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How to rename many files at once with total commander

Rename file extension of multiple files with Windows command line, Total Commander or Multi-File Renamer.

How to change file extension of multiple files in Microsoft Windows

It is very annoying, when you need to change extension of multiple files one by one. Luckily, there are possibilities how to do this job easy in just a few minutes and we will show you some of them.

This guide contains three parts :

You can select your the way that fits you best to change file extension of multiple files.

Use Windows command line to change file extension of multiple files

The easiest way how to change file extensions of multiple files without other software is to use command line.

Open Windows Explorer, create a new folder and copy files that will be renamed to it.

Open command line Start → Accessories → Command line or type cmd.exe to Start menu search bar. In Windows 8 open Metro UItype cmd and press Enter.

Navigate to the folder where files are stored and type command:

ren *.old file extension *.new file extension or ren *.* *.new file extension

How to rename many files at once with total commander
Command Prompt ren command syntax for renaming file extensions

Wait a second till Windows renames the file extensions.

How to rename many files at once with total commander
Command Prompt renamed file extensions

Use Total Commander to change file extension of multiple files

Disadvantage of the first guide is to have basic knowledge about Windows Command line and its commands. Total Commander for Windows is free and much more comfortable file manager that also contains handy utility for renaming multiple files called Multi-Rename Tool.

How to rename many files at once with total commander
Total Commander

Start Total Commander. Navigate to the folder, where are stored files that will be renamed.

Select files by Ins key. If you want to rename all files in the folder you can use * key, or Ctrl+A shortcut to select all files.

How to rename many files at once with total commander
Total Commander select files

Go to the Files menu and select Multi-Rename Tool. option. You can also use Ctrl+M shortcut.

How to rename many files at once with total commander
Total Commander open Multi-Rename Tool

Click in the Extension box, delete the [E] option and type a new file extension, which you want to associate with multiple files.

How to rename many files at once with total commander
Multi-Rename Tool main window

Click on Start! button and wait until the Total Commander will rename files.

Use Multi-File Renamer to change file extension of multiple files

There are many free and paid stand-alone file renamers with various features, but we have selected one that is small, free and easy to use for our topic. It is called Multi-File Renamer and is available for free download on JJC Software website. It is distributed as a simple ZIP archive without installation application.

Start Multi-File Renamer and navigate to the folder, where are stored files for renaming.

How to rename many files at once with total commander
Multi-File Renamer main window

Select files by Shift+mouse click, Ctrl+mouse click, or all files with Ctrl+A shortcut and select Change/Add File Extension option in Replace/Remove tab. Click on Rename button.

How to rename many files at once with total commander
Multi-File Renamer select files

Type new file extension to text box and click on OK button.

How to rename many files at once with total commander
Change/Add file extension option

You will see a Preview window with information about old and new file names.

How to rename many files at once with total commander
Multi-file Renamer Preview window

Click on Do It button and wait until the the renaming job is finished.

Related software and links:

Microsoft Windows
A series of operating systems produced by Microsoft

Total Commander
Highly popular file manager for Windows

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How to rename many files at once with total commander

So you have a bunch of files with sloppy-looking names. It’s not that the names are wrong, but they’re all lowercase, missing spaces, and generally messy. Not a problem for Total Commander’s multi-rename tool! Read on and see.

Getting Total Commander

Total Commander is a powerhouse file management utility. It’s a “dual-pane” file manager, which basically means it looks like this:

How to rename many files at once with total commander

If that makes you think of ancient DOS-era file managers such as Norton Commander, you’ve got the right idea — that’s where Total Commander comes from. But make no mistake — this is a thoroughly modern application, with a ton of features. Today we’ll be going over just one small feature — the multiple-rename option.

While Total Commander is shareware, its trial is not time limited. So the first thing you should do is go to the Total Commander Download Page and get the installer. Install Total Commander on your computer and run it.

Selecting The Files to Rename

On running Total Commander, the first thing you would see is something like this:

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Note that on your system, the colors and fonts would be different — the background would be white, and the font a bit blockier. You can change the colors any way you like — as you can see, we like dark backgrounds.

Next, navigate to wherever you put the files you wish to rename, and select each of the files by right-clicking it with the mouse or hitting the Insert key.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Note how we’ve selected only those files we wish to rename. Now go into the multi-rename tool by pressing Ctrl+M or opening the Files menu and clicking Multi-Rename Tool.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Renaming the Files

This is where the magic happens, at least for this How-To. At first, the multi-rename tool simply shows you the current filenames.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

The old name is on the left side, the new one is on the right. At the moment, they’re the same. Now let’s start tweaking some of the settings and see what happens.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

This is looking better already. Here’s what we did:

  • To replace all the dashes and the underscore with spaces, we typed -|_ into the Search for box. That’s dash (-), pipe (|) and underscore (_). The pipe means “OR” — so we tell Total Commander to search for dashes OR underscores.
  • Then, in the Replace with box, we just typed a single space character. You can’t see that in the image, but it’s there. That’s because we want to replace all the dashes and underscores with spaces.
  • We then ticked the checkbox that says RegEx. That’s short for Regular Expressions. We won’t go too deeply into that right now, but we can say what we did in the first step (-|_) is a simple regular expression, which is why we need to enable this.
  • Last but not least, we’ve selected “First of each word uppercase” in the Upper/lowercase drop-down box.

That’s it! Now simply hit Start! and Total Commander would transform your messy filenames into neat, properly capitalized filenames with no underscores or dashes.

Not an End, But a Beginning

If this how-to feels a bit simplistic, it’s because we’ve barely scratched Total Commander’s surface. Feel free to leave any questions in the comments and we might post a follow-up!

I prepend every document I save to disk with the year, month, and day. While I do that manually for individual files, sometimes I encounter larger numbers of files with an “incorrect” naming scheme. Here is how to quickly rename many files with the help of the versatile Total Commander.

Renaming Files With Regular Expressions

Sometimes you have sets of files with all the right components already in their names but in the wrong places. In one case, the year and month were at the end of the name, instead of the start. Additionally, I wanted to replace underscores with spaces (we are in the 21st century, after all).

Fixing that is surprisingly simple with Total Commander’s multi-rename tool. I defined a regex with two groups (sections in parentheses) to capture the year and month, respectively. The contents of the capture groups is placed in the variables $1 and $2 which I then used to build the new names.

Let me explain in more detail. This is the format of the existing files:

The desired target format:

Search for the following regular expression, matching the source file names and capturing the month and year:

Replace with new filenames, making use of the regex capture group variables:

Using Total Commander Multi-Rename Tool

In Total Commander, select the files you want to rename, then press CTRL+M to bring up the multi-rename tool. Fill out the search and replace fields. As you can see below, Total Commander provides a preview of the changes. Once you are satisfied with the preview click “Start!” to perform the renaming.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Side note: if you are on a high-resolution screen, you will notice that the line with the “RegEx” checkbox in the screenshot is only partly visible. That seems to be a rare DPI scaling bug in Total Commander. It most definitely is an exception: Total Commander is fully high-DPI aware.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Overview

With MultiRename you can rename multiple files or folders by creating a rename rule.

You can easily select part of the existing file name, add text, replace characters or words, insert file property data in the file name, (eg. Date, Exif information for photos and much more )

Undo information is also saved so that if you rename files incorrectly or rename too many files by mistake, you can easily load a previously-renamed session and undo it.

If you are perform the same MultiRename many times you can save the rules and then load them when you need them again.

Rename Rules

Special tag – Counter [C]

There are some special tags that works a bit differently. The counter tag [C] is one of them. By default it is controlled by the counter option specified in Multi-Rename window. But you can override that by using tag parameters.

[C] Insert a default counter tag
[C, , ] Insert a default counter tag that will start counting at and increment the value by for every file
Example [C,10,2] – will start at 10 and increment the value with 2 so you will get 10,12,14,16
[C, , , ] the two first parameters work as above, let you specify how many digits you want to have as a minimum
Example[C,10,2,3] – will start with 10, but since digits are 3 you will get 010 , 012, 014

Special tag – Current Date/Time [Y],[M].

Another special tag is the date/time tags. They will give you the date/time elements of the current time.

[Y] Insert current year as 4 digits, eg. 2016
[Y,2] Insert current year as 2 digits, eg. 16
[M]
[D]
[h]
[m]
[s]
Inserts Day, Month, hour, minutes, second of the current time.
Month and days will be inserted as digits. If the month is April it will insert 4
[M, ]
[D, ]
[h, ]
[m, ]
[s, ]
Inserts Day, Month, hour, minutes, second of current time.
It will insert a minimum of specified digits. If month is 4 it and is set to 2 it will be inserted as 04

Special tag – Date/Time property from Plugin.

If you want the file date/time then you need to select a tag from the plug-in list, for example the [?ExtendedProp.datecreate] tag.
(Note that all plug-in tags starts with a ?)

All file properties from plugi-ns that return a date/time will return the date/time formatted using system settings.
This can be a problem since if time is returned as 12:22:22 the rename will fail since “:” is an invalid character for filenames.
You then need to replace the : with some other character (or blank) in the Search and Replace section in the MultiRename windows.

You can also specify a custom date and time formatting for the tag.

[?ExtendedProp.datecreate] Insert current date/time from this date/time file property. The date/time is formated using current system settings, so it might return 2013-03-03 08:23:23 (see warning above)
Make sure you replace invalid characters in “Search and Replace” or you might get rename problems.
[?ExtendedProp.datecreate-] Insert current date/time from this date/time file property using a custom date/time formatting
Example: [?ExtendedProp.datecreate-]
[?ExtendedProp.datecreate-] Insert only the date part using custom date formatting
Example: [?ExtendedProp.datecreate-]
[?ExtendedProp.datecreate-<|timeformat>] Insert only the time part using custom time formatting
Example: [?ExtendedProp.datecreate-<|HHmmss>]
(Do not forget the | before the time format.)
[?Ex. datecreate-, , ] You can still use the FromPos and Length parameters
Example: [?ExtendedProp.datecreate-,1,5]

How the date and time format works Date Formatting – Time Formatting

Renaming files in Windows explorer is easy but when you need to rename many files it can become quite tedious. A command prompt (terminal) makes it easier.

