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How to reuse broken stemware as garden candle holders

Clean a Candle Jar

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Make a Tree Branch Tealight Candle Holder

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Make a Lace Candleholder

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Make Glitter Candlesticks

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Make a Can Planter or Candle Holder

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Make a Bejeweled Tea Light Candle Holder

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Centuries have gone by yet flower holders have still been utilized as revitalizing attractive items. Nowadays, ornamental vases are made use of to hold blossoms in them. Apart from this, they likewise work as standalone pieces of design. The excellent feature of them is that they always captivate both property owners as well as visitors. If you have actually been wanting to utilize flower holders as attractive focal points for your office or home. We suggest that you see our 19 Lovable Tall Glass Candle Vases listed below right here! Each one of these residence design Do It Yourself flower vase concepts has a memorable originality to it. The most effective component of all of it is that they are really not difficult to develop.

tah dah all clean and clear and ready to use around your house in some other fun project or maybe you just want to add another votive candle to it and use via ourcloverhouse.blogspot.com

Vases have actually long been utilized as attractive pieces inside the house. Whether made use of as flower owners or stand alone home accessories, they never fail to entertain visitors and also house owners alike. One more typical use for flower holders is as a table focal point. Provided the ideal resources, it is possible for you ahead up with an excellent vase centerpiece that will complete your residence’s inside. Sometimes it is attractive to group vases together in ornamental setups. You can have a row of vases done in the same color and also size, or alternating, producing trailing lines going from highest to fastest. You can also obtain innovative with shade, contrasting different tones one off of another. With some flower holders made from natural products, the flower holder itself might have distinct patterns or colors in the surface area. This is especially true of wood, or different marble vases. See additionally other 19 Lovable Tall Glass Candle Vases on our site!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

1. Fill your dyed Easter eggs with beeswax and create tea lights out of them. More instructions here. Source: recycledawblog.blogspot.com

2. Make plant markers out of broken pots. Source: hardlyhousewives.com

3. Or if you’ve got the artistic skill, make a little micro-garden out of those shards. Source: naturework.com

5. A broken umbrella can become one of those awesome kid parachute things. Get the directions here. Source: howdoesshe.com

6. You can also make a waterproof, BAGGU-style bag when you take the metal pieces out. Get the directions here. Source: untrendylife.com

7. Melt down old crayons to make new ones, using old prescription bottles or film canisters. Source: momtastic.com

8. Or use empty glue stick containers to make a cool twist-up crayon. Source: infarrantlycreative.net

9. If you see no use for melting crayons to make new crayons, try this crayon wax candle instead. Get the directions here. Source: notimeforflashcards.com

10. Here’s the adorable bottle cap version. Source: austinweddingblog.com

11. Salvage ripped flip-flops by making a more comfortable version. Use an old t-shirt for the straps. Get the directions here. Source: makeit-loveit.com

12. Turn a pair of worn-out, falling-apart Toms into summer sandals with some creative cutting

13. Soak your old Crayola markers in water to create liquid watercolors. Soak them for 12-24 hours. Source: oilsandglitter.tumblr.com

14. Use any broken stemware as candle holders in plants. Source: google.com

15. Use broken plates as garden edging. Source: pinterest.com Source: wondermom.info

16. Or use bits and pieces to help with drainage for garden planters. Source: green-talk.com

17. Save the clips from broken pants hangers. Source: google.com

18. A broken 3-ring binder makes a cute art kit. Source: cosmocricket.typepad.com

19. Turn broken jewelry into magnets. Get the instructions here. Source: sweetpaul.typepad.com

20. They also make lovely charms for a mobile. Source: blog.alltheluckintheworld.nl

21. Glue ’em on bobby pins using industrial-strength E-6000 glue. Source: zsazsabellagio.blogspot.com

22. Or get meta and make an amazing mega piece of jewelry. Get the directions here.

23. Someone made a crazy chandelier out of broken necklaces. Source: pinterest.com

24. Create holographic Christmas ornaments with broken CDs. Source: cremedelacraft.com

25. Turn those broken ornaments into glitter. Source: patinawhite.typepad.com

26. Never throw out a broken globe: Source: brightnest.com

27. Because they make great centerpiece fruit or potpourri holders. Source: pinterest.com

28. A chipped teacup makes a really cute bird feeder. Source: fairyscape

Hundreds of years have passed yet vases have still been made use of as refreshing attractive pieces. Nowadays, attractive vases are made use of to hold blossoms in them. In addition to this, they likewise act as standalone pieces of decor. The great aspect of them is that they constantly entertain both house owners and also visitors. If you have been seeking to make use of vases as decorative focal points for your workplace or home. We suggest that you see our 28 Elegant Tea Light Candle Vases listed below here! Each one of these house style DIY blossom vase suggestions has an appealing originality to it. The very best component of all of it is that they are actually not tough to create.

submersible lights for vases photos vases under vase led lights simple with a submersible lighti 0d via miagido.org

Flower holders have long been used as attractive items inside the house. Whether utilized as flower owners or stand alone home accessories, they never ever fail to captivate guests and also house owners alike. An additional usual usage for flower holders is as a table focal point. Provided the best sources, it is possible for you to find up with a best flower holder centerpiece that will certainly finish your residence’s interior. Occasionally it is appealing to team flower holders with each other in ornamental setups. You can have a row of vases done in the exact same color and also size, or alternative, developing trailing lines going from highest to shortest. You can also obtain creative with color, contrasting numerous tones one off of another. With some vases made from natural products, the vase itself may have one-of-a-kind patterns or colors in the surface area. This is specifically real of wood, or different marble flower holders. See additionally other 28 Elegant Tea Light Candle Vases on our internet site!

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How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

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How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

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How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

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How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

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How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Check out this easy step-by-step guide showing you how to clean out used candle jars and 3 fun ways to repurpose them.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Have you ever wondered how to clean out candle jars so you can repurpose them? I am a huge fan of using old candle vessels for everything from pencil holders to storing my makeup brushes!

Check out my easy and foolproof way to clean out those old candle jars and use them for fun and pretty ways in your home!

Easy Method To Clean Out Your Old Candle Jars

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

I love a good smelling candle and I’m a total sucker for a pretty packaged one too.

And I’m sure if you have bought one of those candles you have looked at the pretty jar and wondered how you can use it in your home after the candle is all burned out.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

So, I am going to show you how I clean out my used candle jars, the easy way. This is foolproof, requires minimal time and equipment and it works every time.

Step 1: Freeze the candle jar

Once your candle is burned down to the bottom, place it in the freezer. Make sure the candle is not hot or even warm. Do not place in the freezer until at least 24 hours after you last lit it.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

You don’t need to clean it or anything before you put it in the freezer. Freeze overnight or up to a few days.

Step 2: Clean Wax From Candle Jar

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Next, you will want to remove the candle from the freezer. Taking a butter knife, gently slide the knife in between the hardened wax and the edge of the jar.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Go around the edge of the wax and gently separate the wax from the jar. After a few times, the wax will easily pop out.

Step 3: Wash Out The Jar

Place the wax in the garbage and then using hot, soapy water and a sponge, clean the inside of the candle jar. You can also put it in the dishwasher, but hand washing is quick and easy.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Dry it off and you’re ready to repurpose and reuse your pretty candle jar!

3 Ways To Repurpose Your Old Candle Jars

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Ok, here are my 3 favorite ways to repurpose your clean candle jars and use them in your home. There are so many beautiful ideas out there, but these 3 are my go-to ways to reuse candle vessels.

Repurpose Your Candle Jar as a Vase

This one is a no-brainer, but the end result never disappoints. Candle jars just happen to the perfect size and shape to hold garden roses beautifully.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

I love to pop a reused candle jar filled with fresh roses in my bathroom, kitchen and next to my bed.

Reuse Your Old Candles To Hold Makeup Brushes

Another easy and pretty way to dress up your bathroom vanity is to use those cleaned out candle jars to hold your makeup brushes.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Instant glam vibes for your bathroom!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Most old candle vessels are the perfect size to hold your go-to makeup brushes. The clean candle jar corrals your brushes and makes your vanity look like a page out of a glossy magazine at the same time!

Create An Indoor Herb Using Old Candle Jars

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

A few years ago I took all my clean candle jars and created an indoor herb garden in my kitchen.

It was one of my favorite projects ever and was so fun to do. You can read the full post HERE.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Be sure to check out all the other beautiful and imaginative ideas that my friends are sharing today. I love breathing new life into old items and all these repurposed projects are so creative!

