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How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Taylor Gibb is a professional software developer with nearly a decade of experience. He served as Microsoft Regional Director in South Africa for two years and has received multiple Microsoft MVP (Most Valued Professional) awards. He currently works in R&D at Derivco International. Read more.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Running Windows 8 from a USB should not be confused with installing Windows on a USB drive–in this case, instead of installing it on the drive, we’re just running it straight from the portable drive. Here’s how to do it.

This is actually a new feature in Windows 8 called Windows To Go, but if you have been using the Windows 8 Developer Preview you will know that the binaries were removed for this release. The feature which will use a wizard called the Portable Workspace creator relies on existing Windows Deployment technologies, most notably imagex.exe which is a tool used to manage .WIM files. In order to do this there is a few things we need:

  • A bootable Windows 8 PC (You can also use a Virtual Machine)
  • A USB 3.0 16GB USB (This will work on a USB 2.0 but might appear to be a bit slow)
  • A Windows 8 ISO File or DVD
  • An active internet connection (To download the WAIK)

So grab those few things and a hot cup of coffee and lets get started, at this point you should have your Windows 8 PC booted up and your USB connected.

As mentioned are going to have to obtain a copy of imagex.exe, luckily for us it is distributed as part of the WAIK (Windows Automated Installation Kit) which can be downloaded from the Microsoft website.

Note: The download is just under 1.7GB so if you have a slow internet line you might be waiting for a while.

Once the download has completed this will need to be installed on your Windows 8 PC, the install is just of the next, next, finish type and doesn’t require any thinking.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Once the WAIK has finished installing if you are running a 32-Bit version of the Developer Preview navigate to C:\Program Files\Windows AIK\Tools\x86 and send imagex.exe to the root of drive C:\How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

If you are running a 64-Bit installation you need to navigate to C:\Program Files\Windows AIK\Tools\amd64 and send imagex.exe it to the root of the C:\ drive.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Creating The USB

At this point you need to either insert the Windows 8 DVD or mount the Windows 8 ISO file, by right clicking on it and choosing Mount. Switch to the Windows 8 Start screen then type CMD and press Ctrl + Shift + Enter to run a Command Prompt with administrative rights.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Now type the following commands into the command Window:

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Then run the following commands

Select Disk 2 (Replace Disk 2 with whatever number you USB Disk is, seen above)
Clean
Create Partition Primary
Select Partition 1
Active
Format FS=NTFS Quick
Assign
Exit

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Type Exit to leave Diskpart, but keep the command Window open.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Now type the following command

C:\imagex.exe /apply D:\sources\install.wim 1 H:\

Note: Substitute the D:\ for the drive letter that your Windows 8 DVD is in and the H:\ for the drive letter of your USB.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Now drink what is left of your coffee as you wait Windows to expand the WIM file onto your USB. Once its done, a success message will be displayed. The only thing left to do is to copy the files needed to make the USB bootable to the flash drive. To do this run the following command.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

That’s all there is to it, now you have a fully functioning installation of Windows 8 Developer Preview running from your USB. The first time you boot from the USB, Windows will install all the drivers you need for the PC you booted on.

Note: Just as a side note the final version of the Portable Workspace creator will let you clone your entire Windows machine (Programs, Customizations, Settings) to a flash drive, using the above method you will have a clean installation of Windows 8 running from a USB, your programs will NOT be transferred as we are applying the stock Windows 8 Developer Preview WIM to a flash drive, rather than cloning your existing installation.

Thanks to Windows8Italia for pointing this out.

Taylor Gibb is a professional software developer with nearly a decade of experience. He served as Microsoft Regional Director in South Africa for two years and has received multiple Microsoft MVP (Most Valued Professional) awards. He currently works in R&D at Derivco International. Read more.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Running Windows 8 from a USB should not be confused with installing Windows on a USB drive–in this case, instead of installing it on the drive, we’re just running it straight from the portable drive. Here’s how to do it.

This is actually a new feature in Windows 8 called Windows To Go, but if you have been using the Windows 8 Developer Preview you will know that the binaries were removed for this release. The feature which will use a wizard called the Portable Workspace creator relies on existing Windows Deployment technologies, most notably imagex.exe which is a tool used to manage .WIM files. In order to do this there is a few things we need:

  • A bootable Windows 8 PC (You can also use a Virtual Machine)
  • A USB 3.0 16GB USB (This will work on a USB 2.0 but might appear to be a bit slow)
  • A Windows 8 ISO File or DVD
  • An active internet connection (To download the WAIK)

So grab those few things and a hot cup of coffee and lets get started, at this point you should have your Windows 8 PC booted up and your USB connected.

As mentioned are going to have to obtain a copy of imagex.exe, luckily for us it is distributed as part of the WAIK (Windows Automated Installation Kit) which can be downloaded from the Microsoft website.

Note: The download is just under 1.7GB so if you have a slow internet line you might be waiting for a while.

Once the download has completed this will need to be installed on your Windows 8 PC, the install is just of the next, next, finish type and doesn’t require any thinking.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Once the WAIK has finished installing if you are running a 32-Bit version of the Developer Preview navigate to C:\Program Files\Windows AIK\Tools\x86 and send imagex.exe to the root of drive C:\How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

If you are running a 64-Bit installation you need to navigate to C:\Program Files\Windows AIK\Tools\amd64 and send imagex.exe it to the root of the C:\ drive.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Creating The USB

At this point you need to either insert the Windows 8 DVD or mount the Windows 8 ISO file, by right clicking on it and choosing Mount. Switch to the Windows 8 Start screen then type CMD and press Ctrl + Shift + Enter to run a Command Prompt with administrative rights.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Now type the following commands into the command Window:

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Then run the following commands

Select Disk 2 (Replace Disk 2 with whatever number you USB Disk is, seen above)
Clean
Create Partition Primary
Select Partition 1
Active
Format FS=NTFS Quick
Assign
Exit

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Type Exit to leave Diskpart, but keep the command Window open.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Now type the following command

C:\imagex.exe /apply D:\sources\install.wim 1 H:\

Note: Substitute the D:\ for the drive letter that your Windows 8 DVD is in and the H:\ for the drive letter of your USB.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Now drink what is left of your coffee as you wait Windows to expand the WIM file onto your USB. Once its done, a success message will be displayed. The only thing left to do is to copy the files needed to make the USB bootable to the flash drive. To do this run the following command.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

That’s all there is to it, now you have a fully functioning installation of Windows 8 Developer Preview running from your USB. The first time you boot from the USB, Windows will install all the drivers you need for the PC you booted on.

Note: Just as a side note the final version of the Portable Workspace creator will let you clone your entire Windows machine (Programs, Customizations, Settings) to a flash drive, using the above method you will have a clean installation of Windows 8 running from a USB, your programs will NOT be transferred as we are applying the stock Windows 8 Developer Preview WIM to a flash drive, rather than cloning your existing installation.

Thanks to Windows8Italia for pointing this out.

Microsoft has just released a developer preview of their upcoming operating system Windows 8. Users from all over the world can download the preview and install it on their systems, but there is only one restriction with regards to the installation; the user cannot update an existing copy of Windows, so whenever the company will release the final version of Windows the Windows 8 Developer Preview users will have to do the clean installation since they can not upgrade the Windows 8 Developer Preview to Windows 8.

Installation is a little bit difficult, as it requires more preparation than just burning an ISO image to disk and putting that ISO into the DVD drive of the computer. You need a USB key with at least four or more GB of free space. Take a USB Device and follow these following steps to install from USB.

  • The first step is to format the key with the FAT32 file system.
  • Connecting the USB key to the computer.
  • Right-click on its drive letter and select Format from the options.
  • The Format window pops up where you need to make sure that Fat32 is the selected file system. Everything else can be left as is.
  • Wait until the formatting has finished.

Now you need access to the Windows 8 ISO or DVD. The developer preview is only provided as an ISO image. Download the developer preview by clicking here.

The easiest way to copy Windows 8 to a USB drive and make that drive bootable.

To know How to make a bootable USB from the .iso/iso file click here

Another way to make USB bootable drive is Microsoft’s Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool. While designed specifically for Windows 7, it appears to work just fine to create a bootable Windows 8 USB key as well.

Just select the Windows 8 ISO when asked to pick an ISO image from the computer. Then select to copy the contents to a USB drive. The program will copy all files to the drive and make that drive bootable at the same time. You can download the Microsoft tool from here.

How to Install Windows 8 Developer Preview from USB Devices?

Insert your USB device into your computer on which you want to install Windows 8 Developer Preview and reboot your system. On system startup, select the appropriate option to boot your PC from the USB drive or PenDrive. Usually, you can enter into the Bios by pressing F1, F12, Delete or another key which will be highlighted on the screen on while the system is booting and from there you can choose the option to USB booting.

Once you select the option to boot from USB and saved the changes by pressing the F10 button, the computer would pick up the installation files on the USB drive automatically and installation should start.

Mounting the ISO Image Directly on Another Windows System.

Install Windows 8 by mounting the ISO image directly on another Windows system.

If you want to install the Windows Developer Preview, but do not have the possibilities of doing it via DVD or PenDrive then also there is the method to finish the installation.

Before proceeding with this option, you should be having any previous version of Windows Operating System installed on your PC.

  • Download the ISO file from Microsoft.
  • Mount the ISO using Daemon Tools, Power ISO, Clone Drive, or similar tools.
  • Do not use the autorun installer, the autorun installer only allows you to upgrade your existing Windows installation and will not allow you to install to a separate hard drive or partition.
  • Navigate to the virtual install disc and go to the folder called “sources”.
  • Run setup.exe and proceed the steps which are mostly similar to the Windows Vista and later OS.

Update:

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usbImage Source: PCWorld

You can also install windows 8 on Microsoft virtual pc.

Click here to see How to Install Microsoft Virtual PC.

Click here to see How to Install Windows XP on Virtual PC.

Last Updated on April 13, 2020 by admin 2 Comments

By now you probably have heard about Windows To Go feature in Windows 8 OS. If you are not aware of Windows To Go, it’s a new feature available in Windows 8 that lets you install and run Windows 8 from USB storage device.

In simple words, Windows To Go first installs Windows 8 on a USB drive. Then you can connect the USB drive to a PC and run the PC using the new Windows 8 USB drive. The term running Windows 8 from USB drive should not be confused with installing Windows 8 from USB drive. The later one is used to install Windows 8 from USB (see bootable USB)and former one (Windows To Go) is used to run a PC from Windows 8 installed on the USB drive.

