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How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Taylor Gibb is a professional software developer with nearly a decade of experience. He served as Microsoft Regional Director in South Africa for two years and has received multiple Microsoft MVP (Most Valued Professional) awards. He currently works in R&D at Derivco International. Read more.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

The Store in Windows 8 is awesome, but when you have so many apps at your disposal it becomes hard to keep track of what’s installed where, here’s how you can see the apps installed on any of your devices running Windows 8.

Checking if a Metro App is Installed on a Device

Open the Windows Store by click on the Store tile.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

When the Store opens, right click on any white space to bring up the “context menu”, then select Your apps. On a tablet you can swipe from the top of the screen.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

When the “Your apps” page loads, you will see a list off all the apps you have purchased from the Store.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

In order to see which apps are installed on which of your devices, just switch from all apps, to a specific device.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Then only the apps installed on that specific device will be shown.

To get there, swipe up from the bottom of the screen with a touch-based system. Or mouse down to the lower left corner of the Start screen and click the down arrow that appears. The Apps view appears. Apps you have recently installed have the text “NEW” next to their name.

Where in Windows 8.1 can you browse installed applications?

If you want an easy way to find all apps installed on Windows 8 computers, hit the Windows Key + Q in from either the desktop or the new (metro) interface. This brings up the Search box and will display all of the apps. The benefit of this is you can easily start searching for a particular app too.

How do I find apps on Windows 8?

To install an app:

  1. From the Store, locate and select the app you wish to install. Clicking an app.
  2. The app information page will appear. If the app is free, click the Install button. …
  3. The app will begin downloading and will be installed automatically. …
  4. The installed app will appear on the Start screen.

Where do I find installed apps?

You can see all the apps you’ve ever downloaded on your Android phone by opening the “My apps & games” section in your Google Play Store. The apps you’ve downloaded are divided into two sections: “Installed” (all the apps currently installed on your phone) and “Library” (all the apps that aren’t currently installed).

How do I install Windows 8 Apps without the store?

Install Windows 8 Apps without the Store

  1. Search for “Run” from the Windows Start screen and click on it to open its command prompt.
  2. Type in “ gpedit. …
  3. From the main screen of the Local Group Policy Editor, you want to head to the following entry: …
  4. Right-click on “Allow all trusted apps to install.”

How do I install APK files on Windows 8?

Take the APK you want to install (be it Google’s app package or something else) and drop the file into the tools folder in your SDK directory. Then use the command prompt while your AVD is running to enter (in that directory) adb install filename. apk . The app should be added to the app list of your virtual device.

How do I put Apps on my desktop Windows 8?

Pin apps and folders to the desktop or taskbar

  1. Press and hold (or right-click) an app, and then select More > Pin to taskbar.
  2. If the app is already open on the desktop, press and hold (or right click) the app’s taskbar button, and then select Pin to taskbar.

How do I download purble on Windows 8?

Open Windows Explorer and go to Windows 8 installation drive. Then go to “Program Files” folder. Now you can move the “Purble Place” folder into “Microsoft Games” folder. You can now launch the Windows 7 Purble Place game on Windows 8.

How do I see all the apps I’ve downloaded 2020?

On your Android phone, open the Google Play store app and tap the menu button (three lines). In the menu, tap My apps & games to see a list of apps currently installed on your device. Tap All to see a list of all apps you’ve downloaded on any device using your Google account.

Why are my installed apps not showing?

If you find the missing apps installed but still fail to show up on the home screen, you can uninstall the app and reinstall it. If necessary, you can also recover deleted app data on your Android phone.

How do I get a list of installed apps on Android?

To get a current list of apps installed on your Android device, use a new app called List My Apps. When you launch List My Apps, it automatically gathers a list of the apps installed on your Android device.

How do you find out what has recently been installed on your computer?

View recently installed programs and apps in the Start menu

  1. Step 1: Open the Start menu either by clicking the Start button on the taskbar or pressing the Windows logo key on the keyboard.
  2. Step 2: You can find recently installed programs and apps under the Recently added list.

How do I find the last file I saved?

File Explorer has a convenient way to search recently modified files built right into the “Search” tab on the Ribbon. Switch to the “Search” tab, click the “Date Modified” button, and then select a range. If you don’t see the “Search” tab, click once in the search box and it should appear.

How do I get Windows 8?

How to Find Windows 8 Version Details. Right-click the Start button and select System. (If you don’t have a Start button, press Windows Key+X, then select System.) You’ll see your edition of Windows 8, your version number (such as 8.1), and your system type (32-bit or 64-bit).

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

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We know that we can easily create shortcuts for applications on the Windows Desktop to quickly access the apps we use everyday, but if you’ve been using Windows 8 you might have noticed that you don’t have an option to create shortcuts for Metro style apps (or now referred to simply “Windows 8 Applications”). Of course, you can always go to the Start Screen and start typing the name of the application. This works OK while the number of installed applications is small, but once the amount of apps installed in your system starts to get crowded, it also becomes more difficult to easily find apps.

To easy-up this problem you can use MetroApp Link, which is a small utility that it doesn’t need to be installed and it will allow you to create Metro apps shortcuts to the Windows 8 Desktop, reducing the number of steps and time to start working with the apps.

The utility is pretty easy to use, since you don’t need to install it, you just need to extract the content of the zip file and double-click to run it. You may also see a pop-up message at the first run indicating that you need to install the icon library — in this step simply click Yes to continue.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Then the MetroApp Link will load, once in the main application you can just click the Create shortcut button for each Metro app you want to have access from the Desktop.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

The shortcuts you want will now appear on the Desktop and you can double-click them to open the Windows 8 Applications without the need of going through the Start Screen.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Things to keep in mind:

  • Remember to extract all the content of the zip file.
  • When running the application don’t just double-click the application, instead right-click on it and select Run as administrator.
  • The utility do not have a scroll bar, so to view all the shortcut available you need to left-click the application background and grab up and down.
  • If you stumble upon a security warning, simply click Open.

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I am just curious if there is a way to package up a Windows 8 Metro application to distribute it to others with the Windows 8 Developer Preview installed? It would be nice to be able to allow someone to just download and install, rather than requiring them to install VS’11 Preview and compile the code themselves in order to test out / use a Windows 8 Metro application that I’ve built.

Is there a way to distribute a compiled Windows 8 Metro application for others to test/use since the Windows Store is not yet live?

This would likely be useful for testing Metro apps on non-development machines even after the Windows Store is live.

4 Answers 4

Each machine that wants to install the application will need a developer license. See this page for some details.

When you have your app ready:

  1. select Store->Create App Package
  2. Select Build a package to use locally only
  3. Follow the prompts

This will create a package in whatever folder you specified. You should be able to copy that to another developer-licensed machine and install it.

There will be a batch file called Add-AppxDevPackage in the directory. Running it will install the app. It must be run as an admininistrator.

Distributing apps outside store is possible after complying to the prerequisites listed in this MSDN article. It also covers the process of application installation using PowerShell. Though it appears quite complicated, note that MSIs work fine for Windows 8 metro apps so you can probably enclose the installation process into one small instalator.

From the article

  • Requires Windows 8 Enterprise Edition, and must be joined to a domain, and the domain must have the Allow all trusted applications to install Group Policy setting.
  • for Windows 8 Professional, and Windows RT, or a non-domain joined machine, you must buy a sideloading product activation key from Microsoft
  • the application must be signed by a key that is trusted by the computer

Once you’ve purchased your sideloading product key from Microsoft, add the sideloading product key:

To enable side-loading, enable the following guid:

To add an application, from a powershell prompt:

Windows 8.1 Update

According to the latest announcements by Microsoft the next update to Windows 8.1 will allow all the devices running the Pro version to sideload applications without sideloading activation key. So far this has been the case only for the Enterprise version. Bare in mind that the machine will still need to be a part of the AD domain. Additionally, if you still run a previous version but you’re part of any of the below programs:

  • Enterprise Agreement
  • Enterprise Subscription Agreement
  • Enrollment for Education Solutions (under a Campus and School Agreement)
  • School Enrollment
  • Select and Select Plus

You’ll be granted the enterprise sideloading rights starting on the 1st of May 2014. Otherwise you’ll still be able to sideload but will need to buy a sideloading activation key for 100$ (that’s a one-time charge for an unlimited number of devices).

The Windows 8.1 Start screen is loaded with shortcuts to pre-installed apps you may not want or need. Here’s how to clear out the clutter.

Think of those poor, lonely apps pre-installed on Windows 8 PCs that are destined to remain unopened: Travel, Reminders, Maps, Camera, Notes. Reading List?

These are only a few of the many programs preloaded on my Windows 8 PC that I have never opened and am unlikely to use in the future. Windows 8’s Start screen is jam-packed with shortcuts to orphan apps such as these. If you’d rather not live with an overcrowded Start screen, you can remove the unused programs — or at least unpin them from the screen — with just a few clicks.

Unclutter the Win8 Start screen

To remove an app’s shortcut from the Windows 8.1 Start screen or to uninstall a program, press and hold or right-click it to bring the Start screen options into view at the bottom of the screen, as shown in the image at the top of this post.

You can then select other Start-screen shortcuts to perform the same action on several of them at once. Your options are to unpin the shortcuts from the Start screen, uninstall the programs, resize the selected tiles, and prevent “live” tiles from automatically refreshing.

In a post from last June, Lance Whitney explained how to customize the Windows 8.1 Start screen.

If you later decide to re-install an app you’ve removed, open the Windows 8.1 Store app, press and hold or right-click an open area of the screen, and choose Your Apps in the options that appear at the top of the screen.

Re-install a native Windows 8.1 app you previously uninstalled via the Store app. Screenshot by Dennis O’Reilly/CNET

By default, the apps not installed on your PC are listed. The list includes the apps you’ve uninstalled previously.

The Store app of Windows 8.1 lists the programs that aren’t currently installed. Select one to re-install it. Screenshot by Dennis O’Reilly/CNET

To re-install one of the apps, select it and then choose the Install button. You may be prompted to provide billing information even if you selected a free app, but you can skip this step.