14 Repurpose Project Ideas

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

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How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Hi I’m Ashley, wife and mom of 2 young kids. Here, I hope to inspire you by sharing my favorite home decor ideas, easy DIY projects and simple but delicious recipes (sometimes they are pretty healthy too)!

Let’s connect! Pinterest, Instagram, Facebook and subscribe to my emails for new posts sent straight to your inbox!

Our easy melt-and-pour method saves the last bit of this home essential.

If you want to use scent to create a soothing atmosphere in your home, lighting a candle achieves this effortlessly—that is, until your candle burns down to the very last traces of wax. No one wants to toss candles when there’s still some wax left, but it’s nearly impossible to burn the wick when the scent wax won’t be able to melt evenly. So, can the wax from nearly depleted candles be salvaged? The simple answer is yes. The best thing to do is melt down the remaining wax and pour it into a smaller votive—et voilà, you have yourself a new candle. Make sure you combine all the same type of wax (beeswax, paraffin, or soy).

Before tackling this do-it-yourself idea, keep in mind what type of wax you are melting from the candle. According to Kathy LaVanier, President of the National Candle Association (NCA), candles come in paraffin wax, synthetic wax, soy wax, coconut wax, palm wax, beeswax, stearic acid, and gelled mineral oil varieties. The candle expert also notes that liquid paraffin can be helpful to prep for candle wax removal. “Simply put a little on a paper towel and use it to wipe away [excess] wax,” she says. “Also, never use a knife or a sharp object to remove wax drippings from a glass votive holder. It might scratch or weaken the glass, causing it to break upon subsequent use.”

First, melt candles in a small pan set over a large pan of simmering water. (The melting point of different waxes ranges from 100 to 145 degrees.) Once the wax is melted, remove old wicks with tongs and toss them out. Cut a piece of wicking (available at crafts stores) two inches taller than the votive holder. Knot one end and thread through a wick tab (also available at crafts stores); tie the free end around a wooden skewer. Dip wicking and tab into the melted wax to coat them. Remove, then press the tab to the bottom of the holder. Rest the skewer on the votive’s rim. Pour melted wax into the votive holder, stopping a half inch below rim. Let stand until it sets, about one hour. To even the well at the center, pour more wax into the center until it’s one-fourth inch below rim.

If you prefer another tactic to salvage wax instead of the melt-and-pour method, you can also try these best practices: “Wax drippings can be removed from most candleholders by running hot water over them,” LaVanier says. “Some home care experts prefer removing wax by first placing the candleholder in the freezer for an hour or so. This allows the wax to shrink and easily pop out when the candleholder is removed from the freezer.” If you simply want to find new ways to use the remaining wax from candles, you can recycle into different homemade projects. “If that leftover candle end happens to be beeswax, there are all kinds of uses for it. Rub it on a toboggan, a sticky drawer, or wooden window sash to ensure it slides smoothly. Use it to preserve bronze and copper objects, or wax string before sliding beads on it when making a necklace or bracelet,” LaVanier shares.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Pamela Martin

Wine glass candles are a great choice when you need a simple, elegant centerpiece or gift, and they are easy to make at home, giving them that extra touch that comes from something handmade. If you don’t want to pour candles into the glasses themselves, you can use pillar candles or tea lights to embellish your stemware as well.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Gather Supplies for Poured Candles

For candles poured into the wine glasses, you will need goblets or flutes, a liquid measuring cup, rubbing alcohol, a lint-free cloth, candle-making wax, cotton wicking, wick tabs, a pencil or dowel, a double boiler and a wooden spoon or stick for stirring the wax. Be sure that your glassware is heat resistant to 190 degrees or more.

Prepare Your Materials

To determine how much wax you’ll need, fill the glass with water to the level you want for the candle, then pour the water into a measuring cup. Dry the glass and wipe it with rubbing alcohol and a soft cloth to remove any oils on the surface.

Melt the wax in the double boiler over low heat, stirring it often and watching it carefully. While you wait for it to melt, fix a wick tab on one end of your cotton wicking that you’ve cut 1 inch longer than the full depth of the bowl of the glass. Wrap the other end of the wick around a pencil. When the wax is melted, stir in any color or fragrance you desire.

Assemble Your Candles

Pour a small amount of wax into the bowl of the glass to cover about 1/4 inch of the bottom. Allow it to set, then place the wick tab on top. Pull the wick taut, adjusting the wrapping around the pencil as needed. Tilt the glass slightly as you slowly pour in the wax. This helps prevent unsightly bubbles from forming in your candle. As you get to the top of the candle, hold the glass upright. Allow the wax to cool and set up, then use your hair dryer to smooth the top surface. Clip the wick to 1/4 inch above the wax surface.

Use Wine Glasses Without Adding Wax

One way to use your wine glasses for candles that can easily change with the season or the event is to fill the bowl of the glass with ornaments, beads, buttons or other decorations. Turn the glass upside down on the table, keeping the items inside the bowl by covering it with a thin piece of cardboard that you can slip out when the glass is on the table surface. Place a pillar candle on the upturned foot of the stem.

Another option is to fill the glass bowl about halfway with sand or pebbles and then add decorations such as shells or flowers around a tea light. You can also glue curled wire to the bottom of the tea light cup to hang them from the rim of the glass.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Dear Recyclebank: I was wondering if the glass jars that candles come in, such as those that Yankee Candle® uses, are recyclable with regular glass? –Leslie H.

Dear Leslie: If you’re like me, you’ll agree that gatherings on summer nights almost feel incomplete without a candle or two burning. This is especially true if you use citronella candles to fend off mosquitoes. Candles in jars are an easy way to light your cookout, or 4 th of July party, with minimal mess, but once they’ve burned down, you’ve got extra waste on your hands.

Your main concern when recycling glass candle jars is the type of glass used. Candle jars are safe for curbside recycling if they’re made from standard container (soda-lime) glass. However, other types of glass, such as borosilicate, may be used for these jars to help withstand the heat of the burning candle, in which case there could be a problem. This is because mixing different kinds of glass in a recycling batch is a recipe for disaster. Unfortunately, the different melting points of the different glass types can lead to low-quality recycled glass and even broken machinery. Depending on which brand you prefer, you may be able to ask their customer service department directly if they use “container” or “soda-lime” glass, which will indicate that their glass is safe for the bin. If a different kind of glass is used, you can ask the company if they accept their jars back for recycling or reuse.

Yankee Candle® already has an established system, as a matter of fact. They offer a drop-off recycling program in tandem with TerraCycle; all you have to do is bring your jars back to one of their participating stores. You’ll even receive a five-dollar coupon for every five jars you bring in! Only twenty-five locations offer the program at this time, so if you’re not near one of them, you may need to explore other options.

Of course, you can always make use of your candle jars at home. Before you reuse them, be sure to clean them out thoroughly. You can do this by baking the jars at a low temperature or melting the remaining wax out with boiling water. (Save the wax for these handy uses.) Once jars are clean and sanitized, they can be used for bulk ingredient storage in your kitchen (if they have lids), to organize small items on your desk or in your bathroom, or even to hold new candles so you don’t have to buy them in a jar every time. You can find a compilation of great ideas for jar crafts here. If you’re careful, these jars can last for years and possibly save even more resources than if you had recycled them.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Would you like your house to look unique? Then it’s time to make some personalized decorations. Learn how to make decorative elements yourself. In this OneHowTo article we will show you 6 options to make easy DIY candle holders with things that you are sure to have at home: cans, yogurt pots, coffee mugs and so on. Go ahead and let your home shine bright with some 100% unique and original candle holders which will adorn your home.

With glasses

A very simple way to make DIY candle holders is to take some of your regular drinking glasses and then give them a twist with a lick of paint. You can choose the size of glass that suits you best, depending on the size of the candle you want to pop inside. Once that’s sorted, you only have to choose the color you’d like and then combine the holder with your home décor.

To paint your glass, we recommended that you use a brush to apply the paint to the inside of the container. By doing so, you avoid leaving behind overlapping layers of paint or paint drops that would ruin the end result. Before placing the candle inside the glass, you have to leave the paint to dry.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

With coffee cups

A great idea to illuminate your kitchen with candle-light is to make easy candle holders out of coffee cups. To give your kitchen a unique and perfect focus point, you can fill the inside of a cup with coffee beans and then place a candle in the center, as shown in the attached image.

However, this is just an idea that you can customize and adapt to suit your own individual tastes and style. For example, instead of coffee, if you want to put colored pasta, then go ahead! Dried flowers would also be a lovely feature on the inside of a cup. Candles can be white or colored, perhaps to match the color of your cups. The trick is to choose items that match your home décor. Once you’ve mastered that, then the look will be unique.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Tin cans

Cans are one of the most common items used to make recycled décor as they add a touch of personality and re-using them is 100% environmentally friendly. Giving new life to these objects is the basic idea behind this style and, in this case, we will reuse tins and cans (canned tomato purée, peas from a tin, canned fruit in syrup, etc.) to make candle containers that will adorn your home.

