhone, search for the Facebook icon on your iPhone’s home screen. Hold your finger over the icon until a box pops up. Tap Delete App and tap Delete App one more time when prompted.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    The steps for deleting the Facebook app on an Android are equally straightforward. Go into your Settings and click on the Apps option, then tap the Facebook app.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Click Uninstall and choose OK when prompted.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    To re-install Facebook on your mobile device, go to either the Google Play Store(Android) or App Store(Apple), search for Facebook and install the application. Once it’s back on your device, just sign in and it will be like it never went away.

    How to stop the Facebook app from draining your device’s battery

    In addition to requiring a large amount of storage space on your mobile device, with extended use, the Facebook app will deplete your smartphone’s battery. Here are a few tips on how to preserve your phone’s battery life.

    Disable Autoplay for Facebook videos

    The first few steps apply to both Android and iPhone devices. Go into the Facebook app and choose the three-line menu. Open Settings & Privacy and tap on Settings.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    For iPhone users, scroll down and click on Videos and Photos under Media and Contacts. Tap on Autoplay then the Never Autoplay Videos option.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Instead of clicking on Videos and Photos, Android users will tap on the Media and Contacts subheading. Choose Autoplay and Never Autoplay Videos.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Disable location settings and Background App Refresh

    Disabling these settings will further ensure the Facebook app isn’t a burden on your smartphone battery. Learn how to turn off location settings on both Android and iOS devices.

    To turn off Background App Refresh on an iPhone go to Settings, tap the General option, then click on Background App Refresh. Here you can customize when you want your background to refresh. Options include when using Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi & Cellular Data, or turn off the feature entirely.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Turning off Background App Refresh on an Android is also easy. Tap on your phone’s Settings, click Connections, then Data usage. Click Mobile data usage.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Click on any app you want to disable the Background App Refresh feature. In this case, click Facebook and disable Allow background data usage.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Turn off app notifications

    Try limiting the number of apps that use your Facebook account to perform some tasks, including logging you into their service via Facebook verification.

    For both Android and iPhone click the three-line menu in Facebook and Choose Settings & Privacy, then Settings. Under the Security option tap Apps and Websites. Click Apps, Websites and Games and turn off the feature.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Turn off app push notifications

    For Android and iPhone users alike, go into Facebook and click on the three-line menu. Tap Settings & Privacy and then Settings. Click on Notification Settings under Notifications and choose which notifications you wish to not receive. Options include Push, Email and SMS. Toggle off Push.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    The Facebook app is a drain on your battery and storage. Making these changes will not only help you avoid issues with your phone’s performance but also help protect your data.

    • Android
    • Apple iPhone
    • apps
    • auto-play
    • batteries
    • data storage
    • devices
    • Facebook
    • notifications
    • phones

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Data breaches and security incidents have become rampant across the social media sector, making continuous headlines. There are numerous incidents reported where unwitting users suffered frequent data and identity thefts, whose Facebook accounts were compromised.

    Recently, a security research found cybercriminals selling the identities of 267 million Facebook users for £500 (US$623) on dark web forums. The exposed information includes email addresses, full names, last connection, status, age, phone numbers, Facebook IDs, birthdates, age, and other personal data, which could allow attackers to perform spear phishing or credential stuffing attacks.

    By Rudra Srinivas, Senior Feature Writer, CISO MAG

    Every suspicious activity on your Facebook account does not necessary mean that a hacker is behind it. If you can log into your account without any trouble, it means that your account is under your control and not compromised. If you are unable to login into your account, then you can expect potentially malicious intent. However, with proper security measures, users can safeguard their social media accounts from malevolent hands. In case you suspect your Facebook account is hacked, follow the below options to regain control of your account and for future protection:

    When to React

    Ask your Facebook friend to check your profile. Your account may be compromised if you find:

    • Your name, profile picture, or email address have changed.
    • If there are any new friends or friend requests to people you are unaware of.
    • New posts on your timeline you did not posted.

    Report the Hack

    Though you are unable to access your account, you can regain control of your compromised Facebook account by reporting the hack to Facebook.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Visit Report Compromised Account page >> Select “My Account Is Compromised” option >> Enter your email ID or phone number linked to your account. The page displays a list of options. Select your reasons and follow the instructions.