Microsoft gets into the app-store act

It would appear the prospect of offering native Windows 8 apps hasn’t caught on with software developers. Last November, ZDNet’s Matt Baxter-Reynolds analyzed the prevalence of questions posed on the developer site Stack Overflow for each platform. Not surprisingly, questions relating to Android and iPhone app development dominated the site’s forums.

How did Windows 8 stack up? According to Matt’s analysis, in a 28-day period of 2012 there were 3,368 questions posed on the site about Android development, and 3,264 questions asked about iPhone app development. Compared to a total of eight questions relating to Windows Store app development over those 28 days.

In an equivalent period in late 2013, Android-related questions totaled 4,505; iPhone questions dropped to 3,079; questions about Windows Store apps soared all the way to. 80.

Related stories

  • Windows 8.1 update said to arrive when XP ends
  • Windows 8 designer: Why Microsoft forced Metro on us all
  • Microsoft said to slash Windows 8.1 price on low-cost devices
  • Windows 8.1 Metro: Start or stop?

As Matt points out, developers follow the money: there were five times as many questions asked in the time period about Java and .NET development than there were about Android and iPhone app development.

Of course, quality matters more than quantity. There are plenty of useful apps offered in the Windows Store, many of which are free. Last November, Maximum PC listed 49 of the “best” Windows Store apps. The roster is dominated by big names such as Amazon, eBay, Netflix, and Adobe Reader, but also includes Shazam and Plex media players, Network Speed Test from Microsoft Research, and Fresh Paint’s touch-based paint program.

Some folks say Microsoft’s “one OS to rule them all” strategy doesn’t make sense in a multi-platform world. As Roger Cheng reported at the end of February, the Windows 8.1 update expected in the next few weeks will move the OS closer to its Windows 7 predecessor, and perhaps further from the new Metro interface, at least for users of non-touch PCs.

Sure, switching between the new and old Windows looks can be disconcerting. But most MS Office users ultimately got used to the ribbon interface — albeit with more than a little kicking and screaming. One of these days we’ll bid the Windows desktop adieu. The fate of the rest of the OS depends in no small part on third-party software developers.

If there’s money to be made in developing Windows Store apps, you can bet somebody will be chasing after it.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

PC lovers rejoice! Windows 8.1 is here, and it’s chock full of refinements and fresh new features that make Microsoft’s finger-friendly, Live-Tile-spattered vision of the future more appealing—or at least less annoying—than ever before. But as helpful as those tweaks to Windows 8’s modern interface are, they won’t matter a lick to devout desktop diehards, who are no doubt muttering something about lipstick and pigs this very second.

Fear not! I said PC lovers rejoice, not just touchscreen lovers.

Windows 8.1 packs some new settings that make it a snap to spend the majority of your time in the traditional desktop. With a few more tweaks and an extra program or two, you’ll be able to shun the modern UI almost completely, while still basking in the glow of Windows 8’s faster boot times, overhauled Task Manager, and other under-the-hood improvements.

Desktop nirvana, here we come, step by glorious step.

Meet your new favorite menu

Let’s start with the latest additions.

Microsoft naturally wants you to spend time in its touch-tastic app land, and as such, Windows 8.1’s new desktop-centric options are buried deep in a submenu, where few would venture in their everyday computing. To find the treasure trove, you’ll need to right-click the desktop Taskbar, select Properties, and then open the Navigation tab in the window that appears.

Gaze upon the wonderful bounty. Go ahead—shed a tear of joy if you need to. I won’t judge.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Unchecking the options in the “Corner navigation” portion of the tab disables the “hot corner” functionality for the upper edges of your screen. Note that you’ll want to leave the upper-left hot corner enabled if you plan to use Windows 8.1’s App Switcher to fast-switch between modern-style apps—though if you’re reading this, there’s a good chance you’ll be sticking to desktop software anyway.

The real meat, however, is in the “Start screen” options. “When I sign in or close all apps on a screen, go to the desktop instead of Start” is the option we’ve all been clamoring for: the ability to boot straight to the desktop. Check it now!

Now you have a decision to make.

Start me up

Windows 8’s exiled Start button returns in Windows 8.1, but it’s missing a crucial component: The Start menu. Instead, clicking it dumps you on the modern UI Start screen. That isn’t going to cut it in our quest for desktop purity.

If you’re the no-compromises sort of desktop user, you’ll want to install a so-called Start button replacement program. PCWorld recently rounded up the best options available, and some (like Stardock’s $5 Start8) even let you disable all charms—something Windows 8.1 doesn’t allow.

That’s not your only option, however. If you check the “Show the apps view automatically when I go to Start” option in the Taskbar Properties’ new (and awesome) Navigation tab, clicking Windows 8.1’s Start button will bring up a full-screen list of all the apps installed on your PC, rather than the modern Start screen. Even better, enabling the “List desktop apps first in the Apps view when it’s sorted by category” option will do just that.

It works well enough, but unlike Start button replacements, the All Apps view doesn’t let you search for individual files or folders. Fortunately, there’s always the trusty F3 button for that.

Fleshing out desktop functionality

Windows 8.1 includes software to meet virtually all of the average user’s everyday needs… but all of those baked-in goodies are modern-style apps, not proper desktop software.

You’ll need to install some desktop programs to replace those apps if you want to cut the modern UI cord completely.

Rather than rattle off a giant list of suggestions, consider checking out PCWorld’s guide to essential free software, our tutorial on building the ultimate free security suite, and—for the more adventurous— 20 obscure, yet supremely useful PC programs. (You just have to give WizMouse a whirl.) Remember: Windows 8.1 can’t play DVDs out of the box, so consider picking up the free, yet excellent VLC media player if that’s important to you. You’ll also want to snag a desktop PDF reader like Sumatra PDF.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc Don’t forget Windows Media Player while you’re setting desktop-friendly defaults!

Once that’s done, you’ll need to set all those desktop programs as the defaults for the file types they support.

Right-click the returned Start button and select Control Panel if you’ve opted to stick with the Windows 8.1 version, or open the Start menu and select Control Panel if you’ve installed a Start button replacement like Classic Shell. From there, select Programs > Default programs > Set your default programs and go through the list, giving your desktop software the default reins. Don’t forget about Windows Media Player if you’ve skipped VLC!

A modern-styled block in a desktop-shaped hole

If you don’t like the idea of replacing all of Windows 8.1 native apps with desktop alternatives—only modern-style apps receive system notifications, for one thing—you can compromise by installing Stardock’s simply sublime $5 ModernMix program, which lets you run Metro apps in desktop windows. It’s not the same as banishing the modern UI completely, but hey, Microsoft’s modern apps actually handle pretty well with a keyboard and mouse, if you don’t mind all their wasted space.

Shutting the whole thing down

There’s just one niggling problem: The desktop doesn’t have any obvious way to shut down your PC, unless you’ve installed a Start menu replacement program with the option. You still have to swipe open the modern UI charms bar, then select Settings > Power > Shutdown—at least at first glance.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc It would be nice if this option was a bit more obvious.

But good news! Unlike Windows 8, Windows 8.1 indeed has a desktop shutdown option. Like the new boot-to-desktop option, you have to dig for it.

Right-clicking the returned Start button reveals a power menu of sorts, with a scad of shortcuts to advanced system options. Way down at the bottom you’ll see a “Shut down or sign out” option with various shutdown options. Alternatively, you could just press Alt-F4 on the desktop to bring up a list of shutdown options.

How I learned to quit worrying and shun the Live Tiles

Boom! We’re already done, and with none of the complicated task scheduling, shortcut creations, or otherwise complicated tweaks that were needed to banish the modern UI from Windows 8. All in all, Windows 8.1 is truly better than its predecessor, largely because of the compromises Microsoft made both on the desktop and in the modern environment—not that the latter matters if you’ve been going along with this guide.

Enjoy those lickety-split boot times and the revamped File Explorer without the modern UI hassles. Now, if only it were possible to eliminate the networking charm that appears when you click the Internet access button in your desktop system tray…

Last Updated on August 30, 2016 by admin 9 Comments

I have seen a number of users having issues with Metro apps in Windows 8. The most common issue is Metro apps fail to open when the user clicks on their tiles. If you too have installed Windows 8 and experiencing issues while trying to run Metro apps, it could be because of the reasons explained below.

The first possible reason could be PC’s screen resolution. Most of Windows 8 users probably not aware of the fact that Metro apps require 1024 x 768 or higher screen resolution to run properly. That is, the screen resolution must be at least 1024 x 768 pixels. If you are unsure about your current screen resolution, here is how to check it:

Check Screen Resolution:

Step 1: Do a right-click on Desktop and select Screen Resolution option to open Screen Resolution window.

Step 2: You will see the current screen resolution next the Resolution box. If the resolution is lower than 1024 x 768 pixels, you can set a higher resolution, if your PC supports. To change the current resolution, click on Resolution box and select a higher resolution.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

If your PC meets the minimum screen resolution requirement and still you can’t run Metro apps means that you have to check the status of User Account Control (UAC). Metro apps may fail to open when the UAC is turned off. To check whether the UAC is on or off, follow the steps given below.

Turn On User Account Control:

Step 1: Open Run dialog box. To do this, use Windows + R keys. Type control.exe in the box and hit enter key to launch Control Panel.

Step 2: In the Control Panel, click on System and Security and then click Change User Account Control settings to open UAC settings window.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Step 3: Here, you can see the status of UAC. Slider in Never notify position indicates the disabled status of UAC. To enable or turn on UAC, move the slier to Always notify or Default position, and then click Ok. Click Yes for the UAC prompt.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Move back to the Start screen and try to run Metro apps.

If the Metro apps are not working even after performing the above steps, you may consider creating a new user account. It’s easy! If you can’t create a new User Account from the Control Panel, try to create one using Command Prompt.

Create a New User Account:

To create a new user account, type the following command in an elevated prompt (Command Prompt with admin rights):

net user username password /add

(replace “username” with a custom name and “password” with a strong password)

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Refresh Windows 8:

The last option is to refresh your Windows 8 with the help of Refresh PC option. Refresh PC feature helps reload Windows without deleing your photos, music, videos and other personal files. Tens of guides available on the Internet to show you how to refresh Windows 8. Good luck!