To do this, you first have to wash the tin or can to remove any remaining food or dirt. Once clean, you can paint the can or tin’s exterior with the colours that you like. You can add your own personal touch: an inspiring sentence, a little picture, mix the colours or stick to a simple layer of paint. Let it dry and then put the candle inside. At OneHowTo we show you how to make hanging lanterns for your candles.

To help the light shine more, it’s a good idea to make small holes on the outside of the can (as shown in the picture). You can use screws and a hammer to do so. With this trick, you can make sure that the candle’s light better illuminates the room.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

With clothespins

Now we have the perfect fit for outdoor environments (terraces, gardens, balconies, etc.) but it’s also a nice touch in a house that is decorated in a rustic style. We’re going to make a candle holder with the help of a can of tuna and different clothes pegs.

To make this original decorative piece, you start with the empty tuna can. Wash it thoroughly to remove food debris and then put the candle inside. Place the clothes pegs around the edge so that they all stand together to form a sort of fence. You can use wooden clothes pegs (as seen in the image) or, if you prefer, you could use one specific color or mix it up with some multicolored pegs!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

With yoghurt glasses

A very Vintage option, perfect for decorating your home. Here we reuse glass yogurt tumblers from the supermarket to make a candle holder. As with the other pieces, you first have to rinse and clean the container before adding the candle. To make this candle container you have several options available to you:

  • Leave the tumbler as a simple, decorative item and tie it with a little piece of twine, as shown in the picture.
  • Add a sticker with some kind of decorative motif to help make the tumbler look more exciting.
  • Paint the inside of the tumbler (to avoid drops of paint getting on the table or the floor) or add some phrases, drawings, and so on.

Choose the option that best suits your home.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

With twigs or sticks

You can also give your home a a natural and rustic touch with a wood-inspired candle holder. This is a very simple method. All you need is a glass container (bought or recycled) and some wooden twigs or sticks.

Carefully arrange the twigs and sticks in the container. You can use glue to make sure they stay in place. You can arrange the twigs as you wish: unevenly (as seen in the picture) or, if you prefer, you can stick them all together, so that the light comes out only from the top.

If you do not have any twigs or logs, you can also create this effect with natural cinnamon sticks. They will also perfume your home! OneHowTo has plenty of ideas to help you decorate your home with glass bottles.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

If you want to read similar articles to 6 Ways to Make Easy DIY Candle Holders, we recommend you visit our Interior Design and Decor category.

OK my farmhouse loving friends! I’m back with another super easy super quick and incredibly super awesome tutorial! I want to share with you my DIY candle holders!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

So the other day, I went to the thrift store to look for some new decor for my shelves. That day I also shared with you some tips win of what to look for when you are shopping for shelving decor at thrift stores. You can find my Facebook video about that here.

I also took you shopping with me on Snapchat that day which was so much fun thank you all so much for for hanging out with me while I shopped for junk!

Find me on snapchat with the username theweatheredfox!

If you saw my Facebook live video about my thrift store hall then you’ll already know that I I found these really awesome candlesticks that I wanted to refinish to make them fit into my farmhouse style. If you want to see that video of all of the thrift store goodness that I brought home click here.

But seriously though, why was this $3!? Look how cute!!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

The awesome thing about candlesticks like this is that there are so many in the thrift stores they practically give them away.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersUnfortunately not everybody can see the potential of an older looking item but all it took was a little paint and a little wax to completely transform these candlesticks with a super easy tutorial for DIY candle holders!

This DIY candle holders transformation is so easy! It is literally three steps.

Here’s what you need to transform these thrifted candlesticks into farmhouse DIY Candle Holders!

(This post contains affiliate links. This means I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post.)

2) Dark wax of your choice or you can use stain or watered-down brown paint

Check out my Facebook a live video here for a live demonstration on this DIY candle holders tutorial!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

1) Clean your candlesticks thoroughly. I just used soap and water. The spray paint will stick just fine!

2) Spray one coat of spray paint. I used this one here. I didn’t bother with more than one coat! Since the majority of the coat will be covered with dark wax. Just make sure to cover all of the old finish!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

3) Add your finish. When spray paint is dry to the touch, use a brush or paper towel to rub on your brown wax or paint or stain. This will give your candlestick the look of weathered wood. Feel free to add more or less depending on your preference.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Let it dry and add your candles!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersHow to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

And that’s it! For less then three dollars apiece I was able to create a farmhouse style candlestick set.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersHow to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

This is just another way you can get high style decor on a low budget!

It’s almost inevitable – a full set of wine glasses never seems to last. There is always one or two that get knocked off a table or broken while being washed. Instead of throwing the broken wine glass away, try using it for a home or garden decor project.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersStarts at 60 Source: Starts at 60

These 8 creative and fun crafts transform a broken wine glass (or pieces from it) into a work of art.

Now, when a wine glass breaks, you no longer have to look at it as a negative thing – instead, it’s an opportunity to get crafty! Get ready to be surprised at how many awesome things you can make out of what you might have thought was trash.

1. DIY cupcake stand

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersLook What I Made Source: Look What I Made

If the stem or foot of your wine glass is still intact after taking a tumble, transform it into an adorable homemade cupcake stand. With just six pieces of material, Look What I Made has created a really fun, and super easy tutorial on how to make it.

2. Teacup wine glasses

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersApartment Therapy Source: Apartment Therapy

Here’s another fun project if your stem is still in good condition. How incredible and unique are these funky teacup wine glasses? They’re great for entertaining, can be used for wine, tea, or cocktails, and are so darn cute. Head to Apartment Therapy for the full tutorial.

3. Broken glass votive candle holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersInstructables Source: Instructables

If your wine glass has completely shattered, you might think it’s completely worthless to do anything but to sweep it up and toss it in the garbage can. You’ll just need to get some empty glass containers and battery-operated votives. Instructables has the step-by-step instructions.

4. Handmade snow globe ornament

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersPitter and Glink Source: Pitter and Glink

No matter the time of year, Christmas crafting is cool, right? These precious snow globe ornaments are made with plastic wine glasses on the Pitter and Glink tutorial, but a real wine glass makes it a bit more classy.

5. Wine glass bell jar

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersBy Wilma Source: By Wilma

Have you ever dropped a wine glass and the stem just broke right off? So frustrating! But check out this charming bell jar you could make with it instead. By Wilma has the full tutorial and she has some great tips too – like how you can find really cute saucers for your bell jar at the thrift store.

6. Garden candle holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersWikiHow Source: WikiHow

Save the top of your broken wine glass and turn your backyard into a welcoming retreat with these outdoor candle holders. If a bit of the stem is still attached, that will work perfectly to serve as a ‘stake’ in the ground. Just fill the glass with some sand or pebbles and use a real or battery-operated votive.

7. DIY wine glass lamp shade

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersLana Red Studio Source: Lana Red Studio

Lana Red Studio has an incredible DIY project that turns a wine glass stem into a beautiful votive candle lampshade. You could even use battery-operated candles or a small LED light. Check out the full tutorial to find out how.

8. Wine glass coconut planters

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Candle holders are great when it comes to decorating, because they set the mood. Candles are inexpensive and suitable addition to the home decor for every season and occasion. However, you can customize them with these creative decorating ideas for glass candle holders.

1. Decorating glass candle holders with colored sand

You can use sand colors that match the decor of the room or you can choose contrasting colors. Follow the steps as shown above and learn how to make decorative sand layers. Find out how to make colored sand at home, as well. DIY colored sand

2. Decorating glass votives with tape and spray paint

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Add a new decorative element to your home – for your bedside table, to decorate the living room or to set the mood for a romantic dinner. The procedure is so simple and the votives so cute that you’ll want to make more of them. Have a look at the tutorial.

You can try different patterns as well.How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

3. Colorful lanterns in paper

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Make glass votive candles colorful by wrapping them in sandwich paper and tying round a raffia ribbon.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

4. Glass candle lanterns with lavender

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

These lanterns are not only very atmospheric, yet they also smell amazing!

5. Decorating glass lanterns with pasta

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

The perfect decoration for an Italian themed evening. You can also use pasta in other forms such as cars or the good old alphabet pasta! If you have a bigger candle holder, you can just fill it up and place the candle inside.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersHow to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

6. Decorating glass candle holders with lace ribbons

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

And this is how a glass bottle and a candle colder got a romantic look!