    Alert Your friends

    Cybercriminals often use compromised accounts to spread fraudulent links or post distasteful or offensive comments. Inform your Facebook friends that your account has been compromised and ask them not to respond to any messages or links that they receive from your account.

    Delete Suspicious Apps

    Earlier, Facebook admitted that hundreds of users inadvertently gave access of their personal data to third-party apps. The affected users were also using their social media accounts to log in to certain applications.

    Scrap all unknown and suspicious apps from your account. Hackers often use malicious applications to pilfer sensitive data, images, and other personal details from social media accounts.

    Go to settings >> Click on Apps and Websites option >> Select the apps you want to remove

    You can also delete all the data, photos, posts, and links shared through these apps. In addition, click the View and Edit option to change app permissions. You can limit the app’s access to your personal data.

    Finally, Reset Security

    Your account could be hacked again if no proper security measures are taken. Adhere to Facebook’s new security and privacy features. Enable two-factor authentication, which ensures that your account cannot be hacked with just one password. Use an authentication app like Google Authenticator for this.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Rudra Srinivas is a Senior Feature Writer and part of the editorial team at CISO MAG. He writes news and feature stories on cybersecurity trends.

    More from the Rudra.

    Negative emotions are hard-wired into our brains to be managed, not eliminated.

    THE BASICS

    • What Is Anxiety?
    • Find a therapist to overcome anxiety

    We are continually bombarded with messages from the media and self-help gurus that we are in charge of our own happiness. All we need to do is buy this product or follow that secret formula and we can get rid of anxiety and negative emotion for good. If getting rid of negative emotions is so easy, why is it that more than 21 million children and adults get diagnosed with depression each year and that depression is the leading cause of disability for adults age 15-44? Why is it that 40 million adults in the United States suffer from an anxiety disorder? The truth is that we can’t just get rid of negative emotions when we feel like it. They are something we will have to cope with for the rest of our lives.

    When our prehistoric ancestors heard the footsteps of a stalking predator, they got a surge of adrenaline that fired up their muscles, used this to run away as fast as they could, and lived to tell the tale and have babies, while those who didn’t were killed. Through the process of evolution, our brains became hard-wired to be on the lookout for threat and mobilize our bodies to deal with a potential predator by fighting or running away. Even today, fear and pain are powerful learning mechanisms that stop most of us from touching hot stoves, running into traffic, swimming in shark-infested waters, speculating wildly on the stock market, or venturing into crime-ridden neighborhoods alone at night.

    So, indeed, negative emotions are functional in a basic, survival-oriented way. And, we still need them in our modern world where there are natural disasters, wars, and human predators. This may be why expert Gavin De Becker’s book The Gift of Fear continues to grace the Amazon bestseller list, more than 10 years after it was first written. So what is the problem with negative emotions?

    Why are negative emotions difficult to change?

    There are six reasons why negative emotions (like fear or distress) are such a struggle for us:

    1. Our brains are wired for survival, not happiness. That is why they keep bringing up negative emotions, past mistakes, and worries about the future. We can get stuck in repetitive cycles of self-criticism, worry, and fear that interfere with our ability to fully experience and react adaptively to what is happening in the present.

    2. It doesn’t work to just shove negative emotions down or pretend they don’t exist. Because of the survival wiring of our brains, they will be given high priority and keep popping up again in conscious experience. In fact, some research by Daniel Wegner and colleagues suggests that suppressing thoughts while in a negative mood makes it more likely both the thoughts and the negative mood will reoccur.

    3. Our physiological systems can react to mental images and events as if they are happening in the real world. Try thinking about smelling and then biting into a lemon. You will likely feel a change in saliva in your mouth. Now think about putting your hand on a hot stove. Do you feel your heart pounding a bit faster? Thus, when fearful thoughts and worries come into our minds, they may affect our bodies as well. Our hearts may start to race or breathing gets short—we experience physiological symptoms of stress, which, over the long-term, can harm our bodies.

    4. Negative thoughts feed on each other. We may begin by worrying about not having enough money. Then we may think, “What if I lose my job?” and then about all the people who won’t help us and the past mistakes we made getting into this financial situation in the first place. Before we know it, allowing ourselves to dwell on a small negative thought has led to a mental mountain of difficulties.

