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How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Do you want to search for an old Tweet or find a specific Tweet? Discover exactly what you’re looking for in search

Advanced search is available when you’re logged in to twitter.com. It allows you to tailor search results to specific date ranges, people and more. This makes it easier to find specific Tweets.

  1. Enter your search into the search bar on twitter.com.
  2. Click Advanced search, located underneath Search filters on the upper right of your results page, or click More options and then click Advanced search.
  3. Fill in the appropriate fields to refine your search results (see below for some helpful tips).
  4. Click Search to see your results.

How to refine your advanced search

Using advanced search, you can refine your search results by using any combination of the fields below:

  • Tweets containing all words in any position (“Twitter” and “search”)
  • Tweets containing exact phrases (“Twitter search”)
  • Tweets containing any of the words (“Twitter” or “search”)
  • Tweets excluding specific words (“Twitter” but not “search”)
  • Tweets with a specific hashtag (#twitter)
  • Tweets in a specific language (written in English)
  • Tweets from a specific account (Tweeted by “@TwitterComms”)
  • Tweets sent as replies to a specific account (in reply to “@TwitterComms”)
  • Tweets that mention a specific account (Tweet includes “@TwitterComms”)
  • Tweets sent from a geographic location, e.g. a specific city, state, country
    • Use the place dropdown to select the geographic location
  • Tweets sent before a specific date, after a specific date or within a date range
    • Use the calendar dropdown to select a “from” date, “to” date or both
  • Search for Tweets from any date since the first public Tweet

By combining fields in advanced search, you can tailor your search results in a powerful way. For example, if you’re looking for an old Tweet you sent about what you did on New Year’s day, you can search for Tweets containing “New Years” but excluding “Resolution” between December 30, 2013 and January 2, 2014. You can also search for Tweets in English by using the hashtag. For example, “#WorldCup” sent from Brazil in July 2014 will show you Tweets about the world cup that year.

If you have more questions about advanced search, you can contact our Support team.

Justin Pot has been writing about technology for over a decade, with work appearing in Digital Trends, The Next Web, Lifehacker, MakeUseOf, and the Zapier Blog. He also runs the Hillsboro Signal, a volunteer-driven local news outlet he founded. Read more.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Twitter launched in March 2006, which is crazy: that’s over a decade ago! Even weirder: all the old tweets from that pre-historic era are still out there.

Which begs the question: can you dig up really old things that your friends said back in the day? Or perhaps, things your boss said?

Halo 2 came out in 2004, so even in 2009 this reference was pretty dated. And how does one beat Tetris? Clearly this guy is a moron, and deserves to be publicly ridiculed. I was able to find this because Twitter makes it possible to search the entirety of their archive. Here’s how it works, and how you can really dial down and find something specific.

Getting Started With Advanced Twitter Search

First, head to advanced Twitter search. You’ll see all sorts of options. The first section, Words, gives you a few ways to specify words that are and are not included.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

If there’s a particular tweet in your head, start here. “All of these words” lets you search for a combination of words in no particular order, while “This exact phrase” will work as though you’re putting the phrase in quotes on Google. “Any of these words” is useful if you’re not sure about the exact wording, while “None of these words” lets you filter Tweets with words unrelated to what you’re looking for. Finally, you can search for hashtags or specific languages.

It’s a lot of options, but we’re just getting started. To really find a specific tweet, you need to filter things according to user.

Search for Specific Users or Conversations

The second section lets you specify accounts involved in a particular conversation. You can search for tweets that come from particular accounts, but also tweets that are directed at a particular account.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

With the above queries, I found a bunch of tweets between two of my co-workers going pretty far back in time.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Yep, 8GB of memory is more than enough!

Note that the third box allows you to specify accounts mentioned in a particular tweet, assuming someone is mentioned in a tweet not directed at them.

Search for Tweets Within a Given Date Range

Of course, if you want to find really old tweets, you need to specify that. The final section, “Dates”, lets you do so. Click a field and you’ll see a calendar.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Pick a date, or tap on the month and year to quickly choose a month or year.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Specifying a date range far back enough can really narrow the tweets you find, allowing you to find ancient conversations that you’d forgotten about entirely.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

With all of these tools combined, you can search for just about anything. Give it a shot: dig through your friend’s accounts, or even your own, and see what you can find.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Twitter launched in March 2006, which is crazy: that’s over a decade ago! Even weirder: all the old tweets from that pre-historic era are still out there.

Which begs the question: can you dig up really old things that your friends said back in the day? Or perhaps, things your boss said?

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Halo 2 came out in 2004, so even in 2009 this reference was pretty dated. And how does one beat Tetris? Clearly this guy is a moron, and deserves to be publicly ridiculed. I was able to find this because Twitter makes it possible to search the entirety of their archive. Here’s how it works, and how you can really dial down and find something specific.

Getting Started With Advanced Twitter Search

First, head to advanced Twitter search. You’ll see all sorts of options. The first section, Words, gives you a few ways to specify words that are and are not included.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

If there’s a particular tweet in your head, start here. “All of these words” lets you search for a combination of words in no particular order, while “This exact phrase” will work as though you’re putting the phrase in quotes on Google. “Any of these words” is useful if you’re not sure about the exact wording, while “None of these words” lets you filter Tweets with words unrelated to what you’re looking for. Finally, you can search for hashtags or specific languages.

It’s a lot of options, but we’re just getting started. To really find a specific tweet, you need to filter things according to user.

Search for Specific Users or Conversations

The second section lets you specify accounts involved in a particular conversation. You can search for tweets that come from particular accounts, but also tweets that are directed at a particular account.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

With the above queries, I found a bunch of tweets between two of my co-workers going pretty far back in time.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Yep, 8GB of memory is more than enough!

Note that the third box allows you to specify accounts mentioned in a particular tweet, assuming someone is mentioned in a tweet not directed at them.

Search for Tweets Within a Given Date Range

Of course, if you want to find really old tweets, you need to specify that. The final section, “Dates”, lets you do so. Click a field and you’ll see a calendar.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Pick a date, or tap on the month and year to quickly choose a month or year.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Specifying a date range far back enough can really narrow the tweets you find, allowing you to find ancient conversations that you’d forgotten about entirely.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

With all of these tools combined, you can search for just about anything. Give it a shot: dig through your friend’s accounts, or even your own, and see what you can find.

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Twitter’s default search function can be great for seeing the general consensus on a topic, or finding an account. But it’s not so great when you’re trying to find a single tweet or thread.

That’s where advanced search comes in. Available on the Twitter website, advanced search lets you look for tweets that contain specific words, that were sent during specific dates, or that were written by specific users. That last feature is possibly the most important — it lets you search through a single user’s tweets to find any tweet they’ve sent.

Aside from letting you see if your favorite user has tweeted about a topic you’re interested in, disinformation experts also use this feature to debunk hoaxes. If you see a screenshot of something that a celebrity allegedly tweeted, for instance, you can use advanced search to see if it’s actually real.

Here’s how to search someone’s tweets for anything.

How to search through someone’s tweets

1. Head to the Twitter website and use the search bar in the top-right corner to search for anything.

2. At the top of the search results page, click the three dot icon (. ) next to the search bar, and then Advanced search.

3. A pop-up will appear with a variety of text boxes. Scroll down to Accounts and in the From these accounts field, type in the username of the person whose tweets you want to search. You’ll need to put in their exact @ name — you won’t get suggestions.

4. Scroll back up to Words and specify what keywords or phrases you want to search that user’s tweets for. You can also use the None of these words field to exclude tweets that have those words.

5. If you’d like, scroll down to the Filters, Engagements, and Dates sections to make your search even more precise.

6. Click Search in the top-right.

You’ll be brought to a page with your search results. If you’d like to refine your search, just click the three dot icon and Advanced search again.

Get your business started on Twitter with our free guide and template.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Let’s say you want to find a specific @elonmusk tweet about machine learning, but can’t find the tweet when you scroll back in your feed.

Or you’re hosting a “2018 web design” webinar and want to compile a list of experts using Twitter.

Or maybe you just want to see Twitter conversations between @garyvee and @bcuban from 2016.

There’s no denying that Twitter is a great social media tool. But with 300 million people using Twitter every month, it’s often tricky to find the information you need.

Twitter’s regular search feature can’t help you find any highly specific information. Luckily, Twitter’s advanced search can.

But using advanced search isn’t as intuitive as using the basic search functions, so we’ve covered the four steps to master advanced search. Once you have these down, you can explore the various search fields depending on your search intent.

How do you use Twitter Advanced Search?

  1. Enter your search into the search bar on Twitter.
  2. At the top left of your results page, click “Search filters” and then “Advanced search.”
  3. Fill in the appropriate fields to refine search results.
  4. Click “search” to see results.

Okay, so let’s get to it. Here are the four steps you need to use Twitter’s advanced search.

1. Enter your search terms into the search bar on Twitter.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

2. At the top left of your results page, click “Advanced Search” or select filters you’d like to use under the “Search filters” tab.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

3. Fill in the appropriate fields to refine search results.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

4. Click “search” to see results.

In the example above, I used advanced search to see every time @HubSpot mentioned the TV show Game of Thrones after January 1, 2018.