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

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Comments

Metro Apps. Weather, store, finance, sports and Bing news have quit working. It appears weather and sports are updating bur will not open when I click on them. IE works on desktop?
Any help?
Thanx

ronnie schwartzberg says

I’ve had my computer with Windows 8 for about 6 months. All worked fine until the apps just stopped working. Metro apps just won’t open. Tried refresh and user account code with no success.

Carol when you find I’d like to know to…I hate windows 8 I thought I would be getting a better system but this is turning out to be worse than Vista Was….

Carol Zess says

New computer, Asus, with windows 8. Cannot get photo app to work and other apps come and go. Where do I go for help?

i tried to move the Users folder to another drive to make space on my SSD. i made a symbolic link in command prompt mode after using xcopy /s /h to make a copy of the Users folder on my other drive. this causes the metro apps to fail. any thoughts on a different way to move the Users profile and retain use of the metro apps?

I wouldn’t call this a fix but it seems to work for me, this is what i do…when my metro apps won’t open:

1.Go to metro store: “Store” tile in the metro start screen…
2.Right click in a blank area, which brings down a ‘green panel’
3.Select ‘Your Apps’ from the panel…
4.From the first drop-down menu select ‘Apps Installed On ‘
(It should list all the metro apps installed on your PC)
5.Press [CTRL+A] to select all the apps or hold [CTRL] & manually select the ones that aren’t working..
6.From the menu panel at the bottom of the screen choose ‘Install’…
(NOTE: Since that apps are already installed, it just performs a quick re-install of the apps)
(Also, this “will not” reset/remove any configs or saved data of the app)
7.Afterwards the metro apps work again…at least it does for me….

As mentioned above, I don’t consider this to be a fix & am open to any actual fixes found.
Personally i find this much simpler than having to ‘Refresh’ my PC lossing all my thrid party installs,
every time the metro apps stop working…hope y’all found this useful.

The issue may be because Windows 8 is still in pre-beta stage and the Metro apps included in build 8102 are not the official apps for Windows 8. If I am not wrong, those Metro apps were developed by some university students.

I have installed Win 8 three times since it was made available. I installed it on a separate hard drive. I still have it on my computer but rarely use it. Each time I installed it, some of the Metro apps worked for a short period of time, but not many of them. Most of them I have no need for anyway. Eventually, all stopped working. My system meets all the qualifications you outlined in your article. I see very little difference in Win 7 and Win 8 at this time except that Win 8 starts faster. Makes you wonder why the fast start up was not included in Win 7.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

A reader emailed us this week asking about app management in Windows 8. After upgrading to Microsoft’s latest desktop operating system following years of using Windows XP and 7, our reader wasn’t sure how to close or uninstall his Windows 8 Style (a.k.a. “Metro”) apps. We realized that Microsoft doesn’t make this process clear, and that a brief tutorial was in order.

How to Uninstall Windows 8 Style Metro Apps

Longtime Windows users who want to uninstall a Windows 8 Style app will likely head first to the Control Panel’s “Programs and Features” section. While this is still how you manage your desktop apps, Windows 8 Style apps require a different method. For our example, we’ll use the Facebook app, available from the Windows Store.

To uninstall any Windows 8 Style app, first find it on your Start Screen and then right-click on it (or tap and hold if using a touch interface). Then press Uninstall from the App Bar on the bottom of the screen. You’ll be asked to confirm the action; press Uninstall again to complete the process.

The app will be removed from your Start Screen and your PC. Don’t worry if you delete an app by accident; you can always re-download your purchased apps from the Windows Store.

How to Close Windows 8 Style Metro Apps

Okay, so you know how to uninstall your Windows 8 apps, but what about just closing them? Like other mobile platforms, the default behavior in Windows 8 keeps apps apps open after you’ve switched to another app or moved back to the Start Screen. In general, these apps will suspend in the background, but sometimes you may want to close an app completely. Here’s how.
Using the Facebook app example again, once you’ve launched an app, you can close it by first navigating to another app, the desktop, or the Start Screen. Then, move your cursor to the upper left corner of the screen and then pull it down (or swipe in and hold from the left if using a touch interface). This will reveal the Switcher, the primary function of which is to let you quickly switch between Windows 8 style apps. But you can also use this sidebar to close apps. With the Switcher open, right-click on the app you wish to close, and then press Close when the option appears. If using a touch interface, open the app and then swipe from the top of the screen to the bottom to close it.

App management in Windows 8 definitely takes some getting used to, especially when juxtaposed with the separate and familiar desktop app management. But with a little practice, you’ll soon be a pro at handling Windows 8 Style “Metro” apps.

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lol it did not even take me 5 minutes at all! XD

Not unlike previous releases of Microsoft’s ubiquitous desktop OS, Windows 8 has faced a lot of scrutiny in the year it’s been available. Every time the company has made a drastic change to Windows, it’s been on the losing end of user opinion. Windows 8 has been no different.

Microsoft found itself in a bind after the launch of Windows 7. Struggling for relevance in the mobile sector, the company attempted to fill the void in its portfolio by adding a touch-friendly UI layer over the Windows desktop. However, Metro came with a myriad of issues and complaints, mostly because of poor choices in usability design — part of what we’ve been hoping Microsoft will fix in Windows 8.1. And it has, somewhat.

Despite that and the fact that a single-year turnaround for any kind of Windows iteration is quick for the folks at Redmond, we’re not sure if it’s enough to please detractors. Before installing the free upgrade next Thursday, let’s review what’s been improved and what’s still missing.

When I reviewed Windows 8 I criticized its broken down search, as it didn’t make sense to separate documents from settings if search was meant to be used as a keyboard launcher. Windows 8.1 fixes this with universal search that works well most of the time, including some semantic search capabilities (queries don’t need to be keyword-exact). However if you’ve used OS X, you’ll note that Mac maintains its upper hand with more seamless and useful results. For example, OS X can remember your preference of a previous query and make that result more prominent in future searches with less keystrokes.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

As you’ve read dozens of times by now, it’s just the button, not the menu, though the handy right-click menu with power user settings and shortcuts is still present. Returning the Start button is a positive change and works best when you configure the Start screen with your most used apps and shortcuts. However.

While the addition of smaller and bigger tiles enhances the overall experience compared to what we got in Windows 8, the Start Screen still can’t be manipulated fluidly if you wish to add, move or remove tiles. Newly installed programs are not added to Start automatically, which can be both good and bad, but without proper integration of Start and desktop apps, interaction between the two remains broken.

Microsoft’s answer to the divorce between desktop apps and Start tiles is the “All programs” screen which I find horrible to browse because it’s cluttered with countless redundant shortcuts for help files, uninstallers, readmes and other nonsense. It feels like you’re scrolling through every single shortcut from your old Programs menu.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

It’s a shame Microsoft doesn’t make this the default setting as it represents a major improvement in the way Metro and the desktop blend together. The “modern” UI was forced into Windows 8 and that’s why a lot of people have avoided the OS. The design languages are very different and making them co-exist amicably is something Microsoft hasn’t figured out entirely, but the wallpaper integration alone makes 8.1 worth installing. Bonus: the ugly flower wallpaper is no longer the default.

Thank you, Microsoft. You now get the option to boot directly to the desktop, even if it’s not a prominent setting, it’s accesible from the taskbar properties. Hot corners can be disabled which makes sense if you are a desktop power user with multiple monitors. The change helps you forget about Metro if you don’t want to see it. But.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Personally, I’ve disabled all hot corners but Charms. I also hate Charms, or rather I find them irrelevant to my workflow. A welcomed improvement would have been to detect if you are running a desktop, laptop or tablet and show contextually relevant menus. Seriously Microsoft, how hard can it be? For example: show advanced networking options on a PC including control panel integration, show brightness settings on a tablet/laptop, disable the “share” option when you are not in a Metro app, and so on.

The new Skydrive app gives an Explorer-esque way of handling files from the Metro UI. Skype looks great and replaces the old Messaging app. Mail is also better, albeit still very limited. Also, you get a wider variety of options in the settings menu and many visual aids that explain how to get around the OS. These last two translate into a friendlier way to configure and use a Windows 8 PC for less experienced users.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Metro apps are set as defaults for opening PDF, images, and other popular file formats, even though they aren’t optimized for mouse navigation, you typically can’t manipulate files (copy, paste, print, move windows) and it’s not intuitive to bounce in and out of Metro when doing actual work.

Solution: Same as with Windows 8: install and configure your favorite desktop apps as the new defaults. Even Windows’ built-in desktop programs will do the trick. While annoying having to configure this, mark my words, miss one file format and you’ll hate Windows 8 a little more every time it forces you back to a vanilla Metro app.

The Windows Store looks pretty good on its current iteration. When it works right (e.g. Halo Spartan), installing apps from the Store feels magical. It’s as if PCs were always meant to work like this. Two clicks and boom, you’re running your new program.

If you have selected a large app, the download will start on the background. A subtle status notification will tell you when the program is done downloading, installing and ready to run. Choose to run the newly installed program from the notification and it will launch the new app in a visually smooth transition. Like I said, magical.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

“When it works right” being the key phrase here. A thorough transformation is required if we’ll ever see Metro become as powerful or useful as the desktop. A majority of apps that belong to a web service offer a lesser experience than their browser-based counterparts. On some occasions they aren’t official apps and Microsoft isn’t doing enough to clean up that mess (e.g. there are several unofficial and somewhat shady YouTube apps).

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Bottom line, I still think Windows 8/8.1 improves on Windows 7, even if Microsoft is clearly focused on iterating and improving the tablet experience more than the desktop. Which kind of begs the question, did we really have to wait a full year for the company to fix its most glaring mistakes? Things like the lack of a Start button, cross-UI wallpaper integration or booting straight to the desktop could have been addressed with a “powertoy” like the old days, but I digress.