2 Answers 2

Renaming 1 file in cmd is very easy:
In this example we have a sample1.txt and we want to change its name to sample2.txt :

Let’s say the filename is sample1-some-unwanted-text-1234.txt and we want to change it to sample1.txt :

Renaming 1 file by replacing multiple unwanted characters using a star:
Let’s say the filename is sample1-some-unwanted-text-1234.txt and we want to change it to sample1.txt without having to type the whole filename:

This * basically means any characters inbetween sample1 and .txt will be replaced.

Renaming multiple files with similar names
If you want to rename multiple files, i.e. sample1 2020-08-01.txt , sample2 2020-08-05.txt , sample3 2020-08-10.txt , sample4 2020-08-13.txt , you want to keep the first 7 characters you want to get rid of the dates:

In this example, you want to keep the word sample and the number X (where X can be any number or character). Using a ? will leave the number in place and * instructs the rename-command to replace any characters in between sampleX and .txt

Warning: It happens very quickly that a command prompt rename operation renames too many files and you can’t undo it. So, when renaming multiple files it is advisable to make a copy of all the files you want to rename, put them in a temp folder, then run your rename commands in the temp folder, and when you’re certain that it works, go back and rename the original files.

I need to rename a bunch of files in order to fix their sort order, therefore I need to be able to do a sort of “find and replace” so I can replace chunks of the filenames at a time.

What tools should I use? I prefer GUI but a command line tool recommendation would also be fine.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

16 Answers 16

There are a few but I recommend gprename which is a good compromise between usability and functionality.

Other tools are: rename, krename , pyrenamer , cuteRenamer, .

How to rename many files at once with total commander

I really like qmv from the renameutils package. It enables you to use your favorite (terminal based) text editor to rename files. I prefer to invoke it with -f do which gives you a single column (one row per file) with filenames. Combined with the power of Vim it gives you all the tools you need to do massive filename editing.

may be a little difficult to handle, but really powerful!

If you like the shell and perl regular expressions I’d recommend rename . It’s as plain as it’s name.

thunar file manager is a GUI with a bulk rename option

it’s not standard on Gnome but can be installed through the software centre

If you are familiar with Emacs, I think nothing beats Dired for this task. Even if you don’t use Emacs that often you may find Dired a handy tool.

sudo aptitude install emacs23-nox

Start Emacs Dired mode for a directory:

emacs -nw path/to/dir/

Now enter edit directory mode:

C-x C-q (that is Ctrl+x followed by Ctrl+q)

You can now edit the filenames like editing text in every plain text editor. You may even chose to replace the filenames using regular expressions (note that unfortunately Emacs uses a different syntax than PCRE).

For example, to rename files with counter (starting by 1):
M-x replace-regexp (that is Alt+x followed by the string “replace-regexp” typed in the minibuffer at the bottom of the screen).
Replace regexp: DSCN\([0-9]+\).JPG
Replace with: \,(format “P%04d.jpg” (1 + \#))

To reuse a counter in the filename:
M-x replace-regexp
Replace regexp: DSCN\([0-9]+\).JPG
Replace with: \,(format “P%04d.jpg” (string-to-number \1))

When finished, type:

C-c C-c (that is Ctrl+c followed by Ctrl+c)

Or alternatively press the following sequence to abort your changes:

I have a list of files that I need to rename at the same part of each file, with different values.

So in the first example above I want to replace the 1402B103 with C1234-1 all the files are the same length and the sections I want to replace are separated by ” _ “.

I have some code for finding/replacing parts of a filename but I need to do this for hundreds of files – is there a way to pull Pattern= & Replace= as variables from a csv/list and run as a batch?

How to rename many files at once with total commander

3 Answers 3

You could create a csv file and add your search/replace strings:

myfile.csv

The batch file, myrename.cmd

It will seatch for each string in the csv file, split by comma assign the first meta variable to the search variable and the second to the replace variable. Then we simply do the replace for each by calling that procedure.

Note!! in this instance I used echo before ren for testing results. Only once you are happy with your results should you remove echo to perform the actual command.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

I would do such a multi-rename operation of files using shareware Total Commander with its built-in multi-rename tool which has a every easy to use graphical user interface for such tasks making it possible to review the new names of the files before executing the rename operation. This file rename operation could be done with Total Commander nearly complete using only some mouse clicks, just C1234- need to be typed on keyboard. And Total Commander supports even an undo if the rename operation fails for some reason.

Let us assume C1234- in new file name is a fixed sequence of characters and 1 and 5 is a number incremented by one on each renamed each file.

This solution works for the example.

But what about string left to first underscore and string right to second underscore vary from file name to file name?

In this case the following batch file could be the right solution:

The command MOVE with option /Y is used instead of command REN to make the file rename even on a file with that name is already existing. Total Commander would inform the user about such an issue on renaming files with other files with new name already existing.

For understanding the used commands and how they work, open a command prompt window, execute there the following commands, and read entirely all help pages displayed for each command very carefully.

  • dir /?
  • echo /?
  • endlocal /?
  • for /?
  • move /?
  • set /?
  • setlocal /?

Read the Microsoft article about Using Command Redirection Operators for an explanation of 2>nul . The redirection operator > must be escaped with caret character ^ on FOR command line to be interpreted as literal character when Windows command interpreter processes this command line before executing command FOR which executes the embedded dir command line in a separate command process started in background.

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How to open multiple files at once?

How to open multiple files at once?

Post by *cool.bambus » 2010-04-13, 13:28 UTC

now that my first question (inline filename search) was answered so quickly, I’ll try with the second issue that I’ve been unable to resolve, so far.

It might sound stupid, but I just have not managed to find out:
How can I open multiple files with TC?
If I mark files and hit enter, only the currently active file will open, but not marked files, as I would expect (this would also resemble windows explorer operation).

Now, I have already installed choice editor from (can’t post the internet link as I’m too new to the forum), as I read in another thread, but this also would not help.

Thank you very much,
cool.bambus

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Post by *Vochomurka » 2010-04-13, 13:52 UTC

1) Create a button with your program in the Command field and specify %P%S (or just %S) as a parameter. Detail is available via pressing F1 in the button creation box;
2) Use utilities list2str and listmulti (search through the forum). These utilities load all selected files to the specified program.
Some application can accept the list passed by %S parameter, others work better with list2str, some others with listmulti. You should experiment.
Good luck.

Added
ListMulti can be downloaded here (page in Russian).

Post by *cool.bambus » 2010-04-13, 16:11 UTC

Thanks for your reply, Vochomurka.

Well, experimenting is not quite what I had in mind. I was looking for a quick feature to achieve this multi-opening easily.

Isn’t this issue common to many people out there?

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Post by *Vochomurka » 2010-04-13, 16:24 UTC

Look, I need to be happy. Folk, how to do it? Isn’t this issue common to many people out there?

Just try %S. It would solve 70% of your problems.

Post by *cool.bambus » 2010-04-13, 17:10 UTC

Mmh, I think I don’t get your point.
What am I expected to do with %S in this case?

Sorry, but it seems I need a dummy-proof description

Thanks again,
cool.bambus

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Post by *Vochomurka » 2010-04-13, 17:28 UTC

Post by *cool.bambus » 2010-04-13, 20:28 UTC

Hi Vochomurka again,

thank you very much for your effort. And: Yes, it does work

The only thing is: This way, I would have to create a new button for each program / filetype I’d like to open multiple files with. Excel, Word, text, csv, powerpoint, etc. etc.
So, it is quite tedious and not a generalized solution.

Any other hint from anybody?

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Post by *Balderstrom » 2010-04-14, 00:43 UTC

Use an F4 File launcher, use a TC Internal Association, use a PowerPro script, or AHK Script, or the aforementioned LST2Multi, or the MultiFileOpen.cmd Script: which would be simplistic to add a couple lines to inspect the file extension of selected files so that specified programs would launch the files. Or even if one wanted to use the Windows Default programs for said extensions, then CMD.exe’s START command could be used.

There are a plethora of ways to go about such a task, and you obviously haven’t even attempted to look at the very robust help file or any of the detailed documentation that has accumulated on the boards over the years.

Post by *tcvol » 2010-04-14, 07:51 UTC

it really depends on your scenario.
you could install f4menu and assign each extension to another program to launch.

e.g.
select 5 files, *.avi assigned to open with media player classic -> hit f4 -> 4 instances of mpc are opened

maybe you should describe your scenario in more detail.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Post by *Hacker » 2010-04-14, 09:28 UTC

Select files, invoke right-click menu, click Open.

Post by *seldonbilly » 2010-04-21, 05:20 UTC

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Post by *Balderstrom » 2010-04-21, 06:12 UTC

Post by *Venkman » 2010-04-21, 07:45 UTC

cool.bambus wrote: Thanks for your reply, Vochomurka.

Well, experimenting is not quite what I had in mind. I was looking for a quick feature to achieve this multi-opening easily.

Isn’t this issue common to many people out there?

It is. I wondered, too, why I could not select a handful of, say .cpp files, press F4 and they would ALL open up within my favourite programmers editor. All the suggestions here are good, but I would love to have it work with F4, since that is using the file associations feature.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Post by *Balderstrom » 2010-04-21, 08:00 UTC

The editor needs to be able to accept the input from TC, depending on the editor in question it may need a command-line flag to indicate multiple files are following, or the files may need to be quoted.

For example, Flo’s Notepad2 would require (on a button for example)

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MRT: Remove leading digits from file name

MRT: Remove leading digits from file name

Post by *Geiri » 2011-06-29, 01:41 UTC

How can I quickly rename/remove the counter from my mp3 names?

