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How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Wi-Fi hasn’t completely taken over the world yet. Some hotels may offer wired Ethernet connections and spotty or unavailable Wi-Fi, for example. But you can turn that wired Ethernet connection into a Wi-Fi connection all your devices can use.

In some cases, getting on an organization’s Wi-Fi can also be more of an ordeal–you may need a special Wi-Fi login. But you can sometimes just plug in an Ethernet cable and get on their network, if you have physical access.

Consider Travelling With a Wi-Fi Router

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

If you know you’ll be somewhere with only an Ethernet connection, you can always just use a bog-standard Wi-Fi router. Buy a new one or grab an old one out of the closet. That old Wi-Fi router may not support the latest wireless standards and may be a bit slow, but that can be fine for temporary use.

Plug in your router with a power cable, and then connect its WAN or Internet port to the Ethernet jack you have available to you. Your router will then create a Wi-Fi network all your devices can connect to–you can set up your router ahead of time and its SSID (Wi-Fi network name) and passphrase will be the same when you plug it in in a different location.

Connect a Laptop to Ethernet and Share That Connection over Wi-Fi

There’s a good chance you’re not travelling with a Wi-Fi router. Never fear–you can always set up a wireless network with just your laptop. This will make your laptop function as a Wi-Fi hotspot to which all your other devices can connect. Just plug an Ethernet cable into your laptop and connect the other end to the Ethernet port in the wall. if you’re travelling with a laptop with an Ethernet port, it’s a good idea to bring an Ethernet cable just in case.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Unfortunately, some modern laptops–from Windows ultrabooks to MacBooks–have shed the Ethernet port. If you want to connect them to an Ethernet cable, you’ll need to get an Ethernet adapter that works with your laptop. Buy a “USB Ethernet adapter” or similar product, which will take an Ethernet cable and allow you to plug it into a USB port on your laptop.

Once your laptop is connected to the wired network, you just need to turn your laptop into a mobile hotspot to share that connection with whatever wireless devices you have.

How you turn your Windows laptop into a Mobile Wi-Fi Hotspot depends on which version of Windows you’re running. With Windows 10, it’s as simple as flipping a single switch that you can find at Settings > Network & Internet > Mobile Hotspot. In Windows 7 or 8, you can go through the steps to create an ad-hoc network or you can use a free tool named Virtual Router to get the job done simply. On a Mac, you’ll use the “Internet Sharing” feature share that wired connection and turn your Mac into a mobile Wi-Fi hotspot. So long as your Mac has a both an Ethernet and wireless adapter, it’s all pretty straightforward.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

And if none of these solutions fit your needs and you have a smartphone with a decent data plan, you could always use tethering to share your smartphone’s data connection with your other devices. That way, you don’t need to rely on your hotel’s painfully slow and obnoxious Internet connection at all.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Share a wired Internet connection via Wi-Fi without a router

While Wi-Fi hotspots seem to be popping up everywhere, at times Ethernet can still be the best (or only) option. Often, you’ll find hotel room Wi-Fi is weak based on distance to the router, and you might want to use the direct, in-room Ethernet connection instead. But, how can you get your iPad, Kindle, smartphones and other Wi-Fi-only devices onto the hotel’s Ethernet connection?

With Connectify Hotspot installed on your PC laptop, you can turn your computer into a Wi-Fi hotspot and easily share Internet from your wired Ethernet as Wi-Fi. With just a few clicks, iPhones and other mobile devices can get online, no matter where you are.

How to share the Internet from an Ethernet connection through Wi-Fi

Step 1: Download and install Connectify Hotspot.

Step 2: Make sure your Ethernet connection is selected from the ‘Internet to Share’ dropdown. Icons next to each adapter tell you what kind of Internet connection you’re selecting – with Connectify Hotspot you can actually share any kind of Internet connection, including Wi-Fi and 4G/LTE dongles.

Step 3: Give your hotspot a name (SSID) and password. The hotspot name is the network name that other devices will see and connect to using your unique password – feel free to use emojis and Unicode characters to make it stand out. Your Connectify Hotspot is a real, working hotspot that you use just like any other wireless network.
Also – make sure the ‘Ad blocker’ option is selected, as you will save a lot of bandwidth, time, money and battery life for your mobile devices through the universal ad blocker included in Connectify Hotspot.