If you have been using Windows 8 Developer Preview build, you probably know that Windows To Go is not available in Windows 8 Developer Preview. So, how to install Windows 8 on a USB drive without actually using Windows To Go feature?

In this guide, we will show you how to easily install Windows 8 on a USB drive. Thanks to Windows8Italia for this.

Things you need:

# A bootable Windows 8 PC (if you are on Vista or Windows 7, install Windows 8 on VMware or VirtualBox)

# A USB drive with 16GB or more capacity

# Windows 8 DVD or Windows 8 ISO file

Procedure:

Step 1: Boot into your current Windows 8 PC. If you are on Vista or Windows 7, please refer our how to install Windows 8 on VMware or how to install Windows 8 on VirtualBox guide. Once installed, use the Windows 8 running in virtual machine to install Windows 8 on USB drive.

Step 2: Connect the USB drive (16 GB or larger) and backup all data from the USB to a safe location. We are going format the USB drive to make it bootable.

Step 3: Download and install Windows Automated Installation Kit (WAIK) for Windows 7 on your Windows 8. The WAIK software is

1.7 GB. Once installed, go to C:\Program Files\Windows AIK\Tools folder to see amd64 and x86 folders. If you are on 32-bit Windows 8, copy imagex.exe file from x86 folder to the desktop. And if you are on 64-bit version, copy imagex.exe file from amd64 folder to the desktop.

Step 4: If you have a Windows 8 DVD, insert it into the optical drive (DVD drive) and note down the DVD drive letter. And if you have Windows 8 ISO (see Windows 8 ISO direct download links), simply right-click on the ISO and select Mount option. You will see a new drive under Devices with Removable storage in Computer (My Computer).

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Step 5: Next, open Command Prompt with admin rights. You must run the Command Prompt as administrator to complete the procedure without any errors. Switch to Windows 8 Start screen, type CMD and then press Ctrl + Shift + Enter to run Command Prompt with admin rights. Click Yes for the User Account Control prompt. You may refer our how to run Command Prompt as administrator guide for more details.

Step 6: In the Command Prompt, type the following Command and hit enter key:

Diskpart

Next, type List Disk and hit enter key.

You will see list of connected storage drives to your PC (see the screenshot). If your PC has one internal drive and one external drive (the one that you connected in step 2), then you need to select Disk 1 in the next step. Double check the list and note that USB drive number before proceeding to the next step. Selected drive will be erased to make it bootable.

Step 7: Type the following commands one-by-one and hit enter key after typing each command:

Select Disk 1 (replace 1 with your USB disk number that you have obtained in step6)
Clean
Create Partition Primary
Select Partition 1

Active
Format FS=NTFS Quick
Assign

Exit

Don’t close the Command Prompt, simply minimize it.

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Step 8: Maximize the Command Prompt and execute the following command:

C:\Users\Home\Desktop\imagex.exe /apply I:\sources\install.wim 1 H:\
(here, replace “H” with your USB drive letter, replace “Home” with your user name and replace “I” with your Windows 8 DVD drive letter or virtual drive letter that you have obtained after mounting the ISO file)

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Step 9: The last step is to copy boot files to the USB drive. Type the following command and hit enter key:

bcdboot.exe H:\windows /s H: /f ALL

(in the above command, replace “H” with your USB drive letter)

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

Step 10: Once done, exit the Command Prompt. You have just installed Windows 8 on a USB flash drive.

Step 11: Disconnect the USB drive from your PC and connect it another PC to test the new Windows To Go drive. Turn on the PC, enable boot from USB in BIOS and then wait for a while to see Windows 8 booting from the USB drive. On the first run, Windows 8 make take a few minutes to setup up registry and other settings. On the first run you will be asked to enter the product key, accept license agreement, and personalize other settings. Good luck!

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

We’ve already looked at how you can use a USB flash drive to install Windows 8. All you need is an 8GB or larger flash drive, the Windows 8 disc image, and the Windows 7 USB/DVD tool. But there’s also a new feature in Windows 8 that lets you run the operating system from a USB flash drive.

It’s called Windows To Go, and it works sort of like a Linux LiveCD. You can load the operating system onto a flash drive, plug it into any compatible computer, and boot from the USB drive instead of the hard drive or solid state disk. Unlike most LiveCDs though, Windows To Go can be configured with all of your apps, documents, and other settings.

We first saw hints of the Windows To Go functionality in a leaked copy of Windows 8 that was making the rounds earlier this year. While the Portable Workspace Creator doesn’t appear to be part of the Windows 8 Developer Preview that was released to the public recently, it turns out you can still create a bootable Windows 8 USB device with a little elbow grease.

The feature is aimed at enterprise users, and the ability to create bootable USB drives will be included with Windows 8 Server. But Born city has step-by-step instructions for creating your own Windows To Go setup using a USB flash drive and the recently released Windows 8 Developer Preview.

It’s not clear if this method will continue to work once Microsoft officially launches Windows 8 and starts charging for software. My guess is that it won’t, if for no other reason than that you’ll need a license to run Windows. Right now the developer preview is available license-free.

You’ll need a 16GB or larger USB flash drive or hard drive, and the Windows 8 disc image and Windows Automated Installation Kit in order to create a Windows To Go device. For best results you’ll probably want a USB 3.0 disk with 32GB or more of storage capacity though. Make sure to visit Born City for the rest of the instructions.

If you just want to see how Windows To Go works though, you can check out the video below, courtesy of ExtremeTech.

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You can create a bootable flash drive and install Windows 8 CP from it

How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

The new Windows 8 Consumer Preview can be easily downloaded and installed on a variety of supported devices, including desktop PCs that currently run under Windows Vista, Windows 7, or Windows 8 Developer Preview.

There are several ways to get the new Windows 8 Consumer Preview up and running on your personal computer.

For instance, you can use the Windows 8 Consumer Preview setup tool offered by Microsoft to put things in motion.

You’ll simply need to download it (you’ll find it via the link below), hit run and let it do its work. It will check to see whether the PC can run the new OS flavor, and will also check the compatibility with the already installed applications.

There is also the option to download the ISO file that Microsoft released yesterday (either the x86 or x64 version) and burn it on a DVD to perform the installation.

You can use the Windows Disc Image Burner for that if you run Windows 7 on your PC, or a third-party program for creating a bootable Windows 8 Consumer Preview disk in Windows XP or Windows Vista.

Additionally, the ISO file can be used for creating a bootable USB drive from which you can then install the new Windows 8 Consumer Preview.

For that, you will need to download this Windows 7 USB/DVD download tool (which is, in fact, compatible with Windows XP SP2, Windows Vista, or Windows 7, both 32-bit and 64-bit).

The aforementioned Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup will also offer you the possibility to create a DVD or USB flash drive from an ISO file.

As soon as the Windows 7 USB/DVD download tool has been installed on your PC, things are pretty straightforward. You will have to select the ISO file from where it has been downloaded on your hard drive, and let the tool put in on the USB drive.

Then, navigate to the flash drive’s root folder, and hit the setup.exe file there, which will kick off the installation process.

During the setup, Windows 8 Consumer Preview will check to see whether the PC can support the new OS, and will allow you to opt for keeping your settings, personal files, and the like. You will also need to enter the product key that Microsoft is offering for free.

In case there are applications that are not compatible with the new platform, you will be offered the possibility to uninstall them during the setup process.

Make sure that you make all the necessary preparations before hitting the install button. After that, you won’t be able to use your PC. Have a look at the screenshot gallery below to learn more on the matter.

Download Windows 8 Consumer Preview Build 8250 (the aforementioned Setup tool is included as a separate download link there)

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NikolaiT

Senior Member
  • Sep 15, 2011
  • #1
  • NOTE:
    THIS GUIDE WAS CREATED WHEN WINDOWS 8 WAS IN THE DEVELOPER PREVIEW STAGE. IT MAY NO LONGER BE VALID, IT HASN’T BEEN TESTED WITH THE RELEASE PREVIEW OR RTM.

    Well, I didn’t have any DVDs available with me so I figured I’d install Windows 8 from an SD Card, and it succeeded, so here is a guide to install it from an SD Card or USB Stick.

    AT LEAST AN 8GB SD CARD OR USB STICK IS NEEDED
    THIS GUIDE ASSUMES YOU HAVE ANOTHER PARTITION TO INSTALL WINDOWS 8 OVER OR YOU’RE GOING TO INSTALL IT OVER YOUR CURRENT PARTITION. Learn how to create a new partition here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/gg309170.aspx

    2. Download Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool (this was meant for Windows 7 ISOs but it works fine with the Windows 8 ISO: http://images2.store.microsoft.com/prod/clustera/framework/w7udt/1.0/en-us/Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe

    3. Format your SD Card/USB Stick to NTFS, do not do a quick format, fully format it.

    4. Install and open up Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool (This application requires at least .NET Framework 2.0)

    5. Choose your ISO:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    6. Choose media type (choose USB!):

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    7. Insert your USB Stick or SD Card and select it:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    8. Wait for it to finish creating your bootable USB Stick/SD Card:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    9. You should see this, If you don’t something went wrong:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    10. Choose “Safely Remove G: (or whatever drive letter your USB stick/SD Card is.)”, but don’t actually remove the USB Drive or SD Card physically.

    11. Shut down your computer and press F12 (or whatever button it is that lets you choose what media to boot off of, it’s F12 on my Inspiron 1545.)

    12. If you followed these instructions exactly, and you using an SD Card, but it does not work, your computer probably does not support booting off SD. But I urge you to repeat step 10 a few times before giving up, the first time I tried it, it just sat at a flashing _, but the second time, it worked.

    13. Follow instructions setup gives you.

    Q: Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool seems to have stalled.
    A: It probably hasn’t, mine stayed on 98% for 30 minutes. If it has been more than say, 3 hours, cancel, reboot your computer and attempt again.

    Q: Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool tells me it’s not a valid iso!?
    A: Make sure your ISO is not corrupt, compare SHA1 hashes with valid ISOs here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/apps/br229516
    If the hashes are different, redownload your ISO.

    Q: I’m using an SD Card but my computer won’t boot from it?!
    A: Your computer probably doesn’t support booting from SD Card, the only option would be a new computer.