7. Glass lantern with sea shells

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

In search for sea shells? Here they are, as a decoration for marine glass lanterns!

8. Glass votives filled with sugar sprinkles

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

9. Garden pathway lights

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

10. Making colorful dots with wax

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

11. Fall decorating idea – Filling candle holders and vases with legumes

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

12. Decorating with washi tape

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

13. Decorating with doilies

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Plus two beautiful table centerpieces with flowers and floating candles

OK my farmhouse loving friends! I’m back with another super easy super quick and incredibly super awesome tutorial! I want to share with you my DIY candle holders!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

So the other day, I went to the thrift store to look for some new decor for my shelves. That day I also shared with you some tips win of what to look for when you are shopping for shelving decor at thrift stores. You can find my Facebook video about that here.

I also took you shopping with me on Snapchat that day which was so much fun thank you all so much for for hanging out with me while I shopped for junk!

Find me on snapchat with the username theweatheredfox!

If you saw my Facebook live video about my thrift store hall then you’ll already know that I I found these really awesome candlesticks that I wanted to refinish to make them fit into my farmhouse style. If you want to see that video of all of the thrift store goodness that I brought home click here.

But seriously though, why was this $3!? Look how cute!!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

The awesome thing about candlesticks like this is that there are so many in the thrift stores they practically give them away.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersUnfortunately not everybody can see the potential of an older looking item but all it took was a little paint and a little wax to completely transform these candlesticks with a super easy tutorial for DIY candle holders!

This DIY candle holders transformation is so easy! It is literally three steps.

Here’s what you need to transform these thrifted candlesticks into farmhouse DIY Candle Holders!

(This post contains affiliate links. This means I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post.)

2) Dark wax of your choice or you can use stain or watered-down brown paint

Check out my Facebook a live video here for a live demonstration on this DIY candle holders tutorial!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

1) Clean your candlesticks thoroughly. I just used soap and water. The spray paint will stick just fine!

2) Spray one coat of spray paint. I used this one here. I didn’t bother with more than one coat! Since the majority of the coat will be covered with dark wax. Just make sure to cover all of the old finish!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

3) Add your finish. When spray paint is dry to the touch, use a brush or paper towel to rub on your brown wax or paint or stain. This will give your candlestick the look of weathered wood. Feel free to add more or less depending on your preference.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Let it dry and add your candles!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersHow to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

And that’s it! For less then three dollars apiece I was able to create a farmhouse style candlestick set.

This is just another way you can get high style decor on a low budget!

Basic Candle Making Safety

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Container candles are a great way to start making your candles because they’re very easy. While many people start with a plain jelly jar, the variety of containers that you can use is endless.

When choosing a container, there are just three safety rules that you need to follow:

  • It won’t catch fire
  • It won’t leak
  • It won’t crack or break

It sounds pretty simple, right? You would be amazed at how many unsafe homemade container candles are made. These can easily lead to a catastrophe and possibly burn down your entire house. Since this is such an important safety issue, let’s talk about each of these three rules in more detail.

Won’t Catch Fire

This seems like a pretty obvious rule to follow, but it’s broken all the time. Making a candle out of a birch bark bowl, a coconut shell, a plastic margarita glass, or anything you can’t hold an open flame to is a definite no-no.

Another widely reported example of this is using flower pots or other porous ceramic containers for candles. A porous material like terra cotta can soak up the wax. It’s possible that this can, in effect, become a giant wick that causes an enormous flame to rise along the rim of the flower pot.

Is that physically possible? Yes. Is it likely? No. The wax absorbed into the pot would have to get incredibly hot to burst into flames. Nonetheless, it is highly recommended that you coat any porous ceramic containers with two heavy coats of decoupage medium such as Mod-Podge before you make the candle.

And again, don’t ever make a candle in a container that can burn. It does not matter how pretty it looks or how sure you are that the flame won’t even get close to the edge of the container.

Won’t Leak

A leaking container is a problem in two ways. First and foremost, you don’t want hot melted wax spilling out onto your counter, coffee table, mantle, shelf, or nightstand. It’s a big mess. Secondly, depending on how quickly or how suddenly the wax leaks out, a leak could cause a fire hazard.

If the melted wax leaks out of the candle as quickly as it is melted, your wick is going to burn higher and larger than it should. You could have a very big flame in just a few minutes. Turning your back for even a small amount of time means this can easily get out of control.

The most common leaky containers are metal tins that have a seam along the side or bottom. The best way to test a tin to see if it will hold hot melted wax is to fill it with water and let it sit a day or two.

Won’t Crack

This is perhaps the most common container candle problem. It’s also the one that can cause the biggest problems.

Similar to a leaking container, a cracked container is going to spill hot wax all over. Also, the wax-soaked wick is going to be suddenly left with no pool surrounding it, and the flame can just as suddenly grow to be several inches high. The flame can quickly grow high enough to catch nearby drapes, a cabinet, or a plant on fire.

There are countless stories and urban legends about exploding gel candles as well. The majority of these are a result of the gel getting too hot and cracking the fishbowl, martini glass, or other unsafe glassware it was made in.

What to Look for in a Container

In addition to being resistant to fire, leaks, and cracks, look for heat-resistant containers. Even if your candle burns properly, the wax pool and flame get hot as it burns, so your container needs to take that heat.

This is why jelly jars have been so popular over the years. They are designed to withstand high heat and they hold wax very reliably. Other types of glassware are perfectly fine too, as long as it’s thick enough to withstand the heat.

Ceramic bowls, properly treated flower pots and well-sealed metal tins can be wonderful containers as well. They’re often more heat-resistant than clear glass.

Be sure to take into account the shape of the container. If it has a wide mouth and is narrow at the bottom, it’s going to get hotter and hotter as it burns and may be prone to cracking.

Don’t Leave Candles Unattended

The important thing to remember is that any container—even one designed to be heat-resistant—can crack. The most important safety consideration for any candle is proper supervision. Be sure that the candle is on a heat-resistant surface, away from anything flammable, and never leave a burning candle unattended.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

So you’ve justified buying a pricey candle by telling yourself you’ll reuse the jar when the candle is gone, only to find that you’re left with a waxy mess. We hear you. But it is possible to turn that wax-clad container into a vase or a catchall for trinkets. Learn how to get wax out of a candle jar—no matter what shape or size—and give those containers a new life. You don’t need any special equipment or a ton of time—just a kitchen and some patience. Read on to find out how to get wax out of a candle jar once and for all.

1. Freeze the Candle Wax

Cold causes wax to harden and shrink, making it easier to remove, hence the old trick of using ice cubes to get wax out of carpets. Use a butter knife—or a spoon if your wax is soft—to break up any large chunks of wax that remain in the container if the jar has a narrow mouth. Place the candle in the freezer for several hours or until it is frozen. The wax should pop right out of the container, but you can also loosen it with a butter knife if necessary. Scrape off any residue and then clean the container with soap and water.

2. Use Boiling Water

Hot water can also be used to remove wax. Put the candle on a surface protected with a towel or newspaper. Use a butter knife or spoon to remove as much wax as you can. Pour boiling water into the container, leaving room at the top. (If your candle is made of a soft wax, such as soy wax, you can use hot water that’s not boiling.) The boiling water will melt the wax and it will float to the top. Let the water cool and remove the wax. Strain the water to get rid of any small wax bits. (Don’t pour wax down the drain.) Scrape any remaining wax and clean with soap and water.

3. Use the Oven

This method works well if you have several containers to clean at once. Scrape out as much wax as you can with a butter knife or spoon. Heat the oven to 180 degrees and line a rimmed baking pan with tinfoil or one or two layers of parchment paper. Place the candles upside down on the pan and set the pan in the oven. The wax will melt in about 15 minutes. Remove the pan and place on a heat-safe surface. Hold the container using a towel or pot holder and wipe the inside with a paper towel. Let the container cool and then clean with soap and water.

4. Create a Double Boiler

Remove as much wax as you can with a butter knife or a spoon. Place the candle inside of a pot or large metal bowl on a heat-safe surface. (You can put a folded dish towel under the candle to keep it from moving in the pot.) Pour boiling water into the pot around the candle, making sure that the water does not get into the candle jar. Let the jar sit in the hot water until the wax has softened. Hold the jar in one hand and use a butter knife to loosen the wax. Remove the container from the water, pop out the wax, and then wash with soap and water.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersWriting for Crafting a Green World has made me stop procrastinating and finish those U.F.O.’s (Un-Finished Objects) that have been dying for attention. Yesterday, I finally went to work and de-constructed a broken zip quilted tote bag and turned it into a magazine basket, lid handle holders and some coasters.