Having used Windows 8.1 preview/final for months, I think it’s a must-have for those already running Windows 8. At the very least, it polishes some of the roughest edges with Metro’s integration and it won’t cost you a cent.

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So you’ve installed Windows 8. You’ve figured out how to get your favorite desktop programs working, and now you’re wondering what the Metro environment has to offer.

Say what you will about the new Windows 8 Metro interface – called “Modern” by Microsoft – but one thing it’s done is create an ecosystem of apps. It’s been a breath of fresh air, bringing new concepts to the PC platform and apps that otherwise wouldn’t be offered.

Below I’ve listed some apps to check out. It’s not meant to be a list of the best Windows 8 apps; rather, it’s meant to be a list of apps those curious about the platform should check out first. These apps all point in some ways to Microsoft’s plans for the platform, and also do a good job of utilizing Metro’s strengths Go through them if you’re wondering what this new ecosystem has to offer – and what its evolution might look like.

Modern Minesweeper

Think it’s stupid to start with Minesweeper? Think again. Microsoft only included games in early versions of Windows to help new users learn basic concepts, such as the click-and-drag or the menu. So it’s only natural to look at updated versions of these games to learn what Microsoft thinks users will get from Windows 8 apps – and to learn how to use these apps yourself.

The answer? New features, online integration, advertising, and everything taking up the entire screen regardless of whether that’s necessary or not. Curious about what’s new? Read more about the Windows 8 version of Minesweeper, and it’s Adventure Mode.

Twitter

Twitter released an official Mac app years ago, but never got around to putting out a Windows version. Until, that is, Windows 8 came out. This new version of Twitter takes up an entire screen, but don’t think that space is all wasted. Links are opened within the app, allowing you to read articles and see pictures without leaving Twitter.

The Mac app, in contrast, is thin – designed to run alongside a browser. Apps in Windows 8 are meant to be integrated, combining complete experiences into one package. Read more about Twitter for Windows 8, if you’re curious.

Prefer Facebook to Twitter? There’s yet to be an official Windows 8 Facebook app, but Mine is a decent Facebook client for Windows 8 if you’re curious.

NextGen Reader

Windows 8 is meant to run on two mostly unrelated platforms: tablets controlled by touch screens and desktop computers driven by the mouse and keyboard. Sure, there are devices that use both input methods, but most devices are one or the other. The result can be apps not quite feeling at home in one of these two use cases.

NextGen Reader is different. The app – which currently integrates with Google Reader but will be independent when that service shuts down – offers two interfaces. The desktop one will be familar to most RSS users, and the touch interface allows for readers to quickly page through a list of feeds.

Is this hybrid approach one more Windows 8 apps will take? Only time will tell. Read more about NextGen Reader, if you’re interested.

Or, if you want to read news but prefer not to manage RSS feeds, you should check out these fullscreen news apps for Windows 8.

RedditToGo

Love Reddit? You’ll love RedditToGo, then. This Windows 8 app – similar to the Twitter one mentioned above – integrates the content shared on Reddit. You can scroll through Reddit comments about an article without closing the article itself.

It – and Reddit apps like it – are great examples of what Metro feels like when it’s working well. The complete Reddit experience – browsing, reading, commenting – all in one interface, without the need for tabs.

Microsoft Office 2013

Office is Microsoft’s flagship software. It’s basically mandatory on Windows, installed on many Macs and – if online buzz is anything to go by – desired by Android and iPhone/iPad owners. The Surface Pro – the flagship Windows 8 tablet – comes with Office 2013 by default. It’s not a stretch to say that Microsoft’s hopes and dreams for the Metro user interface are tied to Office 2013.

Office 2013 can run two ways: as a traditional desktop app, or as a Metro app. It’s an interesting hybrid approach; one you can read all about in our Office 2013 manual, which goes over all the new features. Read it to discover what Metro means for Office.

Classic Shell

Tried these and other Metro apps, and still find yourself missing the desktop? It might be time to throw in the towel, then. Classic Shell allows you to boot directly into the desktop, and also brings back the Start Menu Windows 8 removed.

The Metro interface may well be the future of Windows, but if you’d like to stay in the present just a little longer, this is a great compromise. Read more about Classic Shell.

Conclusion

Our very own Chris feels that Microsoft is trying to kill the traditional desktop. I’m a fan of what Metro could become, but I sincerely hope this isn’t the case. For getting actual work done, the desktop is still best. Its multiple windows interface is simply great for multitasking.

Still, I can’t help but be fascinated by these and other Metro apps. What are your favorite discoveries? Share them in the comments below.

Want to increase your productivity and do more in less time? Here are some effective ways you can use.

Justin Pot is a technology journalist based in Portland, Oregon. He loves technology, people and nature – and tries to enjoy all three whenever possible. You can chat with Justin on Twitter, right now.

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Follow MUO

So you’ve installed Windows 8. You’ve figured out how to get your favorite desktop programs working, and now you’re wondering what the Metro environment has to offer.

Say what you will about the new Windows 8 Metro interface – called “Modern” by Microsoft – but one thing it’s done is create an ecosystem of apps. It’s been a breath of fresh air, bringing new concepts to the PC platform and apps that otherwise wouldn’t be offered.

Below I’ve listed some apps to check out. It’s not meant to be a list of the best Windows 8 apps; rather, it’s meant to be a list of apps those curious about the platform should check out first. These apps all point in some ways to Microsoft’s plans for the platform, and also do a good job of utilizing Metro’s strengths Go through them if you’re wondering what this new ecosystem has to offer – and what its evolution might look like.

Modern Minesweeper

Think it’s stupid to start with Minesweeper? Think again. Microsoft only included games in early versions of Windows to help new users learn basic concepts, such as the click-and-drag or the menu. So it’s only natural to look at updated versions of these games to learn what Microsoft thinks users will get from Windows 8 apps – and to learn how to use these apps yourself.

The answer? New features, online integration, advertising, and everything taking up the entire screen regardless of whether that’s necessary or not. Curious about what’s new? Read more about the Windows 8 version of Minesweeper, and it’s Adventure Mode.

Twitter

Twitter released an official Mac app years ago, but never got around to putting out a Windows version. Until, that is, Windows 8 came out. This new version of Twitter takes up an entire screen, but don’t think that space is all wasted. Links are opened within the app, allowing you to read articles and see pictures without leaving Twitter.

The Mac app, in contrast, is thin – designed to run alongside a browser. Apps in Windows 8 are meant to be integrated, combining complete experiences into one package. Read more about Twitter for Windows 8, if you’re curious.

Prefer Facebook to Twitter? There’s yet to be an official Windows 8 Facebook app, but Mine is a decent Facebook client for Windows 8 if you’re curious.

NextGen Reader

Windows 8 is meant to run on two mostly unrelated platforms: tablets controlled by touch screens and desktop computers driven by the mouse and keyboard. Sure, there are devices that use both input methods, but most devices are one or the other. The result can be apps not quite feeling at home in one of these two use cases.

NextGen Reader is different. The app – which currently integrates with Google Reader but will be independent when that service shuts down – offers two interfaces. The desktop one will be familar to most RSS users, and the touch interface allows for readers to quickly page through a list of feeds.

Is this hybrid approach one more Windows 8 apps will take? Only time will tell. Read more about NextGen Reader, if you’re interested.

Or, if you want to read news but prefer not to manage RSS feeds, you should check out these fullscreen news apps for Windows 8.

RedditToGo

Love Reddit? You’ll love RedditToGo, then. This Windows 8 app – similar to the Twitter one mentioned above – integrates the content shared on Reddit. You can scroll through Reddit comments about an article without closing the article itself.

It – and Reddit apps like it – are great examples of what Metro feels like when it’s working well. The complete Reddit experience – browsing, reading, commenting – all in one interface, without the need for tabs.

Microsoft Office 2013

Office is Microsoft’s flagship software. It’s basically mandatory on Windows, installed on many Macs and – if online buzz is anything to go by – desired by Android and iPhone/iPad owners. The Surface Pro – the flagship Windows 8 tablet – comes with Office 2013 by default. It’s not a stretch to say that Microsoft’s hopes and dreams for the Metro user interface are tied to Office 2013.

Office 2013 can run two ways: as a traditional desktop app, or as a Metro app. It’s an interesting hybrid approach; one you can read all about in our Office 2013 manual, which goes over all the new features. Read it to discover what Metro means for Office.

Classic Shell

Tried these and other Metro apps, and still find yourself missing the desktop? It might be time to throw in the towel, then. Classic Shell allows you to boot directly into the desktop, and also brings back the Start Menu Windows 8 removed.

The Metro interface may well be the future of Windows, but if you’d like to stay in the present just a little longer, this is a great compromise. Read more about Classic Shell.

Conclusion

Our very own Chris feels that Microsoft is trying to kill the traditional desktop. I’m a fan of what Metro could become, but I sincerely hope this isn’t the case. For getting actual work done, the desktop is still best. Its multiple windows interface is simply great for multitasking.

Still, I can’t help but be fascinated by these and other Metro apps. What are your favorite discoveries? Share them in the comments below.

It’s not hard to make Windows 10 faster. Here are several methods to improve the speed and performance of Windows 10.

Justin Pot is a technology journalist based in Portland, Oregon. He loves technology, people and nature – and tries to enjoy all three whenever possible. You can chat with Justin on Twitter, right now.

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India, June 30 — Windows 8 is only out in a Release Preview so far, but there are already a ton of new Metro-style apps built just for it-all free. Here’s our pick of the crop.

One of the first things Microsoft did when drawing up plans for Windows 8, its hybrid tablet/desktop operating system, was to include an app store that mirrored Apple’s wildly successful iTunes App Store. The Windows Store is where Windows 8 users can get the “Metro-style” apps-full screen, highly touch input friendly apps that use a consistent, intuitive interface. Microsoft even detailed terms for the developers were more generous than Apple’s.

Windows 8 will run all existing Windows apps in its Desktop, in addition to the new Metro-style apps we’re including below, so the whole universe of Windows apps isn’t represented here by a long shot. For complex pro-level apps like Adobe Photoshop, you’re still going to want to run apps in the Desktop.