    IMAGE SOURCES: WindowsVJ – SizzledCore – Softonic – Elmajdal

    If you’ve poked around PCWorld in recent weeks, you’ve learned how to download and install Windows 8 on a new hard-drive partition and how to install Windows 8 in a virtual machine. Today, let’s talk about one of my favorite approaches for installing Windows 8, well, anywhere: by way of a flash drive.

    See, when you download something like the Windows 8 Developer Preview (which anybody can check out, not just developers), you’re left with an ISO file that must be burned to a DVD before you can actually install it. Or must it?

    The Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool lets you copy that ISO file to a flash drive, then use that drive to install Windows. And don’t let the name fool you: although the 1MB utility says it’s for Windows 7, it works like a charm with Windows 8. (Also notwithstanding its name, there’s no real downloading involved.)

    For this task you’ll need a flash drive with at least 8GB of available storage. The utility will necessarily erase everything on the drive as part of the setup process, so make sure you’ve offloaded any important data. You’ll also need to have downloaded the Windows 8 Developer Preview if you haven’t already. I recommend the x64 version without the developer tools, though you may want to choose the x86 version if you’re planning to install it on an older PC with limited RAM (i.e. 3GB or less).

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usbOnce you run the utility, it’s a simple four-step process to select the ISO file, wipe the USB drive, make it bootable, and load Windows 8. So simple, in fact, that I’m not going to reiterate the steps here. But allow 10-20 minutes for the job to finish.

    When you’re done, you can “safely eject” the drive, then pop it into whatever PC is going to be your Windows 8 guinea pig. (If you have trouble booting from the drive, consult your manual; you may need to tweak the BIOS settings.)

    I’m sorry to say you can’t actually run Windows 8 from the flash drive like you can some versions of Linux; you’ll have to go as far as to install it. But it’ll be a lot faster going with the flash drive than it would be with a DVD. Plus, you can load it on a netbook, ultrabook, or any other system that lacks an optical drive.

    Three Surprising Things About Hard Drive Defragging

    Back in the bad old days of computing, hard-drive defragmentation was a big deal. You needed a quality third-party “defragger,” and you needed to run it regularly—at least once a month—to ensure optimal system performance.

    Times have changed. Although computer files still get split into fragments and scattered across your hard drive’s platters, the computers and drives themselves are so much faster now that fragmentation isn’t the same performance-wrecking problem it once was.

    What’s more, if you’re a Windows 7 user, you really shouldn’t have to worry about fragmentation at all. Check out these three important facts about hard drive defragging:

    1. In Windows 7, the built-in Disk Defragmenter utility runs automatically at scheduled times, usually once per week. This happens by default, so chances are good your hard drive is already defragged. And by most accounts, the utility compares favorably with third-party alternatives, so don’t spend money on another defragger unless you have very specific reasons for doing so.
    2. You don’t necessarily have to leave your computer on overnight. If Disk Defragmenter isn’t able to run at, say, 1 a.m. Wednesday, it will kick in the next time your computer is idle.
    3. You should never defragment a solid-state drive (SSD). Doing so can shorten its lifespan. In fact, whether you purchased a laptop with an SSD installed or upgraded your laptop with one, be sure to disable scheduled defragmentation in Windows 7. Click Start, type disk, and then click Disk Defragmenter. Click Configure schedule to disable the feature.

    By the way, if you have an external hard drive, one that’s not always connected to your PC, it may not get the chance to benefit from Windows’ scheduled defragging. Therefore, you should run Disk Defragmenter on it manually every month or so.

    For more on the subject, read Lincoln Spector’s “Defragging: How, Why and Whether.”

    The Fast Way to Launch Programs in Windows 7

    People who migrate to Windows 7 from Windows XP often overlook one of the former’s best features: the keyboard-friendly Start menu. Specifically, you can run any installed program with just a few keystrokes, no third-party launcher required.

    There are, of course, several ways to run a program. You can minimize all open windows, find the program’s icon on your desktop, and double-click it. Or you can click Start and navigate the All Programs menu until you find what you’re after.

    Both approaches are a bit time-consuming, and both require you to reach for the mouse. As a keyboard-shortcut junkie, I prefer the speed and ease of keeping my fingers on my keys.

    All I have to do is press the Windows key, type the first three or four letters of the program I want to run, then press Enter when it appears. For example, I can type itu for iTunes, chr for Google Chrome, exc for Excel, or out for Outlook.

    Very rarely will I have to go beyond three letters. And the only time I might need to reach for the mouse is for something like exp, which makes both Internet Explorer and Windows Explorer appear in the menu. (Actually, typing int solves that problem.)

    This may only save you a few seconds here and there, but I think once you get in the habit of running programs this way, you won’t go back to reaching for the mouse. It’s arguably the fastest and easiest method to load an app–and I find it to be the least disruptive of my workflow.

    So you’ve downloaded the brand spanking new Windows 8 Developer preview but don’t want to destroy your working machine in the process? Why not use a virtual machine instead?

    My Virtual Machine of choice is Oracle’s VirtualBox. It’s up there in the capability stakes and it’s completely free.

    This is my quick guide to setting up the Windows 8 Developer preview as well as possible in the current version of VirtualBox. I’m assuming that you are familiar with the operation of VirtualBox and virtual machines in general when reading this.

    Here is the summary of the VM which provides the best stability and performance for me:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    The important settings:

    General – Basic

    • Operating System: Microsoft Windows
    • Version: Other Windows

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    System – Motherboard

    • Base Memory: at least 2048MB (would recommend your system has 4GB+ RAM running any VM)
    • Chipset: PIIX3 (ICH9 causes issues)
    • Extended Features: Enable IO APIC

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    System – Processor

    • Processor(s): 2CPUs at least (assuming you have a multi-core computer)
    • Extended Features: Enable PAE/NX

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    System – Acceleration

    • Enable VT-x/AMD-V: ON (required for 64-bit)
    • Enable Nested Paging: OFF (causes high CPU usage)

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Display – Video

    • Video Memory: 64MB (at least)
    • Enable 3D Acceleration: ON
    • Enable 2D Video Acceleration: ON

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Storage

    • IDE Controllers Type: PIIX3
    • Use host I/O cache: ON
    • Put the Virtual Hard Drive on a SATA Controller

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    There you go. Now mount your ISO, install and enjoy playing with the first public release of Windows 8!

    Enjoy a few screenshots of the great new interface below:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

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    Not exactly constructive comments here, but just a brief rundown of my experiences: everything starts OK (in spite of meagre 2gb ram) then after a while, instability creeps in, i.e., mouse pointer either disappears or gets trapped within the ‘guest’ screen or simply freezes – followed by a beautiful BSOD or failing that, just restful blackness. My (lay) remedy is to switch off – not at the mains – but the official pc power switch. I think I’ll give it a rest for the time being (I’ve uninstalled) – until I can find out more about it.

    I would have like to have arranged for USB support but upon reading how to do it my palms become moist and my mouth goes dry.

    Possibly we septuagenarians ought to know when we’re licked!

    Loading and running Windows 10 or Windows 11 from a USB drive is a handy option when you’re using a computer saddled with an older operating system.

    If you’re using a PC outfitted with an older version of Windows but want a more up-to-date operating system, you can run Windows 10 or 11 directly from a USB drive.

    You’ll need a USB flash drive with at least 16GB of free space, but preferably 32GB. You’ll also need a license to activate Windows 10 or Windows 11 on the USB drive, which means you have to either purchase one or use an existing one associated with your digital ID. You can then use a Windows USB utility to set up the USB drive with either OS. Once you’re done, you’ll be able to boot up off the drive to launch Windows.

    The major downside of booting from a USB drive is that Windows will run slower than it does off your hard drive. But if you’re in a pinch, you can at least work with the OS and access different apps this way.

    Microsoft once offered its own tool called Windows to Go (Opens in a new window) , which could generate a bootable Windows USB drive with the Enterprise and Education versions of Windows 10. However, the company stopped development on that program and no longer updates it. Instead, you can turn to two utility programs, WinToUSB and Rufus, which will create a bootable drive from any version of the operating system and on any type of USB drive.

    Download Windows 10 ISO File

    If you want to run Windows 10 from the USB drive, the first step is to sign into your current Windows 10 computer and create a Windows 10 ISO file that will be used to install the operating system onto the drive.

    To do this, navigate to the Download Windows 10 website (Opens in a new window) , which offers the latest edition of Windows 10; as of this writing, that’s Windows 10 November 2021 Update or Windows 10 version 21H2. Click Download tool now to save a MediaCreationTool.exe file on your PC.

    Double-click this file to install the program. At the first screen, click the Access button. Then click the Create installation media (USB flash drive, DVD, or ISO file) for another PC button and click Next. Confirm that the language, architecture, and edition are all correct and click Next.

    You are then asked to choose what media you want to use. Though you ultimately want to run Windows from a USB drive, click ISO file (not USB flash drive) and then click Next.

    Choose a location on your hard drive to store the Windows ISO file and click Save. Windows 10 will then generate the necessary ISO file. When the process is done, click Finish.

    Download Windows 11 ISO File

    In order to run Windows 11 from a USB drive, you’ll need to obtain a Windows 11 ISO file to install the operating system onto the drive. Browse to the Download Windows 11 website (Opens in a new window) and scroll down to the Download Windows 11 Disk Image (ISO) section.

    Click the Select Download drop-down menu and choose the Windows 11 (multi-edition ISO) option. Then click the Download button. Choose the product language and click Confirm. Then click the 64-bit Download button and save the ISO file to your hard drive.

    Create Drive With WinToUSB

    In order to put a bootable ISO file onto your USB drive, it’s time to enlist the aid of a third-party program like WinToUSB (Opens in a new window) . This tool comes in three versions—Free, Professional, and Enterprise. Start with the free version, but be aware that it poses certain limitations. You can freely create an installation of the Home version for Windows 10 or Windows 11 but not the Professional or Enterprise flavors. If you need either of these editions, the Professional version of WinToUSB costs $29.95, while the Enterprise option will run you $199.95. Download and install the WinToUSB software from its dedicated website (Opens in a new window) .

    Next, connect a blank USB flash drive to your computer and launch WinToUSB from its Start menu shortcut. At the introductory screen, click the search button next to the Image File field and choose the ISO file you created for Windows 10 or 11.

    Select the version of Windows that you wish to clone onto the USB stick, then click Next. If you’re using the free version, your only choice will be Windows 10 Home or Windows 11 Home.

    You will then need to select your destination disk. Open the drop-down menu and choose your USB drive. A message will pop up asking you to select a partition scheme. For older computers with a legacy BIOS mode, click the MBR for BIOS option.