The zipper broke the first week I bought the bag and I’ve been using it without being able to close it for a long time. I was ready to part with it because the straps were too long and thin and it was awkward to carry. I didn’t feel right about donating a broken bag, so it’s been collecting dust and I desperately wanted to upcycle it into something useful.

Here’s how to make a magazine basket, lid handle holders and coasters from your own broken bag pile.

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Written by Karen Lee

Karen lives a simple, frugal, green life and shares her eco tips and news on ecokaren and is a co-founder of Green Sisterhood, a network of community of green women bloggers, making change. When she’s not managing Green Sisterhood or blogging on ecokaren, she is a chauffeur to two greenagers, wife to an accidental recycler, master chef to hungry locavores, seamstress, knitter, and dumpster diver, not necessarily in that order.

So once you go through this article you would surely know what to do with those leftover pieces of bangles which you have gathered since years and are of no use now. Here are a few home decor tricks to try using them….

Tea light or candle holder– For a quick and easy decor idea you can convert your colorful bangles to a candle holder like this. Simply place a few bangles around a candle, and it will give the much needed kick to your simple plain candles.

Use them to decorate old glasses– Use old glasses as candle holders for a complete different feel. You can make these holders by sticking colorful broken bangles all over the glass. Make sure you use glass bangles and not the bangles made from some other material, as it won’t produce the same result which a glass bangle does.

Hanging decor pieces– Have a function at home or want to simply decorate a tree in the garden, well you can take an inspiration from this pic for the same.

Repurpose old lamp shade– Give your old lampshade a new makeover by using broken bangle pieces all around it.

Coaster set– This one is super easy to make at home. Just take a hard cardborad piece and stick the bangle pieces all around. And you can pick any shape you want for your coasters. You can also revamp the existing old coasters like this which will give them a complete makeover.

Shine on Mirror– You can definitely make your old stuff look like vintage with this bangle trick. Old mirrors, photoframes, doors etc can be done in a sme way. We suggest you to create a set for example a photoframe, coaster and tablelamp like this to make it look more genuine.

Decor piece– Any vase made of glass can be clubbed with bangles like this for an instant riot of colors. Place it on the table top or on console and it will surely take all the limelight.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Amanda Flanigan

Dust off your old or unused pillar candles and give them a primitive look by turning them into grubby candles, which have a textured surface that fits in with any rustic or country chic decor. Giving candles a new life by upcycling them is also budget-friendly, and a task that your family can do together.

Things You’ll Need

Liquid candle dye

Spoon for stirring

Embellishments, such as cinnamon sticks, decorative ribbon or twine (optional)

Step 1

Protect your work area with a layer of aluminum foil to keep the wax off surfaces such as the countertops and stove.

Step 2

Cut the old candles you are melting down into chunks. Remove and discard the wick. Set the cut-up candles to the side.

Alternatively, use paraffin wax, sold at department stores and craft centers, instead of old candles.

Step 3

Pour water into the bottom of a double boiler. Set the double boiler on the stove over medium heat. Bring the water a boil. Once the water is boiling, turn the heat to low.

Step 4

Set the top portion of the double boiler onto the bottom portion. Place the cut up candles into the top part of the double boiler, and let the wax melt.

Warning

  • Always melt wax in a double boiler. Wax that is heated directly over a burner or open flame can explode, resulting in serious injury.
  • Never leave the hot wax unattended.
  • Keep pets and children away from your work area. This is especially important when you are melting or pouring hot wax.

Step 5

Stir a few drops of candle dye into the melted wax. Remove the top portion of the double boiler from the heat.

Step 6

Allow the wax to cool just enough so a thin layer forms on the top. Use a wire whisk to whip the cooling wax for several seconds. Scrape the sides of the pot periodically with the whisk while you’re whipping. Continue in this manner until the wax has a consistency similar to scrambled eggs.

The wax will begin to harden quickly, so you need to work fast when whisking the wax. If the wax becomes too hard, soften it by placing the wax back in the double boiler on the stove for a few minutes before continuing to whip.

Step 7

Hold the pillar candle that you’re turning into a grubby candle in one hand. Dip a clean paintbrush into the whisked wax. Make sure you get an abundance of wax on the bristles of the paintbrush.

Step 8

Dab the wax quickly onto the bottom of the pillar candle. Re-dip the paintbrush into the wax as needed.

Step 9

Continue dabbing the pillar candle quickly with the wax while working your way upward until the entire pillar candle is covered in the whipped wax.

Step 10

Set the grubby candle on an aluminum covered surface and let the wax harden for several minutes.

Add embellishments to the candle, for example, tying cinnamon sticks, decorative ribbon or twine around the middle.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Candles are a wonderful way to create a relaxing atmosphere in your home and keep it smelling fresh or seasonal. However, these home accessories can be costly. Purchasing candle after candle as you burn through them can certainly add up. To do something good for your wallet as well as the planet, upcycle these items by recycling wax to create new candles.

Step 1 – Collect Old Candles

The first step is to build up some old candles where the wicks have run out. Stockpile these until you have at least two of similar scent. You can also opt to pair multiple scents if they complement each other well. Rather than mixing these, you can separate the wax into different layers of your new candle.

Step 2 – Scoop Out Wax

Use a spoon to scoop the wax out of the candle containers and into microwave safe dishes. If you wish, you can separate the wax by scents into different bowls.

Step 3 – Prepare The Containers

If you’re going to reuse the original candle containers, you’ll need to prepare them. Do so by removing the metal wick base from the bottom of the jar. Replace that old wick with a new one suspended from a clothespin or tied to a stick laid on the container’s top.

Step 4 – Microwave Your Wax

In one minute increments, microwave the wax until it’s completely melted. On 60 percent power, this should take about four minutes, but check the wax in between the one minute bursts.

Step 5 – Pour Your Melted Wax

Your melted wax should have a soft, honey-like consistency. Once it reaches that, you’re ready to pour it into the containers. Hold onto the wick with one hand so that it’s extended to the top of the jar, standing straight up in the middle. Slowly pour the melted wax into the jar with your other hand.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Step 6 – Refrigerate the Candle

Place your newly poured candle in the fridge for about ten minutes.

Reusing your candle wax is as simple as that, and you’ll squeeze a lot more bang for your buck out of each candle if you follow this process.

Other Uses for Old Candle Wax

If you don’t want to make a full new candle, there are other uses for that old candle wax.

Make Air Fresheners

Scoop small amounts of old wax into cloths or old socks. Hang or place these in drawers or closets to freshen the air.

Prevent Shower Mold

Wax can help ward off the growth of mold in your shower. Rub wax into the grout between tiles to repel water, minimizing the chance of mold or mildew.

Stop Squeaky Doors

There’s nothing more annoying than squeaky doors! Use candle wax to get rid of this pesky problem. Rub it on door hinges that have been removed. Reinstall the hinges and then listen to the sweet sound of silence as the door closes.

Uses for Old Candle Jars

On the other hand, if you opt to combine candle wax into one candle and are left with an empty jar, you may be looking for alternate uses for this container. There are many different things you can use these for in order to upcycle effectively rather than throwing these away. All you have to do is start by emptying your candle, as directed in step two of the process above.

Make Snow Globes

A fun holiday DIY project that incorporates the use of old candle jars is homemade snow globes. This is particularly fun for kiddos to participate in!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Storage

Many candle jars are pretty and can make for beautiful storage in your home. Use them to store makeup, cosmetic items like q-tips, or even coffee or tea.

Bookends

Candle jars can easily be made into coordinating bookends. Fill the jars with sand, stones, or anything else that strikes your fancy. Use them as decorative bookends and they’ll be a statement piece on your bookcase.

Toothbrush Holder

Old candle jars that are large enough can be a convenient toothbrush holder atop your vanity.

It can be pretty heartbreaking when you break something you love. Well, never fear, because there’s plenty you can do with your broken items instead of throwing them away. Once you read up on these amazing tips, you will never want throw away a broken wine glass, a dinner plate, an umbrella, or broken jewelry again. Check out our collection below to give you some inspiration or ideas of what to do with broken items.

Re-use your broken jewelry to make pretty magnets. Instructions here .

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Or use broken jewelry and a piece of driftwood to create a pretty mobile, like this one.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Make gorgeous, decorated bobby pins with the beads of broken necklaces or bracelets. Simply glue the beads to the pin with super glue.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Put some real effort in and make a simply spectacular piece of ‘recycled’ jewelry. Instructions here .