Step 4: Click the ‘Start Hotspot’ button to begin sharing your Ethernet Internet connection with your iPad and other Wi-Fi-enabled devices.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Wi-Fi hasn’t completely taken over the world yet. Some hotels may offer wired Ethernet connections and spotty or unavailable Wi-Fi, for example. But you can turn that wired Ethernet connection into a Wi-Fi connection that all of your devices can use.

In some cases, accessing an organization’s Wi-Fi can also be a more difficult ordeal – you may need a special Wi-Fi connection. But sometimes you can just plug in an ethernet cable and access their network, if you have physical access.

Consider traveling with a Wi-Fi router

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

If you know you’ll be somewhere with just an Ethernet connection, you can still use a standard Wi-Fi router. Buy a new one or take an old one out of the closet. This old Wi-Fi router may not support the latest wireless standards and may be a bit slow, but it may be suitable for temporary use.

Plug in your router with a power cable, then connect its WAN or Internet port to the Ethernet jack you have. Your router will then create a Wi-Fi network that all of your devices can connect to – you can configure your router in advance and its SSID (Wi-Fi network name) and passphrase will be the same when you plug it in.

Connect a laptop to Ethernet and share that connection over Wi-Fi

Chances are you won’t be traveling with a Wi-Fi router. Don’t worry, you can still set up a wireless network with just your laptop. Your laptop will thus function as a Wi-Fi hotspot that all your other devices can connect to. Simply plug an Ethernet cable into your laptop and connect the other end to the Ethernet port in the wall. If you are traveling with a laptop that has an ethernet port, it is advisable to bring an ethernet cable just in case.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Unfortunately, some modern laptops, from Windows ultrabooks to MacBooks, have lost the Ethernet port. If you want to connect them to an Ethernet cable, you will need an Ethernet adapter that works with your laptop. Buy a “USB Ethernet Adapter”Or a similar product, which will take an Ethernet cable and allow you to plug it into a USB port on your laptop.

Once your laptop is connected to the wired network, you just need to turn your laptop into a mobile hotspot to share that connection with all the wireless devices you have.

RELATED: How to turn your Windows PC into a Wi-Fi hotspot

How you turn your Windows laptop into a portable Wi-Fi hotspot depends on which version of Windows you are using. With Windows 10, it’s as easy as flipping a single switch which you can find in Settings> Network & Internet> Mobile hotspot. In Windows 7 or 8, you can follow the steps to create an ad-hoc network or you can use a free tool named Virtual router to do the job simply. On a Mac, you’ll use the “Internet Sharing” feature to share that wired connection and turn your Mac into a portable Wi-Fi hotspot. As long as your Mac has both an Ethernet adapter and a wireless adapter, it’s pretty straightforward.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

RELATED: How to share your smartphone’s Internet connection: access points and connection sharing explained

And if none of these solutions meet your needs and you have a smartphone with a decent data plan, you can always use tethering to share your smartphone’s data connection with your other devices. That way, you don’t have to rely on your hotel’s painfully slow and obnoxious internet connection at all.

Turn your Windows PC into a mobile hotspot by sharing your Internet connection with other devices over Wi-Fi. You can share a Wi-Fi, Ethernet, or cellular data connection. If your PC has a cellular data connection and you share it, it will use data from your data plan.

Select the Start button, then select Settings > Network & internet > Mobile hotspot.

For Share my Internet connection from, choose the internet connection you want to share.

For Share over, choose how you want to share your connection—over Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. Wi-Fi is usually faster and the default.

Select Edit > enter a new network name, password, and network band > Save.

Turn on Mobile hotspot.

To connect on the other device, go to the Wi-Fi settings on that device, find your network name, select it, enter the password, and then connect.

Turn your Windows 10 PC into a mobile hotspot by sharing your Internet connection with other devices over Wi-Fi. You can share a Wi-Fi, Ethernet, or cellular data connection. If your PC has a cellular data connection and you share it, it will use data from your data plan.

Select the Start button, then select Settings > Network & Internet > Mobile hotspot.

For Share my Internet connection from, choose the Internet connection you want to share.

Select Edit > enter a new network name and password > Save.

Turn on Share my Internet connection with other devices.

To connect on the other device, go to the Wi-Fi settings on that device, find your network name, select it, enter the password, and then connect.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Wi-Fi hasn’t completely taken over the world yet. Some hotels may offer wired Ethernet connections and spotty or unavailable Wi-Fi, for example. But you can turn that wired Ethernet connection into a Wi-Fi connection all your devices can use.