    THE BASICS

    • What Is Anxiety?
    • Find a therapist to overcome anxiety

    5. Negative emotions, such as fear and shame, may help us to survive as young children, when we can’t leave our families and have few options to change a negative situation. When we become adults, we continue to follow the same scripts and never learn that the rules have changed and we have many more options now. For example, if you were heavily punished as a child for talking back to your parent, you may have a lifelong fear of speaking up and asserting yourself, or you may not realize you have a right to leave relationships in which you are treated disrespectfully.

    6. The things we do to avoid or try to cope with feeling negative emotions may be more counterproductive than the emotions themselves. People frequently turn to alcohol, marijuana, or prescription drugs, such as Xanax, to escape anxiety. These substances have negative effects on mood and motivation and addictive properties. Turning to food excessively can lead to overweight or obesity and low self-esteem associated with weight gain. Getting angry and blaming others for our negative emotions can ruin our relationships. Shopping or avoiding opening the bills can lead to mountains of debt.

    Anxiety Essential Reads

    Anxiety in Chronic Illness Pregnancies

    3 Social Mistakes Anxious People Make

    As humans, with brains hard-wired to experience fear and distress, we face a dilemma. We can’t force negative emotions to leave our brains, yet covering them up can lead to worse problems. And paying too much attention to them can create a downward spiral. What do we do with these essential, yet uncomfortable and troublesome parts of our minds?

    The answer is surprisingly simple: We need to make peace with them and, by doing so, take away their power. We can allow negative thoughts and feelings to be there, yet develop an “observing ego” or higher consciousness that directs our attention and behavior towards the goals, values, and activities that are productive and personally meaningful to us. We can strive to live a purposeful and effective life, rather than to be free of negative affect.

    In the next post, I will explain how you can begin to take back control of your mind rather than letting the fears run the show.

    I am a clinical psychologist and an expert on mindfulness, managing anxiety, and more; visit my website or follow me on Twitter.

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    If you’re on social media, you’ve probably uploaded at least a few photos to your account over the years. Most Facebook users have photo albums filled with selfies, vacation photos, candids and other images they want to share.

    Your photo uploads probably aren’t limited to social media channels, either. Many have at least one or two photo accounts that they use to create, share and store digital images. Web-based photo hosting sites are a common way to help organize your messy photo collection, too.

    What you may not realize is if you’ve uploaded any photos to the web, chances are they’ve been used to help build facial recognition systems. It’s not uncommon for developers to train facial recognition algorithms using images from different websites without warning the photos’ owners. Now there is a new tool that can tell you if it’s happened to you.

    Here’s the backstory

    Exposing.ai can help you find out if your photos are among the images developers have used for these types of tasks. This tool focuses on the photo hosting site Flickr in particular. Flickr is regularly used in AI research by companies like IBM due to its huge cache of images, prime pickings for facial recognition training.

    It’s not unusual for developers to scrape photos from these online databases to help train AI facial recognition. Flickr has allowed developers to scrape the site for images to use for these purposes. Social media and other image databases are known to allow it, too.

    Your daily dose of tech smarts

    Learn the tech tips and tricks only the pros know.

    Neither Flickr nor the developers have to get user permission to do it, either — it’s completely legal for them to scrape sites like these for images to use. And without this tool, it’s nearly impossible to know whether your images have been included in past training datasets.

    How this tool works

    Exposing.ai was created as part of the MegaPixels art and research project. According to the tool’s creators, the MegaPixels project stems from years of research into the background on how these types of facial recognition and biometric image training datasets are built.

    “After tracking down and analyzing hundreds of these datasets a pattern emerged: millions of images were being downloaded from Flickr.com where permissive content licenses are encouraged and biometric data is abundant. Telling the complex story of how yesterday’s photographs became today’s training data is part of the goal of this project,” the Exposing.ai website states about the project.

    To use this tool:

    • The only information you need to use the Exposing.ai tool is your Flickr username, photo URL or hashtag, which is entered in the website’s search bar.
    • The tool will then scan through over 3.5 million photos using your unique identifiers, such as username and photo ID, to find your pics.
    • If it finds your photos, the search results are displayed on the screen along with images pulled directly from Flickr.com. You will get thumbnails of images that were used in the results as well.

    While you can’t do much to remove your images from the datasets they were used in, you may be able to use the tool to request the removal of your images from future dataset releases. The Exposing.ai team said information on that process would soon be included with your search results. Future versions of the tool could include more search options as well.

    Why should I use this tool?