Many of my songs start with a 01 etc.. is it possible to search and remove counter numbers?

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Re: How is best to Rename/remove counter from file name?

Post by *nsp » 2011-06-29, 05:55 UTC

If you jest want to remove filenames starting with numbers, you can select a many file as you want.
A) You can search [Alt]+[F7] using RegEx ^\d+ from your music folder and feed to listbox.
B) select all files you want to rename and do a Muti-Rename [CTRL]+M tick RegEx use ^\d+(_-\s)? in pattern and let or nothing in replacement field.

the (_-\s)? part allows to also remove _ – space char that is just after the number if it exist

Post by *Geiri » 2011-06-29, 12:35 UTC

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Post by *Balderstrom » 2011-06-29, 14:57 UTC

The only problem with that, would be if you haven’t used a standard naming scheme, and have songs that start with numbers — where the number in question doesn’t relate to the track#.

Personally, I generally use a MP3 Naming utility, like TagScanner to make sure my files have their tags populated. Then use a naming scheme like: \[Artist]\[Year]_[Album]\[Track]_[Title]

Once everything is named with the same scheme, you can use TC, Batch Script or anything with impunity for naming as you like. Or even an MP3 Batch/Tag Editor.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Post by *nsp » 2011-06-29, 17:16 UTC

This is why i advised to select the files to rename and not select all files.

Personally i use MP3Tag and also verify that all files have valid tags before transferring to music library. I use also the same scheme as you But track number as prefix in filename is not convenient when building medley.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

How to rename many files at once with total commander

One task that was always easier on macOS was to rename multiple files at once using Automator. The Files app on iOS/iPadOS doesn’t have a lot of bulk actions. But I finally cracked it with Shortcuts to let you batch rename files on iOS and iPadOS. My shortcut lets you do three specific things: prepend text, append text, and replace text in a file name. If I think of more things to do with file names in the future, I’ll update the shortcut.

Related

3 thoughts on “ Batch Rename Files on iOS Using This Shortcut ”

I ran your shortcut to rename three files. It created three new files with the new names, but it was unable to automatically delete the files afterwards.

I’ve been having that problem too. I think it’s a bug in Shortcuts.

Thank you, Andrew!

Pardon me for keeping my Shortcuts security settings to not allowing untrusted shortcuts.

Not at all intended to belittle your work: at least file managers FileBrowser (all editions) and iFiles provide batch renaming.

However, my personal benchmark in batch renaming is Total Commander for Windows. It was surpassed by short-lived NIYoW (Name It Your Way).

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How to rename many files at once with total commander

If you are a full time Linux user, you’ll agree that a lot of tools are required to perform day-to-day work. For example, you need a text editor, an application for viewing binary or hex files, a software that can compare files, an archive creator and extractor, and the list goes on and on. While there’s no problem in using tools aimed at specific purposes, juggling between them can be a bit time consuming.

What if you could access most of these features from within a single software? Or better yet, think of a file manager that packs a majority of these tools so that you don’t have to open separate applications for your day-to-day tasks. Directly to the point, you’ll be glad to know that such tools exist, and one of them is Double Commander which we’ll be discussing in this article.

Double Commander

Double Commander is an open-source, dual-panel file manager that’s available for various operating systems including Linux. It is inspired by Total Commander but contains some new features. The application is still in beta phase, presumably because all the features envisioned for it haven’t been implemented yet – it’s currently under heavy development.

Note: we’ve used Double Commander version 0.7.2 beta for this article.

Download and Install

The download and install instructions for Double Commander are there on its official website. You can proceed by clicking links corresponding to your OS. For example, in our case (Ubuntu) we clicked the link corresponding to GTK2 in the GNU/Linux section and then selected Ubuntu.

Given that we’re using Ubuntu 14.04, the following set of commands downloaded and installed the file manager on our system:

Once installed, you can launch the application by running the following command:

Features

Here’s the UI of the application.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

You can see that there are two side-by-side panels listing contents of the same directory “/usr/lib/doublecmd.” Needless to say, you can click the double dot [..] entry in the beginning of the content list to go to a directory of your choice.

For example, I opened “/home/himanshu/Desktop” in both panels.

I know you’ll be eager to know about the various tools that I mentioned in the introduction of this article and how you can access them. Let’s begin with the comparison tool which you can access by heading to “File -> Compare by Contents.”

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Of course, you need to select a couple of files before launching this tool. Here’s a screenshot of the compare tool in action.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Moving on, just next to the “Compare by Contents” option is the “Multi Rename Tool.” As the name suggests, this option lets you rename multiple files in one go. Just select the files that you want to rename and click this option, and you’ll see the following window.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

As you can see, I selected two files named “screenkey” and “screenkey-edited.” Now suppose the aim is to append a “-new” text at the end of the name of both files. For this just add this text after the “[N]” in the ‘File Name’ text box, and you’ll see that the “New File Name” column at the top shows the updated file names.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Now, click the “Rename” button at the bottom to complete the operation.

Next up, the “Pack Files…” and “Extract Files…” options that follow the “Multi Rename Tool” option (described above) in the “File” menu. They let you create an archive and extract contents from an archive, respectively. An important thing worth mentioning here is that you can easily drag and drop a file into an archive, and Double Commander will make sure that it’s added to the archive.

Move over to the “Mark” menu, and you’ll see various available options, including a couple that let you copy the file names as well as names with complete paths of the selected files.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Similarly, head over to the “Commands” menu, and you’ll see a “Run Terminal” option which – as the name suggests – opens a command line terminal from within the editor.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Keep exploring these main menus, and you’ll find some very useful features.

Moving on, the next set of important functionalities is located at the bottom of the Double Commander UI.

Clicking the “View F3” button opens the built-in file viewer to view files in hex, binary or text format, while the “Edit F4” button launches the internal text editor. Similarly, the other buttons let you copy, move, and delete stuff, as well as create a directory and exit the application.

Each panel window has a set of symbols over it (image shown below) that act as clickable buttons and serve as shortcuts to directories.

Suppose you want to go to root directory. Instead of clicking the “[..]” entry again and again, you can just click the “/” symbol from the list shown in the image above. Similarly, “..” takes you to the parent directory, “

” takes you to your home directory, and “

There are also options to add your current or selected directory in the special directories list.

Conclusion

Double Commander is a powerful file manager that’s not at all difficult to understand or use – all you need to do is to spend some time with it. While all of what we covered here is just the tip of the iceberg, it should be enough to get you started. If you are a heavy Linux user, I am sure you’ll benefit from Double Commander. Go ahead and try it.

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Have complete control when copying
files in Windows 11 / 10 / 8 / 7

Copywhiz enhances your file copy & backup experience in Windows. It offers more flexibility when copying and organizing files by letting you choose which type of files to copy, which ones to ignore (Selective File Copy) and how to copy. Also, schedule automatic file backups using Copywhiz.

Extremely useful in quickly organizing, grouping, separating several music files, pictures, videos, and documents.

You will love to see how easy & fast it is to:

    Pick only required files from several folders in one go! Exclude unnecessary files and folders that occupy huge space Sync destination folders with the source Automatically organize files based on their attributes and metadata Collect files from multiple folders and copy/compress at once Auto-rename and auto-skip files when copying them Schedule your file backups and a lot more 🙂

Highlights

Gain Control

Copywhiz allows you to copy only new or modified files or copy files based on file name or extension. You have complete control.

Save Time

Copywhiz lets you collect files from different folders and paste them all together. Saves your time & effort.

Systematize

Organize your files automatically based on file attributes – file name, size, date, type, extension and mp3 metadata (Artist, Album, Genre etc).

Ensure Accuracy

Verify files for data integrity after they are copied. Useful when copying files over network or to another external drive.

Play Safe

When a duplicate file is found, Copywhiz allows you to replace the existing file if it is older or rename the file before copying the new file.

Operate Hands-Free

Use Copywhiz command line options to automate file copy tasks. Copy files to multiple computers or multiple folders in a single click.

Enjoy Convenience

Use Copywhiz right from within File Explorer (Windows Explorer). It also supports other file managers like Total Commander, xplorer2, Directory Opus (dopus), RecentX, XYPlorer & ExplorerXP.

Be Right The First Time

Review the list of files that will be copied. Ensure that no important file is left behind & no unnecessary file is copied.

No More Residues

Sync files between source and destination folders. When you delete it from source it is also deleted from the destination folders. No more unwanted files and folders!

Stay Relaxed

Copywhiz lets you retry or skip a file on error. It does not stop abruptly if a file is in use or if the disk is full.

Save The Effort

Wish to copy the same set of files again? Just save the list in Copywhiz & re-use it in the future.

Review

Free Download

specifications

Rename multiple files (e.g. images, music files, web pages) and folders at the same time using various methods with this simple application

File Renamer Pro is a desktop utility that helps you rename multiple files and folders at the same time using various ways, with as little effort as possible.

Straightforward design

The application comes with a simple interface resembling Windows Explorer, composed of a single window, where all the tools and settings are grouped together. The intuitive features make sure that there are no accommodation issues to any type of users, even beginners.

You can enable or disable the toolbar’s standard buttons and text label, location bar (lets you view the path of the selected files), and the status bar.

More than that, the main panel displays the total number of added and selected items and their paths.

Wide range of renaming methods

File Renamer Pro can rename multiple items at once, such as image, web pages and music files. You can preview file name changes, rename extensions, as well as edit one file or multiple items in bulk.

A few of the renaming methods enable you to convert to uppercase or lowercase, insert a string of text in the existing file names at the specified position, remove parts of the file names, or add a sequence of numbers. MP3 files are supported and can be renamed according to their tag information.

The application supports a list of shortcuts for most of its functions to make it easier to use. You can employ a combination of hotkeys, such as Ctrl + A to select all items, Ctrl + I to invert the selection, and Shift + Del to remove all files.