In some cases, getting on an organization’s Wi-Fi can also be more of an ordeal–you may need a special Wi-Fi login. But you can sometimes just plug in an Ethernet cable and get on their network, if you have physical access.

Turn Your PC Into a Wi-Fi Hotspot the Easy Way

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devicesIf you can’t get the built-in Windows Wi-Fi hotspot working, you should try using Connectify Hotspot instead — it’s a completely foolproof Wi-Fi hotspot with tons of options and a nice interface.

Connectify Hotspot is great if you’re at a hotel that charges per device, or if you’re on a plane and you connect your laptop but don’t want to pay more to connect your phone. If you pay for the Pro version you can even use your PC as a Wi-Fi repeater or a wired router, or share a tethered connection off your phone

It’s really more of a power user tool, but if you’re looking for a good solution, Hotspot is free to try out, and the basic version is free with some limitations.

Download Connectify to Create a Wi-Fi Hotspot the Easy Way

Consider Travelling With a Wi-Fi Router

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

If you know you’ll be somewhere with only an Ethernet connection, you can always just use a bog-standard Wi-Fi router. Buy a new one or grab an old one out of the closet. That old Wi-Fi router may not support the latest wireless standards and may be a bit slow, but that can be fine for temporary use.

Plug in your router with a power cable, and then connect its WAN or Internet port to the Ethernet jack you have available to you. Your router will then create a Wi-Fi network all your devices can connect to–you can set up your router ahead of time and its SSID (Wi-Fi network name) and passphrase will be the same when you plug it in in a different location.

Connect a Laptop to Ethernet and Share That Connection over Wi-Fi

There’s a good chance you’re not travelling with a Wi-Fi router. Never fear–you can always set up a wireless network with just your laptop. This will make your laptop function as a Wi-Fi hotspot to which all your other devices can connect. Just plug an Ethernet cable into your laptop and connect the other end to the Ethernet port in the wall. if you’re travelling with a laptop with an Ethernet port, it’s a good idea to bring an Ethernet cable just in case.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Unfortunately, some modern laptops–from Windows ultrabooks to MacBooks–have shed the Ethernet port. If you want to connect them to an Ethernet cable, you’ll need to get an Ethernet adapter that works with your laptop. Buy a “USB Ethernet adapter” or similar product, which will take an Ethernet cable and allow you to plug it into a USB port on your laptop.

Once your laptop is connected to the wired network, you just need to turn your laptop into a mobile hotspot to share that connection with whatever wireless devices you have.

RELATED ARTICLES How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devicesHow to Turn Your Windows PC Into a Wi-Fi HotspotHow to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devicesHow to Turn Your Mac Into a Wi-Fi Hotspot

How you turn your Windows laptop into a Mobile Wi-Fi Hotspot depends on which version of Windows you’re running. With Windows 10, it’s as simple as flipping a single switch that you can find at Settings > Network & Internet > Mobile Hotspot. In Windows 7 or 8, you can go through the steps to create an ad-hoc network or you can use a free tool named Virtual Router to get the job done simply. On a Mac, you’ll use the “Internet Sharing” feature share that wired connection and turn your Mac into a mobile Wi-Fi hotspot. So long as your Mac has a both an Ethernet and wireless adapter, it’s all pretty straightforward.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

And if none of these solutions fit your needs and you have a smartphone with a decent data plan, you could always use tethering to share your smartphone’s data connection with your other devices. That way, you don’t need to rely on your hotel’s painfully slow and obnoxious Internet connection at all.

Image Credit: Iwan Gabovitch on Flickr

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After all, the wired Ethernet network is still more popular, and you can convert that wired Ethernet connection to a Wi-Fi connection that all your mobile devices, from smartphones, phones. photos, laptops, until game consoles . can be used.

  • Share your Mac’s Internet connection with wireless devices
  • How to enable / disable Ethernet connection measurement feature in Windows 10

We have to admit the popularity of today’s Wi-Fi networks, however, Wi-Fi is still not fully covered worldwide.After all, wired Ethernet is still more popular, and the good news is that you can convert that wired Ethernet connection to a Wi-Fi connection that all your mobile devices, from your phone Smart, camera, laptop, until game console . can be used.