All the apps in the Windows Store right now are free, since the OS is in the testing phase. Once developers can start charging for their work, we’ll certainly see a lot more powerful choices. As with the offerings in the Mac App Store, any app you buy in the Windows store can be installed on up to 5 other computers, and the apps are consistently updated through the Windows Store.

The OS will come with standard Metro apps created by Microsoft for everyday necessities-Mail, Calendar, People (for social networking), Messaging, Photos, SkyDrive, Reader, Music, and Video-but both small and well-known software publishers alike have already released Windows 8 Metro apps, including Autodesk, Cyberlink, and several major news publishers.

One of the most exciting things for a software review has to be checking out a new operating system, and maybe even more importantly all the new-style apps that come with it. Keep in mind that all these free apps are in early stages, so you shouldn’t expect full or even flawless functionality. But many of them show a lot of promise. For a taste of what you can get from some of the better early Windows 8 apps, click through these slides.

Publisher: Zepto Labs

One of the more addictive mobile games around comes to Windows 8, Zepto Labs’ Cut the Rope shares some of Angry Birds’ use of physics in the form of gravity simulation to test your sense of geometry, spacial relations, and logic. As the name suggests, the main action of the game is cutting ropes, but in such a way that a candy lands into the mouth of a hungry little green monster, Om Nom, and hits some gold stars on the way. At times, your candy will be assisted by a bubble, to help you nab stars above, but watch out for those spikes. In all, you may even find Cut the Rope more fun, clever, and addictive than Rovi’s pig-smashing success.

From the maker of PCMag.com’s Editors’ Choice-winning PowerDirector video editing software, YouCam for Windows 8 (beta) is a capable video and photo capture and edit app. Once you allow this app access to your webcam and microphone, you’ve started on the road to YouTube mania! You can shoot stills, too, and apply TrueTheater lighting to correct over and underexposed images. But that’s just the start: You can also apply noise reduction, video stabilization, and custom exposure settings. The app can turn your PC into mirror with zoom and auto face tracking. It can also trim video, and upload directly to Facebook, YouTube, or Flickr. YouCam is a good example of an app that uses a by-the-book Metro design, with still offering sophisticated media capabilities.

Publisher: Microsoft Corp.

I’m the furthest thing from an accomplished painter, but even for me this drawing app offers a fun, clear, simple interface for dabbling in art. Its realistic brushes, pencils, spraycans, and most importantly, erasers aren’t a surprise. Use its color picker to get just the shade you’re looking for and see it previewed in splashy wet paint on a test strip with your choice of brush. You can even pick a surface type from a choice of six canvas and paper types. There’s no clipart or text entry yet, but you can open an existing image and draw on top of that. For a similar app with a different take, check out Autodesk’s more minimalist SketchBook Express, which also can produce realistic pencil, brush, and spray-paint visuals.

If ever an app lived up to its name, Quick Note does. On an attractive simulated wood-grain background, you add legal-pad-style notes. You can pin individual notes to the Windows Metro Start screen, and edit them later. You don’t get EverNote’s tagging and syncing, but that company’s Windows 8 app isn’t very useful, since it doesn’t let you re-edit notes. A semantic zoom option lets you see just all the notes for a particular day, and a recycle bin does what Windows’

Free music all day in every genre conceivable-what’s not to love? With all that and ESPN radio to boot, Slacker Radio is a Windows 8 must. That’s not even considering all the events and tributes, comedy, and children’s listening Slacker also offers. The well-designed Metro interface makes it easy to find, pause, “heart,” and skip tracks. Slacker lives in the sidebar partial screen view while you concentrate on another app. I found the app sluggish on occasion, but that can be chalked down to an overtaxed Internet connection. Slacker’s choice of genre-based stations keeps to music you like but doesn’t present an endless string of identical sounding songs with the same tempos the way Pandora does.

This is the Internet radio app of choice no matter what your platform-iOS, Android, and now Windows 8 Metro. You can browse pretty much the planet’s entire wealth of online sound, including local and international radio stations, news, sports, talk, and Web only choices like podcasts and Soma.fm. It’s all neatly categorized and subcategorized (20 sub-choices under Music), and it’s all searchable using the standard Window 8 search charm. You can “heart” a station or even pin it to the Metro start screen for always access.

Publisher: USA Today

A standout among news apps is USA Today. It’s beautifully designed, letting you scroll through the day’s top stories as well as sections for money, sports, life, tech, and travel. All the while, you can see your local temperature and weather conditions in bug art at the top. For each section, you can view relevant photos and video clips. You can adjust font size for easier reading, and pin the photo and video sections to the Windows 8 Start screen-it would be nice if the same were true for the basic news sections. It’s a readable, skimmable, and enjoyable presentation of the day’s happenings. Another interesting if less polished option is Newsy, which offers multiple video sources for breaking, US, world, and entertainment news.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

One of the more annoying behaviors in Windows 8 and 8.1 is that all of your files are set to open in native Metro-style apps. For instance, if you’re working on the desktop and view a picture or PDF, it opens full screen in the associated app. If you’re working on a traditional computer without a touchscreen, this is frustrating to say the least. Especially if you’re on a laptop with a single screen. Here’s how to take control of your Windows 8 system and make your files open in the desktop programs you want them to.

Change default program file associations

Note: Here I am using the Window 8.1 preview but the process is virtually identical in Windows 8.From the Windows start screen type: default programs and select the Default Programs icon under results.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

The Default Programs windows will open on the desktop. Here you have a couple of ways to change the default programs that open your files. The easiest is to click “Set your default programs.”

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Now select the program you want to set as your default for your files. Here I’m selecting Windows Photo Viewer because I can’t stand it when I want to view an image and the Photo app opens up. This way it will open on the desktop like it used to.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

If you want to customize which files a program opens, choose the second option “Choose defaults for this program.” That allows you to select each individual file type you want the program to open. Just scroll through the list and uncheck the file types you don’t want the program to open. Remember to save your changes when you’re done.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Setting up file associations can take a while, but once you have it set up, you’re good to go. If you want to temporarily open a file in another program, simply right-click it, and select the program or app from the context menu.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Summing Up

Changing these file associations allows you to stay in the desktop more like you’re used to and lets you to get things done faster. When you’re a deadline, you just need to get work done and not fight between the desktop and Metro environments in Windows 8.

Setting file associations is one of the first things I do when I set up a new Windows 8 system. And if you like to stay on the desktop as much as possible, you’ll want to change these associations too. Of course, in Windows RT, you can’t run desktop apps, but you can use the same procedure to change the metro-style apps your files open in.

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How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

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Windows 8.1 comes with several default applications, including Mail, Music, Videos, Photos, Games and Camera. These default programs are arranged on your Start screen; left-clicking an icon opens the program in full-screen mode. By right-clicking an icon, you can view a menu of program options, such as the option to unpin the icon from your Start screen or add it to the desktop taskbar. While traditional desktop applications can be uninstalled from the Control Panel, default programs in Windows 8.1 must be deleted from the Start screen context menu.

Press the “Windows” key to view the Start screen, then right-click one of the program icons.

Click “Uninstall” in the program context menu. The application is immediately deleted from Windows, and the icon is removed from the Start screen. Repeat this step for each application you would like to delete from the Start screen.

Point the cursor to the upper right corner of the screen and click “Search.” Your default applications are displayed in a list in the Apps section of the Search screen. Metro-style programs are listed along with any desktop applications you may have installed since installing Windows. Right-clicking any of these icons displays the option to uninstall the program in a context menu.

Choose “Uninstall” from the context menu. If the program is a Metro-style application, it is immediately deleted. If it is a desktop application, clicking “Uninstall” opens Control Panel on the desktop, and you can remove the program by selecting it from the menu and clicking “Uninstall.”

Last Updated: November 16, 2017

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In my introduction to Windows 8 post, I mentioned how there are basically two different interfaces now available. One is the standard desktop-style interface that we’ve been using forever. The other is the touchscreen Metro-style interface, with all the tiles for various apps on the home screen.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Well, Microsoft’s intent with this operating system is to try to convert people to Metro over time. And one of the things they’ve done is include a lot of Microsoft-developed Metro apps that are similar to other third-party apps that either come pre-installed or that you install yourself. And because they’re so pro-Metro, they’ve made those the default apps for specific file types.

The best example for me is Microsoft’s Reader app for reading PDF files. Now, one of the first things I install on any new computer is Adobe Acrobat. I’m a power PDF user and I want to use Acrobat for reading them. And even if I didn’t, I would still prefer to use Adobe’s free Reader program than Microsoft’s, if for no other reason than I’m much more familiar with it. (Adobe Reader is one of the third-party apps that did come pre-installed on my computer.)

Now, since I’m usually working in Desktop mode, I can just open Acrobat and then browse for the PDF file I want to read/work on. But there are instances where I do it in reverse; double-click on a PDF file to open it. I can do this when I’m exploring the files on my computer or when I get a PDF attachment in an email.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

The problem is that when I do that, it opens Microsoft’s Reader app, not Acrobat. (The app will also open automatically when I create a PDF file from another program, like Word.)

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Ugh. So here’s what you do to change what program opens by default for any given file type.

Open the Control Panel.

If you’ve upgraded to Windows 8.1, you can just right-click on the Start button and pick Control Panel from there. If you haven’t yet upgraded and so you don’t have a Start button, you can also open the Control Panel by going to the Metro screen (press the Windows key) and just start typing “Control Panel.” (Your cursor doesn’t have to be anywhere in particular; as soon as you start typing, a search box will appear.)

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Click Make a File Type Always Open in a Specific Program.

It will take a few seconds, but then a screen will appear listing all the different file types and their associated programs.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Scroll down and select the file type that you want to change the program for, then click the Change Program button.

A list of applications that can open that file type will appear. If the one you want isn’t on the list, click More Options.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Select the program to use for this file type.