During our testing, we have noticed that the tool carries out tasks very quickly and no errors showed up throughout the entire process. It doesn’t eat up a lot of CPU and memory, so it does not slow down the overall performance of the computer.

Last few words

Taking everything into account, File Renamer Pro proves to be a reliable and useful tool if you need to rename multiple files and folders at the same time. It offers you various name changing methods.

Manage data in two-panel mode

Electronic Team, Inc.

    • 3.9 • 344 Ratings
    • Free
    • Offers In-App Purchases

Screenshots

Description

A high level of file management can be reached with the updated version of Commander One v3.0. The app is now fully compatible with macOS Big Sur, offers more efficiency, stability, and improved functionality.

Commander One is a free file manager created in Swift, has a dual-pane interface that helps you handle your files in the most efficient way. Besides being easy-to-use, the app is rather fast and powerful that offers necessary features for seamless and full control over your files and folders.

Cultofmac.com – “Commander One looks like a great app to have on your Mac if you’re frustrated with OS X’s built-in file management.”
Lifehacker.com – ”Once it’s installed, you get dual pane browsing, unlimited tabs, a variety of sorting options, an easy toggle for revealing hidden files, and more. It also adds a handful of new keyboard shortcuts to make moving files around a little less painful. If you’re not a fan of how Finder does things, Commander One’s a more than capable alternative.”

Dual-pane view:
-Classical dual-panel appearance that can be adjusted according to your taste (color theme, fonts);
-Support for the Dark Mode to be in tune with the times (available starting from 10.14 only);
-Multiple tabs for browsing as many folders as needed;
-Support for three view modes, namely Full, Brief, and Thumbs for convenient work with different types of files.

Slick navigation and display:
-Hidden files are revealed with one click;
-Support for file operations queuing including already in progress;
-Support for drag and drop functionality;
-Rename files and folders while moving.

Different search methods:
-Built-in search with support for Regex;
-Search by file contents;
-Spotlight search.

Commander One can offer more useful features that can simplify your work routine:
-Configure hotkeys for most frequently used operations;
-Brief mode to view and handle many files simultaneously;
-Process viewer;
-Support for Finder Tags;
-Archive and unarchive files and open ZIP as regular folders;
-Work with .ipa, .apk, .jar, .ear, .war files as with regular folders;
-Preview all types of files, including Hex and Binary, before opening them;
-Detect over the network and conveniently list computers that use NetBIOS protocol;
-Seamlessly obtain access to the folders that are open or you use the most through History and Favorites;
-Select the program to open the file using ‘Open with’ in the main menu – File or via the context menu;
-Choose UI language.

*PRO version of Commander One is available via in-app purchase*
Additional features available in Commander One Pro

I have a bunch of files needing renaming but I do not want to create a script for it, just a command line.

I need to remove the last digits between the . and the .gif :

To be like this:

4 Answers 4

You can achieve this with a for loop and some bash expansion. If you’re already in the directory containing the files:

If your directory containing the files is called /home/gifstore/ :

The $ performs expansion of each filename we’ve saved into the variable named f . The % in the expansion of the filename means remove the shortest match of the following pattern from the end of the variable. The pattern is .*.gif , meaning any amount of characters between . and .gif . Finally we append the literal string .gif outside of the expansion to create our new filename, and rely on the mv command to move the file.

This won’t work for hidden files, starting with . .

How to rename many files at once with total commander

The rename command (you can also run it as file-rename ) is well-suited to this task. There are a few ways to use it here. I suggest this, though I’ll show an alternative below:

The -n option makes it just print out what rename operations would be one first. Once you’re happy with that, run it again without -n to do the actual renaming. One of the benefits of rename is that it will not overwrite files (unless you pass it the -f option, which you should very rarely do). That’s especially good here because you’re removing parts from filenames that potentially could result in naming collisions. Even if the collisions aren’t detected when you perform the simulation with -n , they will be caught when you perform the actual renaming.

With the four files you showed, that command will show this output:

Of course, your output will be longer if you have more than four files, which I presume you do.

The way that command works is that s/ performs substitution. Filenames that contain text that matches the regular expression ^\d<8>_\d\d\K\.\d+ are changed so that the match is erased, i.e., replaced with the empty string which is between / and / in the // that follows it.

Although the regular expression could be written in such a way as to ensure that only files ending in .gif are operated on, this is unnecessary, because you can pass just the .gif filenames to rename . The shell expands *.gif to a list of those files and passes that list to the rename command. Note that the syntax the shell uses for filename expansion is not the same thing as regular expressions. * does not have the same meaning as in regular expressions.

Here’s what the regular expression ^\d<8>_\d\d\K\.\d+ does:

  • ^ anchors to the beginning of the line.
  • \d <8>matches a sequence of exactly eight digits.
  • _ matches a literal _ . It is not special.
  • \d\d matches two more digits.
  • \K forgets the preceding matched characters. These are the characters we want to keep, after all, not the ones we want to replace. The effect is to ensure those characters are present just before the part we will actually replace.
  • \. matches a literal . . The backslash is necessary because when a dot appears in a regular expression it otherwise matches any single character.
  • \d+ matches one or more digits.

Thus, it is a . followed by digits that get removed. If the file does not begin with the necessary pattern, then there is no match. This helps avoid renaming files you don’t want to rename.

It’s possible to write a shorter rename command that ought to work. I’ve chosen this approach–among many possible approaches–because the command expresses precisely the naming scheme that you wish to operate on. This is to say that the solution resembles the problem.

If you want to use a simpler rename command, and you know all the .gif files in the current directory are named according to your description and need to be renamed, you can use:

Remember that -n just shows you what will be done, and you must then remove it to actually rename files.

In that command, I’ve included the .gif suffix in the regular expression so you don’t have to filter for it in the filenames you pass to rename . Still, you might choose to do so, if you have many non- .gif files in the current directory that would be pointlessly matched by * .

Here’s what the regular expression \.\d+\.gif$ does:

  • \. matches a literal . . (Without the \ , a . matches any character.)
  • \d+ matches one or more digits.
  • \. matches another literal . .
  • gif matches the literal text gif .
  • $ anchors the match to the end of the filename.

So the dot, the final digits, and the suffix .gif are matched, and all replaced with just .gif .

How to rename many files at once with total commander

The ren and rename commands change the name of files and directories.

In earlier releases of MS-DOS, instead of using ren or rename, you need to use the move command to rename directories or files.

  • Availability
  • Ren and rename syntax
  • Ren and rename examples

Availability

Ren and rename are internal commands that are available in the following Microsoft operating systems.

Ren and rename syntax

Renames a file/directory or files/directories.

You cannot specify a new drive or path for the destination of a renamed file.

Ren and rename examples

Change the name of the directory “computer” to “hope.”

Rename all text files with the “.txt” file extension to files with “.bak” extension.

When renaming files using an asterisk (*), keep in mind that you can rename all files in a directory. If there are files in the current directory you don’t want renamed, make your rename less greedy by adding a file extension.

Rename all files to begin with 1_. The asterisk (*) in the command above is an example of a wild character and can represent one or more characters. With only an asterisk, all file names in the current directory are renamed to have “1_” as the first two characters.

To represent or match one single character only, use the question mark (?) character instead.

Users with dual monitors may want to set a specific playlist to each monitor. BioniX Background Switcher cannot do that directly. However, with the following trick you can do it:
Rename your wallpapers in such a way that all wallpapers for monitor 1 will have an odd number at the end, and all wallpapers for monitor 2 will have an even number at the end. Also disable the ‘Shuffle’ mode.

for monitor 1 for monitor 2
wallpaper 01 wallpaper 02
wallpaper 03 wallpaper 04
wallpaper 05 wallpaper 06

This works because when you have two monitors BioniX Background Switcher picks the images for each monitor, in the order they are arranged in the playlist. Your playlist must be sorted by filename.

Renaming hundreds of wallpapers manually takes time so here is how to rename all images at once.
You have two possibilities to rename your wallpapers at batch:

Below we present you the both possibilities to batch rename your wallpapers.

Things about wallpapers

The best file format for wallpapers

Debunking the DPI myth

Different wallpapers on each monitor

How to open WB1 Webshots files with BioniX

Monitor multiple folders

How to change the wallpaper on Windows

Download photos from Flickr without a Flickr account

Wallpapers for dual-monitor system

1) Batch rename wallpapers with Windows XP/7

a) On Windows 7

a1) Open the folder containing your wallpapers and select all of them (you can use ‘Ctrl + A’ or Ctrl + Click to do that).

How to rename many files at once with total commander

a2) Right click on the first file in the list and select Rename from the context menu.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

a3) Type a new name for the file, then hit the Enter key. In our example we named the first file ‘Wallpaper’. The other images will automatically be given the same name followed by numbers (in round brackets).

How to rename many files at once with total commander

If you made a mistake, you can click on Undo from the Organize menu (or press Ctrl + Z keys repeatedly).

b) On Windows XP

On Windows XP the first two steps are the same as on Windows 7. At the step 3 when you rename the wallpaper your image will have the exact name you entered, without a number. So, when you rename the wallpaper, you must enter the file name followed by a space and the number 1 in round brackets. Example: wallpaper (1)

If you made a mistake, you can click on Undo from the Edit menu (or press Ctrl + Z keys repeatedly).

Now your work is done in less than a minute.

2) Batch rename wallpapers with Total Commander

Total Commander has an advanced too that can be used to batch rename your wallpapers in seconds.

Select the files you want to rename (with Insert, or the right click, or with the Plus key on the numeric keypad)

Click the Files menu, then Multi-Rename tool (or press Ctrl + M keys).

Now in the first field from the left of the Multi-rename window you have to enter the name you want for those wallpapers followed by a space and ‘[C]’ (‘[C]’ is from counter).

Total Commander has a nice preview panel that shows the result in real time, without actually renaming the files!