Use Wi-Fi routers

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

This is the most common way we still apply to convert a wired Internet connection to wireless.You only need to plug your Wi-Fi router with the power source and then connect its WAN or Internet port to the available Ethernet jack.After that, the router will automatically convert the Ethernet network into a Wi-Fi connection that all your devices can connect to.You can set up the router, while the SSID (Wi-Fi network name) and passphrase will be the same when you plug the device into other locations.

Connect the laptop to the Ethernet network and share that connection via the Wi-Fi player

This is also very simple but sometimes we forget to use it.The Wi-Fi player on laptops will turn your laptop into a portable Wi-Fi hotspot that all of your other devices can connect to.For example, you go on a business trip and unfortunately the hotel Wi-Fi system malfunctions, while the Ethernet network still works well.All you need to do is plug the Ethernet cable into the laptop and then launch the portable Wi-Fi hotspot feature.

Unfortunately, some modern laptops, from Windows ultrabooks to MacBooks, have all been removed from the Ethernet port.Therefore, if you want to connect them to an Ethernet cable, you will need a compatible Ethernet adapter with your laptop.Buy an Ethernet USB adapter or similar products that will allow you to plug the Ethernet cable into the USB port on the laptop.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

When your laptop is connected to a wired network, simply turn the laptop into a mobile hotspot to share that connection with any wireless device you have.

How to turn the Windows notebook feature into a portable Wi-Fi hotspot depending on the version of Windows on which the device is running.For Windows 10, this operation is quite simple, you can find in Settings> Network & Internet> Mobile Hotspot .In Windows 7 or 8, you can take steps to create an ad hoc network or you can use a free tool called Virtual Router to turn your Windows laptop into a portable Wi-Fi hotspot. Simple action.On a Mac, you’ll use the Internet Sharing feature to share wired connections and turn your Mac into a portable Wi-Fi hotspot.As long as your Mac has both Ethernet adapters and wireless adapters, it is generally quite simple.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

And if both solutions are not suitable for you, there is another way to invest in a 3G or 4G sim, install that sim on your smartphone and use the smartphone as a portable Wi-Fi hotspot ( All smartphones currently support this feature).

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In this article, you will learn how to share a wired (Ethernet) internet connection via a wireless hotspot and also how to share a wireless internet connection via a wired connection on a Linux desktop.

This article requires you to have at least two computers: a Linux desktop/laptop with a wireless card and an Ethernet port, then another computer (which may not necessarily be running Linux) with either a wireless card and/or an Ethernet port.

Sharing Wired(Ethernet) Internet Connection Via Wi-Fi Hotspot

First, connect your computer to a source of internet using an Ethernet cable as shown in the following screenshot.

Connect Ethernet Cable

Next, enable Wireless connections, then go to Network Settings as highlighted in the following screenshot.

Enable Wireless Connection

Then click Use as Hotspot as shown in the following screenshot.

Use as Hotspot Feature

Next, from the pop-up window, click Turn On to activate the wireless hotspot.

Turn On Hotspot

Now a wireless hotspot should be created with a name defaulting to the hostname e.g tecmint.

Wireless Hotspot Created

Now you can connect another computer or device via the hot-spot to the internet.

Sharing Wi-Fi Internet Connection via Wired(Ethernet) Connection

Start by connecting your computer to a wireless connection with access to the internet e.g HackerNet in the test environment. Then connect an Ethernet cable to it and go to Network Connections.

Connect to Wireless and Enable Ethernet

From the pop-up window, select the Wired/Ethernet connection, then go to its settings as described in the following screenshot.

Select Network Connection Interface

Under the connection settings, go to IPv4 Settings.

Select IPv4 Settings

Under the IPv4 settings, set the Method to Shared to other computers as shown in the following screenshot. Optionally, you can add the IP address to define the network to use. Then click Save.

Select Share to Other Computers

Next, turn the wired connection off then on, to activate it once more. Then open it under Network Connections, it should now be configured for sharing (by having a default IP address of 10.42.0.1) as shown in this screenshot.

Sharing Wired Connection with Other Computers

Note: You can also share a bridged interface the same way as the wired interface as shown in the following screenshot.

Share a Bridged Interface with Other Computers

Go ahead and connect another computer to the other end of the Ethernet cable or an access point to serve many computers/devices. For any inquiries, reach us via the feedback form below.

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Use Windows XP to give Wi-Fi access to other devices

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Very often, especially when traveling, you may find yourself with one wired Ethernet connection for Internet access (or one 3G cellular data modem), but multiple devices that you want to be able to go online.