    For newer computers with UEFI mode enabled, click GPT for UEFI. You can also choose MBR for BIOS and UEFI if you bought one of the paid versions of WinToUSB. Click Yes to continue.

    At the next screen, choose the Legacy option for Installation Mode. Click Next and your Windows USB drive will now be created. When the installation process reaches 100%, indicating that it’s finished, close the WinToUSB program and remove the USB drive.

    Create Drive With Rufus

    Another solid utility is Rufus (Opens in a new window) . Download, install, and launch the program. At the Drive Properties window, select your USB drive in the Device field, if it’s not already selected. Click the Select button next to the Boot selection field and select your Windows ISO file.

    Click the Image option field and change it to Windows to Go. For older computers with a legacy BIOS mode, change the partition scheme to MBR. For newer computers with UEFI mode enabled, change it to GPT. You can leave the other options at their default values. If you wish, change the Volume label to a name like Windows 10 or Windows 11. Then click the Start button.

    At the next screen, choose the version of Windows that you want to run on the USB drive, then click OK. A warning message flashes that all data on your USB drive will be destroyed. Click OK to continue. Rufus will now copy the necessary files to the drive. Once the process is complete, close the Rufus window.

    Launch Windows From a Flash Drive

    When you want to launch Windows on a different computer, insert your USB drive into that PC. Press the appropriate key for your computer make and model to get to your Boot menu and choose the option to boot up off the USB drive.

    The first time you run Windows off the USB drive, you’ll need to go through the familiar Windows setup process. You’ll also need to activate Windows (Opens in a new window) . You can then install Windows applications onto the USB drive and access any files or documents stored online, so the experience comes close to working on one of your own Windows PCs.

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    Since I deployed my HP Proliant Microserver, I had been running ESX from a USB flash drive. Now that Windows 8 Beta is available, I wanted to test out some of the new Hyper-V features in my home lab. All the talk about Windows To Go had me thinking it would be a good test to run Windows 8 Hyper-V server from a USB flash drive. After all, deploying Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2008 R2 on a USB Flash Drive was already supported.

    I found a good tutorial about running Windows 8 Developer Preview from a UFD which outlines the process. If you’ve used WAIK before, then you’re familiar with the process which basically involves creating the partitions on disk, and then applying a WIM file to the partition. This process works great for Consumer edition on many UFD’s, however, Windows To Go is not supported with server edition. That doesn’t mean Windows 8 Server cannot be installed to a UFD though – it just means that the same rules apply as 2008 R2.

    Specifically, the UFD needs to have it’s Removable Media Bit set to 0. This is a setting in the UFD’s controller that tells Windows how to treat the device. Typically, when you attach a UFD, Windows classifies the device as a Removable Disk:

    There’s a couple of limitations that come with Removable Disks in Windows though. Specifically, you can’t create multiple partitions on them (even if you do via other partitioning methods, Windows will only show you the first partition), and you can’t run Windows directly from them. So, in order to deploy Windows 8 server to a UFD, the RMB needs to be set to 0.

    Some UFD manufacturers provide utilities to set this. Lexar has the BootIt utility for instance. This utility may work for UFD’s manufactured by others provided it’s using the same controller. After some searching, I came across and excellent thread that described how to flip the Removable Media Bit for non-Lexar UFD’s. The ChipGenius and USBDeview utilities will give you detailed information about the Controller in the UFD:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    This tool provides a few critical pieces of information: The Chip Vendor, Part Number, VID and PID. Using the VID and PID, you can find out if there is a tool available that will allow you to program the UFD controller. Head over to the Russian site flashboot.ru (I recommend using Chrome and you can auto-translate the page) and enter your VID and PID. This will list all known UFD’s matching those ID’s and let you know what utility you can use to program the controller, as well as helpful hints from other users. In my case, the Patriot XT Rage 16GB UFD showed up in the list:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    In my case, I needed to use Phison’s MPALL tool (version 3.20) to program the Phison PS2251-38 controller on the Patriot XT Rage 16GB UFD. FlashBoot.ru has a catalog of all utilities for Phison controllers and I was able to easily download the necessary version. Inside the MPALL archive, you’ll find a few utilities. The first is GetInfo which displays current configuration of the controller:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    The second tab has partition information:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Notice the Fixed Disk setting of “No” – this is the RMB on Phison controllers. All that’s necessary is for us to update that using the other utilities in the archive. It took some testing/tweaking to figure out how things work with the Phison USB Mass Production Tool, and admittedly I’m a bit fuzzy on the specifics. However, it looks as though there are two controller configuration sections that need updating: F1 and F2 (I haven’t been able to find what these mean, but they seem to be common to all UFD’s). There are two Parameter Editor utilities that generate INI files that can then be used by the flash utility, one for the F1 configuration (writes to a MP.INI file) and one for the F2 configuration (writes to the QC.INI file). In here, we can set the UFD to be a Fixed Disk:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    You will find all of the necessary information from the GetInfo screen for the Controller, FC1-FC2 settings, the VID and PID’s, etc. Once you have your settings in place, hit save to write them to the MP.ini file. From there, you can use the MPALL F1 utility to write the configuration to the UFD. When performing this procedure, ensure that ONLY the UFD you want to program is connected. Insert the USB flash drive, click the Update button which will populate the various boxes with ANY UFD found that has a Phison controller. Once it’s detected, click Start to program.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Once F1 is done, you’ll need to do the same for F2. I was unable to get it to successfully update the F2 settings using any of the versions, however, even though the MPALL F2 utility reported an error, GetInfo did show that both F1 + F2 where set on the controller after the update. A few notes that may save you some time:

    • I’m not sure where the “MAPPING” setting comes from, but when I created my MP.INI and QC.INI files using the ParamEditor utilities, the MPALL utilities would not find my UFD. I had to add MAPPING=0 to the Configuration section of both files.
    • The Inquiry Version of my UFD was PMAP to start and though I had it set in MP.INI, the MPALL F1 utility changed to to DL07. Because of this, my QC.ini had to have Inquiry Version set to DL07 in to avoid a Incorrect Inquiry Version error message.

    Once this is done properly, the partition will show as a fixed disk:

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Now that we have a UFD with the RMB set to 0, we can proceed with deploying Windows 8 to it. Obviously, the FAT32 partition the pre-format created won’t work for Windows 8, so we’ll need to clean out that information. We’ll use diskpart for this – run the following commands from a command prompt:

    select disk X
    clean
    create partition primary
    active
    format FS=NTFS quick

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    This will delete the existing partition table, create a new primary partition and mark it as active and then format it as NTFS. Now, we can use the imagex utility (available as part of the WAIK) to apply the install.wim file to the UFD. Either mount the ISO or insert the DVD and apply the image to the UFD:

    imagex /apply F:\sources\install.wim 4 G:\

    The number 4 is the index of the image in the WIM file to be applied. The Windows 8 beta media has multiple available (Standard Core, Standard w/ GUI, Datacenter Core, and Datacenter w/ GUI) so I’m applying Datacenter w/ GUI by selecting index 4. You can read the available options by using the imagex /info F:\sources\install.wim command. Once the image has been applied, we need to write a boot record using bcdboot:

    bcdboot G:\windows /s G:\

    If you’ve done everything correctly, you should now have a bootable UFD with a base install of Windows 8 Server that is recognized as a non-removable hard disk:

    Microsoft has renamed Portable Workspace feature to Windows To Go in Windows 8.

    Microsoft is targeting this new feature to enterprise IT pros and basically it allows to create a bootable USB device that contains a copy of Windows 8, along with their business applications, data, and settings. When the user is finished and log off, they will simply disconnect the USB device, leaving not data or information behind; besides that using Windows in this environment will not modify anything in the computer that is running, which it can be very useful an a variety of scenarios, like troubleshooting computers, access data securely, and just work more efficiently.

    It is also important to note the Windows To Go USB devices can be secured with encryption using BitLocker technology, that way if your USB device “is misplaced”, the content within will stay safe.

    “Windows To Go is a new feature in Windows 8 that enables enterprise administrators to create USB drives containing complete, managed Windows images that users can use to boot and run Windows on any Windows 7 or Windows 8 capable computer. Windows To Go makes it possible for employees to use a managed device whether they work from home, a client office or in a free seating environment. This session will discuss Windows To Go, its hardware requirements and building compatible and complementary software.”

    Useful Links

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    The latest Windows avatar, Windows 8 has already created lot of hype and hoopla in the technology domain. Many users are looking to switch to the new flavor through a clean install. That basically means, you will have to format your hard drive where you want to install the OS—using upgrade media, and yes you will need the Win 8 setup files to do that. You must also have a previous version of Windows running on that PC. You can not install in a bare metal drive.

    To begin with purchase the Genuine Retail Windows 8 Media, and then follow these simple steps to perform a clean install Of Windows 8.

    •Turn on your PC. Insert the Win 8 DVD or USB flash drive and restart your PC.

    •You would need to change the boot priority to make your system read from the disc. To change the boot order you generally need to press a combination of keys( such as F2, F12, Delete, Esc) immediately after you turn on your PC. Select the boot device i.e DVD ROM or USB flash disk (if you have obtained a Win 8 offline boot media) and proceed.

    •On the Install Windows page, enter your language and preferences and hit next.

    •On the EULA (End User License Agreement) page accept the license terms, and click Next.

    •On Which type of installation do you want? page, click Custom.

    •On Where do you want to install Windows? page, click Drive options (advanced)

    •Click the partition that you want to change, click the formatting option that you want to perform, and then follow the instructions.

    •When you have finished formatting, click Next.

    •Follow the instructions to finish installation.

    With the release of Windows 8 right around the corner, if you plan on buying it (or just want to see what it’s all about), it’s a good idea to take advantage of the free trial before you shell out any money. If you’re an Apple user who doesn’t have a deep-seated disdain for Microsoft products, this tutorial will show you how to install the Windows 8 preview to try it out on your MacBook.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    First things first, you’ll want to download the Release Preview on Microsoft’s website (make sure to save the Product Key to validate it later). Next, we’ll create a bootable USB drive. You can do this a few different ways, depending on which OS you’re using.

    If you already have a PC running Windows, you can use Windows To Go (probably the easiest option). But if you’re an Apple purist, you can use Boot Camp Assistant to do the same thing. Just remember to back up any files on your USB drive that you’d like to keep before starting because both methods will erase all data on it.