How to rename many files at once with total commander

When you are happy with the results, click Start to actually rename your images.

If you made a mistake, you can click on Undo. This even works after closing and re-opening the rename tool!

Now that you have all your wallpapers properly named add them into a new BioniX Playlist. But after you sort the playlist (by filename) you’ll notice that the images are not sorted alphabetically by the number in the brackets. So, you have to put some zeros in the front of the number in brackets when you rename the wallpapers. If you have 100 wallpapers you’ll put two zeros in front of the numbers with one digit and one zero in front of the numbers with two digits.

one digit numbers two digits numbers
wallpaper 001 wallpaper 010
wallpaper 002 wallpaper 011
wallpaper 003 wallpaper 012
. .

Windows cannot do that but Total Commander can. All you have to do is to follow the steps from the ‘Batch rename wallpapers with Total Commander’ and before you click the Start button to start renaming your wallpapers select the number of maximum digits (the Digits button in the right of the rename window) which corresponds with the number of digits of the number of your wallpapers you want to rename then click the Start button.

Now your wallpapers are all renamed and ready to cycle on your monitors.

This way you’ll have a single playlist but BioniX will act as if you’d have two different playlists, one for each monitor.

Total Commander Editor’s Review

Well known as a file manager replacement for Windows Explorer, Total Commander keeps surprising us with new handy features:
flat buttons on Windows XP and Vista, new file list icons, drive icons, bar icons, Lister with support for text cursor, allows to center images, and resize only larger, show drive letter in folder tabs, more options in copy overwrite dialog: Compare by content, Rename target, automatic rename, copy all smaller or all larger.

Total Commander supports ZIP, ARJ, LZH, RAR, UC2, TAR, GZ, CAB, ACE archive handling. The program is completely pluginable: the setup package comes with packer, file system, lister and content plug-ins. You can also get plug-ins for pretty much anything you wish to do: from burning disks to extracting sound and frames from AVI files.

Like the old Norton Commander and Win Commander, the two file windows side by side make it very easy to copy, paste, compare directories, upload and download files to FTP servers.

Another nice feature is the fact that once the “File system plug-ins ” installed, you can have access to whole file systems via the Network Neighborhood, e.g. to a PocketPC device or a Linux file partition.
The interface is very user friendly and completely customizable, from buttons to fonts.

Pluses: Customizable right click menu for Windows Explorer fans, tabbed interface, regular expression search; pluginable, built-in FTP client with FXP (server to server) and HTTP proxy support, parallel port link, multi-rename tool, tabbed interface, etc.

Drawbacks / flaws:

In conclusion: An advanced, powerful and totally configurable file management tool both for beginners and advanced users that can make your life so much easier, expecially when you’re working with files on a daily basis.

I would like to change a file extension from *.txt to *.text . I tried using the basename command, but I’m having trouble on changing more than one file.

I’m getting this error:

15 Answers 15

*.txt is a globbing pattern, using * as a wildcard to match any string. *.txt matches all filenames ending with ‘.txt’.

— marks the end of the option list. This avoids issues with filenames starting with hyphens.

$ is a parameter expansion, replaced by the value of the f variable with .txt removed from the end.

Also see the entry on why you shouldn’t parse ls .

If you have to use basename , your syntax would be:

Here’s how I change all the file extensions in the current directory on Debian.

On MacOS, user Monkpit reports that they were able to use brew install rename to get this to work.

A simple command, the rename from util-linux , will do that for you, it replace every occurences of “txt” to “text” in all file matching “*.txt”:

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Above works fine but limited to current directory. Try the command below, which is flexible with sub-directories. It will rename all .txt files under directory structure with a new extension.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

The answers here referencing s/oldExtension/newExtension/ are wrong. If you use s/txt/text/ , you would convert footxt.txt to footext.txt , which is not what you want. Even if you use s/.txt/.text/ , that would convert footxt.txt to fo.text.txt .

You have to use \. to match the period ( . will match any character). And the trailing $ to match the end of the line. Only this will properly match the extension.

Review

Free Download

specifications

Seamlessly copy, rearrange and rename a group of files at once using your predefined rules with this lightweight software solution

What’s new in Rename Us Pro 4.2.6.30:

  • Fixed a bug when calculating size of big files in a project.
  • Minor improvements and bugfixes in Expression Builder.

Read the full changelog

Generally speaking, hitting the F2 key and using arrows to go for the next file is one of the easiest methods of renaming numerous files in a folder. Then again, the F2 shortcut can become challenging when you need to rename files from various directories, while making some small modifications as well.

Rename Us Pro is a lightweight application that enables you to select files from different drives or directories and rename them according to your own rules.

Clean and well-organized interface

Even though the UI is designed on a white background, the truth is that this theme is suitable for viewing files, icons and their extensions easier and faster. The interface is well-built, clear, intuitive and consists of 4 tabs whose names suggest their main functions.

Therefore, in the Select Files tab you can search for the files on your computer and move the ones you want to rename in the dedicated area. Before you can proceed to the next steps, you can also open, copy or export the files to TXT, HTML or XML. It could support more file extensions.

It is very easy to use if you are an advanced user

After you have selected the files you need to re-organize, you can specify the actions and the rules the application should account for when renaming the batch of files. More precisely, you can add a prefix, suffix, replace substring, use expressions, change text to lower or upper case and rename Cyrillic symbols to translate to name a few.

In addition, the app allow you to modify the file extensions by including enumerations, cut or add suffixes and prefixes or use a specific expression. Lastly, you can browse through the Choose execution parameters tab and specify the actions for the log files, existing files and the folder where you save them.

A tool for quick batch file renaming

Considering the parameters you can use, it is clear that you need a level of experience with file management to work this app properly. Leaving experience aside, Rename Us Pro can lend you a hand with getting the job done fast and without too many headaches.

I n this tutorial, we are going to see a list of batch file commands with examples. Batch files are batch files that allow Windows users to automate system or program processes. For this purpose, these files contain commands, also called “batch commands”, which can be executed via the command prompt. There are hundreds of batch commands that can be used to automate many tasks.
How to Create a Batch File in Windows In this tutorial, we are going to see how to create a batch file in Windows. Creating your own Bat files is useful when you… Read More How to Run Batch File in CMD In this tutorial, we are going to see how to run a batch file in CMD. CMD is one of the oldest software components of… Read More

Batch File Commands List With Examples

Allows you to display the current version of the operating system.

Allows you to display the entire contents of a directory.

The following example list the contents of c:\example including all files:

Allows you to delete individual files.

The following example delete “My File.txt”:

MKDIR

Allows you to create a directory.

The following example create a new directory called “MyFolder”:

RMDIR

Allows you to delete a directory.

The following example delete the directory called “MyFolder”:

RENAME

This command allows you to rename files.

The following example rename “example.txt” as “test.txt”:

REPLACE

This command allows you to replace or overwrite files.

The following example Update the record.mp3 file in all the folders under C:\records :

This command allows you to rename or move files or directories.

The following example rename “oldfile.txt” as “newfile.doc” in the current folder:

Output:

CMD Commands List You Should Know In this tutorial, we are going to see a list of CMD commands that you should know. Windows command prompt provides access to over 280… Read More

This command allows you to copy files.

The following example copy the content from “source.doc” to “newfile.doc” in the current folder:

This command allows you to switch to another directory or folder.

The following example switch to the parent directory:

CHDIR

This command is a synonym for CD.

The following example switch to the parent directory:

CHKDSK

This command allows you to search for errors on hard disks.

The following example scan the C drive:

This command allows you to delete all the content on the screen.

Output:

COLOR

This command allows you to change the background color of the current console.

The following example change the color to White on Blue:

Output:

To change back to the default terminal color run this command COLOR 07(white on black).

This command allows you to compare the contents of two or more files.

The following example compare the contents of file1.txt to file2.txt:

This command allows you to display and change the system date/time.

The following example display the system date/time:

This command allows you to display messages in the console and activation/deactivation of the command display.

The following example display the department variable:

EXIST

This command allows you to check if a file exists.

The following example check if “filename” exists:

This command allows you to ends a batch file or command prompt.

The following example exit if the required file “myFile.txt” is missing:

This command allows you to creates a for() loop that polls the commands one after the other at the frequency indicated in parentheses.

1,1,10 means:

  • Start = 1
  • Increment per step = 1
  • End = 10

This command allows you to integrate conditions within batch files, similar to JavaScript for example.

The following example exit if the required file “myFile.txt” is missing:

All commands coming after REM or :: are considered as comments by the console.

The following example exit if the required file “myFile.txt” is missing:

This command allows you to go directly to a specific location in a batch file.

The following example jump to ‘next_message’ label and display “Next Message”:

PAUSE

The executed batch file is stopped and the console displays the message Press any key to continue….

This command allows you to call a batch file from another batch file.

The following example call SecondScript.bat from the current script.

This command allows you to read and delete variables in the command prompt.

The /P option allows you to set a variable equal to the value entered by the user.

Output:

TITLE

This command allows you to change the title of the command prompt window.

The following example change the title of the command prompt to “Welcome to StackHowTo!”.

Output:

START

This command allows you to start some programs or some commands.

The following example will start two programs called Notepad and Calculator.

Output:

SHUTDOWN

This command allows you to closes the session, restarts the computer, or shuts it down.

The following example will shut down your computer in 60 seconds.

This command allows you to search for one or more files by using character input.

The following example will search for “hello” in myFile.txt.

This command allows you to display data page by page on the screen.

The following example will display the content of myFile.txt page by page on the screen.

This command allows you to display the contents of text files.

The following example will display the content of myFile.txt.

This command allows you to test the connection with another device.

The following example will ping a website(example.com) 5 times.

HOSTNAME

This command allows you to display the computer’s name.

Electronic Team, Inc.