I needed to use the “exact phrase” because, as I learned through trial and error, “any of these words” produced results for anytime HubSpot mentioned the word “game,” “of,” or “thrones.”

This broadened my results, but didn’t provide accuracy.

If I wanted to find other information regarding Game of Thrones, I could search “these hashtags” (#gameofthrones) to see tweets where GoT is mentioned.

I could also see if @GameofThrones has mentioned @HubSpot (they haven’t …).

I could even choose a specific place and time if I wanted to know what people were saying about GoT last September in Ireland.

The advanced search fields provide ample opportunities to explore Twitter’s deep crevices, including:

  • “all of these words” to ensure you’re narrowing in on a specific query
  • “any of these words” to broaden your research scope
  • “none of these words” to exclude irrelevant search information
  • “these hashtags” to find popular topics.
  • “from account” and “to account” to see interactions between specific people
  • “mentioning these accounts” to see who’s talking about you

How to Search Tweets From a Specific Account

If you want to look for tweets from a specific account, advanced search can help with this too. When you get to the Advanced Search tab in step three, scroll down to Accounts and type in the handle of the account you’d like to search.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Another method you can use is by search code, which is also fairly simple.

First, go to your search bar and type in the phrase, “from:,” followed by the account name.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitterClick “Search,” and then you will have all mentions, tweets, and media from the account you searched.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitterThis is a good alternative to advance search if you want to see an overview of the account you’re looking for, not just a specific few keywords.

Now that you know how to Twitter search like a pro, try it yourself.

Editor’s Note: This blog post was originally published in March 2018, but was updated in November 2019 for comprehensiveness.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Originally published Jan 8, 2020 5:15:00 PM, updated April 27 2020

Quickly and easily find something you previously tweeted

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

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What to Know

  • Go to the Twitter advanced search tool and enter your Twitter handle in the From These Accounts field.
  • Search for tweets from more than one account by entering multiple Twitter handles and separating each with a comma and space.
  • To download your entire Twitter archive, go to More >Settings and privacy >Download an archive of your data.

This article explains how to search your own tweets on Twitter using a web browser or the Twitter mobile app.

How to Use Twitter’s Advanced Search Tool

Twitter’s basic search function is available from virtually every Twitter page or mobile app tab, but for more specific searches, you need to access its advanced search tool. Here’s how:

Navigate to twitter.com/search-advanced in a web browser.

Locate the From These Accounts field and type in your own Twitter handle. This ensures that all of the search results you receive are only from your own account.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Fill out at least one other field to help narrow down your results. If you just have a basic word or phrase to search, use the first All of these words field.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

You can also search by:

  • An exact phrase.
  • Any group of words.
  • None of a group of specific words.
  • Specific hashtags.
  • Any language.
  • Tweets to specific users.
  • User mentions.
  • Locations.
  • Date or time period.
  • Happy face signs 🙂 or sad face signs :(.
  • Question marks.
  • Retweets included.

Click the Search button to see your results, which display directly on Twitter.

For example, to search for any tweets about Facebook from the @LifewireTech Twitter account. You would type “lifewiretech” in the From these accounts field and the word “Facebook” in the All of these words field.

After selecting Search, you see a regular search results page of all the tweets from @LifewireTech containing the term “Facebook” listed in order of most recent.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

You can also search for tweets from multiple accounts. You can do that by typing multiple Twitter handles in the From these accounts field and separating each with a comma and space.

Optional Alternative: Download Your Twitter Archive to Search Your Tweets

Twitter’s Advanced Search is the fastest way to search through your own tweets, or for any tweets at all for that matter. But if you want, you can get access to all the tweets you’ve ever sent by downloading your entire Twitter archive. Here’s how:

Go to More > Settings and privacy > Download an archive of your data. You need to enter your password to access the page. From there, select Request archive.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

You might have to wait some time before you receive your archive, but when you do, it’s in a ZIP file you can download to your computer. There you can access a list of your tweets in a spreadsheet format, which you can search through.

Want to go back in time and see what you – or someone else – tweeted about on a specific date? Here’s how you can search for tweets on Twitter.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Have you ever wanted to go back in time and see what was being tweeted about on a specific date?

Twitter has a built-in search function for that.

Maybe you’d like to see what some of the reactions on Twitter were like when Google launched a major algorithm update.

Or maybe you’d like to reminisce on how far your business has come since the days you first started tweeting.

Now you can do that quickly and easily.

In order to search for tweets within a specific date range you’ll have to utilize Twitter’s advanced search functionality.

How to Use Twitter’s Advanced Search Feature

This will open as a pop-over window on the web based version of Twitter.

Scroll all the way down to the bottom of the pop over window and you will see the options to add a date range to your search.

You can add a range of dates, or just one specific date.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

In addition to searching by date, you also have the option to narrow down your search by any of Twitter’s other advanced search options.

Those options include things like:

  • Words used in tweets.
  • Exact phrases used in tweets.
  • Hashtags used in tweets.
  • Tweets from a specific account.
  • Accounts mentioned in in tweets.
  • Tweets with links only.
  • Amount of engagement (i.e., tweets with a minimum number of replies/likes/retweets).

Here are some examples of searches using these filters.

Example: Find Your First Tweets

Let’s look at an example using several of the advanced search filters in one query.

Longtime Twitter users occasionally find themselves wondering what their first tweets were like and how much engagement they received.

With that said, we’re about to take a trip back in time to look at the first tweets ever published by Search Engine Journal.

First, we must add our Twitter handle in the accounts filter, as shown below.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Next, we’ll add a date filter.

We’ll use the date on our Twitter profile that tells us when we first joined.

Just for fun, we’ll create a date range until the end of the year so we can see all tweets from our first several months on Twitter.

Note: you have to enter a value for date, month, and year or else Twitter will disregard the date filter.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Now, the only thing left to do is hit the big “Search” button and see the results.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

There it is, folks.

Our first-ever tweet was a news story about an ad partnership between Yahoo and Twitter.

And we received no engagement at all on any of our first tweets.

How times have changed since then.

Example: Find Tweets With Specific Keywords From Specific Accounts

Here’s another example that may be useful.

Let’s say you want to find all tweets from a specific account that contain specific keywords.

You may find yourself wanting to look up what Google has officially stated regarding specific SEO topics.

In this particular example let’s try to find everything Google’s official Twitter accounts have published regarding core updates.

First we’ll use the keyword filters.

Consider the ways in which the keywords you’re looking up might be used in tweets.

In this example, our subject might be referred to either as “core update” or “core algorithm update.”

So we’ll put in “core” and “update” to make sure we catch everything.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Next, we’ll add Google’s official Twitter accounts.

Google has many official accounts, so we’ll only add the ones that are most likely to tweet important information regarding core updates.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

From here you can narrow it down even further with engagement and date filters.

We’re going to leave those filters alone for this particular example though.

Here’s what we get after hitting the big “Search” button.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

There’s a snapshot of everything tweeted about core updates from Google’s accounts in one place.

Summary

Those are two examples of how to use Twitter’s advanced search filters.

There are nearly endless combinations of filters you can use to find the exact tweets you need.

Twitter’s advanced search filters are relatively easy to use, but that wasn’t always the case.

You used to have to type in the search operators manually, which required a deep understanding of the way Twitter search works.

Previously, searches by date could be performed by manually adding the “since:” and “until:” operators to your search.

Now you can simply fill out a form instead of memorizing all the various search commands.

Unfortunately, Twitter’s advanced search isn’t available on the mobile app.

If you’d like to search by date on the mobile app you can still do so the old fashioned way using the “since:” and “until:” operators.

Or you can use the mobile browser version of Twitter, which supports advanced search.

Want to learn more about the ins and outs of this powerful search feature?

Matt Southern

Matt Southern has been the lead news writer at Search Engine Journal since 2013. With a degree in communications, Matt . [Read full bio]

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By the records, Twitter had its launch by March 2006, sure it is over ten years now. But can you really believe every single tweet there is since its launch, are all intact in Twitter and you can really recover them?

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

The wonder is Twitter really simplifies the procedure of retrieving every single thing that has ever been tweeted, thus anyone can remotely search Twitter’s archive. So in this guide, that is what we will be showing you.

One of this ways you could retrieve such tweets is with Advanced Twitter Search

Now what you need to begin with is move to Advanced Twitter Search. There you will come across a variety of options. Words which is the first section allows you the premise of a few ways to precisely spell out words which are included as well as words which are not.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Now let us say you have a particular tweet in your head.“All of these words” gives you the avenue to search for a no-order combination of words, on the other hand “This exact phrase” has its operation like you are on Google inserting the phrase in quotes. “Any of these words” is really very helpful in the condition where you can’t precisely tell the specific words you are searching for. On the other hand, “None of these words” gives you the avenue to filter Tweets with words which has no relationship with what you searching for. One popular option however is to use hashtags or distinct languages.

Well that is pretty broad, but that is just one of your wide options, a very precise one when finding a specific tweet is filtering things by the user.

So we move over to how you could specify accounts which participated in a specific conversation. So now,you can search for tweets proceeding from specific accounts, even general tweets directed at a specific account.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

So rolling in those above queries, you could find conversations as old as this.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Yeah, 8GB of memory is pretty sufficient!