The list of file types will refresh and you’ll see the new program associated with the one you just changed. You can then close the window.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Now, when I double-click on the PDF file in my email, Adobe Acrobat automatically launches instead of Microsoft Reader.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

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How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Microsoft Windows 10 may be around the corner, but the company is still issuing Windows 8.1 updates on a fairly regular basis. If you’re already using Windows 8.1, and aren’t sure you’re running the latest system update, the easiest way to check and download it is to visit PC Settings (the new Control Panel, available from the right-hand menu bar) and click “Update and recovery.” There is also the option to download the latest Windows 8.1 Update as standalone files, if you want to archive them or perform an offline or enterprise installation.

If you haven’t already installed the latest system updates, you should do so — Microsoft has said that users won’t get any security updates if they stick with older versions of Windows 8.1. To continue receiving security updates, you need to make sure you’re running the latest version of the OS. How do you do that, for free? Just follow these simple instructions.

How to download and install the latest Windows 8.1 Update

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

As we previously mentioned, the quickest way to get the latest update is to use the PC Settings control panel. If you do that, skip ahead to the section at the end of the story with tips on how to make the most of it. If you want to download the standalone files, though, read on.

As always, we have to preface this with the usual disclaimer: Downloading Windows updates using unconventional methods is risky. At the very least, you should ensure that the SHA hash of the downloaded file matches by using the Microsoft File Checksum Integrity Verifier (a free tool). If you have any important documents on your computer, you should back them up, too (this should be an unnecessary precaution, though; updates are just a bunch of patches, rather than a complete reinstallation).

Use the following links to download the right version of Windows 8.1 for your computer’s architecture (probably 64-bit, unless you have an older computer or a tablet).

Official Windows Update download links:

Alternatively, if you don’t like direct downloads, you can always hit up the official Windows Update website, which always points you to the latest version, and follow the instructions there.

Once you’ve downloaded the initial Update 1, you will have six separate patches that need to be installed in a very specific order. Your computer will need to reboot a few times during the process.

  1. KB2919442
  2. KB2919355
  3. KB2932046
  4. KB2937592
  5. KB2938439
  6. KB2934018

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Windows 8.1 Update Desktop. Note how Metro apps can now be minimized to the Taskbar.

Life after updating Windows 8.1

If you’re a mouse-and-keyboard person, you will find that the latest version of Windows 8.1 makes the Metro interface more palatable. Whether this will move you to actually use the new Start screen is a different question. Unless there’s a Metro-style app that you really want to use, you will probably still find yourself on the Desktop, using a third-party app to bring back the Windows 7-style Start menu. On the rare occasion that you find yourself thrust into the new Metro interface, at least the latest version of Windows 8.1 makes the whole experience feel a little less you’re being brutally plucked out of one operating system and unceremoniously dumped in another. So that’s good.

On the Desktop side of things, the latest update doesn’t change much. Recent tweaks have included better support for high-PPI displays, and that audio and video files now open in Photo Viewer and Media Player, respectively, rather than bouncing you into Metro. For Windows 8.1 tablet owners, you now get a Search button on the Start screen, and some of the stock Metro apps have been updated/improved. Really, though, if you’re a power user and have some free time to play around, check out how to install Windows 10 Technical Preview in a virtual machine. Soon, things will get much, much better.

Sebastian Anthony wrote the original version of this article. It has since been updated with new information.

Remain in Desktop mode as you work and even bypass the Start screen, starting up directly into Desktop.

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Windows 8 has two environments: the full screen, touch-centric Windows Store App interface (also called Metro) and the Desktop interface, which looks and acts like Windows 7. If you install programs you used on previous versions of Windows (XP, Vista or 7), they will open in the Desktop environment. If you prefer this mode to Metro, it’s possible to work only or mainly in the Desktop. With Windows 8.1, you can skip seeing the Start screen altogether.

The biggest difference between Desktop apps and Windows Store apps is that the latter tend to be more touch-friendly, while Desktop apps have smaller menus and icons, so it’s more comfortable to use a mouse. Also, in Desktop mode each program operates in a distinct window that can be moved around, resized and minimized (again, like Windows 7).

Windows Store apps are full screen. You can split the window to see two apps side by side, but you can’t tile four or five apps the way you can in Desktop.

Both Desktop and Windows Store apps can be launched from the Start screen. So once you’ve set up your computer, spend some time using both types of apps. If you end up spending most of your time using Desktop apps, you’ll want to take some steps to remain in Desktop mode as you work and even bypass the Start screen, starting up directly into Desktop. Here’s how.

How to start in Desktop Mode

On the Start screen, find the Desktop icon and tap it to switch. Right-click the taskbar at the bottom (or tap and hold there for a second to bring up the menu), and click Properties > Navigation. Under Start screen, check the “When I sign in or close all apps on a screen, go to the desktop instead of Start” option, then OK.

Now when you boot Windows or when you close a program, the PC will default to the Desktop and not the Start screen.

Staying in the Desktop

Even with this setting on, your PC might still enter the Windows Store App environment under some circumstances. Most of the time, this will happen because the default program for opening a file (photos, PDF documents, etc.) is a Windows 8 app. Also, some programs work in both environments and might open in touch mode at first. To avoid this, change file and program defaults.

As an example, the Reader app in Windows 8 opens PDF files by default, even if you download Adobe Reader XI. To change this, find a PDF file in the File Explorer, right-click, then choose Open With > Choose Default Program… > Adobe Reader. Be sure that “Use this app with all .pdf files” is checked. This will work with any file type; just download the Desktop app you want to use first.

Google Chrome has both a Desktop and a Windows 8 mode and will load in the latter environment if it’s the default browser. To change this, click the Menu icon (three horizontal lines in upper right corner) and select Relaunch Chrome on the desktop. Chrome will remember your choice after you close the browser and relaunch in the mode you last used.

Look for a similar setting in any other apps that you install in Desktop mode but launch in Windows 8 mode.

Customize the Desktop

The Windows 8 Desktop works the same way as Windows 7, including the ability to place program icons anywhere on the desktop and pin icons to the taskbar. In Windows 8.1, there is even a Start Menu, though it doesn’t work quite the same.

To pin an app to the taskbar, open the program, then right-click (or tap and hold for a second) the icon on the taskbar. Click “Pin this program to the taskbar” in the menu that comes up. Now the icon will stay even after you close the program.

To change the background image and colors in Desktop mode, right-click anywhere on the desktop and choose Personalize from the menu that pops up. Here, you can choose from preset themes and colors or create your own.

To get a more Windows 7-like Start menu back, you’ll have to go with third-party software. There are several options available, but the best is Start8. It costs $5 and has a 30-day trial period.

Learn the Windows 8.1 keyboard shortcuts

Windows 8.1 is a touch-friendly operating system, though sometimes reaching up to tap the screen isn’t the fastest way to get things done. Here are four types of helpful keyboard shortcuts that will save you time on a daily basis.

Charm Shortcuts

Charms are Windows 8 menus that you can reveal by swiping in from the right edge or down from the top of the screen. You can also activate them with the keyboard.

  • Windows Logo key + C to bring up the right edge Charms menu
  • Windows Logo key + H to open Share
  • Windows Logo key + I to open Settings (general and app-specific)
  • Windows Logo key + Z to open app commands (same as swiping down from the top)

Search Shortcuts

  • Windows Logo key + F to search files
  • Windows Logo key + W to search settings
  • Windows Logo key + Q to search within apps that support it
  • Windows Logo key + S to search everywhere (files, settings, within the app, and the web)

Easily switch between apps

Alt + Tab toggles back and forth between two most recently used apps (including Desktop programs). Keep pressing Tab to cycle through all open apps in last used order.

Windows Logo key + Tab toggles between last two Windows 8 Store apps only. Keep pressing Tab to cycle through open apps in last used order.

Navigation

  • Windows Logo key + M to minimize windows on the Desktop
  • Windows Logo key + D to display or hide the Desktop
  • Windows Logo key + , to peek (not switch to) the Desktop
  • Alt + Left Arrow to go Back
  • Alt + Right Arrow to go Forward

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Your paralegal’s six-year-old computer just spontaneously combusted. Or you are still running Windows XP. Either way, it’s time for new computers in the office. You’ve heard bad things about Windows 8, but your office has always run on Windows.

Mac OS X or a Windows 8 PC? Learn a new operating system, or learn a new operating system?

Your best bet is to find a leftover copy of Windows 7, though beware of bootlegs on second-hand and auction sites. But if you don’t want to pay extra for an operating system, or accidently buy illegitimate software, your options are limited.

The Case for Switching to Mac

Many would argue that Mac OS X has always been superior — it’s less prone to viruses, it’s prettier, the hardware is superior.

But what is it like going to a Mac after decades on Windows-based systems? If you’re a keyboard shortcut aficionado, prepare for a lot of pain — everything, from copy-paste to opening a new tab in a browser, is different. You may also miss Windows 7’s Aero Snap feature, which automatically resizes a window to fit the left half, right half, or full screen, depending on where you drag it. The thumbnails when hovering over icons in the taskbar were a nice touch as well.

Also, while Microsoft Office 2011 is available on Mac, it’s largely considered to be inferior and it’s certainly a bit different than the last few Windows versions. There’s also iWork, Apple’s own office suite, but as we all know, MS Office is the industry standard for lawyers.

It’s an adjustment. But, speaking as a DOS to Windows 7 loyalist, it’s certainly doable, and it’s a great operating system in its own right. It’s stable, visually appealing, there’s almost no app gap anymore, and the trackpad — nothing compares to the magnificence of Mac’s magical gesture-based trackpad.

Long-term, Apple has repeatedly reiterated that Mac OS X will not go touch-based, which is a relief for those of us burned by Microsoft’s hideous Metro interface (the tile-based abomination used in Windows 8).

The Case for Windows 8

Do you want to minimize the disruption to your office? Buy Windows 8 PCs, come in on a weekend, and prepare to “fix” Microsoft’s many backwards steps with their new OS.

If you’re buying desktop PCs for your office, you probably won’t have touchscreens. Windows 8, out of the box, is a nightmare for traditional mouse-and-keyboard setups — otherwise known as every desk in a law office. Even longtime Windows users, even the technically inclined types, will find the experience frustrating, even with the Windows 8.1 tweaks.