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Create a fastening for things like chip packets with the clips from broken pants hangers.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Use bits and pieces of broken crockery for the bottom of planters, to help with drainage.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Broken plates? Use them as garden edging.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Utilize glasses with broken stems as outdoor plant candle holders.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Transform old, used-up Crayola markers into watercolors. Simply soak in a jar of water for 12-24 hours.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Transform an old, broken pair of flip flops into a more comfortable and fashionable shoe. Use an old t-shirt to make the straps. Instructions here .

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

M Melt down the ends of used-up or broken crayons to create new, multi-colored ones. Simply melt them on the stove and pour into old prescription bottles or film canisters.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Or melt broken or used-up crayons into an empty glue-stick container, for a unique, twist-up crayon.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

If you don’t feel like making new crayons from old or broken ones, you can try making this awesome candle from them, instead. Instructions here .

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

You can even make these cute little bottle cap tea lights. Instructions here .

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

You can create a bag from a broken umbrella. Instructions here .

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Or, also with a broken umbrella, you can create a cool, kids’ parachute. Instructions here .

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Transform a broken table into two desks. Instructions here .

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Create handy plant or herb markers out of broken terracotta pots.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Or, if you are feeling particularly artistic, you can fashion a micro-garden from those broken pots.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Use broken egg shells to create wonderful dyed tea lights. Instructions here .

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Melissa Hincha-Ownby

Any house with children is bound to have crayons. Inevitably these crayons will be broken into small pieces making it difficult for children to use for coloring. Instead of throwing the crayons out, recycle them into a fun adult-supervised craft project. You can melt them and create colorful and unique crayon candles.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Things You’ll Need

Wax boiling bags

Step 1

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Gather up the old crayons and have the children remove all of the paper. The paper will interfere with the candles so it is important that the crayons be free of their paper wrapping.

Step 2

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Find glass jars to use for the candles; old baby food, pickle and jelly jars are good choices.

Step 3

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Cut the candle wicks so that they are slightly taller than their respective jars.

Step 4

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Tape the top of the candle wick to a pencil and then place the pencil over the top of the jar. You don’t want to hold the wick until all of the wax dries. The pencil will hold the wick in place freeing you up to make other candles.

Step 5

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Place a pot of water on the stove and bring to a boil.

Step 6

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Place the unwrapped crayons into a wax boiling bag. These bags can be purchased at your local craft store, and they make the cleanup process much easier. You will not have to worry about removing wax from your good pots; simply throw away the bags after you are done with your crayon candle project.

Step 7

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Mix and match the crayons in the bags to create unique color arrangements. If you want purple but don’t have purple crayons, mix red and blue. You can also boil individual colors in separate bags to use for layering colors.

Step 8

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Put the bags in the water and wait for the crayons to melt. Once they do, you are ready to start pouring the candle wax into your prepared jars.

Step 9

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Carefully pour the candle wax into the jars. This is where you can get creative and mix and match colors. If you’re making holiday-themed candles, mix orange, yellow and white for a candy corn themed Halloween candle. For Fourth of July, place blue on the bottom, white in the middle and red on top.

Step 10

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Let the candle jars sit until the wax has completely cooled off and is solid. This will vary depending on the size of the jar but it is a good idea to wait at least 24 hours.

Get creative and consider adding glitter, beads or other items to the candle wax to give the crayon candle a unique design.

Warning

Children should not create crayon candles without adult supervision.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Don’t get caught in the dark when the power goes out; try one of these 6 easy candle hacks with how-to videos.

The problem with power outages is that we don’t always know when they’re coming. Even with a proper warning of an incoming storm, we can find ourselves unprepared if the power goes out. Now that we’re in the season of icy, winter storms, it’s good to know what you can do to make some light if you can’t locate a flashlight or candle or if you need extra sources of heat on a cold night. Many of the following could also be helpful on a camping trip.

Below are six ideas for emergency candles that use common household items, along with videos that show you how to make them. It’s very likely that you have at least one of these things in your house right now if not all of them.

These candles rely on two simple components: a wick and fat or wax to place it in. A glass or metal base or container is also ideal for supporting a candle and keeping you safe.

How to Make a Homemade Wick

For homemade wicks, you can use tightly rolled-up newspapers, toilet paper, paper towels, twine, or any cotton fabric like strips from an old t-shirt, though, with a couple of these, the item itself acts as a wick. Make sure you also always have matches or a lighter on hand.

How to Make an Emergency Candle

Use an Orange

One emergency candle hack that you may have seen before is using an orange and a little cooking oil like canola or olive oil. Slicing the orange to remove just the top part of the peel and the center pith makes an instant candle that just needs a little oil poured in. You’ll get a longer-burning candle if you use a larger orange, but clementines are easier to peel and work just as well, though the burning time will be shorter.

Make a Simple Butter Candle

There couldn’t be a simpler candle. Cut off a rectangle of butter, insert a wick, light it and you’re done. Make sure to place the butter on a glass or metal surface and you should get about one hour of light per tablespoon.

Use a Tuna Can

If you’re out of fresh oranges or butter, check your pantry for a can of tuna, salmon, anchovies or any fish packed in oil. As DaveHax shows you above, poke a hole in the top of the can with a screwdriver and insert a wick, making sure to spread the oil up through the top, then light and enjoy.

Create a Crayon Candle

They may not be the first thing to come to mind, but a crayon is a self-contained candle: All you have to do is light it. The paper wrapper acts as a wick and the wax keeps the flame going. Make sure to melt the bottom of the crayon lightly so that it will stick to a metal surface light an Altoids tin or a glass plate for safety.

More than one crayon can be wrapped together with foil to make a larger candle or an effective fire starter.

Use Cheese Wax

Cheese wax may be a nuisance when you’re trying to slice some cheese to eat, but in addition to keeping cheese fresh, it is also a great material for making an emergency candle. Any waxed cheese will do if slice the wax off and mold it into a cylinder shape and then insert a wick. The more wax you have, the bigger and longer-lasting the candle, but even the little Baby Bel cheeses are great for this purpose. Slice open a few of them and make many small candles or one larger one.

Again, make sure you have a flame-resistant base to hold your candle.

Use Cooking Oil for Lamp Oil

If you find yourself without any of the above, you can fashion an emergency candle out of any type of cooking oil — fresh or used — and a flame-resistant container. Small glass cups or jars like mason or jam jars will work as will aluminum cans and even a cup made out of aluminum foil. If you don’t have a lid to thread the wick through, a paper clip can be used to hold the wick in place.

Bonus!
These other items will also work as emergency candles. All you have to do is insert a wick in the middle: lip balm tins, shoe polish, or vegetable shortening like Crisco.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Large chandelier made with glass bottles

Glass recycling offers numerous ways to create useful and beautiful furniture and decorative accessories. Bottles made with glass are a fun recycling material, especially colored glass bottles. They make spectacular sunscreens and fences, lanterns and room furniture pieces. Lushome shares a collection of creative design ideas for glass recycling and decorating your home in eco style.

Glass recycling benefits the environment and help save money on home decorating. Modern interior decorating ideas include room furniture and decorative accessories recycling bottles. Outdoor furniture and lanterns can beautifully decorate yards with glass bottles. Glass recycling is an art and a nice hobby that can bring you some extra money.

Glass recycling if for cost-conscious people and all who appreciate unique and creative design ideas. Glass recycling allows to create fabulous home decorations, room furniture, decorative accessories, lanterns and table lamps. Glass recycling uses bottles as an inexhaustible source of inspiring, natural and beautiful material for new design.

Glass recycling ideas to reuse and recycle bottles

The problem of landfills is getting worse, and it is important to support recycling, including glass recycling. People can put glass bottles to good use and use these containers as vases and lanterns or make unique furnishings with clear glass or colored glass bottles.

Glass recycling can be quick and easy. The collection of creative design ideas that reuse and recycle glass bottles for various stylish, functional and unique home furnishings demonstrates how to enhance your Green home atmosphere by recycling glass bottles.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersFences and decorative screens made with colored glass bottles

Glass recycling at the treatment plant includes sorting and washing glass bottles, making them free of any impurities and then melting glass which requires lots of energy. After the melting, glass is molded for new shapes turning into new glass jars, wine bottles or glass containers. The Green alternatives are to reuse and recycle glass bottles at home and save the natural resources.