Good, now don’t forget that the third box gives you the capacity of specifying accounts which have been mentioned in a specific tweet, this is say someone got mentioned in a tweet which is not particularly for such party.

So when you combine everything you have learnt in this tutorial so far, you could conveniently look for simply any tweet you have in your head!

It’s easy to avoid names or tags that you’re tired of seeing

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How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

In February 2020, I found that that it was possible not only to mute conversations or other accounts on Twitter, but (courtesy of a tweet by @nonprofWHIT ) that you could also mute a specific word. And you could do it straight from a tweet.

Now, Twitter has announced it is expanding this feature so that when you mute a word or phrase, it will not appear in your Explore tab or Event-based notifications.

Here’s how you go about it.

Mute words or phrases on an iPhone

If you’re using the Twitter app on an iPhone, it’s a quick and easy process:

  • Long-press on the word you want to mute.
  • Choose “Mute” from the pop-up menu.
  • You’ll be sent to a page where you can choose from where you want to mute the word (your timeline or notifications), from whom (anyone or people you don’t follow), and the duration (forever, 24 hours, seven days, or 30 days).

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Long-press on the word you want to mute.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Select where you want to mute it.

Mute words or phrases on an Android phone

If you’ve got an Android phone, don’t despair. You can also mute words from the Android Twitter app (or, for that matter, from the iOS Twitter app) through the app’s settings. It’s not quite as fast as doing it directly from a tweet, but it’s just as effective.

  • Select your icon on the upper left corner.
  • Select “Settings and privacy” > “Privacy and safety” > “Mute and block.”
  • Tap “Muted words.”
  • Tap the plus sign and enter the word you want to mute. You then get the same choices as to where, from whom, and duration.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

In Android, you mute using settings.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Enter each word or phrase separately.

If you no longer want to mute the word or you want to extend the mute time, return to the “Muted words” screen, tap on the word in question, and choose the corresponding option (“Delete word” or “Change mute time”).

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

You can always delete the muted word.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Mute words or phrases on your desktop

And finally, if you’re tweeting directly from Twitter’s website, you can mute a word from there as well.

  • On your desktop, from the left-hand menu, click on “More” > “Settings and privacy” > “Privacy and safety” > “Mute and block.”
  • In the right column, click on “Muted words.” Click on the plus sign in the upper right corner.
  • Now you can enter the word or phrase you want to mute. As with the mobile Twitter apps, you can choose whether to mute from your timeline or notifications, from anyone or people you don’t follow, and for how long.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

On a desktop, you first find the “Mute and block” section.

  • When you’ve made all your choices, click on “Save.”
  • If you want to unmute any words, go back to the “Muted words” column. Click on the red crossed-out volume symbol to the right of the word, and then click “Unmute” on the pop-up window that appears.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

It’s simple to go back and unmute a word or phrase.

Some additional notes

Twitter has a number of ways you can mute different types of info in your timeline and notifications. For example:

  • You can also mute specific mentions of specific accounts (but not mute the account itself) by using the @ in front of the account name.
  • If you mute a word, you will also mute that word’s hashtag.
  • Muting is not case-sensitive (“spoilers” and “SPOILERS” will both work), and you can use a phrase with punctuation (“Hey, you!”).
  • Twitter is expanding the ability to mute words, phrases, etc. to areas other than timelines and notifications. Just yesterday, it announced that blocked or muted text would also no longer appear in Events-based areas:

First up, Events. Now across Android, iOS, and web, Events from accounts you’ve blocked or muted won’t appear in your Explore tab, “What’s happening” sidebar and emails, or Event-based notifications.

If / when the ability to mute is extended even further, we’ll add it to this article.

Update January 12th, 2022, 10:00AM ET: This article was originally published on February 19th, 2020, and has been updated to allow for UI changes and new features.

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How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

Multiple Timelines.

If you follow many people, keeping up with your timeline can be a daunting task. Create custom curated lists and use them as your timeline. With a friends or family timeline, you will never miss one of their tweets again.

Powerful Filters.

It’s your timeline. Control what’s displayed in it.

Mute Filters.

Tweetbot’s mute filters hide tweets in your timeline based on a person, hashtag, client source, or keywords (with regex support!). Mute for 6 hours, a day, week, month, or forever.

Timeline Filters.

Think saved searches for your timeline. Filter your timeline by keyword, preset boolean options, or a combination of them. Or simply filter by media, links, retweets, or quotes.

Personalize Your Experience.

How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

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How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

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      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      Mar 13, 2021 · 6 min read

      Everyday, hundreds of millions of people use Twitter. But how many of us know how we can use Twitter search engine better? Let’s learn!

      Twitter search engine is very strong. You can filter lots of things whi l e you looking for a specific subject or a person’s tweet. Lots of researchers following economists, entrepreneurs, politicians etc. But there are thousands of tweets on their accounts. What would you do if you wanted to find specific tweets? If you are a student in economics, you should follow economists on Twitter. Those economists talk about so many topics. But what if you want to see what they think about a particular topic, such as value of gold between January 2021 and March 2021? Or if you are a researcher, you open a politician’s page and you start finding a specific subject among 10k tweets, huh? Of course not 🙂 We can give more examples.

      First way to filter a search is to use “advanced search” part. There is a difficult point. “Advanced search” is a little bit hard to use. When you see it you feel like you’re filling out an application form, it’s long.

      In this article I’ll show you how some Twitter tricks make you faster and more comfortable when you want to find specific thing on Twitter.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      For example, you follow Elon Musk on Twitter. And you wondered his thoughts about cryptocurrency but there are 13.7k tweets on his Twitter account. He tweets about space, electric cars, neuralink, cryptocurrency etc. How could you distinguish these topics?

      If you wondered what are Elon Musk’s ideas about cryptocurrency you can type:
      (from:elonmusk) (Cryptocurrency)/(from:elonmusk) (“Cryptocurrency”)
      It means, tweets from Elon Musk containing the word “cryptocurrency”.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      If you want to specify cryptocurrency, I mean if you want to look for cryptocurrency especially dogecoin you can type:
      (from:elonmusk) (“Cryptocurrency” OR “Dogecoin”)/(from:elonmusk) (“Dogecoin”)
      OR means tweets containing “Cryptocurrency” OR “Dogecoin” words, if you want to search for just dogecoin you should type (from:elonmusk) (“Dogecoin”).

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      If you want to see specified tweets which are mentioning Elon Musk about Neuralink you can type:
      (@elonmusk) (“Neuralink”)

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      If you want to search for tweets to Elon Musk about Neuralink by writing a specific time, you can type:
      “Neuralink is” (to:elonmusk) since:yyyy/mm/dd

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      If you want to search for a topic and you don’t want to see a certain word in search engine you can type:
      “SpaceX” -neuralink (from:elonmusk)
      It means tweets not containing “neuralink” word.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      I’ve told that it’s hard to find a specific tweet among thousands of tweets. At this point you can specify the dates. For example, if you want to see what Elon Musk told about SpaceX from the beginning of the year you can type:
      “SpaceX” (from:elonmusk) since:2021–01–01

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      If you want to find tweets in more specific time, you can limit that. You can type:
      “SpaceX” (from:elonmusk) until:2021–03–01 since:2021–01–01

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      If you wondered what do people think about US elections in Texas from beginning of October until election day, you can type:
      “Elections” near:“Texas” until:2020–11–03 since:2020–10–01

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      There is more specific way to limit the location. You can type near:“USA” and within:1000mi, Twitter shows you what people say in USA and people who are 1000 miles from the USA.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      You can also type km instead of mi.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      Lastly there is a much more specific way to find tweets by location: You can use latitude and longitude while searching for tweets.

      Firstly you can find the location on Google Maps. I chose Twitter Headquarters:

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      After that copy latitude and longitude and paste it by writing near:…

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      You can use geographic coordinates like this.

      For example, if you follow a multilingual account and it’s hard to distinguish different languages, you can type lang:en, lang:fr, lang:tr… I chose Alexander De Croo. He is Prime Minister of Belgium. Three languages are spoken in Belgium, so he tweets in three languages and English. I chose French language:

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      Likes, replies, and retweets are the most important points that show impressions. While you are searching for elections you can type “election”. However there are millions of tweets. If you want to find the most engaging tweets you can write min_replies:… min_faves:… min_retweets:…

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      We learned how to use Twitter better. We can find more specific tweets while we searching a subject. You can find who said it, when they said it, where they said it. Those possibilities help you find particular things on Twitter.

      You can use this chart that I got from Search Engine Journal.

      By Dan Simmons
      Technology reporter

      By any measure, Twitter hit particularly rough conditions on Tuesday night, which sent its share price into a tailspin.

      At one point in the final hours of trading, the stock had lost more than $8bn (ВЈ5bn), or 25% of its opening price.

      It seems investors were spooked by the early and unintended publication of earnings results that should have been presented after the markets had closed.

      So how did that happen, and why did it result in Twitter’s worst day on the markets since its flotation?

      What actually happened?

      Twitter was due to announce its earnings for the first quarter of the year after close of trading on the New York Stock Exchange, where the company is listed.

      Announcing results after the markets close gives investors a chance to digest the news, sleep on it, and then start trading again the next day.

      Except it turns out that somebody thought it would be a good idea to release this information early, on the technology-led Nasdaq-run investor relations page for Twitter.