    To use Boot Camp, go to Applications >> Utilities >> Boot Camp Assistant. Check all three boxes to create the bootable drive, download updates, and start the installation when they’re done. Then, just choose your USB drive when it prompts you. Note: Boot Camp will say it’s making a Windows 7 drive because the new OS isn’t officially out yet, but it works just the same.

    Next, Boot Camp will ask you to create a partition for Windows on your hard drive. If you have extra space, set aside more than the 20GB that Microsoft recommends, just to be sure. You can always change the size of the partition later if you need to.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Now, all that’s left to do is install it. When it asks you to select a partition, click on the one called BOOTCAMP, then delete it (just be sure that’s the only one you delete). Then, click New to create a new partition and select that one to finish installing.

    There will be a folder on your USB drive called WindowsSupport that will let you install Boot Camp after the installation is complete. This is a set of drivers that “support your Mac’s hardware, including AirPort, its built-in camera, the Apple Remote, the trackpad on a portable Mac, and the function keys on an Apple keyboard.” Once you’ve done this, all that’s left to do is restart your computer and you’re all set!

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Don’t want to permanently install Windows 8 on your Mac? You can also run it on a virtual machine so you can access both at the same time.

    Keep Your Connection Secure Without a Monthly Bill. Get a lifetime subscription to VPN Unlimited for all your devices with a one-time purchase from the new Gadget Hacks Shop, and watch Hulu or Netflix without regional restrictions, increase security when browsing on public networks, and more.

    Would you like to have a version of Windows that you can carry around in your pocket and use anywhere? Here’s how to make a USB drive with Windows 8.

    Wouldn’t it be cool to have a version of Windows that you can carry around in your pocket and use anywhere? Well, it’s possible and you don’t need to spend any extra money or have an Enterprise version of Windows. Here’s how to do it.

    Note: You can also use WinToUSB to create a bootable version of Windows 7, Windows 10 Technical Preview, and Server 2008 R2 or 2012 R2. For best results I recommend using Windows 8 since it’s more friendly to being portable than Windows 7. Also note that this is quite different than installing Windows from a flash drive.

    Windows 8 Enterprise edition has a feature called Windows To Go that allows you to install a portable version of Windows on a certified flash drive. However, most of us aren’t running running the Enterprise version of Windows, let alone able to find a “Windows certified” flash drive for it.

    Here’s What You’ll Need

    • A Windows 7 or higher ISO image
    • 32GB USB 2.0 or 3.0 Flash Drive — USB 3.0 will perform faster and you can also use a USB external hard drive for a faster experience via 2.0.
    • WinToUSB (Free)

    Create a Portable Version of Windows 8

    Start by installing WinToUSB and follow the installation wizard and accepting the default settings. There is NO weird toolbar or other crapware that the installer tries to sneak on your computer.

    Then launch WinToUSB and the first thing it will do is ask you to find your ISO (or DVD) version of Windows. Then select the version of the OS you want to use.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Then it will need to format your drive, there you can select the default which is MBR partition scheme and click OK.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Next, select your drive and select the system and boot partition. In most cases, on a freshly non-partitioned drive, you can just choose the default as show in the screenshot below.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Now get your favorite mobile game cued up on your smartphone because the installation is going to take an hour at least, but everyone’s mileage will vary depending on the speed of their hardware.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    That’s all there is to it! Now you can take your USB flash or hard drive and run the portable installation on whatever computer you want.

    To do it, you’ll need to plug the drive in, restart he computer you’re using, and boot to the USB drive. The first time it runs it will install drivers and take a bit of time to boot, and then set it up like you would a new install of Windows 8.x.

    Give it a try and let us know how it works for you in the comments below.

    cara instal windows 8 pada usb atau hardisk external

    By Mpchekuri on 2011-09-22 08:05:25 | From grabi.org

    This is the Video, you are going to see, How Windows 8 Running from an USB Drive. Watch it after the Break.

    How to Install Windows 8 on USB Drive/External Hard Drive or Disk

    Step 1 – You must have a 20GB or Higher USB Drive or an External Hard Disk of 500GB or more.

    Step 2 – If you are using a External Hard Drive, then make a Partition before Installing Windows 8 on That Disk (make a Partition of 50GB and Name it Windows 8)

    Step 3 – Now Insert Windows 8 Developer Preview on the CD/DVD Drive and Connect your USB or External Hard Drive/Disk to the Computer.

    Step 4 – Now Restart your Computer

    Step 5 – When Rebooting, just Select F2/F8 or Delete to Select the Bios Settings.

    Step 6 – In the Bios -> Boot Menu – Ist Priority select CD/DVD Drive and Second USB Drive (If Disabled, Enable it.) and Save it by pressing F10.

    Step 7 – Now Installing Windows 8 Starts.

    Step 8 – When you come to the Partition Selection Menu, scroll down and the Windows 8 Partition Section and Select that Partition that was in yoiur External Hard Drive/Disk.

    Step 9 – Format that Windows 8 Partition and click on Next to Install Windows 8 onto the USB Drive of External Hard Disk Drive.

    After 10 Minutes, you can See The Windows 8 Installed on your USB or External Hard Disk. Now once again Reboot your Computer, so that you can See Windows 8 and Otheer Operating System side by Side, and when you Remove the USB Drive or External Hard Drive then you will only see the Other (Windows 7 or Mac OS X) on the Screen.

    – Last updated on January 4, 2013 by VG

    One of the most impressive and most talked about features introduced in Windows 8 is “Windows To Go“. “Windows To Go” is a brand new feature ever introduced in any Windows version which helps users in creating a portable live version of fully functional Windows 8 OS which is known as “Windows To Go Workspace”. It saves the portable Windows 8 environment on a USB drive which can be used in any other PC to start Windows 8 immediately.

    If you have this portable version of Windows 8, you don’t need to install it again in any other computer system. You just need to insert the USB drive in the computer and boot the computer. That’s it. You’ll have a full version of Windows 8 running in that computer within seconds.

    This type of portable version of Windows 8 might become very useful if you are traveling and don’t have access to your personal computer. You just need to carry the USB drive with you and you can insert the USB drive in any other computer system and you are ready to work in your very own Windows 8 OS.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Although all types of USB drives should work for creating portable Windows 8 version but you should always use a USB drive having “Designed for Windows” logo on it. Regarding the host computer system which will run this portable Windows 8 version, it should pass the minimum system requirements to use Windows 7 or Windows 8 OS. If the computer system has been certified to use Windows 7 or Windows 8, it’ll run this portable version of Windows 8 without any problem. Basically the host computer system must have at least 1GHz processor and 2 GB RAM.

    Now the question comes how to create this portable version of Windows 8? The “Windows To Go” feature is only available in Windows 8 Enterprise edition so you’ll first need the Enterprise version. Don’t worry! You can download a 90-day trial version of fully functional Windows 8 Enterprise edition absolutely free using following link:

    Install Windows 8 Enterprise edition and then you can launch “Windows To Go” wizard from Control Panel. Follow the easy steps and you’ll have a bootable USB drive in your hand which will run a portable version of Windows 8 anywhere in any PC.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Now the good news is that Microsoft is offering a free guide for creating portable Windows 8 environment using Windows To Go feature which can be downloaded using following link:

    Its a .docx file which can be opened in a word processor such as Microsoft Word. Its a small guide consists of 7 pages only. It helps you in learning how to create the portable Windows 8 USB drive as well as how to use it in a host computer.

    Thanks to our friend Rob Margel for sharing it…

    You are here: Home » Windows 8 » [Guide] How to Create Portable Version of Windows 8 on USB Drive Using “Windows To Go” Feature?

    Published in: Windows 8

    About the author: Vishal Gupta (also known as VG) has been awarded with Microsoft MVP (Most Valuable Professional) award. He holds Masters degree in Computer Applications (MCA). He has written several tech articles for popular newspapers and magazines and has also appeared in tech shows on various TV channels.

    Comments

    NOTE: Older comments have been removed to reduce database overhead.

    They should have included this in Windows 7. This is possibly the only feature that has me truly interested in Windows 8.

    ^^ lol. At least there is something that you like about Windows 8. 😉

    The only problem is that it is only available with Windows 8 Enterprise.

    It’s good that Windows finally has this capability, though it is still unfortunately vastly inferior to Linux Live USBs. Only available on Enterprise? Requires an installation of an OS? You are only supposed to install a portable Windows 8 on a certified USB stick? Which needs to be a minimum of 32GB? I’m a Windows fanboy, but this seriously disappoints me.

    how much usb disk space is recomended and alas the feature is only in Enterprise Edition and me having Pro version :'(

    I assume that if we use the 90-day Enterprise edition the flash drive OS will also expire after 90 days. Please correct me if this is wrong.

    The reason why it’s only for Windows 8 Enterprise is because it is intended only for Enterprise customers. It is ideal for workplaces with many employees who move regularly from computer to computer and need to access their company files, intranet, etc. securely and to also have their own operating system that can be isolated from the computer’s local operating system.

    Seriously? Just use WinBuilder, you can have Win7 in an 8GB drive.

    ^^ always thought WinBuilder is for boot disks only. No?

    I’ll second Someone’s point. You have to EDIT the article to include the point that “TO GO” is only a part of Windows 8 Enterprise. The point should be made in the first paragraph!

    I too wish that MS had made a part of Windows 8 Pro.

    You can also install Windows 8 using Windows 7 ISO/Download Tool for alternative.

    hey vg , are there no 3rd party softwares to do the job . I desperately need one of them

    @Addy, use WinBuilder. You’ll need an ISO or a disc or a folder with the setup files to create ur Win XP, Vista, 7, 8 Standard/Pro live environment plus a usb to put ur windows to-go on.

    I have a portable version of XP its not official put same idea boot xp from cd(cant save changes) or usb. Also many distros of linux are portable

    The USB flash drive must be version 3.0. USB 2.0 devices should not work.

    Walter Glenn is a former Editorial Director for How-To Geek and its sister sites. He has more than 30 years of experience in the computer industry and over 20 years as a technical writer and editor. He’s written hundreds of articles for How-To Geek and edited thousands. He’s authored or co-authored over 30 computer-related books in more than a dozen languages for publishers like Microsoft Press, O’Reilly, and Osborne/McGraw-Hill. He’s also written hundreds of white papers, articles, user manuals, and courseware over the years. Read more.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    If you’d like to install Windows but don’t have a DVD drive, it’s easy enough to create a bootable USB flash drive with the right installation media. Here’s how to get it done for Windows 10, 8, or 7.