    In general, there’s nothing nefarious about training AI with user photos from a database like Flickr. Researchers regularly use these types of databases to train AI to eliminate some of the ongoing biases that occur with facial recognition software.

    There’s nothing quite as annoying as losing track of your email address or password and not being able to get into your Google account — especially if it houses most of your digital life.

    Nothing, that is, except for having your account hacked.

    Regardless, there are several ways to recover your Google account.

    Here’s what you need to know.

    How to recover a Google account if you forgot your email address

    If you’re having trouble logging into your Google account because you can’t remember your email address, go to Google’s Find My Email page and follow the prompts.

    You’ll need to be able to provide the full name associated with your account, as well as the phone number or the recovery email address associated with it.

    How to recover a Google account if you forgot your password

    If your password is the issue, use the Account Recovery page to reset your password. You’ll be asked to confirm your identity by answering a few security questions.

    If possible, try to complete this process using a device (and browser) that you used to sign into the account previously and in a location where you’ve used the account.

    If you aren’t able to verify your identity through the security questions, you’ll be able to try again. Google also offers helpful tips if you’re having trouble answering the security questions correctly.

    After successfully confirming your identity, you will be able to reset your password.

    If you use this option, however, be aware that you will have to provide your email address, so if you forgot both, start with the “forgot email address” instructions as listed above.

    How to recover a Google account if your account was hacked

    If you aren’t able to log into your Google account — for example, if you’re trying to log into your Google account and you find that someone has changed your password or recovery phone number, or deleted your account (or in some cases, even if you deleted the account) — you will also use Google’s Account Recovery page.

    Simply answer the questions as best you can and follow the prompts.

    If all else fails, or you can’t sign in for another reason (like you’re having trouble with two-step verification or you can’t reset your password with a code by text), you can get help signing in and recover your account directly through Google.

    In another question someone mentioned that it couldn’t happen. Why not?

    For example I asked about the speed an object would have to move at sea level to create a vacuum behind it; in the comments someone asked what I meant by vacuum because there couldn’t be a perfect vacuum.

    3 Answers 3

    What you’re describing is theoretically possible, or at least there is no contradiction inherent in its conception any more than any other “pure” quantum state is: you simply need to prepare the pure quantum state which is the zero particle number observable eigenstate for all the quantum fields (electron, photon, . ). This of course corresponds to all the quantum fields’ being in their ground energy eigenstate.

    Now, how to prepare this state in practice is another matter. There are both practical and theoretical difficulties. First the question of matter quantum fields. The key idea here is that regions of space only evacuate through diffusion: we don’t have any magic means of calling up all the particles in a region and saying “hey guys, could you all please shift to one side of this chamber now?” You simply place the region of space you want to evacuate in contact with another region of space with a lower particle density and let particles freely diffuse back and forth between the two. We can prepare low particle densities through piston apparatus and the like, and one could imagine in theory using pistons with non return valves over many cycles to achieve a high probability of no matter particles in a region (somewhat like the old joke about homeopathic procedures diluting medicine to below single molecule in the bottle concentrations), but in practice this procedure is hard to make perfect. Some of the practical difficulties (outgassing and so forth) are talked about in the Wikipedia article “Ultra-high Vacuum”. Moreover, even if you did get rid of all matter particles, then your chamber walls are at nonzero thermodynamic temperature, so now the inside of the chamber contains blackbody radiation. This you cannot get rid of unless the chamber walls are at truly absolute zero thermodynamic temperature.

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  • Gundabad Solo Instances Nearly Impossible

    I have been running the three solo instances for a while now, and suddenly I am getting my butt kicked in every one.

    In HoR, I cannot get past the last boss; get him to about half health then he one shots me with freezing breath (over 600k damage). Cant avoid it or interupt it.

    In Dhurstok, the two headed boss floor cast (purple damage zone on floor) no longer can no longer be interupted. While the graphic shows his induction as interupted, he still places the damage zone on the floor.

    In Pughlak, all damages seemed to have been increased (especially the tentacle room, have to use heals and pots to survive there).

    The only think different on my character is my gear level has improved. I am wondering if the instances are calibrated by gear level and I have attained a break point where all the damage mechanic stepped up. I did submit a bug report on the HoR issue.

    I have been running the three solo instances for a while now, and suddenly I am getting my butt kicked in every one.