      Initially it seemed no-one really noticed the error, until a well-placed tweet highlighted the mistake and revealed Twitter’s disappointing results.

      The markets were still trading, and Twitter had not had the chance to formally present its results in a statement that would have bathed them in a more flattering light.

      How come Selerity got the news early, and who are they anyway?

      This is the interesting bit.

      Selerity is a tech start-up running a very specific service catered to investors.

      It automatically scans all sorts of documents, press releases, and social media online and looks for anything that could prove useful to investors.

      It then reports back to subscribers with what it describes as real-time actionable intelligence.

      In this case, it picked up the early Nasdaq posting.

      The company then tweeted the figures under the hashtag “#breaking”, ensuring that the world and his dog would know of Twitter’s failings through its own service.

      Selerity then tweeted its source, adding to Twitter’s embarrassment by making it clear that the results had been neither leaked or hacked.

      Shares in Twitter lost 6% before trading in the stock was momentarily suspended.

      When trading resumed, the stock plummeted a further 19%, before finishing 18% down on the day.

      To put this into perspective, at its low point Twitter had the total value of UK supermarket chain Sainsbury’s or slightly more than the value of the Dixons Carphone group wiped off its share price.

      So who is to blame?

      Well, it seems that Nasdaq slipped up here after Twitter furnished the exchange with earnings details ahead of time ready for official publication.

      It is like someone breaking an embargo on a news story.

      The key factor in Tuesday evening’s fiasco was that Selerity’s automatic computer programs, called bots, which scan the web for juicy financial details, were able to find the mistake so quickly.

      Selerity then made sure that everyone knew about it through Twitter’s own platform, but it did not break any rules in doing so as the results had already been published and were effectively in the public arena.

      Nasdaq blamed the error on a division of its business called Shareholder.com, which provides investor relations services.

      “The posting was caused by an operational issue that exposed the release on Twitter’s IR website for approximately 45 seconds,” Nasdaq said.

      “During those seconds the site was scraped by a third party that publically disseminated the earnings information.

      “We regret the incident and remain fully committed to providing the highest quality investor relations communication product and services to our clients.”

      It is not the first time this has happened. Six months ago, Nasdaq accidentally published JPMorgan’s quarterly results hours before close of trading.

      Selerity has form here too. In 2011, it caused Microsoft to officially release its financial earnings early after finding the results had been posted on a little-visited part of its website.

      It has all left Twitter, which did not have great news to share with investors anyway, somewhat red-faced.

      “We asked the New York Stock Exchange to halt trading once we discovered our Q1 numbers were out, and we published our results as soon as possible thereafter,” said Twitter’s senior director for investor relations, Krista Bessinger.

      “Selerity, who provided the initial tweets with our results, informed us that earnings release was available on our Investor Relations site before the close of market.

      “Nasdaq hosts and manages our IR website, and we explicitly instructed them not to release our results until after the market close and only upon our specific instructions, which is consistent with prior quarters.

      “We are continuing to investigate with them exactly what occurred.”

      Was the tweet the only reason Twitter stock crashed?

      No. The results were fairly disappointing, with Twitter missing market analysts’ revenue expectations of $456m by $20m.

      Forecasts for future revenue were downgraded.

      Twitter chief executive Dick Costolo said he was “disappointed” by the figures.

      Is there any good news from Twitter?

      Well, it also announced a couple of new things that could help the platform.

      Its content will be more closely integrated with Google search, and it is working with Apple so tweeted content will also appear more prominently in Spotlight searches on iOS and OS X devices.

      It is also planning to curate timelines for users so, at least in theory, the more relevant tweets from people they follow will bubble up to the top of their feeds.

      Presumably for @twitter, those will most definitely include tweets by @selerity.

      We were asked if saving a video from Twitter is possible so you can share the clip without having to send someone a Twitter link. The answer is yes.

      Save a Twitter video in just a couple of taps.

      A lot of videos have been circulating on Twitter in the past two weeks, from countless protests in support of the Black Lives Matter movement to the far opposite end of the spectrum: cute dog videos and silly hijinks. When a colleague asked if it’s possible to save these videos to the phone or laptop — for historical reference or to share with family and friends outside of the Twitter bubble, I got to work finding out how.

      What do you know? It’s easy to save a video, once you know how. Here are the tools and steps you’ll need to follow to download a Twitter video to your computer, Android phone, iPhone ($499 at Apple) or iPad ($356 at eBay) .

      Download Twitter videos to your computer

      There are two main websites that make the process of downloading a video posted to Twitter a simple process: Either SaveTweetVid or TwitterVideoDownloader.

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      Both websites work the same way. You’ll need to use the Twitter website to copy the direct link to the tweet that contains the video you want to save, then paste it into the text field on either site, then click download.

      All you need is the link to the Tweet with the video.

      Screenshot by Jason Cipriani/CNET

      SaveTweetVid will then ask you to pick from three different quality options. Click Download next to the size of the file you want to save and the clip will automatically begin downloading. Alternatively, you can scan the QR code at the bottom of the page to download the file on your phone or tablet.

      TwitterVideoDownloader will also give you different quality options. Click on the Download button next to the video quality you want to save.

      There’s a dedicated app for Android owners to download Twitter videos.

      There’s an app for that. on Android

      If you want to download the video to your Android phone, the aptly named Download Twitter Videos app will get the job done.

      The app is ad-supported, but you can remove the ads through an in-app purchase for 99 cents.

      After installing it, open it and go select your preferred settings. I set it to download videos at the highest resolution and to automatically begin downloading when I share or paste a link into the app.

      With Download Twitter Videos setup, use the Twitter app to find a tweet that contains the video you want to save. Tap on the Share button and either select Copy link to Tweet or Share Tweet via. If you copied the link, leave the Twitter app, open Download Twitter Videos, and then paste the app into the text field at the top of the screen.

      If you tapped on share tweet, look for and tap the Download Twitter Video app icon in the share options. The app will then begin downloading the video in the background.

      To view your downloaded videos, open the app and select the video you want to watch. You can then share it via another app, save it to your Photos app, or upload it to a cloud storage service for safekeeping.

      Apple’s Shortcuts app makes saving videos too easy.

      iPhone owners can use Apple’s Shortcuts app

      Apple’s Shortcuts app is an incredibly powerful and useful tool for automating routine tasks or doing more complex things, like downloading videos from Twitter.

      Before you can install the Shortcut that downloads videos, you’ll first need to install Shortcuts on your iPhone or iPad.

      After it’s installed, open the Settings app on your phone or tablet and tap on Shortcuts in the list of options. Move the switch labeled Allow Untrusted Shortcuts to the On position. We have to take this extra step in order to install user-created Shortcuts that aren’t listed in the Gallery section of the Shortcuts app.

      With all of that done, open this link on your iPhone or iPad, then tap Get Shortcut. The Shortcut app will open, and show you everything the task does. For most of us, including myself, it’s a bunch of gibberish. Just scroll to the bottom on tap on the red button labeled Add Untrusted Shortcut.

      There is no shortage of interesting Twitter stats out there. We’ve collated and categorized the most up-to-date, most interesting facts we could find.

      Ever since the first tweet was sent, Twitter has been clocking up some impressive numbers. There is a library’s worth of Twitter stats, facts and figures out there on the internet, so we’ve collected the very best for your reading pleasure.

      Whether you’re looking for some stimulating reading with your morning coffee, a self-confessed data geek, or a marketer who wants to understand how Twitter can help your brand, we’ve got the Twitter stats for you.

      Twitter historical facts

      Twitter was created in March 2006 by Jack Dorsey, Evan Williams, Biz Stone, and Noah Glass and launched in July 2006

      Jack Dorsey sent the first ever tweet on 21 Mar 2006

      In August 2007 the hashtag debuts, first proposed by user @chrismessina

      how do you feel about using # (pound) for groups. As in #barcamp [msg]?

      On 15 January 2009, a US Airways flight crashed on NYC’s Hudson River. A photo posted to Twitter broke the news before traditional media, highlighting Twitter’s role in breaking news

      In October 2012 Twitter bought Vine, which Twitter released as a standalone app in January 2013. It was hugely successful but eventually closed down in October 2016.

      In November 2013, Twitter went public with shares being valued at $26 as the market opened and at $44 when it closed.

      In March 2015, Twitter acquired the live streaming app Periscope.

      Twitter financial statistics

      Twitter reached a peak in revenue of $717m in Q4 2015. In Q3 2017 it was $590m.

      On November 7, 2013, Twitter priced their IPO at $26 per share . As of Jan 2020, it was $32 .

      You might like

      126 Amazing Social Media Statistics and Facts

      Twitter user statistics

      A total of 1.3 billion accounts have been created.

      Of those, 44% made an account and left before ever sending a tweet.

      Only 550 million people have ever sent a tweet.

      500 million people visit the site each month without logging in.

      As of Q1 2019, 68m US citizens are monthly active users of Twitter.

      80% of active users access the site via mobile.

      707 is the average number of followers.

      391 million accounts have no followers at all.

      Barack Obama has the most followers, with over 111m , followed by Katy Perry and Justin Bieber.

      Taylor Swift is the most influential person on Twitter. Donald Trump came second, with Narendra Modi in 3rd place.