The following instructions are for Windows XP. Microsoft ended support for Windows XP on April 2014, and no longer provides security updates or technical support for the Windows XP operating system. There are separate instructions for Vista and Windows 7. You can also share your Mac’s wired internet connection via WiFi.

Difficulty: Average

Time Required: 20 minutes

How to Share Internet Connection in Windows XP

Using the built-in Internet Connection Sharing feature on Windows computers, you can share that single Internet access with any device over Wi-Fi or by connecting with an ethernet wire. In essence, you can turn your computer into a wireless hotspot (or wired router) for other devices nearby.

Log on to the Windows host computer (the one connected to the Internet) as an Administrator.

Go to Start > Control Panel > Network and Internet Connections > Network Connections.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Right-click your Internet connection that you want to share (e.g., Local Area Connection) and select Properties.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Select the Advanced tab of the Properties dialog box.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Under Internet Connection Sharing, select Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s Internet connection.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Most people don’t use dial-up anymore, but if that’s how you connect to the Internet, select Establish a dial-up connection whenever a computer on my network attempts to access the Internet.

Select OK and you will receive a message about your LAN adapter being set to 192.168.0.1.

Select Yes to confirm you want to enable Internet Connection Sharing.

Your Internet connection will now be shared with other computers on your local network; if you connect them via wire (either directly or through a wireless hub), you’re all set.

If you want to connect the other devices wirelessly, however, you’ll need to Set Up an Ad Hoc Wireless Network or use newer Wi-Fi Direct technology.

Stuck in a dead zone or struggling to connect your phone or tablet to spotty Wi-Fi? It might seem like an odd solution, but if you have an Ethernet cable and an adapter, faster and reliable internet access is a few taps away.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

If your Wi-Fi is too slow and cellular data is erratic, there is an alternative. With an Ethernet cable, and the right adapter, you can connect your mobile device to an Ethernet port on your router or modem for a fast and dependable connection.

It may seem odd to connect a mobile device via Ethernet, since Wi-Fi is built-in and easily available, but there are times when it makes sense. Your home Wi-Fi could be weak but your Ethernet connection is strong. You could be staying at a hotel with Ethernet port access, but unreliable or expensive Wi-Fi. Or you might need a better connection for online mobile gaming.

The main limitation is that you’re tethered to the Ethernet port on your router or modem, so you can’t go too far with your device. You can increase the range with a longer Ethernet cable, which can stretch up to 300 feet, though you may want to limit yourself to 50 feet to avoid tripping.

Buy the Right Adapter

First, you’ll need to pick up the right adapter for your particular phone or tablet. Most of these adapters shouldn’t cost more than $20 and can be found on retail sites like Amazon, Best Buy, and Newegg.

Most Android devices and the iPad Pro will need a USB-C-to-Ethernet adapter, while older Android phones and tablets require a micro USB-to-Ethernet adapter. If you have an iPhone or standard iPad, you will need a Lightning-to-Ethernet adapter.

While some recognizable brands make these adapters, many of them are made by companies you might not recognize. It shouldn’t matter who you buy from, but your best bet is to read the reviews to see what other customers have to say. Not all adapters are compatible with every device, so do some research before you make a purchase.

Get an Ethernet Cable

If you don’t already have an Ethernet cable, you can easily find one online. Prices vary depending on the length and quality of the cable, so you don’t have to spend a lot here, but don’t skimp either. Amazon sells a basic cable for cheap, but if you want something longer or tougher, there are nylon cables at differing price points.

Set Up Your Android Device

Your Android device must be running Android 6.0 Marshmallow or higher, and be disconnected from Wi-Fi and cell service to connect via Ethernet. Both can be turned on and off by swiping down from the top of the screen and tapping their respective icons.

Alternatively, go to Settings > Network & internet (or Connections) and turn off the switch for Wi-Fi. Go to Settings > Network & internet (or Connections) > Mobile Network and turn off the switches for mobile data and roaming. You can also simply turn on the switch for Airplane mode, which automatically disables Wi-Fi and cellular connections for your device.

Set Up Your iPhone or iPad

The process for using your iPhone or iPad is similar to that on Android, which means you’ll need to turn off Wi-Fi and cellular access. Swipe down from the top right of the screen to display the Control Center. Tap the Wi-Fi and Cellular icons to turn off these services.