    In HoR, I cannot get past the last boss; get him to about half health then he one shots me with freezing breath (over 600k damage). Cant avoid it or interupt it.

    In Dhurstok, the two headed boss floor cast (purple damage zone on floor) no longer can no longer be interupted. While the graphic shows his induction as interupted, he still places the damage zone on the floor.

    In Pughlak, all damages seemed to have been increased (especially the tentacle room, have to use heals and pots to survive there).

    The only think different on my character is my gear level has improved. I am wondering if the instances are calibrated by gear level and I have attained a break point where all the damage mechanic stepped up. I did submit a bug report on the HoR issue.

    I don’t think we have ilvl scaling, which would be a disaster imo. But we had another update last week and there might have been some changes to the bosses.

    I have long come to the conclusion that t1 solo or solo only are not always solo able. No problem since we can scale them but if we want the rewards that is not an option. It really bothers me when story is connected to these instances. Take Narrowdelf, if I want to finish this epic interlude on level (45-50) I will need help. Why, we are talking about t1 solo so called story mode, shouldn’t that be as easy as landscape? This is probably the hardest instance at lvl 130, I didn’t have any problems with the others on level. It seems like the devs sometimes go out of their way to laugh at non-fellowship players.

    I did Den at lvl 140 today and it was no different to previously, trivial.
    The other 2 are also doable at 140 but there is a difference between running them at lvl 140 and lvl132 and neither of them is worth wasting any more time in than strictly necessary as I only want them for the weekly quest so run the other 2 at lvl 132 but run den at 140 as it makes no noticeable difference.

    I personally did a test today for all three instances to see if there were any changes. And I decided to try it out on my non-raiding minstrel, without any virtues maxed and 78 trait points. I don’t normally do the 3-man instances on-level because you essentially earn the same rewards at level 131 (outside the gear that is).

    I came close to dying when the room exploded on Shaikmuz because I didn’t remove the bleed on me. I was able to interrupt the troll boss 4 times (and he interrupted himself when phasing once). I, again, almost died on that boss because I wasn’t paying attention to the adds. The crawlers for PUG were not a problem. I was about to come on here and say I had no issue for House of Rest until this happened: “Vethúg Wintermind scored a hit with Freezing Breath for 533,292 Frost damage to Morale.” That only gave me 40,000 morale remaining when the boss died seconds later.

    This doesn’t mean I never had any problems. I recall dying from the bosses in Assault on Dhúrstrok because my buff friend was caught on something behind me. I know the crawlers in PUG gave me a hassle because I never focused down one of the mind roots in the background. I once died on my slow-killing captain during the final fight in House of Rest because my friend lost all her morale in the middle of battle. I believe they solved that issue by making her invulnerable.

    Last edited by WeirdJedi; Mar 06 2022 at 02:16 PM . Reason: Female dwarf pronoun

    I personally did a test today for all three instances to see if there were any changes. And I decided to try it out on my non-raiding minstrel, without any virtues maxed and 78 trait points. I don’t normally do the 3-man instances on-level because you essentially earn the same rewards at level 131 (outside the gear that is).

    I came close to dying when the room exploded on Shaikmuz because I didn’t remove the bleed on me. I was able to interrupt the troll boss 4 times (and he interrupted himself when phasing once). I, again, almost died on that boss because I wasn’t paying attention to the adds. The crawlers for PUG were not a problem. I was about to come on here and say I had no issue for House of Rest until this happened: “Vethúg Wintermind scored a hit with Freezing Breath for 533,292 Frost damage to Morale.” That only gave me 40,000 morale remaining when the boss died seconds later.

    This doesn’t mean I never had any problems. I recall dying from the bosses in Assault on Dhúrstrok because my buff friend was caught on something behind me. I know the crawlers in PUG gave me a hassle because I never focused down one of the mind roots in the background. I once died on my slow-killing captain during the final fight in House of Rest because my friend lost all her morale in the middle of battle. I believe they solved that issue by making her invulnerable.

    The freezing breath is what is wiping me. I remove all debuffs and Veth still one shots me.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    A zoysia grass lawn is frequently touted as the cure-all for the homeowner’s lawn cares. The basic fact about zoysia grass is that, unless it is grown in the right climate, it will cause more headaches than not.