Why? Full screen “Metro” apps that are intended for touch devices currently lack the familiar “X” button to close. How do you close these apps? You could try keyboard shortcuts, you can drag the app to the bottom of the screen, or you could scrap all of this newfangled crap altogether and give me back my big X button. That’s one example, but the entire Metro layer is more tablet than traditional PC.

But that’s the secret folks — underneath the new touch-based layer is a faster version of Windows 7 via the classic desktop. The problem is, until Microsoft releases a few more updates, it’s going to remain a touch-first operating system, unless you tweak the heck out of it.

We’ll go more into the tweaks later this week, but you’ll need to configure Windows to boot to the classic desktop, and you’ll want to install a third-party app to restore the classic start menu, if you want your workplace to be disrupted as little as possible. But, once the tweaks are in place, Windows 8 becomes the same old operating system you’re used to, which is a strong case in and of itself.

Lesser of Two Evils?

Mac OS X is brilliant in its own right, and doesn’t require tweaking out of the box, but if you haven’t used it before, it will take some time to learn.

Windows 8 or 8.1, out of the box, are unusable for non-touch PCs, but if you have an hour to spend, you can “fix” Microsoft’s fixes.

Whichever path you choose, we’ll have tips for making the adjustments and tweaks later this week.

Enjoy the latest legal news and information from our blogs? Keep up with the latest legal docs on Scribd.

You Don’t Have To Solve This on Your Own – Get a Lawyer’s Help

Meeting with a lawyer can help you understand your options and how to best protect your rights. Visit our attorney directory to find a lawyer near you who can help.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

By default, Windows 8 only allows users to install apps from the Windows Store. If you want to download third party apps that haven’t cleared Microsoft’s security checks, you can do so by enabling an entry in the Local Group Policy for your PC. Once you’ve enabled the entry, you’ll be able to install windows 8 apps without the store.

Proceed with caution

Before you add non-Windows Store apps to Windows 8, it’s important to understand why Microsoft has made this difficult to do. While part of it has to do with forcing you to use apps they deem fit for the OS, it also has to do with security. Whenever you download an app from a developer, you’re not 100% sure you know what you’re getting.

When you install an app from the Windows Store, you know that Microsoft has vetted the app and ensured it’s as trustworthy as it can be. This is similar to the way the Chrome Web Store, the Apple Store and other online app distribution services do business. Proceed with caution!

Install Windows 8 Apps without the Store

These steps will work for Windows 8 and Windows 8.1.

1. Search for “Run” from the Windows Start screen and click on it to open its command prompt.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

2. Type in “ gpedit.msc ” and click “OK.”

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

3. From the main screen of the Local Group Policy Editor, you want to head to the following entry:

4. Right-click on “Allow all trusted apps to install.”

5. You’ll want to enable this entry to all non-Windows Store apps to install in Windows 8. Make sure to click “Apply,” then “OK” to change the entry’s settings.

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Before you install any non-Windows Store apps, they still must meet two criteria:

  • The developer must cryptographically sign the app
  • Your computer must be able to accept the certificate

6. If the app meets these two conditions, then you’ll want to use Windows PowerShell to run the following command:

“app1.appx” is the app you want to install, you’ll need to change this as necessary depending on how it’s named.

“winjs.appx” is the dependency for the app, which you’ll also need to change if necessary. The dependency will be included with the app.

Now, you’re ready to use your new non-Windows Store app on Windows 8.

Make sure you’re only installing these apps from trusted sources and always keep a Windows 8 system recovery image or backup handy in case you run into issues.

Conclusion

There are a lot of good apps out there that don’t meet the requirements of the Windows Store, even though they should. If you’ve found one that you want to add to Windows 8, following the above steps can get it working on your computer.

Nicole Kobie ContributorOne of the best technology journalists in the UK, Nicole is known for getting behind the headlines to uncover the truth of what’s really going on. If there’s a story, she’ll find it. Read more May 9, 2014

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Windows 8 wasn’t as popular as Microsoft would have hoped, though it’s repaired some of the damage with Windows 8.1 and its first Update. With Windows 9 on the horizon, we’ve put together our wish list of what needs to be improved from Windows 8

Bundle up the apps

Sasha Muller, deputy reviews editor: “If you’ve ever had to set up a new PC from scratch, or have a fleet of Windows devices, you’ll remember the fun you had (re)installing your applications – it’s painful. Try the same on a Mac, however, and in most cases it’s as simple as opening the Applications folder, selecting all the icons of the software you wish to copy, and dragging them onto an external disk.

“As applications are tucked into a ‘bundle’, all you see is a single icon: this means you can copy it wherever you please, or run it directly from an external drive, without having to tackle errors concerning missing dependencies. The only irritation is that apps from the App Store require you to input your Apple ID the first time they run on a new machine – which is still far less hassle than installing it from scratch.

“If Microsoft wants to make Windows 9 a more pleasant experience, and encourage users to use it on every device they own, pushing developers towards a bundled application structure would be a welcome step forwards.”

Buy an app once, run it anywhere

Jonathan Bray, reviews editor: “When Microsoft moved its mobile OS from Windows Phone 7.5 to 8, one of the most interesting parts was the move to the NT kernel, which meant a lot of shared code with Windows 8. The reason behind this was to make it easier for developers to produce and release apps for both platforms. It was assumed at the time, by some commentators, that this might result in a bonus for users, too – but no tangible benefits have yet materialised. Wouldn’t it be great if apps bought on your Windows phone were automatically available on the desktop, and vice versa? If Windows 9 could implement such a thing, it would give users more incentive to buy into the Microsoft ecosystem, an area where Apple currently holds the whip hand.”

What you thought

How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pcWe asked PC Pro readers for their ideas to fix Windows 8; here are ten of the best suggestions. Listen up, Microsoft.

Paul started with a common complaint: “Remove the ‘Metro’ interface for non-touch devices. Full-screen apps only work on touch devices.”

Ben agreed, suggesting the business version of the OS should be easier to customise. “As a small-business owner, I’m in the process of rebuilding 15 business PCs from Windows XP Professional to 8.1 Pro. I’m getting to know 8.1 pretty well, and I’m happy with it once up and running. What’s annoying me is that all I want is a business desktop with Office and one piece of dictation software – I don’t need the Metro interface and don’t want to have to re-train staff to use it. A significant portion of my setup time involves removing all traces of Metro from the everyday user experience. There needs to be an ‘Is this a work PC?’ option in the control panel to give you the choice to turn it off if you want to.”

Andrew Jones is tired of having to sign in. “It would be nice if it stopped nagging me to use a ‘Microsoft Account’ every time I use an app. I have my own Active Directory domain, I don’t want to sign in online, thanks.”

Andy wants to keep using Metro, but in his own way: “To make Metro useful, it needs the option to permanently display the new Start menu on a second screen so you can keep an eye on apps.”

Simon Ball says Microsoft needs better built-in support. “Why aren’t the help files in one place so that the average user can find out how to use the software they have spent so much money on?”

Many readers – although not all – called for the return of a fully functioning Start menu, which Microsoft has said is on the way. John Haynes had another idea: “The Stardock software [that installs a Start menu] costs less than £4 and makes me happy. ”

R Jones says Microsoft should “forget [the] charmless hidden daft ‘charms’ – they’re so hard to find that I use the power switch for shutdowns.”

Chimera Obscura would like to see “a compelling reason to upgrade”, adding: “There really wasn’t one with Windows 8, and I think that was a big part of its failure. People may have been more forgiving of the shortcomings if there had been a really good reason to upgrade. Windows 8.1 just seems too lame and plain, and for me, I fail to see any benefit.”

Paul Bristow called for Microsoft to “sort out a proper backup system and make it easy and almost compulsory to set up. Everyone needs an image backup and a data backup.”

And tech3475 had perhaps our favourite suggestion: “I know this may be minor, but restore Solitaire as a native desktop app. I play Solitaire when I’m waiting for something – for example, a long install – [and] I don’t want to leave the desktop mode.”

Windows 8.1/8 comes with two new options to restore your PC to its original state, the Basic Refresh, and the Complete Reset feature. The Refresh your PC gives you an easy option to restart afresh while retaining all of your documents, accounts, personal settings, and even the Metro apps you’ve downloaded from the Windows Store.

When you refresh a Windows 8 computer, by default, the Metro apps will be restored – but the desktop apps or software are not. If you wish, you can create a custom system image that will include your desktop apps or software too. Reinstalling all of your Desktop software all over again can be a boring and time-consuming chore. When you use this custom system image, in Refresh Your PC, all your desktop software too will be included.

NOTE: Recimg.exe does not exist in Windows 11/10. You can create System Image in Windows 11/10 with Windows 7 Backup or use one of its own built-in Recovery Options.

Use Recimg.exe to create a Custom System Refresh Image

To create a custom system image in Windows 8, first, create a destination folder for saving the custom system image. I have my Windows 8 installed on C Drive, so I may want to create the custom system image on D Drive in a new folder named MySystemImage. So the folder I have created has the path: D:\MySystemImage.

Now move your cursor to the bottom left corner to open the Win+X menu and click on Command Prompt (Admin) to open an elevated CMD.

Now to create a custom system image, we will use the Recimg.exe command-line tool that is included in Windows 8. Recimg.exe creates an image that can be used by the Refresh facility when restoring Windows 8.

The recimg.exe command-line tool lets you configure a custom recovery image for Windows to use when you Refresh your PC. When you create a custom recovery image, it will contain the desktop apps you’ve installed and the Windows system files in their current state. Recovery images do not contain your documents, personal settings, user profiles, or apps from Windows Store, because that information is preserved at the time you refresh your PC.

When you create a custom recovery image, recimg will store it in the specified directory, and set it as the active recovery image. If a custom recovery image is set as the active recovery image, Windows will use it when you refresh your PC. You can use the /setcurrent and /deregister options to select which recovery image Windows will use. All recovery images have the
filename CustomRefresh.wim. If no CustomRefresh.wim file is found in the active recovery image directory, Windows will fall back to the default image (or to installation media) when you refresh your PC.