      79% of accounts are held outside of the U.S.

      Twitter estimates 23m of its active users are actually bots.

      Twitter usage statistics

      There are 500 million tweets sent each day. That’s 6,000 tweets every second.

      The most retweeted tweet, one from a Japanese billionaire offering cash prizes, has 5.5m RTs:

      During the 2014 FIFA World Cup Final, 618,725 tweets were sent in a single minute.

      A day’s worth of tweets would fill a 10 million page book .

      Twitter’s top 5 markets (countries) account for 50% of all tweets .

      It took 3 years, 2 months and 1 day to go from the first tweet to the billionth.

      Twitter marketing statistics

      65.8% of US companies with 100+ employees use Twitter for marketing.

      77% of Twitter users feel more positive about a brand when their tweet has been replied to.

      58% of top brands have over 100,00 followers on Twitter.

      92% of companies tweet more than once a day, 42% tweet 1-5 times a day, and 19% tweet 6-10 times a day.

      Tweets with images get 150% more retweets.

      80% of Twitter users have mentioned a brand in a tweet.

      54% of users surveyed by Twitter reported that they had taken action after seeing a brand mentioned in Tweets (including visiting their website, searching for the brand, or retweeting content).

      The last two years have seen a 2.5x increase in customer service conversations on Twitter.

      60% of consumers expect brands to respond to their query within the hour , but the average is 1 hour 24 minutes.

      76% of consumers are likely to recommend the brand following friendly service.

      Companies using Twitter for customer service see a 19% lift in customer satisfaction.

      Tweets with images receive 18% more click throughs , 89% more likes, and 150% more retweets.

      In the 2016 Q1 shareholder letter, Twitter revealed total ad engagements grew 208% year-on-year.

      Those are the most interesting and up-to-date Twitter stats and facts that we could find. These statistics provide an interesting and useful overview of Twitter users. For real-time, in-depth insights about your audience or competitors, Brandwatch provides detailed analytics to give your brand the advantage.

      Sometimes you want to see the specific user tweets on Twitter. In this article, I will show you four easy methods to search tweets from a specific user with a specific date.

      Method 1: Search Using a Search Code

      1. Open the Twitter website and log in to your Twitter account using email and password.

      2. Click on the Search Twitter box from the top-right corner of your Twitter account homepage.

      • Type the From: Username into the search box and press the Enterbutton from your keyboard.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      ​You don’t type a username. Type the specific user username which person tweets you want to find. I type the howtoway1 because I want the search to these users tweet.

      • After that, you will see that your selected person tweet will show. Scroll down to see the all more tweet.

      3. You can search for a specific word using this method. Just type the word in front of Form: Word and hit the Enter button.

      Method 2: how to search tweets from a specific user by date

      1. Copy the https://twitter.com/search-advanced URL and paste it on your web browser address bar and hit the Enter button.

      2. Go to the Accounts section and type the specific person username into the “Form these accounts” box.

      • Scroll down below the advanced search window to get Dates section.
      • Select date from the From section.
      • Select date from the To section.
      • Click on the Search button.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      After that, you will see the specific user with specific date tweets on Twitter.

      Method 3: Search Specific Person Tweet Using Twitter Advanced Search

      1. Open the Twitter website and sign in your Twitter account.

      2. Type the https://twitter.com/search-advanced URL into your web browser address bar and press Enter to open the Twitter advanced search window.

      • Scroll down to the advanced search page to go to the Accounts section. Into the Accounts section you will see a few search options. Below of the “from these accounts” text type the username which person tweet you want to see and press the Search button from the top-right corner of the window.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      3. You will see the tweets to your selected user.

      Method 4: From the Android Mobile

      1. Open the Twitter app on your Android mobile and login to your account.

      2. Touch up to the search icon from below of the Twitter homepage.

      3. Into the “search Twitter” box type your specific person Twitter username.

      • Press the search icon or you can choose a user from the search result.

      You will see the specific person profile with the tweets. Scroll down below to see this person tweets.

      ​Common ​Questions and ​Answers

      Q: How do you find tweets from a specific person?

      A: You can easily find tweets from a specific person on Twitter using the upper any method.

      Q: How do you do an advanced search on Twitter?

      A: Follow the number 3 method to advanced search on Twitter.

      Q: How do you find tweets from a certain date?

      A: Follow Method number 2 to find tweets from a certain date.

      I’m a researcher. How is using Twitter going to benefit me?

      A search in Google will come up with a long list of academics explaining how Twitter has benefited their research, before and after publication. Twitter can be a useful tool to:

      • Connect with other academics in your field
      • Ask questions, (“crowdsourcing”) ideas
      • Spread the word about the research you’re undertaking
      • Publicize your article, increasing downloads, citations (in time) and impact

      How to sign up to Twitter and create your profile

      Your profile page is effectively your “shop window” so try to make it unique, something that says who you are and what you do. Your username can be your own name (e.g., @JohnSmith) or something a bit more esoteric (e.g., @mathsgenius). Remember though, if you use your own name it may be easier for others to find you.

      Use your profile to tell people about your research and experience, what you teach, and what your interests are. Link to your blog or website too, so people can explore more, and try to add a photo so people can recognize your tweets immediately on their feed.

      Who should I follow on Twitter?

      Following the right people and organizations automatically personalizes your Twitter feed (the list of tweets that come up on your home page), and helps Twitter tailor the recommendations it makes to you. You are bound to have a list of colleagues who already use Twitter, so you can start with these. Then think more widely: follow people you admire, organizations you have an interest in, media outlets, and researchers working on related areas to you.

      You can use the Twitter list functionality to group accounts you’re interested in and create a mini-feed so it’s easier to keep up-to-date with their latest tweets.

      Tips for tweeting about your research

      • Announce your published work along with a link to your article. Tag co-authors, your publisher (e.g. @tandfonline), funder and institution, and anyone else you think might be interested in your paper. For Twitter you can post multiple times a day.
      • Ensure your post describes the article or topic accurately. Aim to ‘edutain’ – teach them something useful in an enjoyable way. Do not use the article title as the entire social media copy. Engage with your audience by asking them questions linked to the content of the article. Tweets are limited to 280 characters per tweet, so be concise and to the point.
      • Include hashtags that your intended audience are using, spend time doing a little research on Twitter beforehand to find the best ones to use. This will make your tweet part of a bigger conversation, meaning you might reach an even wider audience for your research. If you’re attending a conference use the conference hashtag (e.g. #ScholarlySummit) to discuss ideas raised during the conference, as well as to make connections during and afterwards.
      • Consider including a relevant and engaging image, gif or video to represent your article, as this can make posts more appealing and encourage people to read and click. Make sure the image is copyright free before using or make sure you give credit to the artist.
      • Engage in Twitter conversations and retweet what you find interesting. You can do this using Twitter’s retweet or you can add some context (and interest) by adding your own comments. You can also respond to tweets, giving your view but remember to always include the username of the person you’re responding to (e.g., @JohnSmith).

      These are just some starter tips; you can also direct-message people, thank people if they retweet you, ask questions, or set up polls.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      Twitter has a history of sharing feature and design ideas it’s considering at very early stages of development. Earlier this month, for example, it showed off concepts around a potential “unmention” feature that would let users untag themselves from others’ tweets. Today, the company is sharing a few more of its design explorations that would allow users to better control who can see their tweets and who ends up in their replies. The new concepts include a way to tweet only to a group of trusted friends, new prompts that would ask people to reconsider the language they’re using when posting a reply, and a “personas” feature that would allow you to tweet based on your different contexts — like tweets about your work life, your hobbies and interests, and so on.

      The company says it’s thinking through these concepts and is looking to now gather feedback to inform what it may later develop.

      The first of the new ideas builds on work that began last year with the release of a feature that allows an original poster to choose who’s allowed to reply to their tweet. Today, users can choose to limit replies to only people mentioned in the tweet, only people they follow, or they can leave it defaulted to “everyone.” But even though this allows users to limit who can respond, everyone can see the tweet itself. And they can like, retweet or quote tweet the post.

      With the proposed Trusted Friends feature, users could tweet to a group of their own choosing. This could be a way to use Twitter with real-life friends, or some other small network of people you know more personally. Perhaps you could post a tweet that only your New York friends could see when you wanted to let them know you were in town. Or maybe you could post only to those who share your love of a particular TV show, sporting event or hobby.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      Image Credits: Twitter

      This ability to have private conversations alongside public ones could boost people’s Twitter usage and even encourage some people to try tweeting for the first time. But it also could be disruptive to Twitter, as it would chip away at the company’s original idea of a platform that’s a sort of public message board where everyone is invited into the conversation. Users may begin to think about whether their post is worthy of being shared in public and decide to hold more of their content back from the wider Twitter audience, which could impact Twitter engagement metrics. It also pushes Twitter closer to Facebook territory where only some posts are meant for the world, while more are shared with just friends.

      Twitter says the benefit of this private, “friends only” format is that it could save people from the workarounds they’re currently using — like juggling multiple alt accounts or toggling between public to protected tweets.