    Zoysia Grass Problems

    Invasive – Zoysia grass is a very invasive grass. The reason you can plant plugs and not have to seed the lawn is because zoysia grass will crowd out all other species in the lawn. Then when it has taken over your lawn, it will start in on your flower beds and your neighbor’s lawn.

    Temperamental color – Another one of the zoysia grass problems is that unless you live in a consistently warm climate, the color of your lawn can go rapidly from green to brown at the first sign of cool weather. This can leave your lawn looking unsightly for a good part of the year.

    Slow growing – While this is touted as a good feature because it means that you don’t need to mow as much, it also means that your zoysia grass lawn will have a harder time recovering from damage and heavy wear.

    Zoysia Patch or Rhizoctonia Large Patch – Zoysia is prone to zoysia patch disease, which can kill the grass and give it a rust color as it is dying.

    Thatch – Another one of the facts about zoysia grass is that is prone to thatch problems. While you will have less mowing, you will have to do more thatch control, which is significantly more labor-intensive.

    Difficult to remove – One of the most frustrating zoysia grass problems is the fact that it is nearly impossible to remove once it becomes established. If you decide to plant zoysia grass, you are making the decision to grow it for life.

    In warm weather, zoysia grass problems are fewer and the benefits are greater and this grass is worth looking at. But if you are in a cooler climate, planting a zoysia grass lawn is just asking for trouble.

    You’ve just discovered your Facebook account has been posting all kinds of weird, pornographic, or generally inappropriate content to your Wall and/or News Feed. Your friends are annoyed with all the questionable posts and requests coming from you.

    Did you forget to log out of Facebook at your friend’s house, did you accidentally click on something you shouldn’t have, or has your account been hacked?

    I can’t answer these questions without actually seeing what’s happening on your profile, but I can offer some advice. Here are four things you should try in order to clean up your Facebook account.

    Reclaim your account

    My account is hacked. If your account is sending out spam (ex: advertisements or suspicious links) or was taken over by someone else, secure it here.

    After you’ve navigated to facebook.com/hacked, click the blue “Continue” button and follow the instructions.

    Change your Facebook password

    In this case, you should change your password on Facebook. If you don’t know how to do so, you can refer to the following guide: How to change your Facebook password.

    If changing your password fixes your Facebook problems, you should change your password for all your other services too, especially if you use the same password for them as you previously used on Facebook. If this doesn’t fix the problem, try the next step.

    Remove unwanted Facebook apps

    Your best bet is to remove all the Facebook apps you find suspicious. If you don’t know how to do so, you can refer to the following guide: How to clean up your Facebook apps.

    If cleaning out your apps fixes your Facebook problems, tell your friends they should do the same (chances are the app asked your friends to install it as well). If this doesn’t fix the problem, try the next step.

    Get some security software and run a virus scan

    I recommend Microsoft Security Essentials –it’s free and gets the job done very well. Another good one is Malwarebytes. Other free alternatives include Avira and Avast.

    The aforementioned security programs are for Windows. If you have a Mac, try using the antivirus from Sophos.

    After running the virus scan, clean out whatever the program detects. If you’re not sure about what it found, ask a friend who might.

    As an Amazon Associate and affiliate of other programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

    Updating your status on Facebook has become common today. But there are certain things that you might be afraid or wish to share and want to update them secretly. For e.g. many times some people want to change their relationship status on Facebook, but without letting others know about it. It’s true, some people are introverts and they want to keep it a secret. There can be many reasons why someone wishes to do so.

    Maybe when people break up, then they feel embarrassed or awkward to change their status. As it will show your changed status in your friend’s news feed. Or you simply want to keep your love life secret from all the others.

    And for these kinds of users, Facebook has provided with the ability to make your profile private which includes hiding relationship status making it invisible in the Timeline. Or you can also hide or show it to any certain people or friends. So here we are going to share the methods to do so.

    How To Secretly Change Relationship Status On Facebook

    You can do it from both, the website and the Facebook Android and iOS app. And both are almost the same but with a little bit different in the interface. So let’s check them out.

    From Web Browsers

    1. After logging in to your Facebook, click on the Profile name at the top left.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    2. Then in the profile, you will see About tab. Click on it

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    3. Now from the left-hand column select Family and Relationships option.

    4. If you’re adding the status for the first time then you’ll get the option to add while others will get the option to change or edit the status. To make the status hidden from the timeline and everyone else you will need to change the privacy. For that, click on the privacy icon beside Edit. The icon will change depending on the setting chosen. For instance, in case of public, it will appear as a globe like in the screenshot above.