Note that you cannot reset your PC using a custom recovery image. Custom recovery images can only be used to refresh your PC.

The following commands can be specified:

  • /createimage : Captures a new custom recovery image in the location specified by , and sets it as the active recovery image.
  • /setcurrent : Sets the active recovery image to the CustomRefresh.wim file in the location specified by . Windows will use this image when you Refresh your PC, even if a recovery image provided by your PC’s manufacturer is present.
  • /deregister : Deregisters the current custom recovery image. If a recovery image provided by your PC’s manufacturer is present, Windows will use that image when you refresh your PC. Otherwise, Windows will use your installation media when you refresh your PC.
  • /showcurrent : Displays the path to the directory in which the current active recovery image is stored.
  • /? : Displays this help text.

In the CMD windows type the following and hit Enter:

Recimg will begin the process of creating a snapshot and writing the image as a wim archive into the specified folder. This is expected to take a while, so you may continue to work on your computer, or leave it on and go away and let it finish its task.

In this way, you can create a custom system image for your Windows 8. I strongly recommend you create one as soon as you have completed installing all your Metro apps and Desktop software on your new Windows 8.1 installation.

Recimg.exe command for creating a recovery WIM image is no longer available on Windows 11/10.

Date: September 21, 2016 Tags: Backup, Refresh

The buzz around Windows 8 is all about the redesigned “Metro” interface, but that’s not the only cool thing to be found in the Consumer Preview version Microsoft released last month.

The tiles and text-heavy design constitute the most obvious change, but this overhaul of Windows includes some other features that are very useful.

Here are my five favorite features so far:

• Type to search. Most users don’t take advantage of the search box in the Windows 7 Start menu, which lets you type the name of a program or file to see it appear quickly in the pane above.

Windows 8 does even better by getting rid of the search box altogether. When you’re in the Start screen with all the pretty tiles, just begin typing the name of what you want. The tiles vanish and are replaced by two sets of results: program icons on the left and a list on the right of file types and apps.

For example, type the word “note” and you’ll see Notepad and Sticky Notes on the left, and in the right-hand list, the Apps category will have the number “2” beside it, while Settings has the number “6.” Clicking on the Settings item brings up a list of Control Panel options that use that word.

• New Task Manager. The Windows Task Manager hasn’t changed much since its inception in Windows NT 4.0, but it becomes significantly more useful in Windows 8. Yes, you can still use it to halt programs and processes that have locked up, but it does a lot more now.

The new Task Manager lets you disable startup items, see both running apps and their processes in one screen, check to see who is logged into your PC and monitor the performance of your computer.

In a sense, it combines the original Task Manager with the Resource Monitor that was introduced in Windows 7, then streamlines them into an easier-to-use app. (Fans of the Resource Monitor, rest easy: It’s still present in Windows 8.)

• Synchronize apps and settings. Both Android and Apple’s iOS will let you synchronize some features between mobile devices, and Windows 8 brings this concept to the desktop. When you set up your Windows 8 system, you’re encouraged to sign in with a Windows Live ID (or create one). You can then sync key settings between Windows 8 systems.

For example, I set up Windows 8 on a PC at the office, choosing colors, an avatar picture and wallpaper. At home, when I installed Windows 8 on my desktop, the same customizations were applied. You can also sync Windows Metro apps between Windows 8 PCs, but not traditional desktop apps.

• Refresh or reset. Every Windows user knows that, from time to time, you’ve got to bite the bullet and reinstall your operating system. Windows 8 makes this almost painless.

Inside the settings is something called “Refresh your PC without affecting your files.” In essence, it reinstalls the operating system on top of itself, without losing data or removing applications.

And if that’s not good enough, another feature is called “Reset your PC and start over.” This gives you a fresh installation of Windows, and it’s also handy if you want to sell or give away your PC.

• Swiping and hot corners. If you installed the Consumer Preview, chances are you did it on a desktop PC. But for mouse users, the Metro interface still has interesting ways to move around, even with a mouse.

For example, the fact that there’s no longer a Start button on the Windows 8 desktop is controversial, but a form of it is still there. Hover your mouse cursor in the lower-left corner, and a thumbnail of the Metro Start screen appears. Click it to go there.

Microsoft has a set of basic icons called Charms that let you get to settings, the Start screen, attached devices, search and sharing (the latter only works when you’re in a Metro app). Just move your cursor to the lower right corner, and the Charms slide out from the right screen edge.

Metro apps don’t close when you move away from them — they remain in memory until some other program needs the resources, then Windows handles their closing. But you can get to the apps that you have been using by putting your cursor in the upper left corner.

The final release of Windows 8 is expected this fall.

Are you looking for new tablet with latest Operating System like Windows 8, iOS, Android? This article includes some advantage and basic problem of all Operating System. Comparing some features of Microsoft Windows 8 with Apple iOS and Google Android.

Last month, Microsoft handed a tablet that was loaded with a preview version of Windows 8. And after a few weeks spent with the OS, I can’t help but be impressed .Let me explain: Apple with its iPad and IOS introduced a paradigm shift in mobile computing-and since then, almost all other slate manufacturers have been playing catch-up. With Windows 8, Microsoft is reimagining the game. The Redmond gaint’s new OS promises to convert tablets from mere consumption devices into full-fledged mobile computing systems that could possibly replace your desktop or notebook.

Desktop Familiarity

Anybody who has ever used a computer after 1995 has definitely worked on at least two to three different versions of Windows. And while Microsoft has made changes to its flagship product every now and then, almost everyone will admit to being accustomed to the operating system. It’s precisely this reason why most PC users will hit the ground running with a Windows 8 tablet. Tap the Desktop tile on its Start Screen and you’re greeted by the familiar users interface.

Apple’s iOS and Android are intuitive OSes, but Windows 8 seems familiar straight out of the box. There’s no huge learning curve and you don’t have to fiddle around to discover the operating system.

That said, Windows 8 is slightly different from its predecessors. Its Start button has been replaced by the Start Screen. But if you’re coming from Windows 7, it takes only a couple of hours to get used to it; perhaps a day if you’ve been on Windows XP or Vista.

Even better, I could install all the programs that I’ve always used: Full-fledged Adobe Photoshop, the indispensable Microsoft Office, Winamp, WinZip, etc. They work just as well on the Windows 8 tablet as they do on my desktop computer.
The only things that has changed drastically is the hardware, and for the better at that. Instead of a mouse, I now use my finger. And that’s not even the slightest problem; there are no wrong taps, and I even got to the right-click context menu by keeping my finger pressed for a few seconds.
How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Device Support

Windows 8 will detect and manage almost any other gizmo you connect to it. iPad, on the other hand, cannot be connected to the iPhone with a wire, even though they both run in iOS. And Android won’t recognize any camera you connect to it-at best; it’ll show up as external storage. Indeed, the current lot of slates seem isolated from the rest of the technology world.

Windows 8 tablets promise to change that: Connect a camera and the built-in drivers recognize it. If you have camera’s custom software installed, it’ll start up too. Plug in a printer into the tablet’s USB port and it’ll be detected, and you can start printing that important file in seconds. No, it just doesn’t work that way on an Android tab-and of course, there’s no USB support on the iPad.

In fact, you can even manage other tablets with your Windows 8 slate. I hooked up an iPad through a cable to the Windows 8 tablet and iTunes popped up, ready to have Apple’s device do my bidding. My Nexus S phone and a Nokia handset, when connected, were recognized within minutes and were ready to be managed.
Supporting other device is a critical part of any computing device and Windows 8 tablets do it better than any other slate around.
How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Tablet Interface

MS has made some changes to its user interface to support touch screens, and I’m happy to say that Windows 8 is both, fluid and beautiful. Metro-its tile-based interface already seen on Windows Phone 7.5-flows smoothly when you swipe with your finger on a full-sized tablet. And it looks great doing it.

The Start screen with its collage of multi coloured tiles is astonishingly easy to get used to. iOS is often praised for how intuitive it is, and Android enjoys favour for its customizability. Well, Windows 8 is as intuitive as an iPad and as customizable as Android.

Live Tiles constantly refresh to show new data, be it a post on Facebook, a message, a tweet or the latest happening in Bing News.

Besides Metro apps are also customized for a tablet touchscreen. They run in full-screen mode and invite quick taps and flicks.

But there is a downside: the Windows Store is spare, now. Some of the apps are quite good, but if the big names-Flipboard, Angry Birds, etc-don’t release and update at the same time as iOS and Android, Windows 8 can’t complete. Hopefully, developers will take to the new system and provide a wide choice of apps.
How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Data transfer

Transferring files on any Windows, Linux or Mac PC is one of the simplest jobs in personal computing. But tablets have made this activity so hard, it’s almost ridiculous. On an iPad, there’s no USB port. And is case you happen to carry an external adapter for pen drives, transferring files (which also involves a bit of hacking) can be a tedious task. As for Android, some tablets do offer a USB port; but you need a file-manager app to use it properly. And even then, it’s tough figuring out the new file system.

But with Windows8, it’s simple: Connect your USB drive to the tablet. Tap the pop-up notification to open the drive in the familiar Windows desktop environment. Everyone knows how to copy stuff from Drive C to Drive D-just do it like you always did.
How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc

Multi-tasking

Whether it’s switching between apps or using two of them simultaneously, multi-tasking is important. And Microsoft has cracked the issue with an approach that is far superior to both iOS and Android.

When in a full-screen Metro app, you can simply swipe in from the left of the screen bring in any other open app. This puts the original app in a ‘suspended’ state of action to save battery. Swiping again brings back that original app, and it resumes exactly where you left it.

Besides, Windows 8 users screen space smartly by docking apps. For example, you don’t need the full screen to read an article. But if you’d like to talk about it with a friend on IM, you can start the Messaging app and ‘dock’ it to the side of ypur Internet Explorer. Just like that, you can have two apps running at the same time, letting you multi-task without leaving either one.

It’s a feature that’s available on Android through third-party apps but doesn’t work as smoothly, and it’s entirely missing on iOS.
How to see which metro apps you’ve installed on each windows 8 pc