    In this guide, we’ll be making a simple USB drive that acts just like an installation DVD, and lets you install one version of Windows. If you’d like to create a USB drive from which you can install multiple versions of Windows, you’ll want to follow these instructions instead.

    Step One: Create or Download an ISO for the Windows Installation Media

    Before you can create your USB installation drive, you’ll need to have your Windows installation media available as an ISO file. If you already have an installation DVD, you can use it to create an ISO file using ImgBurn, a handy little free utility that’s been around forever. If you don’t have Windows installation DVD, you can download ISO files for Windows 10, 8, or 7 directly from Microsoft.

    You’ll also need a minimum of a 4GB flash drive to create your installer. Be sure to copy anything you want off of it, because this process will erase it. Once you have both your ISO and flash drive in hand, you’re ready to continue.

    Step Two: Create Your Installation USB Drive with the Windows USB/DVD Download Tool

    With your ISO file saved to your computer, your next step is to download and install the Windows USB/DVD Download Tool. The description on that page, on the actual download page, and on the tool itself talk a lot about Windows 7 and even XP. Don’t let that worry you. The tool works just fine for Windows 7, 8, and even 10.

    Once you’ve got the tool installed, creating your USB installation drive is a pretty straightforward process. Run the tool and give it permission to make changes to your PC. Click “Browse” to locate your Windows ISO file and then click “Next.”

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    On the next page, click “USB device.” The tool can also burn the ISO to a DVD if you need that option.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Use the drop-down menu to choose the USB flash drive you want to use. If you haven’t inserted it yet, do that now, and then click the Refresh button. Once you’ve got the right drive selected, click “Begin copying.”

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    If your USB drive has anything already on it, you’ll next see a warning that it will be formatted and you’ll lose any data stored on the drive. Go ahead and click “Erase USB Device.” If you started with a newly-formatted USB drive, you won’t see this warning.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Now you just have to wait for the process to complete, which usually takes 15-20 minutes. The drive will be formatted and files copied to the flash drive.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    When the process is finished, you can close the download tool.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    If you take a look at the flash drive in File Explorer, you’ll be able to see the same files that you would if you opened the installation DVD.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    And now that you have your installation USB drive, you can use it to start the computer on which you want to install Windows. You may have to fiddle with the BIOS on the computer to allow it to boot from USB or to change the boot order so that it will boot from the USB first. You may even be able to use the disk on computers that don’t support booting from USB, but you’ll need to take additional steps to create a bootable CD.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Microsoft has finally released the first Insider Preview build for Windows 11. Getting on that build is fairly simple from Windows 10. Just sign in with your Microsoft account on the Windows Insider Program, click the “Register” button, accept some T&Cs, and you should be in.

    Those who signed up for the Insider Build already have access to the update, but all hope is not lost for the enthusiasts who forgot to sign up for the Insider Preview builds.

    Today, we’ll talk about a workaround, and tell you how you can grab a copy of the latest Insider Preview build right now. Let’s get started.

    • How to create Windows 11 Insider Preview package
    • How to download Windows 11 Insider Preview ISO to your PC
    • How to install Windows 11 ISO
      • Method #01: Run the setup file
      • Method #02: Create a bootable pen drive and install from USB
    • What if ISO download fails?

    How to create Windows 11 Insider Preview package

    For this guide, we’ll be using a third-party tool called UUP Dump. What this tool essentially does is that it grabs all the latest updates directly from the Windows Update servers and makes it available for anyone to install. Another cool feature of this tool is that it can even convert the UUP(Unified Update Platform) packages to easy-to-install ISOs.

    First of all, you need to head over to uupdump.net and click on the ‘Downloads’ tab on the top left.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Once on the Downloads page, you’ll see a long list of builds with other related information, like ‘Architecture,’ ‘Date Added,’ and ‘Update ID.’

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    You’ll notice that the Architecture column has three unique variants, x64, x86, and arm64. You can use the x64 build for any AMD/Intel machine. arm64 is only to be used if your processor is running on the arm microarchitecture, like Apple’s newest M1 range of processors.

    From this list, pick one of the builds with the right Architecture for your PC that’s titled “Windows 11 Insider Preview 10.0.22000.51 (co_release)” as this is the latest preview build. Click on the build name to proceed to the next step.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Here you’ll need to select your OS language. You’re free to select any language you want from the dropdown menu and then click on “Next”.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    On this screen, you need to select the edition of Windows 11 that you wish to download. You’re free to keep those editions ticked if you want to have the option to try multiple editions without downloading each of them separately.

    For this guide, we’ll be proceeding with the “Windows 10 Pro” edition while unticking the rest. Once done, click on “Next”.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    On the “Summary for your selection” page, you’ll find a lot of options that are catered towards power users. To make things as simple as possible for a quick install, make sure that the Download Method is set to “Download and convert to ISO” (1), and untick all the boxes in Conversion options (2). Then finally click on “Create Download Package”.

    Tip: On the left side of the image, you can see the options that you have selected so far and double-check before proceeding.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    A small ZIP file will be downloaded which contains all the necessary files to download the Windows 11 Insider Preview build that we just finalized.

    How to download Windows 11 Insider Preview ISO to your PC

    Open and extract that zip somewhere on your PC. Once done, open the extracted folder, and you’ll find a bunch of files and three files with the prefix “uup_download_xxxxx.xx”.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Each of those three files is labeled according to the host operating system, i.e, the operating system that you’re currently using. If you’re using Window, open the “uup_download-windows” file, if you’re on macOS, then the one with “_macos”, and the same goes for Linux.

    We’re on Windows, so we’ll open the “_windows” file. Once opened, a Command Prompt/Terminal window will open up and after a few seconds of loading things up, you’ll see the download progress for your Windows 11 Insider Preview.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Once the download is finished, you’ll see something like below.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    You can confirm the file download by opening the extracted folder. Once there, you should be able to find the downloaded ISO in the tools folder itself.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    How to install Windows 11 ISO

    Well, that’s pretty basic work. You can either run the ISO file, or if you wish to install it from the boot menu, then you will need to create a bootable disc first. We have covered both the methods below:

    Method #01: Run the setup file

    Double-click the ISO file to mount it and open it too right there. Now, click the Setup file to run the Windows 11 installation.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Or load up Rufus to create an installation media for your PC. Once you run the Setup file, you’ll see that an update is being prepared and will get the Windows 11 installation screen.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Method #02: Create a bootable pen drive and install from USB

    You can use software like Rufus to create installation media using a Pen drive for your PC. Once you have the Windows 11 bootable pend drive, restart your PC to boot into the boot menu or UEFI BIOS menu, and select the pen drive containing the Windows 11 installation.

    Here our guides on creating a bootable pen drive using the Windows 11 ISO and then installing the same using a USB pen drive.

    What if ISO download fails?

    Note: If for some reason, your download gets interrupted and you get a download failed message, you can simply re-open the downloader script and it’ll resume downloading the remaining files. The downloader is smart enough to skip (after verifying) the files that were successfully downloaded.

    Windows 8 build 7850, the first leaked Windows 8 build, may be old (it was compiled on September 22, 2010) as it’s from Milestone 1, but it actually does contain something we haven’t seen before. There are a number of references to a brand new feature in Windows called Portable Workspaces, discovered by users on the My Digital Life forums (via WinRumors).

    Here is the full description of the feature, which requires 16GB of space, as seen in the early Windows 8 build:

    Portable Workspace Creator
    Portable Workspace is a Windows feature that allows you to run Windows from a USB storage device.
    To create a Portable Workspace, you need access to Windows 8 Enterprise Edition installation files and a USB storage device with the following features:
    The device appears as fixed storage media.
    There is sufficient space for a full installation of Windows 8 Enterprise Edition.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Windows enthusiasts have been putting the operating system on USB drives for years, but having Microsoft officially support the feature should ease the process. It appears Microsoft is targeting the feature at business customers and IT professionals who want to use the latest version of Windows on a computer which they do not want to modify.

    It’s not yet clear exactly how Portable Workspaces work once created. It would be nice if the feature would let you bring your whole workstation with you on your USB drive. The initial setup (putting a fresh installation of Windows 8 on your USB device) would surely take a while, but afterwards syncing what’s on your PC should not take very long.

    Maybe I’m expecting a little too much from this feature, but I can envision many scenarios in which I would rather take just my 16GB USB stick with me instead of my whole laptop. Once at another computer, I could access all my files and programs as needed. My USB stick is on my keychain anyway, so it never leaves my side, while obviously my laptop is not as convenient to bring along.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    If you’re new to the Windows Insider program and you do not have a compatible PC, you’ll see the following error message when attempting to install Windows 11: Your PC does not meet the minimum hardware requirements for Windows 11. Your channel options will be limited.

    On June 24, Microsoft announced Windows 11 and promised that users in the Windows Insider program would be able to download the builds by joining the Dev ring. However, there are exceptions to which PCs can install the Windows 11 beta builds.

    If you’ve been installing builds on your PC or virtual machine up through June 24, you can go ahead and install the preview of new Windows even if your machine does not meet the hardware requirements: newer CPU and TPM 2.0.

    If you missed the deadline of June 24 and your device does not meet the requirements, your channel options will be limited on the Windows Insider program page and the following error message will appear:

    Your PC does not meet the minimum hardware requirements for Windows 11

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Thankfully, you can make minor changes to Windows Registry to enroll into the Dev Channel and receive Windows 11 Insider preview builds.

    Install Windows 11 beta builds on unsupported devices

    To install Windows 11 preview on unsupported devices, follow these steps:

    1. Backup Windows Registry.
    2. Open Windows Settings > Update & Security > Windows Insider Program.
    3. Click on ‘Get Started’ and connect your Microsoft account used for registering to the Insider program.
    4. Select the available channel: Release preview.
    5. Click on ‘Restart‘ when prompted.
    6. Reboot.
    7. Open the Windows Insider program and check if the Dev Channel option is available.
    8. If it is not available, type “Regedit” in the Start menu.
    9. On the Registry Editor, navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsSelfHost\UI\Selection
    10. Double-tap on the UIBranch key on the right side of the window.
      How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb
    11. Change the value to Dev from ReleasePreview.
    12. Change ContentType to Mainline
    13. Change Ring key to External
    14. On the Registry Editor, now navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsSelfHost\Applicability
    15. Change BranchName key to Dev
      How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb
    16. Make sure ContentType key value is Mainline and Ring is set to External
    17. Close the Registry Editor.
    18. Reboot.
    19. Open the Windows Insider Program program and make sure that your settings are correct (i.e Dev is selected).