      Another new feature under consideration is Reply Language Prompts. This feature would allow Twitter users to choose phrases they don’t want to see in their replies. When someone is writing back to the original poster, these words and phrases would be highlighted and a prompt would explain why the original poster doesn’t want to see that sort of language. For instance, users could configure prompts to appear if someone is using profanity in their reply.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      Image Credits: Twitter

      The feature wouldn’t stop the poster from tweeting their reply — it’s more a gentle nudge that asks them to be more considerate.

      These “nudges” can have impact. For example, when Twitter launched a nudge that suggested users read an article before they amplify it with a retweet, it found that users opened articles before sharing them 40% more often. But in the case of someone determined to troll, it may not do that much good.

      The third, and perhaps most complicated, feature is something Twitter is calling “Facets.”

      This is an early idea about tweeting from different personas from one account. The feature would make sense for those who often tweet about different aspects of their lives, including their work life, their side hustles, their personal life or family, their passions and more.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      Image Credits: Twitter

      Unlike Trusted Friends, which would let you restrict some tweets to a more personal network, Facets would give other users the ability to choose whether they wanted to follow all your tweets, or only those about the “facet” they’re interested in. This way, you could follow someone’s tweets about tech, but ignore their stream of reactions they post when watching their favorite team play. Or you could follow your friend’s personal tweets, but ignore their work-related content. And so on.

      This is an interesting idea, as Twitter users have always worried about alienating some of their followers by posting “off-topic” so to speak. But this also puts the problem of determining what tweets to show which users on the end user themselves. Users may be better served by the algorithmic timeline that understands which content they engage with, and which they tend to ignore. (Also: “facets‽”)

      Twitter says none of the three features are in the process of being built just yet. These are only design mockups that showcase ideas the company has been considering. It also hasn’t yet made the decision whether any of the three will go under development — that’s what the user feedback it’s hoping to receive will help to determine.

      This may sound too good to be true but Indian Railways is no longer that lumbering, unresponsive PSU with a sarkari work culture. It’s changing that perception, one tweet at a time.

      NEW DELHI: Travelling on Jaipur-Pune Superfast Express on June 2, Shatrunjay Singh found that the phone-charging port next to his seat was not working. A tweet to the official account of the Ministry of Railways got him a response in less than 15 minutes. Singh shared his PNR number and in an hour, the socket port was fixed.

      @anshuku824 tweeted to @RailMinIndia for help when his niece, who was travelling with his sister-in-law on Sanghamitra Express, got hurt. He was told to get their PNR numbers and share it with @RailMinIndia. Within an hour, the kid got medical assistance.

      These may sound too good to be true but Indian Railways is no longer that lumbering, unresponsive PSU with a sarkari work culture. It’s changing that perception, one tweet at a time.

      @DebroyAtanu tweeted to @RailMinIndia when he was overcharged for breakfast, and he got his issue settled immediately. A follower of @DebroyAtanu noticed his Twitter feed and found it to be too good to be true. He tweeted in response: “This seems to be fake. I have issues with Suresh prabhu sir but never got any reply.” @RailMinIndia read his comment and replied: “Kindly elaborate your issue in detail along with journey details like PNR/Train number.”

      The Railways gets nearly 15,000 tweets a day on @RailMinIndia out of which 2,100 are classified as actionable. These complaints are mainly about unscheduled stops, lack of cleanliness, defective fans or ACs, medical emergency, catering and harassment.

      THIS IS HOW THEY DO IT
      Before getting the system to work on a complaint, a tough task is to find out which tweet needs how much attention. “Since there is character limitation for tweets, our software processes the information based on keywords to analyse the sentiments. Once analysed, the actionable tweets are classified on the basis of priority—high, medium and low,” said Ravinesh Kumar, Executive Director of Public Grievance at the Ministry of Railways, while speaking to the Economictimes.com.

      Tweets which seek medical assistance, cleanliness or police help are kept in critical or high-priority category. Others such as those about broken windows, catering issues and missing parcels are categorised as medium and low priority. The handling of complaints has been outsourced to a trained team that works 24×7 in shifts.

      The team which looks after the grievances reported via social media channels

      But not every compliant on Twitter is resolved. A user tweeted on April 24: “@RailMinIndia @IRCTC_Ltd TDS#100000148819453 for PNR 2556868045 is still pending aftr 40+ days. train was late for more than 13 hrs. pls revert.” He got an immediate response from @RailMinIndia: “2556868045 /13008 Your tdr case is under examination in EASTERN RAILWAY.” Since then, the user has been tweeting to @RailMinIndia for updates repeatedly but has got no response. Finally, he tweeted on Friday: “hav been taging (sic) @EasternRailway & @CCMPMER & @sureshpprabhu in my tweets 4 last 2 months. STILL NO RESPONSE. NO REFUND. PATHETIC SERVICE.”

      However, such cases seem to be exceptions rather than the rule. The Railways has a meticulous system to register, track and resolve complaints. A ticket is generated for every actionable tweet. Then the complaint is forwarded to the responsible divisional railway manager. All such managers are now on Twitter. If a DRM does not act on the complaint, the system sends an SMS to a higher official. The timings of the complaint tweeted by the passenger, reply by the railways and action taken by the DRMs are recorded.

      “We are revolutionising our grievance-redressal system. We follow every complaint closely and try to liquidate all the cases on daily basis. Tickets are closed only if a passenger tweets a ‘thanks’ message. However, if there is any instance of inaction, a confidential report is prepared about the official involved and action taken against him,” said Kumar.

      DIFFERENT WAYS OF COMPLAINING
      The railways receives complaints through several channels such as Facebook, Instagram, interactive voice response system (IVRS) and Centralized Public Grievance Redress And Monitoring System (CPGRAMs), besides Twitter.

      Every day, the railways receives on average 200 complaints via CPGRAMS, 2,100 actionable tweets, 500 complaints on Facebook, 350 via COMS (railways-specific complaints management system that works through an Android app and mobile SMS) and 6,000 phone calls on number 138. It collects feedback from 1.2 lakh customers evey day through IVRS.

      To make its complaint-redressal system more effective, the railways plan to integrate feedback received from different channels. The integrated customer complaint system will include Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and CPGRAMS. “Twitter and Facebook have already been integrated. We plan to develop this comprehensive system in the next six months,” the railways had stated in its three-year report card last month.

      Besides this, the railways is also working towards a single phone number for all the complaints and issues. “PM Narendra Modi wants one helpline for all the issues. We are working towards unification of the helpline numbers. IVRS and 138 will be merged into 139. The unification will be achieved before year-end,” said Kumar. A unified helpline will make the response to complaints quicker and more effective.

      NFTs are getting a lot of attention. Maybe too much attention.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      On Thursday, Twitter announced that people who pay for Twitter Blue, a $3 per month subscription, would be able to change their profile picture to a non-fungible token (NFT). Doing so would change the shape of your photo from a circle to a hexagon to identify that you had in fact linked an NFT wallet, and didn’t just upload some random pixelated photo of a monkey.

      In response, Elon Musk–who is never shy about saying what he’s thinking–tweeted three words that I think sum up what almost everyone is already thinking about Web 3.0: “This is annoying.”

      If you spend any amount of time online, you probably fall into one of three groups. The first are people who think that NFTs, cryptocurrency, and Web3 are the promised utopian future of the internet. The second are people who think the entire thing is, as Musk said, an annoying distraction. The third are people who have no idea what any of those words mean. Oh, to be so lucky as to be in group three.

      To be fair, Musk didn’t just dismiss Twitter’s new “feature.” He followed it up with a more precise critique: “Twitter is spending engineering resources on this bs while crypto scammers are throwing a spambot block party in every thread!?”

      He’s referring to the fact that almost every tweet from an account with more than, say, 10,000 followers eventually ends up with a spam bot reply promising Bitcoin riches. It is–to be sure–annoying.

      The point Musk is making is that instead of making their products better, companies are spending resources, time, and energy chasing the shiny new thing. Sure, some of them would argue that the shiny new thing–in this case, the blockchain and all things crypto–is better. That might be true in some circumstances.

      I think there’s also a reasonable argument that someone should be thinking about what comes next. Someone should be building a better version of the internet since it’s the thing we all depend on for, well, pretty much everything we do.

      The problem is that “better” for now mostly means a way to make a quick buck as people pump insane amounts of money into things like Bitcoin and NFTs. The value of either isn’t based on an actual tangible thing–just hype.

      For example, ask someone what it means to own an NFT. To be fair, most people won’t know what you’re talking about. Even if they’ve heard of an NFT, they probably have no idea what it means and they simply dismiss it as not important to their life. They would be correct.

      Even those who do “understand” NFTs can’t actually tell you what they own. If you change your profile picture on Twitter to an NFT monkey, you don’t actually own the image of the monkey. You own a token that represents that image of the monkey. You basically paid for the right to say I paid for something, even though I’m not sure what it is.

      Evangelists argue that the promise of Web 3.0 is that people will have the “option to own the internet.” What does that mean? What will you own? Mostly, it means you’ll own an intangible thing that has no actual utility or value, in hopes that someone else will come along later and pay you more money for the thing that still has no utility or value.

      They are basically collecting Beanie Babies, which didn’t become valuable because they had more intrinsic value than, say, baseball cards or stamps. They were valuable because they were the hot trend at the time, and people who were willing to pay $1,000 for a rare stuffed toy were counting on the idea that, at some point, someone else would be willing to pay more.