    5. To hide the relationship status from everyone select Only Me, set the status as required and Save Changes.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Using different options from this drop-down list, you can also select it to be visible to only Friends or show/hide from certain friends(Custom).

    From Mobile App

    1. In the app, select the hamburger icon, and then tap on your Profile.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    2. Now, select the relationship status that is currently on your Profile and it will show the option to edit that. Tap on the drop-down icon in front of the status, and then select the ‘Sharing with’ option.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    For users, who are setting the relationship status for the first need to tap on See Your About Info under your profile. On the next screen, you’ll find an option to Add Relationship Status. After that, you can set the status and for privacy tap on the globe icon.

    3. Here select the option Only me to keep it hidden from your timeline and news feed of others.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Now no one can see your relationship status as it is set to Only me so only you can see your relationship status.

    How To Hide Or Show Relationship Status From/To Certain People

    Like you can hide friends list from certain friends, similarly, if you wish that your relationship status should be visible to only one person, or just with limited friends than that can also be done. But only from the Facebook website. To do so, while setting the Privacy from the given options select the Custom option.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    In this custom option, you can simply add the People or friends in two lists. One list is for the people with whom you want to share the relationship status and others for not sharing the staus.

    Hide Relationship Status Form Others News Feed

    Now, what if you want to make it visible on your timeline under About section but don’t want it to be visible on the friend’s news feed? So what you have to do is no need of changing the privacy, once you have changed your relationship status, immediately go to your timeline and look for the relationship status post.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    On the top right of that post, click on the Edit link and choose Hide from Timeline. Then it will not show on your timeline and your friends’ news feed.

    Change Relationship Status

    Now you know how to hide the relationship status, so you can change it accordingly. Here you will get various relationship options like Single, In a relationship, Engaged, Married, In a civil partnership, In a domestic partnership, In an open relationship, It’s complicated, Divorced, Widowed, and Separated. In some of the statuses, you can add the name of the partner you are in a relationship with and even add dates for anniversaries so your friends can get to know.

    Add Relationship As Life Event

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    If you wish to add your relationship status to your life event then that is also possible. Just head towards the website, open your profile and go to About section. There select Life events from the left sidebar. After this, select the category i.e. Relationship.

    How to remove facebook from your life (and why that’s nearly impossible)

    Then enter the title, add a partner if you wish to, select the kind of relationship, add photos/videos if desired, and share the post with your friends.

    Wrapping Up

    So using the methods above you can secretly change your relationship status, or hide it from your friends or show it to a selected number of people.

    Hope you got the methods, just a few clicks, and you are done.

    We’ll show you how to free up storage on your Samsung, Google Pixel or other Android device by uninstalling the apps you rarely open.

    Contributing Writer, ZDNet

    Jason Cipriani is based out of beautiful Colorado and has been covering mobile technology news and reviewing the latest gadgets for the last six years. His work can also be found on sister site CNET in the How To section, as well as across several more online publications.

    It’s always a good time to free up space on your Android phone — whether you’re getting an “insufficient storage” alert or you’re preparing your phone to download Android 12. A great place to start is deleting your old apps that you no longer use. Apps are notorious storage eaters, and it’s all too easy to accumulate a bunch of apps for stores you rarely visit, games you don’t play anymore or services you don’t use.

    If you know where to look, deleting an app on your Android phone or tablet is a straightforward process that takes just a few seconds to complete. But as is often the case with Android phones, not every phone uses the same method. I found four different ways you can uninstall an app on your Android phone, explaining each one in detail below.

    The tried-and-true method for all Android devices.

    A method for deleting apps that works on every Android phone

    The tried-and-true method for deleting apps from your Android phone or tablet is simple: Long-press on the app’s icon until the app shortcut’s popup shows up. You’ll either see an “i” button or see App Info; tap it. Next, select Uninstall.

    It’s simple and works on every Android device I’ve ever used.

    Three alternative ways to uninstall Android apps

    As with all things Android, not all phones work the same way and there are multiple ways of achieving the same task. For example, you can view a list of all apps installed on your phone in Settings > Apps & Notifications (sometimes it’s just listed as Apps).