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Once done, you can now start testing the Windows 11 preview builds on your unsupported device. However, if you start using the preview builds on unsupported devices, you need to roll back to Windows 10 when Windows 11 is generally available (exists preview) and your device does not meet the requirements at that time.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    To check compatibility for Windows 11, you can either use Microsoft’s PC Health app or manually verify the requirements.

    You can check TPM compatibility by running Get-Tpm command in PowerShell (elevated). For CPUs, Microsoft says Intel’s 8th generation processors and Ryzen 2000 or newer are currently supported.

    Enable Windows 11 Dev Channel on unsupported device (method 2)

    If you don’t have a Microsoft account, there’s a simple script to join Dev Channel on unsupported devices and install Windows 11 builds:

    • Download the script from the GitHub website.
    • Right-click on the script and select “run as administrator”.
    • The command line window will display the available Windows Insider Program channels.
    • Select “Dev Channel” by pressing the corresponding number.
      How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb
    • Press Enter-key.
    • Reboot.
    • Go to Windows Update and click on check for updates, and the build will start downloading.

    OfflineInsiderEnroll is a simple script and it can be used on a device with a local account, but you’ll need to set the Telemetry setting to Full to receive preview builds.

    If you’re planning to clean install the new Windows, you may need to bypass TPM 2.0 requirements by modifying the registry during the installation screen.

    • By Wayne Williams
    • Published 8 years ago

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usbThe Enterprise edition of Windows 8.x has a feature called Windows To Go that lets you create a working version of Microsoft’s tiled operating system on a USB memory stick. You can boot into this and be instantly up and running in the new OS from any computer. Which is great — provided you have the Enterprise edition of the OS and a “certified” USB drive. If you only have the standard version of Windows 8.x then the option isn’t available to you.

    But there is a very easy way you can build a personalized and bootable copy of Windows 8 or 8.1 on a USB drive, for use anywhere. All you need is a USB 3.0 device with at least 13GB capacity (it will run on a USB 2.0 memory stick, but slowly), a copy of Windows 8.x (either an installation disc or an ISO — you can get the Windows 8.1 ISO by following these instructions but you will need a Windows 8.1 key), and a free partitioning program. Here’s what you need to do.

    Firstly download AOMEI Partition Assistant Standard Edition (formerly Home Edition). If you have a Windows 8 or 8.1 installation disc insert it into your DVD drive. If you have an ISO file mount it as a virtual drive using a tool like ImDisk (or similar) or you can burn it to disc — the choice is yours. The program can’t create the bootable USB operating system from an unmounted image unfortunately.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usbPlug the USB drive into your PC. Run AOMEI Partition Assistant and click the Windows To Go Creator link on the left hand side.

    Make sure the correct USB drive is selected (any content on the drive will be wiped during the creation process so this is a vital step), and click Browse. Partition Assistant should identify the Windows 8 installation file it needs (named install.wim) but you can browse for the file manually if it doesn’t for some reason. You’ll find it in the \sources folder.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Click Proceed. The creation process will start. Remember, any existing data on the drive will be overwritten so make sure you’ve backed it up. Depending on the type (and quality) of the USB drive, you might be waiting for a couple of hours or even longer for everything to complete so just leave it to get on with things.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    When the task is completed, you can boot into the OS from any computer. The first time you run it you’ll be prompted to enter your Windows key and will then need to set up Windows as you would any new installation.

    Although it will work like any Windows install, the portable version has some restrictions — Windows Store isn’t available in Windows to Go workspaces, for example.

    The beautiful Windows 8 Consumer Preview is upon is, and although it’s not the final version, it’s getting close. This isn’t just for developers—it’s for you. So get downloading and start using Microsoft’s amazing new beginning.

    Are you already a Windows diehard? Or an Apple user, looking to see how the other half lives? Either way, we’ve got you covered like a thick flannel blanket. Made out of preview software.

    First things first: download Windows 8

    Then you need to put that file on something you can install it with. That means either burning the ISO disc image to a DVD or copying it to a USB flash drive. A little annoying, but that comes with the territory when installing a separate operating system.

    Whether you’re using Windows or OS X , this feature is built right in.

    Win 7 Tip: ISO Disc Image Burning Is Built Right In

    Windows 7’s ISO burning feature isn’t all that useful for a majority of people, but for the small…

    Experience Next-Level Sound
    Spatial audio with dynamic head tracking provides theater-like sound that surrounds you

    Now let’s install that sucker. (If you’re prompted for an activation key, use this: DNJXJ-7XBW8-2378T-X22TX-BKG7J)

    Are you on a PC?

    Once you’ve got the Windows 8 file, you’ll want to install it alongside the current version you’re using—this will allow you to dip your toes in without committing, but requires some minor hard drive futzing.

    If you want to run Windows 8 on its own slice of hard drive real estate, you’ll need to create a disk partition—clearing out a blank space on your computer for Windows 8 to settle into. This is easy! Our pals at Lifehacker have a full guide if you need it, but you really only need to follow this:

    Install Windows 8 from a USB Stick

    Many netbooks and low-profile laptops are ditching the optical drive in favor of portability, which

    Open the Start Menu and right click on the “Computer” option. Click “Manage”, and in the window that appears, click on “Disk Management” in the left sidebar.

    Find your system hard disk in the graphical list that appears in the bottom pane. Right-click on it and then click “Shrink Volume”. Shrink it down so you have at least 20GB of space left on the end of the drive, and click OK. Then, click on the “Unallocated” block of that drive that appears and click “New Simple Volume”. Click Next on the next few windows until you get to the “Format Partition” window. Here, give it a volume label you’ll recognize (like “Windows 8”) and click Next. It should format the drive for you. Now you’re all set to install Windows 8.

    Your PC will now boot into Windows 8 by default, but if you want your previous version to auto-start, go to “Change Defaults or Choose Other Options” from the Windows 8 boot menu.

    You’ve now got a two-headed computer.

    Are you on a Mac?

    Taking your Apple down the Windows trail is a little bit more complex, but not enough to keep you from going nuts. Apple has a special tool to get Windows running on your computer—Boot Camp. Guess what! It’s already on your computer: Applications > Utilities > Boot Camp.

    NOTE: We’re encountering some problems at the office trying to get Boot Camp to create a Windows 8 installation flash drive via MacBook Air. It’s possible the method that worked for the Developer build won’t work for the Consumer Preview. We’ll keep you updated.

    Pop that open, click Continue, and select “I have already downloaded the Windows support software,” create a partition for Win 8 (Boot Camp will divvy off a chunk of your hard drive for you), and then Boot Camp will walk you through the rest like installing anything else (watch this video from 3:00 onward if you need visual guidance). We promise it’s an easy step. You’ll automatically boot into Windows, but hold down the option key on your next restart to switch operating systems.

    You’re now using Windows 8. Tell us what you think.

    But remember: not only is this a beta product several months away from release, it’s also dramatically different from any operating system you’ve used before. So proceed with the knowledge that you’ll volunteering to be Microsoft’s guinea pig.

    Microsoft introduced a search bar on the desktop in Build 25120 that was released yesterday to the Dev Channel in the Insider Preview Program. The feature is being tested on a limited basis, so not everyone has access to it. But, if you can’t want to try it, we show you how to enable the search widget in Windows 11 right now.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    How to enable the search widget in Windows 11

    1. Download the ViveTool application from its GitHub page.

    2. Extract the ZIP file’s contents to any folder.

    3. Open a Terminal window as an administrator.

    4. Copy and paste the following code in the window.

    .\vivetool addconfig 37969115 2

    The command window should display a message that says “Successfully set feature configuration”.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Accessing the search bar

    Close the command window, and go to your desktop screen. The search bar won’t be visible on it, even though you just enabled it. You can access it without rebooting the computer.

    1. Right-click anywhere on the desktop, and select Show More Options.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    2. This menu has a “Show Search” option, it will have a checkmark next to it.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    3. Toggle the option to disable it.

    Repeat the above steps, and you should see the search widget on the desktop. Give it a try.

    Don’t like it? Use the following command to remove the search bar.

    .\vivetool delconfig 37969115 2

    You will need to restart Explorer.exe from the Task Manager, or restart the computer to apply the changes.

    A few observations about the search widget in Windows 11

    When you type your query in it, the search bar will display some results in a pane, aka search suggestions. Click on it, or hit the Enter key and Windows 11 will open the results via Bing, in Microsoft Edge. Entering a URL such as ghacks.net will directly open the website in Edge.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    There are no options to configure the widget’s behavior. The biggest issue here is that all results from the widget are opened in Microsoft Edge, even if you have set a different program as your default web browser. There aren’t any keyboard shortcuts to access the tool. The search widget’s right-click menu has some basic options to edit the text.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    Having tried it out, I think the widget is sort of pointless, as you can do the same things (paste a URL, or perform web searches) directly from the Start Menu. The new search widget in Windows 11 is quite obtrusive, since it is not opaque it hides part of the wallpaper. It stays on the desktop permanently with no option to hide it, and you cannot move the widget or resize it either. The widget is still in an early phase, so hopefully we can expect some improvements to it in the future.

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    If you really need a similar search tool/launcher app, try Microsoft PowerToys. It has a utility called PowerToys Run, which has more options than the new widget, as it can be used to search files on your computer, open applications, etc. The app is similar to the Spotlight tool in macOS. PowerToys Run tool hides automatically when not in use, and you can trigger it using Alt + Space. It also respects your default browser setting to handle web searches.

    The Everything desktop search engine is an excellent alternative as well, and you can use the Everything Toolbar to access it quickly from the Taskbar.

    Have you tried the new search widget in Windows 11?

    – Last updated on June 1, 2012 by VG

    After releasing Developer Preview and Consumer Preview builds of Windows 8 , Microsoft has finally released “Release Preview” build of Windows 8 to public which can be downloaded and tested absolutely free as usual.

    This new “Release Preview” build is actually the “Release Candidate” (RC) build of Windows 8 which means there are very less chances that Microsoft will add any new feature or make major UI changes in final RTM build of Windows 8. You should expect only bug fixes and performance enhancements in RTM build. The only UI change which you might see in RTM build is the removal of Aero glass as mentioned by Microsoft in a recent official post at Windows 8 blog.