      At least Beanie Babies were a real thing. At a minimum, you could set them on fire and use them for heat when you realized you’d blown all of your money on something worthless and have nothing left to pay your utility bill.

      The reason Musk’s tweet is a big deal is that he highlights the real problem with everything Web3. And, yes, I realize that while Web3 encompasses blockchain technology including NFTs and Bitcoin, they aren’t exactly the same. Musk is an avowed fan of cryptocurrency, but not of Web3 generally. That problem is that a bunch of very smart people with a lot of money are chasing after a shiny new thing instead of making the thing they already sold to people better.

      If you’ve built a platform, like Twitter, for example, it would be nice if you make it the best platform you can. Twitter is great for a lot of things, but it’s terrible when it comes to things like sending direct messages, managing bookmarked tweets, or editing tweets. Instead of fixing those things, it is investing resources in things that most users don’t care about, and that doesn’t make the experience better.

      Of course, Twitter has a vested interest in getting people to connect their NFT wallets. Twitter wants to be a player in what it sees as the next big thing. The problem is, it isn’t making Twitter better for anyone who uses it today. That is, as Musk points out, annoying.

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      It wouldn’t be Twitter if there wasn’t a new controversy about some decade-old tweets.

      Just hours after Twitter founder and former CEO Jack Dorsey announced his resignation from the company, there’s already new drama surrounding its new CEO, Parag Agrawal, and an old post he made on the platform.

      “If they are not gonna make a distinction between muslims and extremists, then why should I distinguish between white people and racists,” tweeted Agrawal in quotes on Oct. 26, 2010.

      That’s right. October 2010. This 11-year-old tweet is currently making the rounds in right-wing Twitter circles. Conservative users on the platform are expressing outrage over the tweet.

      However, those criticizing Twitter’s new CEO – as of just a few hours ago – don’t seem to realize Agrawal is quoting an episode of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart that aired that very night in 2010.

      The nearly 10-minute segment on NPR’s firing of Juan Williams, “NPR Staffing Decision 2010,” is still available to stream on Comedy Central’s website.

      The quote Agrawal tweeted comes at the tail end of the segment, during a panel with former host Jon Stewart and comedians Larry Whilmore and Aasif Mandvi.

      “If they’re not going to make a distinction between Muslims and violent extremists then why should I take the time to distinguish between decent, fearful white people and racists?” jokes Mandvi, eliciting laughter from the audience.

      In addition, in a follow-up tweet on Twitter that same night, Agrawal replied to another user to explain that The Daily Show is exactly what he was quoting.

      “I was quoting Asif Mandvi [sic] from The Daily Show,” he tweeted less than 20 minutes after the now-controversial Oct. 26 tweet.

      Regardless, the tweet continues to be circulated without context. One archived version of the tweet taken at 11:24 a.m. on Monday shows that the tweet had 3 retweets, 9 quote tweets, and 3 likes when first dug up today.

      As of the publishing of this post, Agrawal’s tweet now has 2,432 retweets, 5,453 quote tweets, and 4,623 likes.

      “This is Parag Agrawal, Twitter’s new CEO and the person who’s going to be deciding what kind of speech is allowed on Twitter,” tweeted Senator Marasha Blackburn (R-TN) while quote tweeting Agrawal’s old post.

      Right-wing media outlets like Brietbart picked up on the tweet, declaring it to be “anti-white racism” while at the same time admitting “it was unclear who he was quoting.”

      The message of Agrawal’s tweet and Mandvi’s initial joke appears to go over every critics’ head: Of course not all white people are racist and that exact sentiment should be extended to Muslims when it comes to Islamophobic stereotypes regarding terrorism as well.

      Welcome to your first day as CEO at Twitter dot com, Parag Agrawal!

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      Here’s the thing about social media: Even with likes, comments, and other sorts of interactions, when you’re posting from the comfort of your device, it can be easy to forget there are actual people viewing your posts. But knowing the specifics of who engages with your social media account and how they interact with it can be valuable information. When it comes to Twitter, the micro-blogging platform makes some information — like followers, likes, retweets — public. But can you see who views your Twitter, or if your posts appear in Twitter search? Let’s break it down.

      Can you see who views your Twitter?

      Simply put, no. There is no way for a Twitter user to know exactly who views their Twitter or specific tweets; there’s no Twitter search for that kind of thing. The only way to know for sure if someone has seen your Twitter page or posts is through direct engagement — a reply, a favorite, or a retweet.

      That said, if a user wants to have a general idea about how many people have seen a tweet, they can do so by visiting the Twitter Analytics page. This page will show the number of impressions (the number of times users saw the tweet) and engagement (how often users interacted with it).

      How exposed is your Twitter profile?

      That depends on your privacy and visibility settings. If you have a private account, only your Twitter followers can read your tweets, and they won’t appear in Twitter search results. If they were public at one point, though, it’s possible Google and other third-party search engines indexed the Tweets, meaning they’re still searchable. If you have a public account, non-followers and anyone with internet access can read your tweets — and if they search certain keywords, your tweets could appear in their results (though, as Twitter explains on its website, they may not always be among the “top” Tweets results).

      “Your Tweets are public by default; anyone can view and interact with your Tweets,” the site notes. If you want to change that, you can make your Tweets “protected” via your account settings.

      This article was originally published on 3.6.2017

      The history of the Chargers account includes a lot of random tweets, and a deep love of PF Changs.

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      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      The San Diego Chargers’ twitter account is @Chargers, which makes sense. However, once upon a time, @Chargers was not the official voice of the San Diego Chargers. It was the Twitter account of Joel Price, who still works in digital media for the Chargers and now tweets from @joelprice, mainly about bikes and the Chargers.

      However, when he switched from tweeting from @chargers to @joelprice, he left @chargers as an account with several months of his musings. These tweets still exist, and since they were sent from @chargers, they appear to be official dispatches from an NFL team.

      For whatever reason, I find these tweets absolutely hilarious, whether you read them as the NFL team the Chargers saying them, or a person tweeting on behalf of the Chargers, informing everybody about the musings of his day. I hope they never disappear.

      (Note: Shout-out to @lana and @BrianPickett for occasionally resurfacing these, for example, tonight during Sunday Night Football.)

      The Chargers love PF Chang’s!

      soo hungry need to find my wife and head to pf changs

      The Chargers are really excited about SXSW!

      Need to find a late Sunday night return flight from San Antonio to San Diego need to be back on Monday but I don’t want to miss SXSW

      just booked my room for SXSW not cheap when you wait this late in the game.

      looking over the SXSW web site on sessions I will want to attend. less then two week I will be in Texas

      need to make a list of SXSW presentation I will want to attend.

      I’m checking my SXSW itinerary. Man I can’t wait. It appears Austin temperature is much like San Diego this time of the year.

      OH NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

      I had to cancel my trip to Austin for the SXSW show last minute.

      The Chargers are tired!

      I will be going to bed early. I will awake early and fire up PhotoShop for a day of pixel pushing.

      I must stop staying up so late.

      It’s late and I need to go to bed. staying up late is catching up to me.

      Going to bed. Will pick it all back up in the morning.

      The Chargers are always working!

      I’m home from the office and just had some left overs and off to a meeting.

      When I say I’m not coming in to the office in the morning it doesn’t mean I’m not working.

      I’m leaving the office and its 5:23? That’s a record!

      time to go home. I cant believe I’m still at the office.

      The Chargers are slowly figuring out how the Internet works! Specifically 2007-era Internet:

      Still trying to figure out twitter. It has a strange draw but I don’t know why I keep coming back.

      setup our teams myspace page, this is a project that I was going to do last year.

      launched a myspace page for the Chargers and we are going to hit 400 friends today for sure

      I need to spend a weekend learning the ends and outs of wordpress.

      getting way too much spam on my blog

      Testing from my Palm 700p. I will see how it looks in the am. Really going to bed this time.

      And then one day. it’s gone:

      i have a personal twitter account now: http://twitter.com/joelprice the chargers twitter will become more about the chargers less about me.

      You should give Joel a follow — he has a sense of humor about his early tweets:

      BIG thanks for the complimentary lettuce wraps. @PFChangs definitely knows how to make our day better. #Chargers pic.twitter.com/flxTNuAMcf

      And I’m glad he’s decided to leave them up for posterity.

      Calum Marsh: You don’t want to seem like you’re trying too hard to appear easygoing. That tends to spoil the effect

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      Reviews and recommendations are unbiased and products are independently selected. Postmedia may earn an affiliate commission from purchases made through links on this page.

      Article content

      In early April, 2014, a little more than eight years after the service was globally launched, Twitter implemented a change for which emotional and psychological ramifications are still felt among its user base today. They introduced what is known as the pinned tweet: a single 140-character dispatch selected by each Twitter user as fundamentally representative of what prospective followers might expect from their feed.

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      In theory, it is a matter of choosing an amusing bon mot or witticism with which to welcome the uninitiated to one’s page. In practice, it’s proven a decision of paralyzing strain.