Originally glass is produced with the three essential raw materials, – sand, limestone and soda ash. Producing new glass items require the usage of these raw materials, electricity and oil. Turning old glass bottles into room furniture and decorative accessories, making gifts of glass bottles and using existing glass bottles for outdoor home decorating not just allow to experiment and create original designs, but help the environment.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersGlass recycling for yard decorations, planter made with green glass bottles How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersCeiling light recycling glass bottles in white, yellow and green colors How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersHome bar design idea to reuse and recycle glass bottles How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersWood shelving unit made with glass bottles How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersOutdoor lights and planters recycling glass bottles in green colors How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersGlass lanterns with tea candles How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersWall design with colored glass bottles How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersBird feeders recycling glass bottles How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersChandelier decorations made with colorful glass bottles How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersBird feeders and yard decorations How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersWatering plants containers How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersLanterns, outdoor lights and yard decorations How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersTable lamps How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersWall design and yard decorations How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersCandle holders How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersModern furniture How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersTable decorations How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersGift ideas How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersDecorative vases How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersThemes decor and holiday decorations

I’m a woman who loves beautiful things, but not at an extra cost (if I can avoid it!). I have a ton of glass votives and they are all soot filled with wax, ranging from 1/4 inch -1 inch full of wax. I could be completely lazy and materialistic and toss the old and go buy myself new ones, (which I can afford to do), but I don’t feel right in my soul to waste these perfectly beautiful pieces of glass for my laziness. So I put out a call on my Sand & Sisal Facebook Page for help. I asked my wonderful readers this: “Calling all my clever, crafty, ingenious readers: I have a ton of glass votives with 1/3 inch of melted wax in them. What is the best way to remove the wax from votives so I don’t have to buy new ones? (I hate wasting!).”

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Well, within about 5 minutes over 50 of you had commented! Who knew removing wax was such a hot topic?! haha! In the past 24 hours 11,000 people have seen my question and 151 of y’all have graciously given your tried and true advice and I thank you for taking the time to help me out!

Here are the 3 main methods of wax removal that you all recommended.

FREEZER – HOT WATER- OVEN

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersMETHOD 1 – FREEZER

I tossed most of my votives in the freezer for several hours. For some reason my kids kept removing them from the freezer. I’m sure it is because they probably thought mom had lost her mind again and was doing whack-a-doo things… ha! After educating the entire family that YES, I actually WANTED the votives in the freezer, they relented and let them sit….. geesh! Who knew weird items in the freezer would cause such a ruckus? Well, the FREEZER METHOD DOES NOT WORK IF YOU HAVE A VOTIVE WITH A GLUED WICK. (Thank you sweet readers who advised me on that! You are so right! ) If your wick is glued to the bottom of the votive then this is what you get as a result… a mess. Time to move on…
How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersThe overwhelming comments were, “Stick it in the freezer!”. So for the votives I had without a glued wick, this freezing method worked like a charm! Pop! It was out! Yet there was always a bit of wax residue on the sides, so you do still have to wash them with hot water or simply place in the dishwasher.
How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Method 2- HOT WATER

I was worried about what this hot water method would do to my pots, but to be honest…. I’m seriously due for new pots any how! I placed the votives in the pot, in the sink, and filled it with super hot tap water.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

After 5 minutes I could remove the votives from the pan and easily scoop out the wax. Finish washing out residue with soapy hot water. **NOTE** Do not use boiling water. Why? Well, 1) you risk the glass shattering under the extreme temperature, and 2) you do not want to melt the wax, just soften it enough to scoop it out. If you melt the wax to a liquid state in your boiling water and then dump it down the drain, you will end up with a clogged drain. (Thank you sweet readers for informing me of that! I’m glad you did!). How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

METHOD 3 – OVEN

Line a baking sheet with foil making sure the edges of the pan is covered. Turn the votives upside down on the foil. Place the baking sheet in the oven and turn it on to 200 degrees. In about 15 minutes all the wax will be melted out. Remove each votive with a hot pad and wipe out the remaining wax with paper towel, then wash with soapy water if needed. This oven method worked fine, but I didn’t like the strong smell it left in my kitchen and I was using non-scented wax.
How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Now there was a 4th method that many suggested… the MICROWAVE method, which I tried…..How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Let’s just say when you see flames and sparks shooting out of the microwave , your votive most likely has a metal wick in it! YIKES! Not good! I do not recommend risking blowing up your microwave just to save a little votive. 😉

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle HoldersOverall I must say that the freezer method comes out pretty clean (if they didn’t have a glued wick), but I had to wait for them to freeze for at least an hour and then wash them in hot water regardless. So in my opinion, I think the HOT WATER METHOD wins out! It takes the least amount of time.

Thanks everyone for sharing all your advice and helpful tips!

Something that I’m trying to do in our house is try to keep décor simple but classy and still show my colorful style (P.S. by the way: I’m super excited to reveal pictures of our reno once it’s all done! We’re about halfway there!!). I found an idea for making candle holders out of table legs, and aside from making them my own by changing how to assemble them, I also decided to make smaller versions for our new kitchen table we plan to build soon instead of huge ones that sit on the floor (though, someday when we have a bigger place and our kids are a little older, it would be nice to have them on a fireplace hearth or something like that). While I decided to keep these clean color-wise, I love how they go with any colorful bouquet of flowers or table setup. It’s amazing what some and flowers will do to your eating space—and it always gives me the warm and fuzzies when I have fresh cut flowers displayed in our home.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

STEP 1: Remove screw

Because I didn’t want to risk drilling into the Terra Cotta saucers and cracking them, I decided to remove the screws at the top ends of the table legs and use another method to attach the legs to the saucers. I simply used a pair of pliers to twist the screws out of the table legs.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

STEP 2: Adhere saucers to legs

After the screws were removed, I mixed the epoxy according to the directions on the package and applied it to the table legs.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Make sure not to get this stuff on your hands! I got a teeny tiny bit on my hand and it did not feel good!

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

I flipped three of the saucers upside down and put the epoxy coated table leg end down on the saucer.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

. then, I did the same for the top end of the table leg and attached another saucer (bottom side down) to it—this is where the candles will sit. Even though the epoxy package says it sets in 5 minutes, I let my candle holders sit for about an hour to ensure that they were set.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

The cool thing about this particular epoxy applicator is that you can use the little black piece that came attached to it and put it back on the tip so it can be used again for another project.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

STEP 3: Paint candle holders

Once the candle holders were assembled and completely dry, I painted them so that each of them looked like one holder from top to bottom. I chose a neutral, vintage white. Feel free to show your personality with these!

I bought some candle holders from a thrift store, blue mason jars from a garage sale, and put them together with some solar lights to create a beautiful light up sidewalk for my home. You can see more of my crazy creations here

Materials

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

  • Candle holders (thrift store)
  • Blue mason jars (garage sale
  • Solar Lights (dollar store)
  • Silicone
  • Painters Tape

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

I pulled the base off the solar lights as well as the orange take to turn them on.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

I used silicone to adhere the solar light to the candle holder.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

I used painters tape to hold the solar lights into place until the silicone dried.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Once the silicone dried, I pulled off the painters tape, and placed the mason jar upside down onto the candle holder.

Having the jar upside down will also protect the solar light from the elements.

I didn’t glue the jars into place as I wanted the ability to go back in and replace the solar light tops if needed.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

I placed them along the sidewalk that goes to our front door.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Here’s what they look like at night.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

I would love to have you stop by my blog Chas’ Crazy Creations for the full tutorial as well as sign up for my latest creations, posts, recipes, exclusives, and more.

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Watching a beautiful vase smash into a thousand pieces is a trauma untold, but fortunately, that doesn’t have to spell the fateful end to your favorite glass pieces. With some tough glass glue and maybe some grout, you can turn those broken remnants into backyard splendor. But first, a quick word of caution. It should go without saying, but broken glass is sharp.

Always handle glass pieces with care, and use rubber coated gloves when picking up broken shards, especially when you’re first cleaning up. Additionally, if you’ll be breaking your pieces down, you’ll need to be careful when you do it. Always wear safety glasses. Throw the shards into a box draped with cloth to keep them in place, and beat with a hammer. Now that that’s out of the way, let’s jump in!

1. Mosaic Stepping Stones

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

Dress up a boring paver or plain stepping stone with a unique, sun-sparkling mosaic, and give your garden some eclectic charm. To begin, spread a thin layer of all-purpose epoxy (make sure it’s graded for concrete and glass), and lay your pieces in your desired design. Once the glue is dry, mix together sanded tile grout as indicated on the instructions and spread over the piece using a trowel. Wipe away excess grout using a damp sponge, and allow the grout to dry. Give it another quick wipe with a cloth, and it’s ready to lay in the ground!