    Interested people can download Windows 8 Release Preview build using following links:

    Release Preview of Windows 8 will expire on January 15th, 2013.

    Windows 8 Release Preview is available in Arabic, English, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese (Brazil), Russian, Spanish, Swedish, and Turkish languages.

    Both 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x64) versions are available for download.

    If the setup asks for a product key at installation time, please use following product key provided by Microsoft:

    TK8TP-9JN6P-7X7WW-RFFTV-B7QPF

    Windows 8 Release Preview Setup will check to see if your PC can run Windows 8 and select the right download. Setup also features a compatibility report and upgrade assistance. Built-in tools for creating an ISO or bootable flash drive are available for some previous versions of Windows (excluding Windows XP and earlier).

    One more thing, you can upgrade to Windows 8 Release Preview from Windows 8 Consumer Preview, Windows 8 Developer Preview, Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP, but you might not be able to keep all of your files, programs, and settings. Check out FAQ topic for more details.

    Also check out our review of Windows 8 at following link which will help you in getting used to new features in Windows 8:

    Let’s tell you again that Microsoft has removed Start button and Start Menu from Windows 8, if you want to get them back, check out following tutorials:

    Also check out following article containing a list of some hidden secret stuff present in Windows 8:

    And if you are facing problem in shutting down or restart Windows 8 PC, check out following topics:

    Many other interesting and useful articles can be read in our exclusive Windows 8 section, so don’t forget to check it.

    Once you download and install Windows 8 Release Preview, feel free to share your feedback and experience in your comment…

    You are here: Home » Windows 8 » Download Windows 8 Free Release Preview (RC Build)

    Published in: Windows 8

    About the author: Vishal Gupta (also known as VG) has been awarded with Microsoft MVP (Most Valuable Professional) award. He holds Masters degree in Computer Applications (MCA). He has written several tech articles for popular newspapers and magazines and has also appeared in tech shows on various TV channels.

    Comments

    NOTE: Older comments have been removed to reduce database overhead.

    you guys should thank me for this; i was the first to find out

    ^^ I think you are not subscribed to AskVG on Facebook, Twitter or Google Plus. We are continuously posting updates for Windows 8 Release Preview there since a few hours. 😉

    Thanks for the notice, downloading it now.

    I also see that Visual Studio 2012 RC is out too. Downloading that as well.

    can i get a torrent download link for windows 8 release preview please?

    Thank You
    Shon John Xander

    removal of Aero glass mean that transparent task bar as m using in windows 7 will not b available in windows 8.

    ^^ Taskbar will have a little glass effect.

    @Shon John Xander
    No official torrent available but you can search for a torrent using a search engine. Downloading directly from official Microsoft website is always recommended.

    Dear VG, I have download the customer preview of win8 but when I had trying to install the package had refused the key to authenticated and I’ve unable to install. Please help me

    ^^ Thats strange. Following is the only official product key provided by Microsoft and it worked for me:

    Dear VG, This is the same key that I was tried, I have use USB method for Installation, is it is correct or go with DVD mode, Kindly expalined and help me

    ^^ I also installed Windows 8 by creating bootable USB drive and the key worked for me.

    Can we use aerovg Se7en on win8rc to get aero

    ^^ No. Windows 7 themes will not work in Windows 8.

    Today, we unveiled Windows 11 to the world, and we know Windows Insiders are super excited to get their hands on it! As Panos mentions here, we plan to release the first Insider Preview build for Windows 11 next week. However ahead of that release – we wanted to let Insiders know of a few changes we are making to how they will receive Windows 11 Insider Preview builds going forward.

    Since launching Windows 10 six years ago, a lot of hardware innovation has happened in the PC space. For Windows to move forward and take better advantage of the latest innovations, we need to update the baseline system requirements for modern PCs. As a result, Windows 11 has updated hardware requirements which will be reflected in the Windows Insider Program. This blog post will outline what this means for Insiders new to flighting as well as Insiders who have already been flighting Insider Preview builds.

    If you are new to flighting Insider Preview builds:

    Welcome! After registering for the Windows Insider Program on the web or directly via Settings > Update & Security > Windows Insider Program, opt-in your PC to flight Insider Preview builds via Settings and it will guide you through what options are available based on the hardware specifications for your PC.

    We invite PCs that do not meet the new hardware requirements for Windows 11 to join the Release Preview Channel to preview updates for Windows 10.

    If you are already flighting Insider Preview builds:

    If you are already flighting Insider Preview builds, please take a look at the below chart to understand your PC’s eligibility for Windows 11 Insider Preview builds.

    In support of the Windows 11 hardware requirements, we’re setting the minimum requirements for flighting to match what is enforced within our media install experience (ISOs), but we recommend that PCs meet the full hardware requirements for the best experience when using Windows 11 Insider Preview builds. You can use the PC Health Check app here to see if your PC meets these requirements. UPDATE 6/28 at 12:30pm PDT: See this blog post on an update on Windows 11 minimum system requirements.

    Warning: Installation on PCs below Windows 11 hardware requirements can result in a degraded experience & some features may not work properly.

    Warning: Installation on PCs below Windows 11 hardware requirements can result in a degraded experience & some features may not work properly.

    While we recommend that all PCs meet the full hardware requirements for Windows 11, we are allowing some limited exceptions as we apply these new restrictions. All Windows Insiders who have already been installing builds from the Dev Channel on their PCs up through June 24, 2021 will be allowed to continue installing Windows 11 Insider Preview builds even if their PC does not meet the minimum hardware requirements. Insiders with PCs already in the Dev Channel have been installing and giving feedback on builds with Windows 11 features since last year. Our way of saying thanks is to go ahead and give them the opportunity to see everything come together. However, this comes with some important tradeoffs we want to call attention to:

    • Because these devices do not meet the new hardware requirements, there may be issues and bugs that impact the experience of Windows 11 on these PCs that may not get fixed.
    • If at any point something goes wrong on one of these PCs that requires having to go back to Windows 10, you can use the media creation tool here to go back to the Windows 10. These PCs will not be given another exception and not allowed to upgrade to Windows 11 Insider Preview builds again. They will be treated as a new PC and the minimum hardware requirements will be enforced as highlighted above.
    • Once Windows 11 is generally available, these PCs will be opted out of flighting and will not be able to receive future Windows 11 Insider Preview builds. These PCs must clean install back to Windows 10 with the media (ISOs) that we provide and can then join the Release Preview Channel to preview Windows 10 updates.

    Preparing the Beta Channel for Insider Preview builds of Windows 11

    In preparation for releasing Windows 11 Insider Preview builds to the Beta Channel later this summer, we are moving PCs that do not meet the hardware requirements for Windows 11 in the Beta Channel to the Release Preview Channel. Some of these PCs may be able to move back to the Beta Channel, but at their own risk. See the above chart for details.

    We realize this is a bit of a change, but this will ensure Windows Insiders have the best possible experience with Windows 11 Insider Preview builds on their PCs. We have set up a Microsoft Answers forum post here to address any questions Insiders might have.

    We can’t tell you how excited we are to finally share the first full preview with our Insiders next week!

    How to run windows 8 developer preview from a usb

    In this simple step by step tutorial we will tell you how to create Windows 10 Bootable USB Flash Drive using either of Two methods: Using Rufus that works for any Windows 10 Build including Insider Preview builds and Media Creation Tool (MCT) that lets you create Bootable USB Windows 10 Drive for the Official general release Windows 10 Build.

    Using Rufus (Method 1):

    This works for any of the the Windows 10 Builds, officially released for everyone or even for Insider Preview Builds.

    1) As the first step you need to download ISO for the Windows 10 Build you want to create Bootable USB drive for. You can check our downloads section for ISO download links for many Builds. For the Windows 10 official ISO download click here.

    2) USB drive should ideally have minimum 4 GB for the Windows 10 32-bit version and 8 GB for the Windows 10 64-bit version.

    3) Now Download Rufus (.exe file) to your desktop from here. Rufus doesn’t need any installation and the .exe file is ready to use.

    4) Connect the USB Flash Drive to PC that you want to make Bootable

    5) Run the Rufus .exe file, and click/tap on Yes if prompted by UAC.

    6) Set Rufus using the settings below which are valid for both 32-Bit and 64-Bit Windows 10 ISO files.

    • Device option: Select the USB flash drive you want to format
    • Format Options:
      • Check create a bootable disk using
      • select the ISO Image option
      • Click/tap on the Disk icon to navigate to and select your 32-bit or 64-bit Windows 10 ISO file
      • Select Standard Windows installation
    • Partition scheme and target system type: MBR partition scheme for BIOS or UEFI-CSM under
    • File system: NTFS
    • Cluster size: Default value (4096 bytes)
    • Format Options:
      • Check, Quick format
      • Check, Create extended label and icon files
    • New volume label: Any name that suites your taste

    7) Tap / Click on start and click ok on the next prompt to confirm

    8) Rufus will start creating the Bootable USB Drive and it may take around 5 minutes to accomplish this task or even more.

    Using official Media Creation Tool (Method 2):

    It is quite easy to use and if you check our tutorial on updating to Windows 10 and downloading official ISOs, we have also shared steps to create Bootable USB drive using Media Creation Tool. So, as you can understand it works only for the official Windows 10 general release build.

    Find the media creation tool on the Software download page.

    There are two versions of the tool, one for a “32-bit operating system” and one for a “64-bit operating system.” To find out which you have, go to Start , type Control panel , select System and security , and then, under System , look at the value for System type.

    If your PC is a 32-bit operating system, on the Software download page, select Download tool now (32-bit version) . If your PC is a 64-bit operating system, select Download tool now (64-bit version) .

    When you’re asked, select Run (or choose to Save the tool if you don’t want to run it now).

    Select Create installation media for another PC.

    • Choose the language, edition, and architecture (64-bit or 32-bit) for Windows 10. Check the screenshot below that shows how one can choose these options.
    • Now choose USB Flash Drive option in the next screen and click on next
    • A blank USB or DVD (and DVD burner) with at least 4 GB of space if you want to create media. We recommend using a blank USB or blank DVD, because any content on it will be deleted.
    • Connect your USB flash drive, click/tap on the Refresh drive list link, select the USB flash drive, and click/tap on Next.
    • After the download is complete and the Bootable media is created, select Finish

    In case you want to read our step by step tutorial about how to do a clean install of Windows 10 next by using Bootable USB created by following above steps, click here.