    • 4,4 • 96 valutazioni
    • Gratis
    • Offre acquisti in-app

Screenshot

Descrizione

A high level of file management can be reached with the updated version of Commander One v3.0. The app is now fully compatible with macOS Big Sur, offers more efficiency, stability, and improved functionality.

Commander One is a free file manager created in Swift, has a dual-pane interface that helps you handle your files in the most efficient way. Besides being easy-to-use, the app is rather fast and powerful that offers necessary features for seamless and full control over your files and folders.

Cultofmac.com – “Commander One looks like a great app to have on your Mac if you’re frustrated with OS X’s built-in file management.”
Lifehacker.com – ”Once it’s installed, you get dual pane browsing, unlimited tabs, a variety of sorting options, an easy toggle for revealing hidden files, and more. It also adds a handful of new keyboard shortcuts to make moving files around a little less painful. If you’re not a fan of how Finder does things, Commander One’s a more than capable alternative.”

Dual-pane view:
-Classical dual-panel appearance that can be adjusted according to your taste (color theme, fonts);
-Support for the Dark Mode to be in tune with the times (available starting from 10.14 only);
-Multiple tabs for browsing as many folders as needed;
-Support for three view modes, namely Full, Brief, and Thumbs for convenient work with different types of files.

Slick navigation and display:
-Hidden files are revealed with one click;
-Support for file operations queuing including already in progress;
-Support for drag and drop functionality;
-Rename files and folders while moving.

Different search methods:
-Built-in search with support for Regex;
-Search by file contents;
-Spotlight search.

Commander One can offer more useful features that can simplify your work routine:
-Configure hotkeys for most frequently used operations;
-Brief mode to view and handle many files simultaneously;
-Process viewer;
-Support for Finder Tags;
-Archive and unarchive files and open ZIP as regular folders;
-Work with .ipa, .apk, .jar, .ear, .war files as with regular folders;
-Preview all types of files, including Hex and Binary, before opening them;
-Detect over the network and conveniently list computers that use NetBIOS protocol;
-Seamlessly obtain access to the folders that are open or you use the most through History and Favorites;
-Select the program to open the file using ‘Open with’ in the main menu – File or via the context menu;
-Choose UI language.

*PRO version of Commander One is available via in-app purchase*
Additional features available in Commander One Pro

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Sometimes it’s just faster to do things with the command line.

In this quick tutorial we’ll go over how to open Command Prompt, some basic commands and flags, and how to delete files and folders in Command Prompt.

If you’re already familiar with basic DOS commands, feel free to skip ahead.

How to open Command Prompt

To open Command Prompt, press the Windows key, and type in “cmd”.

Then, click on “Run as Administrator”:

How to rename many files at once with total commander

After that, you’ll see a Command Prompt window with administrative privileges:

How to rename many files at once with total commanderScreenshot of Command Prompt window

If you can’t open Command Prompt as an administrator, no worries. You can open a normal Command Prompt window by clicking “Open” instead of “Run as Administrator”.

The only difference is that you may not be able to delete some protected files, which shouldn’t be a problem in most cases.

How to delete files with the del command

Now that Command Prompt is open, use cd to change directories to where your files are.

I’ve prepared a directory on the desktop called Test Folder. You can use the command tree /f to see a, well, tree, of all the nested files and folders:

How to rename many files at once with total commander

To delete a file, use the following command: del ” ” .

For example, to delete Test file.txt , just run del “Test File.txt” .

There may be a prompt asking if you want to delete the file. If so, type “y” and hit enter.

Note: Any files deleted with the del command cannot be recovered. Be very careful where and how you use this command.

After that, you can run tree /f to confirm that your file was deleted:

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Also, bonus tip – Command Prompt has basic autocompletion. So you could just type in del test , press the tab key, and Command Prompt will change it to del “Test File.txt” .

How to force delete files with the del command

Sometimes files are marked as read only, and you’ll see the following error when you try to use the del command:

How to rename many files at once with total commander

To get around this, use the /f flag to force delete the file. For example, del /f “Read Only Test File.txt” :

How to rename many files at once with total commander

How to delete folders with the rmdir command

To delete directories/folders, you’ll need to use the rmdir or rd command. Both commands work the same way, but let’s stick with rmdir since it’s a bit more expressive.

Also, I’ll use the terms directory and folder interchangeably for the rest of the tutorial. “Folder” is a newer term that became popular with early desktop GUIs, but folder and directory basically mean the same thing.

To remove a directory, just use the command rmdir .

Note: Any directories deleted with the rmdir command cannot be recovered. Be very careful where and how you use this command.

In this case I want to remove a directory named Subfolder, so I’ll use the command rmdir Subfolder :

How to rename many files at once with total commander

But, if you remember earlier, Subfolder has a file in it named Nested Test File.

You could cd into the Subfolder directory and remove the file, then come back with cd .. and run the rmdir Subfolder command again, but that would get tedious. And just imagine if there were a bunch of other nested files and directories!

Like with the del command, there’s a helpful flag we can use to make things much faster and easier.

How to use the /s flag with rmdir

To remove a directory, including all nested files and subdirectories, just use the /s flag:

How to rename many files at once with total commander

There will probably be a prompt asking if you want to remove that directory. If so, just type “y” and hit enter.

And that’s it! That should be everything you need to know to remove files and folders in the Windows Command Prompt.

All of these commands should work in PowerShell, which is basically Command Prompt version 2.0. Also, PowerShell has a bunch of cool aliases like ls and clear that should feel right at home if you’re familiar with the Mac/Linux command line.

Did these commands help you? Are there any other commands that you find useful? Either way, let me know over on Twitter.

Supreme commander: Modern War

Supreme Commander mod | TBD

First mod with Modern warfare theme on Supreme Commander game engine with all new modern real 3d-models units, buildings, and gameplay

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This is pre-Alpha version and this is a final version, cause mod closed due low community activity :(( Install mod: unpack folders to “Supreme Commander\Supreme Commander – Forged Alliance\gamedata\ *.scd\ “

Love the handshake image 😀

world war 3 has just begun

i dont understand how to install this mod

unpack rar-archive to
Supreme Commander\Supreme Commander – Forged Alliance\gamedata\ :

folder “etc” to “etc.scd”
“units” to “units.scd”
“particiles” to “particiles.scd”
“lua” to “lua.scd”
.
use Total Commander or WinRAR

and still i dont understand

Ok, I’m guessing here but from what I can gather you should have several .SCD files in gamedata.
The mod consists of folders which match the names of some of these .SCD files.
What you have to do is unpack the .SCD file, then add the data from the mod to the new folder before repacking it as a .SCD
Use winrar or 7zip for this.
You might be able to skip the unpacking stage and just add a new folder to the .SCD’s but not 100%

soo i have to move the folder of the exact name to scd file right

Well what I’m doing is extracting the .SCD files with the same name as the ones in the mod. That creates a folder with the same name, say, lua.
Then I’m moving the stuff from the lua mod folder in to this new folder and then repacking that folder.
The only problem I’ve got is that I can’t repack as .SCD so I’m going to try as a zip and then rename it.

uhgghh. mass headache. i still dont know how to install this mod.

I’m not sure either. This is a total guess based on what was said.
I’ve almost finished setting it up so I’ll give it a test and see if I’ve done it right.

Do i need to patch Supreme Commander?

need help how to install it.

Is there anyway you can make this into a mod folder format, for us simpletons that can’t work it out?

Too many bugs. But I like your idea very much. Thanks

Ok I got it working.
I’ll try a step by step guide as to how.
1. Download the mod and extract it using winrar or 7zip.
2. Go to supreme commander – forged alliance/gamedata
3. In here you will find many files of file type .scd e.g. lua.scd, units.scd
4. Using winrar/7zip unpack the ones that match the files in the download.
These should be env, lua, projectiles, textures and units.
5. You should now have 5 folders with those names.
6. Move the contents from the mod folders to the game folders e.g. put the stuff from the lua folder from this download in to lua folder in your gamedata folder.
7. Once this is done you will need to repackage the folders using winrar/7zip. You will end up with 5 zip files.
8. Rename the 5 zip files to .scd e.g. lua.zip becomes lua.scd
NOTE: you will want to move the original .scd files to a safe place to restore the normal game later.
9. Run the game and test it out. I am unsure if all factions have the units as I have only found them for the UEF. All units appear to be T1 so do not upgrade your factories if you want to use the new units. I know you can select lower tiers but its a hassle to do it every time.
Thats how I got it working. Pretty major hassle but fun to play with for a bit.

nope it doesn’t work

Well its working on mine so I don’t know what to suggest.
Maybe I just haven’t explained it well enough but I’m not sure how else to put it.

@Kerensky I don’t have any folders in my gamedata folder, just scd files and they are named after their respective mods, not lua etc. What are you talking about?

Is there a way to make this into a mod instead

Hmmm cn someone use this mod and redo the setup and make it mod enable instead cus it seems a bit hard to install but if possible cn it be hack to another mod?

also before i download it does this mod have naval units?

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Good mod. I like the AWACS. Also, not all the units are available are they? Or am i missing something.

Note!

Since most of the updates are integrated from the upstream repository, this repository is occasionally rebased.

Double commander

A twin panel (side by side) cross platform open source file manager.

This Double commander on github is fork of the official double commander project at github.
It is inspired by Total Commander and features some new ideas.

The goal of this fork is to relief this project from the constraints of archaic development methotodloies by facilitating github capabilities to achieve a better collaboration and attract developers to improve this software to be the best it can.

  • Unicode support.
  • Background file operations.
  • Multi-rename tool.
  • Tabbed interface.
  • Configurable file panel columns.
  • Internal file viewer and text editor.
  • Folder like bahviour of many archive file types.
  • Advanced search (in files).
  • Configurable button bar to start external programs or internal menu commands.
  • Total Commander plugins compatibility WCX, WDX and WLX plug-ins support.
  • File operations logging.
  • Fully configurable key mappings.