Alternatively, go to Settings > Wi-Fi and turn off the switch. Go to Settings > Cellular and turn off the switch for Cellular Data. To save time, open Control Center or Settings and turn on Airplane mode.

Connect Your Device to Ethernet

Now if you load a website in your browser—preferably one you don’t use often so a cached version of the site doesn’t pop up—you should get a notice that there’s no internet connection. Connect the Ethernet cable to your router or modem, then connect the Ethernet adapter to the Ethernet cable. Finally, connect the the adapter to your phone or tablet.

If the adapter has display lights, you should see the lights flash to indicate a connection. Refresh the current page on your browser, and it should now load. While you should be able to enjoy normal internet service through an Ethernet connection, some apps and services may not work properly because they expect a Wi-Fi or cellular connection.

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Services at a Glance

The Problem with Multiple Network Connections & Network Bridging

Many laptop and some desktop computers have both wired and wireless network adapters or cards. These two cards allow you to establish simultaneous wired and wireless connections to the campus network.

While this simultaneous connection (also known as ‘network bridging’) may be useful on some home networks, it causes problems on the campus network.

You can use only one network connection at a time. Ethernet jacks on campus are set up to automatically shut off once they detect network bridging. Plugging your computer into another jack will disable that jack as well.

Note: Some computers and network adapters may use network management software other than the built-in applications included with an operating system (especially on Windows). If you find that this is the case, the process described below will be similar, but the steps may not apply exactly. Consult the Help documentation for your network management software or contact the IT Help Center if you need assistance.

Step 1: Disconnect or Disable Additional Network Connections

Please do not use more than one network connection at one time.

Disconnect Additional Connections (temporary)

  • To disconnect your wired Ethernet connection, unplug your Ethernet cable from its jack.
  • To disconnect your wireless connection:

Windows 7
On the Windows taskbar (bottom, right), right-click the connection icon and select Disconnect from [connection name]

Windows Vista
On the Windows taskbar (bottom, right), right-click the connection icon and select Disconnect from [connection name]

Windows XP
On the Windows taskbar (bottom, right), right-click the Wireless Network Connection icon and select Disable.

Mac OS 10.x
On the menu bar (top, right), right click the wireless icon and select Turn AirPort Off.

Completely Disable Unused Connections

This will keep your operating system from using the disabled connection until you re-enable it. To enable your connection, reverse the process you followed below. Consult the Help documentation of your operating system if you need assistance.

Windows 7

  1. Go to Start > Control Panel > Network and Internet > Network and Sharing Center.
  2. In the left-hand column, click Change adapter settings.
  3. A new screen will open with a list of network connections. Right-click Local Area Connection or Wireless Connection and select Disable.

Windows Vista

  1. Go to Start > Control Panel > Network and Internet > Network and Sharing Center.
  2. In the left-hand column, click Manage network connections.
  3. A new window will open. Right-click Local Area Connection or Wireless Connection and select Disable.

Windows XP

  1. Go to Start > Control Panel > Network Connections.
  2. Right-click Local Area Connection or Wireless Network Connection and select Disable.

Mac OS 10.x

  1. In the Apple Menu, go to System Preferences.
  2. Under Internet & Wireless, click Network.
  3. If the lock on the lower left corner of the Network window is closed, click it so you can make changes to the network settings (do not click the lock if it is already “open”), then enter your system password when prompted.
  4. From the options at right, select the connection you wish to disable:
    • Ethernet and from the Configure IPv4 drop-down menu, select Off
    • Wireless: and click Turn AirPort Off (at right).

Step 2: Make Sure Network Bridging is Disabled

If your laptop has more than one network adapter or card, you may have to disable network bridging, otherwise known as Internet connection sharing. Find your operating system and follow the instructions below.

Before you start, you’ll need:

  • A computer that meets the ResNet minimum requirements
  • Your UCSD username and password.

FALL 2021 UPDATES:
The ResNet network has been updated and our network names have changed. Instead of RESNET-LOCATION-E and RESNET-LOCATION, we have now renamed our networks to RESNET-PROTECTED and RESNET-GUEST-DEVICE. Additionally, ResNet now no longer requires downloading and installing the policy key.


FALL 2020 UPDATES:
As of Fall 2020, the ResNet network has been transitioned to a wireless-only infrastructure to improve wireless coverage throughout the residences. Wireless access is available throughout the residence, including the common room and bedrooms. Wired connections are not available.