      The important questions: What is the perfect pinned tweet? Back to video

      The trouble with settling on an illustrative tweet lay in deciding what precisely one would like to illustrate. Do you want to emphasize your intelligence? Your relaxed good nature? Your humour and easy charm? And supposing you know what qualities you’d like your pinned tweet to underscore, have you in fact ever tweeted anything that really evinces them? Scrolling through your timeline in pursuit of representative efforts can be tremendously humbling for this reason: maybe, you quickly start to feel, your Twitter is not so well-known for the intelligence, good nature or easy charm and humour you imagined. Maybe you don’t have many good qualities to show off after all.

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      You don’t want to seem like you’re trying too hard to appear easygoing. That tends to spoil the effect

      But settle on something you must, even if the material you’re drawing from isn’t sterling. So, what do you choose? Some are compelled, by either insecurity or pride, to put their best foot forward with a positive declaration – an announcement of recent success or professional achievement, a simple statement of self-flattery, a notable flourish of retweeted praise.

      But whatever gains you may make in immediate recognition (whereby a stranger happening on your page will spot straight away your curated glimpse of glory) are not worth the loss in delicacy and reserve. What such a pinned tweet announces to new arrivals is not so much the content of the accomplishment you’re highlighting as the fact that you believed it needed announcing – in other words, a deficit of confidence and an abundance of vanity. Not a good look.

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      You may prefer instead to take the opposite approach: the appointment of some insult or merciless jibe as the one to share. Possibly this will make you seem appealingly self-deprecating, good-humoured enough to take a joke, and, most saliently, important enough to be mocked by others online. On the other hand, it may just make you seem anxious and easily perturbed, as you invariably do when you retweet trolls into your timeline in a transparent bid to show how little you mind them. (As a general rule, those who retweet insults are the people most affected by them.) You don’t want to seem like you’re trying too hard to appear easygoing. That tends to spoil the effect. And nothing screams effort quite like the pre-eminence of that pin.

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      If you are in a creative field, you may think it easiest to simply pin your latest work and update it whenever something new surfaces. This strategy not only serves as an ongoing testament to what you do and a reminder to the world of your prolificacy but also, happily, it alleviates the stress of having to choose something more broadly meaningful or representative of your image as a whole. The problem is the pressure produced by the routine. That little date in the top corner of your pinned tweet will remind you constantly of your last pin-worthy achievement; and should your workload slow or its prestige suffer, even for a mere week, you will feel that reminder looming over your online identity, taunting you to one-up yourself once more.

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      More On This Topic

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      The trouble with settling on an illustrative tweet lay in deciding what precisely one would like to illustrate

      How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

      The important questions: Is it wrong to ghost (or bench) someone you just started dating?

      Your safest bet, then, may be to find a conspicuously trivial tweet, ideally a joke or recognizable meme, with a higher-than-average number of favourites and retweets. The relative popularity will reflect highly on your usual readership, making it seem at a glance that your wit is widely cherished and admired; the levity will speak well of your disposition, not only because the tweet itself is light or funny, but because it proves you don’t take yourself so seriously that you’re above a joke.

      Finally, it will defer judgement on the wisdom of your insights, the quality of your work and the parameters of your success, because it will suggest to anyone reading that they’ll just have to stick around to see if they want to know the rest. Which is the best you can hope for on Twitter: not to impress anyone but to avoid the opposite.

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    How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

    Twitter, The advanced search that Twitter allows us is a good system to search for what we need with the possibility of filtering the results with several specific parameters, to which we must add the commands that we can use within the search itself. The sum of all this will make us find what we are looking for accurately.

    But we can also search Twiiter in a less specific way and with results that we can include in several different categories that the social network has.

    Twitter search

    If we consult the Twitter search box, we will see that we do not have a system that is extremely exact, but we will be able to see many different results.

    From the web

    If we use the search box from the web we will see how the results of Featured, Most Recent, People, Photos or Videos appear.

    We can put filters if we click on More options (three vertical dots) and then Search Filters, filtering the results according to From any user O People you follow Y Anywhere O Near you.

    We can also click on More options and then on search settings to Hide confidential content Y Remove blocked and muted accounts.

    From Android

    For searches on Android we must enter To explore (magnifying glass at the bottom of the screen) and we will receive results from Highlights, Most recent, People, Photos Y Videos.

    As happens on the web, we will be able to click on More options and then in Search Settings to leave us Hide content that may hurt some people’s sensibilities Y Remove blocked and muted accounts.

    Also See: Which Xiaomi to buy on Black Friday if you don’t get one for one dollar

    Advanced search

    Advanced search is a Twitter service that allows us to allows you to customize the results of a search according to certain parameters, which makes finding the tweet we are looking for much easier. To achieve this we must follow these simple steps:

    • We enter our search in the bar dedicated to it on Twitter.
    • Now we must click on the option Advanced search, which is under Search Filters in the upper-right corner of the results page. We can also enter if we click on More options and then on Advanced search.
    • Now we fill in the fields to refine the search and then click on Look for to make it easier for us to find any tweet.

    Refine your search

    When we enter the advanced search we get a series of options that we are going to explain what each one consists of and how to get the best out of it.

    Words

    In words we can complete several options as follows and in this specific order:

    • Tweets containing all the words in any position (what’s up- it will search for those that contain both words)
    • Those with exact phrases (happy day – in this case it will only show those that have just this phrase)
    • Tweets containing any of the words (cats dogs – will search those tweets with one or the other word or both at the same time).
    • Tweets that exclude specific words (cats dogs – will exclude those that have both words)
    • Those with a specific hashtag (# Thursdays – will only show those with this hashtag)
    • Tweets in a specific language (we can choose the language of the tweets to search).

    Accounts

    We will specifically search for people in the Advanced Twitter Search:

    • Tweets from a specific account (any Twitter user with the name of your account).
    • Tweets sent as replies to a specific account (those that we have sent to a specific account)
    • Those who mention a specific account (all those that exist and that mention one or more accounts separately or at the same time)

    Filters

    • We can include answers in our searches and at the same time we must mark if we want:
      • Include original tweets and responses.
      • Just show answers.
    • In addition, they can be included or excluded links and within them we will have two options:
      • Include tweets with links.
      • Only show tweets with links.

    Interaction

    In this case, what we are going to take into account is the interaction that the tweets have had.

    • Tweets con minimum of responses.
    • With minimum likes.
    • Tweets con minimum of Retweets.

    Dates

    Here we will search for Tweets sent before a specific date, after a specific date, or within a range of dates.

    Twitter commands

    We can use the Twitter search commands, both in the normal search that we have on the web or our mobile device, and in several of the parameters within the Advanced Search.

    In any of the two official search options that exist, you can manage these commands that give us search parameters that we would not have otherwise and that will be very useful for us to find what we are looking for in a way much more accurate.

    These commands are the following:

    • Text: Tweets that contain the words that we indicate (Dog Cat).
    • » «: the exact term will be searched (“Cat Dog”).
    • OR: it will look for all the words that we put (Dogs OR Cats).
    • – : a word will be excluded from the search (Dogs-cats).
    • #: this will search for tweets with the requested hashtag (#dogs)
    • From usuario: tweets of a specific user (From: ManuNaranjoR)
    • To: user: when we want to see tweets sent to a user (To: ManuNaranjoR)
    • @Username: tweets in which a user is quoted (@ManuNaranjoR)
    • Name without @: We will see tweets that quote that user and the user’s own account (ManuNaranjoR).
    • Near: search term by location (Event near: Madrid)
    • Within: term by location and distance in miles (Event near: Madrid Within: 10m)
    • Since: tweets with end and event from a date (Event since: yyy / mm / dd)
    • Until: same as above, but until a specific date (until event: yyyy / mm / dd).

    With everything we have told you, searching on Twitter will be much easier and faster from now on.

    • ‘)” data-event=”social share” data-info=”Pinterest” aria-label=”Share on Pinterest”>
    • ‘)” data-event=”social share” data-info=”Reddit” aria-label=”Share on Reddit”>
    • ‘)” data-event=”social share” data-info=”Flipboard” aria-label=”Share on Flipboard”>

    How to search for just about any tweet on twitter

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    • How Do I PM Somebody on Twitter?

    If your business has followers on Twitter, you may want to send tweets directly to them. Depending on where you type someone’s Twitter name, you’ll send that person either a mention or a reply. Mentions are public tweets, so they’re visible to everyone. Replies also appear on the recipient’s Mentions tab, but only people who follow both of you can see them. You can send tweets via text message or on the Twitter website.

    Tweet from a Computer

    Go to Twitter and sign in to your account.

    Type your tweet in the box in the top left corner of the page. To send someone an @reply, enter the person’s Twitter name at the beginning of the tweet in the format @username. To send someone a mention, type his or her Twitter name anywhere within the tweet. Each tweet can contain up to 140 characters.

    Click “Tweet” to send your message.

    Tweet via Text Message

    Text the word “Smart” (without quotes) to 40404 if you’re in the United States. If you live in a different country, your code may be different (see link in Resources).

    Wait for a reply from Twitter, and then text “Yes” (without quotes) to 40404 or your country’s short code.

    Text your Twitter username to your short code. Don’t include any symbols, such as the @ symbol. Send your Twitter password in a separate text message. Your Twitter account and phone are now linked.

    Text a tweet to your short code. To send a tweet to someone, type the person’s username in the format “@username” (without quotes). Enter the username at the beginning of the tweet to send an @reply, or enter it within the tweet to send a mention.