Building the project on windows.

  1. Download Lazarus version 1.8 or higher and install to c:\lazarus
  2. Clone this repository using “git clone https://github.com/double-commander/doublecmd.git” or fork the project and clone your repository.
  3. Run build.bat

Opening new issues

  • Prior opening a new issue please review the current issues to make sure an identical issue isn’t already exists.
  • Test your issue using one of the lastest builds to make sure it’s still relevant
  • Bugs should use this template

Since currently changes are slim, the ‘master’ branch in this repository is being rebased every week on top of the master branch in the upstream repository. Once a fair amount of developers will use this repository, a rebase will not occur, but a normal merge.

About

Double commander, A twin panel (side by side) cross platform open source file manager

I’m moving a file to a different folder and would like to add some kind of index to the newly moved file if a file with the same name exists already (the old one should remain untouched). For example, if file.pdf existed I would prefer something like file1.pdf or file_1.pdf for the next file with the same name.

Here I’ve found a variant for the opposite idea — but I don’t want to make a “backup”.

Does mv have some parameters out of the box for that scenario? I use Ubuntu Linux.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

– I don’t know what to think of it

is the first file moved that would have klobbered file.pdf if it had not been renamed.

4 Answers 4

As the answer to the question you linked already states, mv can suffix files that would otherwise get overwritten by the file you move with a number to give them a unique file name:

The command works by appending the next unused number suffix to the file that was first in the destination directory. The file you are moving will keep its original name.

However, this will appends suffixes like .

, which seems to be not what you want:

You can rename those files in a second step though to get the names in a format like file_1.pdf instead of file.pdf.

This takes all files that end with the unwanted backup suffix (by matching with the shell glob *.

) and lets the rename tool try to match the regular expression ((?:\..+)?)\.

$ on the file name. If this matches, it will capture the index from the .

-like suffix as second group ( $2 ) and optionally, if the file name has an extension before that suffix like .pdf , that will be captured by the first group ( $1 ). Then it replaces the complete matched file name part with _$2$1 , inserting the captured values instead of the placeholders though.

Basically it will rename e.g. file.pdf.

to file_1.pdf and something.

to something_42 , but it can not detect whether a file has multiple extensions, so e.g. archive.tar.gz.

would become archive.tar_5.gz

How to rename many files at once with total commander

While the simple substitution-based renaming of files in Linux is relatively facile, something to note on Linux distributions is that there are multiple rename command packages, as noted here:

Complicating this issue are more complex file renaming approached involving regex (regular expressions) commands.

The rename solution provided by @ByteCommander did not work for me; here are the specifics and a solution (I’m on Arch Linux).

Comments:

Using a sed regex command I capture three parts of the source filename, then rearrange them; see (e.g.) https://www.gnu.org/software/sed/manual/html_node/Regular-Expressions.html for explanations of the syntax, and/or web searches for regex capture groups and backreferences, e.g. https://www.regular-expressions.info/refcapture.html

I get warnings from the command above, which I ignore (redirect/hide) with 2>/dev/null

See also re: comments on the rename command(s), and the use of the find command to rename files.

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Description: Total Commander
Author: Andrew Rathbun and Jessica Venturo
Version: 1.3
Id: ae5bfc3d-cc1c-41ec-a11a-19233ae82877
RecreateDirectories: true
Targets:
Name: Total Commander – .ini File
Category: Apps
Path: C:\Users\%user%\AppData\Roaming\GHISLER\
FileMask: ‘wincmd.ini’
Comment: “Locates .ini file associated with Total Commander which stores useful user activity information.”
Name: Total Commander – Log File
Category: Apps
Path: C:\
Recursive: true
FileMask: ‘totalcmd.log’
Comment: “Locates log file associated with Total Commander. NOTE: this log file is NOT enabled by default and the filename can be modified.”
Name: Total Commander – Temp Files Created During Folder Traversal
Category: Apps
Path: C:\Users\%user%\AppData\Local\Temp\
FileMask: ‘FTP*.tmp’
Comment: “Locates .tmp files which are created during the user’s folder traversal and provide insight into contents of each folder traversed.”
Name: Total Commander – FTP .ini File
Category: Apps
Path: C:\Users\%user%\AppData\Roaming\GHISLER\
FileMask: ‘wcx_ftp.ini’
Comment: “Locates .ini file associated with Total Commander which stores useful FTP information.”
Name: Total Commander – File Tree
Category: Apps
Path: C:\Users\%user%\AppData\Local\GHISLER\
FileMask: ‘treeinfo*.wc’
Comment: “Locates a file that contains an exhaustive file tree of a user’s file system.”
Name: Total Commander – FTP Logs
Category: Apps
Path: C:\Users\%user%\AppData\Local\Temp\
FileMask: ‘tcftp.log’
Comment: “Locates a file that contains the Total Commander FTP logs.”
# Documentation
# Total Commander is a shareware Windows File Explorer replacement commonly used by threat actors during IR incidents.
# This Target grabs the .ini file which provides some useful information very similar to Windows Shellbags.
# It should be noted this .ini file is updated when Total Commander is exited.
# Within the wincmd.ini file, you will notice the following fields:
# InstallDir – directory where Total Commander is installed
# Path listed for both Left and Right panes – in my testing, this is what folders were currently displayed in each respective pane upon exiting Total Commander
# RightHistory and LeftHistory – each of these provide a breadcrumb trail of the user’s actions in each respective pain. For example, mine looked like this (0 is most recent):
# [RightHistory]
# 0=C:\Users\%user%\Music\ #0
# 1=C:\Users\%user%\ #08,Music
# 2=C:\Users\ #01,%user%
# 3=C:\ #04,Users
# 4=C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\
# 5=C:\Program Files (x86)\ #05,Google
# 6=C:\Program Files (x86)\BraveSoftware\ #2,CrashReports
# 7=C:\Program Files (x86)\ #02,BraveSoftware
# 8=C:\ #2,Program Files (x86)
# [LeftHistory]
# 0=C:\Users\%user%\Desktop\ #0
# 1=C:\Users\%user%\ #03,Desktop
# 2=C:\Users\ #01,%user%
# 3=C:\ #04,Users
# 4=C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft\
# 5=C:\Program Files (x86)\ #07,Microsoft
# 6=C:\ #2,Program Files (x86)
# 7=C:\Program Files (x86)\ #0
# 8=C:\Program Files (x86)\BraveSoftware\Brave-Browser\ #0
# 9=C:\Program Files (x86)\BraveSoftware\ #01,Brave-Browser
# 10=C:\Program Files (x86)\ #02,BraveSoftware
# The totalcmd.log is the default filename by Total Commander for the log file which can track creation of folders, delete actions, archive packing and unpacking, etc.
# Within a user’s NTUSER.DAT file, there will be a key with an address of: SOFTWARE\Ghisler\Total Commander. There will be a value for InstallDir which will list where TotalCommander is installed for that user.
# wcx_ftp.ini will contain saved FTP connections that the user configured with Total Commander
# .tmp files will only exist during an active Total Commander session. Once Total Commander is existed, they will be deleted. I’d suggest carving for them to see file/folder contents.
# A preview of their contents can be seen below:
#
# Contents of C:\Users\%user%\AppData\Local\Temp\FTP418E.tmp
# type=file;modify=20210327145254;size=65536; AppEvent.Evt
# type=file;modify=20201021200345;size=65536; Internet.evt
# type=file;modify=20201021160008;size=65536; SecEvent.Evt
# type=file;modify=20210327145254;size=65536; SysEvent.Evt
# type=file;modify=20201021200840;size=65536; ThinPrint.evt
#
# Please note that each folder I traversed made a new .tmp folder and had similar contents for each respective folder traversed
# Hex -> ASCII, 0x747970653D translates to file= which appears to be the first 5 characters of each of these .tmp files
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Useful if you have network log files, server log files, or backup logs you want to mine or analyze

There are several occasions where you may need to merge multiple text files into single text file. For example, you may receive a CD that contains hundreds of text files, all in different directories, which you need to combine into one file for importing into Excel, etc.

It’s also useful if you have network log files, server log files, or backup logs that you want to combine for purposes of data mining or data analysis. There are a couple of different ways you can go about joining text files together and the results are slightly different depending on the method you choose.

In this article, I’ll write about several ways to combine text files so that if one method doesn’t work out too well, you can try something else.

Method 1 – Command Prompt

If you are ok using the command prompt, then there are a couple of simple commands you can use to merge a whole bunch of text files quickly. The advantage of using the command prompt is that you don’t have to install any third-party programs. If you want a little primer on using the command prompt, check out my beginner’s guide to use the command prompt.

Also, since the command line can take multiple parameters, you can really create quite a complex command to filter and sort through which files you want to include in the joining process. I’ll explain the simplest command, but will also delve into a few examples to show you how to do the more complicated stuff.

Firstly, open Windows Explorer and go to the directory where you text files are located. If the files are stored in many subfolders, navigate to the parent directory. Now press and hold CTRL + SHIFT and then right-click on any empty spot in the Explorer window.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

This will open a command window that is already set to the directory you were in. Now all we have to do is type in the command. As you can see above, I have three text documents in the folder along with a couple of folders. If I only want to combine the text files in this one folder, I would issue this command:

for %f in (*.txt) do type “%f” >> c:\Test\output.txt

In coding parlance, this is a simple FOR loop that loops through all the files end with .TXT and outputs them to a file called output.txt.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

As you can see above, the loop just runs a separate command for each text file that it finds in the directory. Note that if you have a text file, but it has a different extension like .log or .dat, etc, then you can simply change the *.txt value in the command. It’s also worth noting that the output should be to a different location than the current directory, otherwise it will append the output file to itself since it also is a text file.