2. Customized Planters

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

This uses the same idea as the mosaic stone, only on a terracotta pot instead. As a bonus, since the planter is ceramic, you can use mortar instead of epoxy, which is a little easier to work with. In fact, if you want to really get creative, you can even use this method to decorate a tree stump, a patio border, or any area that could use a little pop of color.

3. Ground-level Bird Bath

Birds don’t really need a high surface to enjoy a quick bath. A ground-level pool is more naturalistic and helps you reuse leftover glass. To start, dig a shallow 15×6 inch bowl-shaped hole in the ground. Cover the area with a layer of coarse sand and pat it down. If it’s dry, you can moisten it to make sure it sits smoothly.

In a large container, mix up about 40 pounds of quick-setting concrete—make sure to wear a dust mask while you do this to avoid breathing in fumes. Working quickly and wearing gloves, pile the concrete into the sand-covered hole. Continue to pat the concrete until it shapes to the bowl—about a 2-inch layer is good. Gently press broken glass bits into the wet concrete and allow it to set. In a few days, you’ll have the perfect bird paradise.

4. DIY Sea Glass

If you have a concrete mixer or large rock tumbler, then what you actually have is your own sea glass factory. Throw the glass bits in with coarse sand and water, and set it to tumble for a few hours. Sift the glass pieces through a screen and wash them off. Use them in vases, along pathways, or as wedding decor—the possibilities are nearly endless with this one.

5. Broken Glass Votives

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

This is a very simple way to repurpose crushed glass into something luminous and beautiful. Using the hammer method discussed above, break the glass into very small pieces. Pile it into a tall lidded glass container until it’s nearly full. Nestle a small glass votive holder into the glass, making sure you can still close the lid. Inside the votive holder, place a battery-operated LED votive candle, and put the lid on top. Now turn off the lights and watch how shimmery and beautiful your home grows.

6. Unique Jewelry

How to Reuse Broken Stemware As Garden Candle Holders

If you’ve been able to make your own sea glass, you can take things a step further by making a unique pendant necklace to match. This maneuver is a bit tricky, so if you’re a novice with a drill, you might want to get some practice first. Only use very strong drill bits when attempting this, or even a special bit made for going through glass or tile.

Wet the piece of glass and the drill bit and hold the piece of glass very firmly. Drill enough to make a small divot in the glass—this will keep the drill from slipping. Continually mist the glass and drill bit with water to prevent overheating, and continue drilling slowly through the glass. Clean the cut piece with olive oil and then string it along a ribbon, hemp rope, or leather cord. Lastly, congratulate yourself on your resourcefulness and your DIY prowess.

At first, when you build or buy a property, even portion of the house and the adjacent structures seems very interesting. But, with time, spaces such as the garage, the shed or other adjoining structures become almost useless. They simply take space and offer nothing in exchange. In such cases, it would be useful to repurpose them.For example, a garage can be turned into a number of different things. You could fill it with storage units or build shelves on the walls and turn it into a storage space. You can use it to store all your tools, your bicycle, all the things that you don’t use during a particular season and, of course, the car if it’s the case.

If you no longer use the garage as a home for your car, you can completely restructure it. For example, you could turn it into a sort of indoor garden when you can raise plants, vegetables, flowers and other things. It could be useful for those species that need to sit in the dark or somewhere where there’s moisture.

A shed can also be repurposed. You can use it to make a great guest house for the kids and their friends. It could be their retreat, similar to a tree house. You can even make it look like a tree house is they don’t have one. Put a bed, some armchairs, a table and a cabinet inside and it should be enough. Also, don’t forget about the rug. Let the kids decorate the rest as they want.

If you live on a farm or something similar, you can repurpose the shed in a different way. You could turn it into a chicken house. There’s not much you need to change. You just need some wood and some nails.

These are just a few ideas and suggestions. You can come up with your own concept. It all depends on the environment and the present state of both the garage or shed and their use..

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Posted in How To, Tips, and Advice on September 24, 2012

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Baccarat crystal’s beginnings date back to before the 19th century, but it was in the mid-1800s when the company expanded its offerings beyond France to become known for making everything from quality perfume bottles to barware and even paperweights. Since its early days, Baccarat marked its crystal pieces for proof of identification, but its marks and marking methods have changed over the years. In some cases, the company name is etched into the crystal, but early pieces may simply bear a letter “B” and the year the piece was made.

Look for the Logo

Many Baccarat crystal pieces — from decanters to perfume bottles and stemware — are marked with a logo that also includes the company name. Beginning in the 1920s, many pieces were etched with a logo in a circle that included a sketch of a carafe, goblet and wine glass, as well as the words “Baccarat” and “France.” The logo may be found on the bottom of stemware or a carafe, or perhaps even on a paper label somewhere on the piece, or on one piece of a set. Modern laser etchings do not include the full logo; instead, they feature the word “Baccarat.” Antique paperweights made by Baccarat may not feature a logo, as the logo didn’t come along until the late 1800s. Instead, look somewhere on the weight for the letter “B” and a year.

Pinpointing Patterns

Baccarat crystal, such as glassware, typically has a pattern name that may be easy to forget if you do not have the original packaging the crystal came in. Search a replacement-crystal website that has an image gallery until you find a pattern that resembles yours. Once you’re fairly certain that you know the right pattern name, type the pattern name into a search engine to pull up even more images. The more images and the greater the detail that you see, the more certain you can be that the pattern name is correct.

Contact the Company

If the Baccarat piece on hand is fairly current, or if you aren’t completely sure it is Baccarat, the company’s customer service department may be able to help or even determine its approximate value. Search the company’s online catalog for an image similar to your piece to determine its name. A Baccarat retail-store representative knowledgeable in recent offerings may also be able to tell you more about your piece if you take it to the shop.

When in Doubt

If you have doubts as to whether the piece is genuinely Baccarat, take it to a Baccarat retailer, if the piece is fairly current; or to an antique shop specializing in crystal and fine antiques. Representatives at either type of shop may have years of experience gained from looking at numerous pieces to help them determine if it is fake or authentic. Crystal collector books full of images may also help you determine whether the piece is authentic.

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A premade wine rack, complete with storage for glasses, may prove to be a pricey addition to your home. There’s also no guarantee that the selection of racks in a local shop fits into the intended space. Rather than searching far and wide for the ideal rack, make your own from a cabinet you no longer need for other uses. Bottle-storage kits slide into existing cabinets for simple transformations that involve little carpentry.

Kitchen Cabinet Fitted with a Kit

A deep kitchen cabinet, such as a cupboard that formerly housed plates or baking pans, becomes a wine-storage cabinet with little effort. Remove the shelves, if any, and then insert a premade lattice- or cube-style wine bottle holder that fits inside the cabinet opening. Add an under-cabinet stemware holder to an overhead cabinet, or leave space inside for glasses to hang from trim strips installed to the cabinet top’s underside. Remove the cabinet door, if any, filling the hardware holes with putty and repainting or staining the front to match the rest of the cabinet.

Vertical Cabinet Revamp

You can use a tall vertical cabinet — such as a wood curio cabinet or combination bookcase/storage cupboard — to create an attractive wine rack that takes up little floor space. Remove the doors, if any, and build wooden cubby-style dividers for the cupboard area, each section large enough to hold one wine bottle. Add decorative trim such as crown molding to the top of the cabinet to give it a decorative touch. Thin wood trim strips or an under-cabinet glass holder provide hanging glass storage space inside the highest portion of the cabinet. Add thin LED light strips, hidden from the front of the cabinet, to illuminate the stemware.

Upcycled Hutch or China Cabinet

A hutch or china cabinet, already intended to display items within, becomes an attractive wine rack with plenty of storage for stemware, corkscrews and coasters. Add planks in an X shape spanning one open area of the hutch, and then stack bottles in each of the four partitions. For a different look, add terra-cotta pipes or roofing tiles to separate wine bottles from one another. Install a glass holder under the top of the cabinet. Stash corkscrews, spare synthetic corks and coasters inside the hutch drawers.

Wine on the Go

Turn a freestanding cabinet, such as a kitchen island or microwave stand, into a portable party center with a few modifications. Add locking casters, if needed, to the cabinet bottom so it can be moved around; if the cabinet is tall, it can double as a wine bar or seating area. Add plywood as a support base if the bottom of the cabinet seems flimsy. Store bottles horizontally in cabinets with door fronts, using a homemade or storebought rack to keep bottles separated and securely in place during transport. Add magnetic door catches to keep doors closed. If the cabinet has no door front, add decorative slats across the wine-storage area, hinged on one end and made from boards reclaimed from wine crates. A bookcase-style portion of the island, fitted with a hanging wire glass rack, stores the stemware.