    Selecting an app will show you the same App Info screen you can access from the app shortcut, complete with the Uninstall button. For some, seeing a list of all of your apps in one place that you can easily scroll through instead of swiping through your home screens or app drawer is a better way to cut the fluff.

    You can also uninstall from the Play Store.

    You can also use the Play Store to uninstall apps by viewing an app’s Play Store listing and selecting Uninstall next to the Open or Update button.

    Not all phones are created equal. On Samsung and OnePlus phones, for instance, you don’t have to go through the extra step of selecting App Info after a long press on the app icon. There’s an Uninstall option built into the app shortcuts menu, making the process much easier and quicker.

    After deleting apps to give yourself some extra storage and thin out your app drawer, make sure you look at these settings you should change . It’s also a good time to give your phone a privacy tune-up by going through the privacy settings to help you protect your personal data. Oh, and don’t forget about the hidden Android features we found and love . We know you’ll love them too. Plus, check out our first impression of the newly announced Galaxy S22 , which is now available for preorder .

    This step-by-step guide will tackle an infestation in your pantry ASAP.

    Despite your best efforts to keep your house sparkling clean and bug-free, it doesn’t always work. Even with the best cleaning tips and top-tested cleaning products, pesky weevils can still make their way into your home, more specifically in your kitchen pantry or where you keep dry goods such as flour or rice. While weevils aren’t necessarily dangerous or harmful to humans or pets, they are a nuisance. Unfortunately, by the time you spot them, there’s already an infestation — which means you’ll want to get rid of them ASAP.

    To learn more about weevils, how to get rid of these unwelcome visitors quickly and prevent them from coming in, we teamed up with urban entomology expert, Changlu Wang, Ph.D., of Rutgers University, who focuses on biology, ecology and the management of urban pests. Follow our guide below for everything you need to know on how to get rid of weevils.

    What are weevils and how do they get inside the house?

    A weevil is part of the beetle family and they are tiny bugs that are practically invisible to the naked eye until fully grown. There are various types of weevils, and the kind that invades your pantry feed on dry goods such as grains, rice, beans, cereals, seeds, nuts and more.

    According to Wang, they can fly into your home or come in through contaminated food. Weevils can also lay their eggs inside dry goods like grains, rice, beans, etc., which means it’s possible to buy food at the store that already has weevils in the bag.

    While you should inspect each bag of food before you buy it for open or torn packaging, it’s nearly impossible to spot the eggs or bugs until they are fully grown and have become a problem.

    You’ll know you have weevils if you spot tiny brown bugs in your dry goods or around the food containers. Weevils are especially easy to spot in light-colored foods like rice and light-colored grains. Other signs you may have weevils are “damaged packages or fine dust inside or outside of food containers,” Wang says.

    How to get rid of weevils

    There’s no need to panic if you spot weevils inside your pantry as they’re generally harmless, but you’ll want to get rid of them quickly. Wang states that while weevils typically just damage food, some people may experience an allergic reaction when exposed to a large number of beetles.

    It’s best to try to prevent weevils in the first place, but even with precautions, it may not be entirely possible to prevent them altogether. While getting rid of weevils isn’t hard, it can be time-consuming and tedious. Here’s what you need to do:

    1. “Throw away any infested food,” advises Wang. If you suspect any opened or unopened packages that might have or had weevils, it’s best to get rid of them. Be sure to check nearby containers as well even if they haven’t been opened. Weevils can chew through cardboard and plastic, which means they can also get into unopened packages of food.
    2. Get rid of excess food packaging such as cardboard boxes if the food is in an airtight bag that hasn’t been contaminated. Weevils can hide in packaging and re-emerge later.
    3. “If trying to salvage food, put items in the freezer for a few days or spread the food under the hot summer sun, if suitable, and then store them in a sealed container,” recommends Wang. If you’re unsure whether it can be salvaged, it’s best to dispose of the item.
    4. After getting rid of the affected foods, you’ll want todeep clean your pantry. Take everything out of the pantry and thoroughly vacuum the shelves, including the cracks and crevices where weevils may hide. You’ll want to dispose of the vacuum bag or dump the vacuum contents outside and clean and disinfect it before bringing it back in.
    5. Wipe the shelves with hot soapy water or a disinfecting spray then wipe again with white vinegar, which is known to kill weevils.
    6. Clean any unaffected items such as cans or containers before returning them to the pantry.