Now let’s say you have text files that are located not just in one folder, but in many subfolders. In this case, we can add a parameter to the command, which will tell it to recursively search for text files in any subfolders of the current directory.

for /R %f in (*.txt) do type “%f” >> c:\Test\output.txt

You’ll notice the /R parameter right after the for statement. Now when I run the command, you’ll see that it finds a couple of extra text files in the three directories that are in the same directory.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

As is usual with the command prompt, there is actually another command that allows you to do the same thing as the FOR statement above. The command is actually a lot simpler and if it works fine for you, then feel free to use it instead of the above method.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

This command works well, but doesn’t have as many options as the previous command. For example, it won’t let you recursively search through subfolders.

Method 2 – TXTCollector

TXTCollector is a free text file-merging tool with a decent feature set. It’s very easy to use and can be configured to work in a couple of different ways.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

First, type or copy and paste the folder path into the Folder box at the top or simply click on Browse Folders button and select the folder with the text files. You can then choose which type of files you want to combine.

By default, TXTCollector will search for all TXT files and combine them. However, you can pick from the list and combine or merge multiple CSV, BAT, HTM, LOG, REG, XML, and INI files into one also!

Check the Include subfolders box if you want TXTCollector to recursively look into each sub-folder of the main folder. TXTCollector will show you exactly how many files it found in the directory.

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Next you can choose a separator that will appear between each file that is being combined. This is a nice feature that you don’t get with the command line method. Either you can pick from the drop down menu or you can just type in whatever you want into the box.

By default, the program will put the directory name, file name, and the separator between each file. If you want to combine the files continuously without any break between each file, check off No Separator, No Filename, and No Carriage Returns.

You will then have the choice of adding a space character between the files or not. The cool thing about TXTCollector is that you can really customize it. If you click on the link at the bottom called Extensions and Separators, you can add your own extensions to TXTcollector.

Edit the extensions.txt file located in the TXTCollector application data directory. Note that TXTcollector only handles plain text files, no matter what extension is used. Therefore, it cannot combine multiple XLS files, for example, unless they are saved as plain text.

The only limitation to the program is that it can only combine 32,765 text files at once. If you have more than that, you can combine that many into one and then combine the large one with more smaller ones, up to 32,765!

Overall, a very simple, yet powerful freeware app for combining multiple text files. Hopefully, these two methods will work for most people. If you have run into a situation that is more complicated, feel free to post a comment and I’ll try to help.

Also, be sure to check out my other post on how to combine multiple PowerPoint presentations. Enjoy!

Founder of Online Tech Tips and managing editor. He began blogging in 2007 and quit his job in 2010 to blog full-time. He has over 15 years of industry experience in IT and holds several technical certifications. Read Aseem’s Full Bio

The title is confusing, but what I mean is if you can have for example installed both third age and warcraft mod and then you can launch them individually. So lets say one day you decide to play third age, the other day warcraft and perhaps the third day you decide to play some vanilla game. Or is this not possible and would cause a conflict between mods?

And also I’m interested in trying out some mods for this game, however until now I’ve only played vanilla. Are there any good guides that you reccomend on how to install and correctly setup mods in order to work?

The title is confusing, but what I mean is if you can have for example installed both third age and warcraft mod and then you can launch them individually. So lets say one day you decide to play third age, the other day warcraft and perhaps the third day you decide to play some vanilla game. Or is this not possible and would cause a conflict between mods?

And also I’m interested in trying out some mods for this game, however until now I’ve only played vanilla. Are there any good guides that you reccomend on how to install and correctly setup mods in order to work?

It actually already works that way with the kingdoms DLC, all you need to do is set a mod to launch under Teutonic and another under Americas (maximum of 4 mods running at the same time plus vanilla medieval 2)

All you need to do is trick the game into thinking that the mod is a Kingdoms DLC campaign.

First go here: C:\Program Files (x86)\Steam\steamapps\common\Medieval II Total War\mods
Keep in mind that C:\program files (x86) is only going to be for your main drive, if you have the game installed on a different hard drive/ssd then you will need to look for steam on it and follow the rest of the file path; steamapps, common, etc.

Then in a new file browser go to your downloads folder where you have those shiny new mods in their win,rar folders, drag them over to the Medieval 2 mods folder and unpack them, you should now see: Crusades, British isles, Teutonic and Americas along side the two mods, warcraft and third age.

Now right click on crusades and rename it “crusades 1” then right click on warcraft and rename it crusades, launch steam, launch the game, a pop up will appear with the vanilla and kingdoms DLC campaigns, click on crusades, play, the game should now be the warcraft mod instead of the crusades campaign. Repeat for other mods by simply adding a 1 to the end of the original campaigns and giving the original name to your mod(s).

Post by SonOfDiablo » 11 Feb 2019, 10:15

I’m attempting to write a script that will rename a list of given files.
My intend is to use it with Total Commander to rename selected files.

I have had this working before, but I sadly lost all my data and thus also the script I was using and I just can’t seem to figure out how to structure the script to rename specific file.

Any help on this issue would be greatly appreciated!

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Re: [Help] Rename Script

Post by rednoah » 11 Feb 2019, 10:35

Re: [Help] Rename Script

Post by SonOfDiablo » 11 Feb 2019, 22:59

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Re: [Help] Rename Script for Total Commander

Post by rednoah » 12 Feb 2019, 04:31

This is a question best asked at the Total Commander forum.

If you can figure out how to call any program on select files, then I can help you call filebot specifically on selected files.

Re: [Help] Rename Script for Total Commander

Post by SonOfDiablo » 12 Feb 2019, 08:33

rednoah wrote: ↑ 12 Feb 2019, 04:31 This is a question best asked at the Total Commander forum.

If you can figure out how to call any program on select files, then I can help you call filebot specifically on selected files.

Where ‘%P%N’ is the selected files.

This is what I get when trying:

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Re: [Help] Rename Script for Total Commander

Post by rednoah » 12 Feb 2019, 09:15

You’re command line is somehow wrong.

It’s best to learn how to use the command line tool first without Total Commander, and only integrate with TC once you already get the hang of it directly in CMD.

e.g. your first mistake is using ‘ which is ok in Unix bash but not Windows CMD.

Re: [Help] Rename Script for Total Commander

Post by SonOfDiablo » 12 Feb 2019, 09:49

rednoah wrote: ↑ 12 Feb 2019, 09:15 You’re command line is somehow wrong.

It’s best to learn how to use the command line tool first without Total Commander, and only integrate with TC once you already get the hang of it directly in CMD.

e.g. your first mistake is using ‘ which is ok in Unix bash but not Windows CMD.

So I tried it in PS and I got the following:

Not really a useful message I have to say

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Re: [Help] Rename Script for Total Commander

Post by rednoah » 12 Feb 2019, 10:02

Haha, it’s a funny one isn’t it?

It’s a JRE error message, not specific to FileBot. It’ll just say if the path is invalid, and then echo the path that’s invalid.

In this case, ‘ is index 0, d is index 1 and : is index 2. So you get the error because index 1 is not : which means the path is not a valid Windows file path, and then it’ll just repeat the invalid path, except ‘ is part of your invalid path, even though it might look like it’s part of the error message on first glance.

Re: [Help] Rename Script for Total Commander

Post by SonOfDiablo » 12 Feb 2019, 10:57

rednoah wrote: ↑ 12 Feb 2019, 10:02 Haha, it’s a funny one isn’t it?

It’s a JRE error message, not specific to FileBot. It’ll just say if the path is invalid, and then echo the path that’s invalid.

In this case, ‘ is index 0, d is index 1 and : is index 2. So you get the error because index 1 is not : which means the path is not a valid Windows file path, and then it’ll just repeat the invalid path, except ‘ is part of your invalid path, even though it might look like it’s part of the error message on first glance.

I think you are looking at the wrong image

The message I got was “Done ?(. )?” which I do not really understand what means

How to rename many files at once with total commander

Re: [Help] Rename Script for Total Commander

Post by rednoah » 12 Feb 2019, 11:11

Just means that Windows CMD can’t display unicode characters, and that the script completed without errors.

Why does it not do anything? Because the renall script explicitly deal with folder structures:
viewtopic.php?t=5#p2211

Since you have a very simple use case, that is covered by the the built-in commands just fine, I’m not quite sure why you’re using the renall script. The renall script might be useful for large jobs, dealing with large file and folder structures in manageable chunks, and not processing a single file, which apparently doesn’t do anything anyway.

You’ll want to use the filebot -rename commands as documented in the manual:
https://www.filebot.net/cli.html

Re: [Help] Rename Script for Total Commander

Post by SonOfDiablo » 12 Feb 2019, 11:45

rednoah wrote: ↑ 12 Feb 2019, 11:11 Just means that Windows CMD can’t display unicode characters, and that the script completed without errors.

Why does it not do anything? Because the renall script explicitly deal with folder structures:
viewtopic.php?t=5#p2211

Since you have a very simple use case, that is covered by the the built-in commands just fine, I’m not quite sure why you’re using the renall script. The renall script might be useful for large jobs, dealing with large file and folder structures in manageable chunks, and not processing a single file, which apparently doesn’t do anything anyway.

You’ll want to use the filebot -rename commands as documented in the manual:
https://www.filebot.net/cli.html

huh, that worked.. I could have swore I had tried that already. Thanks man!
I really appreciate all of your help and time!

If anyone else reads this thread here is my solution:

Re: [Help] Rename Script for Total Commander

Post by SonOfDiablo » 12 Feb 2019, 12:04

rednoah wrote: ↑ 12 Feb 2019, 11:11 Just means that Windows CMD can’t display unicode characters, and that the script completed without errors.

Why does it not do anything? Because the renall script explicitly deal with folder structures:
viewtopic.php?t=5#p2211

Since you have a very simple use case, that is covered by the the built-in commands just fine, I’m not quite sure why you’re using the renall script. The renall script might be useful for large jobs, dealing with large file and folder structures in manageable chunks, and not processing a single file, which apparently doesn’t do anything anyway.