Connecting to the internet using a wireless connection

  1. Connect to an available ResNet network (eg. RESNET-PROTECTED or RESNET-GUEST-DEVICE). Read about the differences in ResNet’s available networks. To connect to RESNET-PROTECTED, use your UCSD username and password as the network credentials. Some devices need more configuration options for RESNET-PROTECTED which can be found on the Configure Android, Chromebook, and some Linux Devices to connect to RESNET-PROTECTED webpage. To connect to RESNET-GUEST-DEVICE, use password ResnetConnect and accept the acceptable use policy. If no page loads, please navigate to httpforever.com.
    • Devices that will be using RESNET-GUEST-DEVICE should be registered through the Device Portal to ensure they can access UCSD resources when connected. Information about registration can be found on the How to Connect Your Devices to the Internet webpage.
  2. Familiarize yourself with the ResNet Acceptable Use Policy.

If you are still having issues connecting to the network, please call ResNet at (858) 246-4357.

Connecting to the internet using a wired Ethernet cable

Ethernet access is not available in residential areas.

However, if you are a student with a disability and need access to Ethernet as an accommodation, please email the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) at [email protected] to schedule an interactive process appointment. During this appointment, students will be able to share how access to Ethernet would mitigate a limitation imposed by a disabling condition. Additional documentation may be requested before the OSD makes a determination.

Contact Us

Phone: (858) 246-4357
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Portal: support.ucsd.edu/its
Email: [email protected] Walk-in: Applied Physics and Mathematics (AP&M) 1313 –>

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How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

How to make an informed decision between WiFi and Ethernet.

Many of us are so used to working via a WiFi Internet connection at home, in coffee shops, and every time we’re on our phone, that we’re tempted to think that hard-wired Internet is no longer necessary. However, before you decide to do away with your Ethernet connection, you may want to consider the advantages it still has over wireless technology.

Hard-wired Internet: high speed, low latency, stability, and security.

There are several factors that make hard-wired Ethernet connections preferable to wireless Internet: speed, latency, security, and stability. Put briefly, an Ethernet connection allows for faster transfer of data from your computer to the Internet. It has less of a lag than WiFi, and it’s less likely to lose connection. Furthermore, wired connections are easier to secure than wireless, reducing your risk of a data breach. All of these are incredibly important factors for businesses which handle large amounts of data and can’t afford even a brief interruption in their connectivity.

That said, although speed is one of the most oft-cited benefits of Ethernet, it’s most important when transferring data through a local area network (for instance, if you’re a manufacturing business and regularly move detailed drawings or CAD files to an in-house server). This is because wired connections transfer data from computers faster than WiFi. However, the speed at which data can move between devices is not the same as your internet speed. Bandwidth is the ultimate bottleneck that will slow down the transfer of data between your office and the outside world.

Wireless Internet: convenient, sufficient, and improving.

For many tasks, a wireless Internet connection will be good enough, and most people prefer the convenience of wireless to the marginal gains of Ethernet. Furthermore, improvements in WiFi technology are continually narrowing the efficiency gap between wired and hardwired Internet. However, even if your business doesn’t require the connection speed, low-latency, and stability of Ethernet, there are still some things you should look out for before you decide to go totally wireless.

Be sure that all new WiFi devices meet the latest 802.11 AC Wave 2 standard. This will be critical for your business moving forward because it supports multiple users, as well as multiple inputs and outputs (otherwise known as MU-MIMO). 802.11 AC Wave 2 allows WiFi equipment to support multiple inbound and outbound streams. This means your WiFi can simultaneously broadcast and receive data, allowing for much better performance of streaming audio or content.

You will want to take advantage of the new standard, not only for its higher performance, but because it positions your business to take advantage of future technological improvements. Additionally, all new Apple devices support MIMO over 5Ghz bandwidth, and this is set to become the new industry standard within a few years. So, for a smoother experience, you want all devices to be able to support the Wave 2 standard.

What to look out for in a new office space.

As you move into a new office space, have an IT professional look at your Internet connections. Your office should be equipped with gigabit switches that can handle modern workloads, but some businesses move into an existing building trusting that the “pre-wired” connection will be up to task. Unfortunately, these can sometimes be 10-100 switch which can in no way keep up with current bandwidth consumption.

There are a few other reasons why a wired Internet connection may make sense for your office. For instance, many phone systems require a hardwired connection to function efficiently, and a lot of desktop computers are built to be hardwired. This can also have advantages when it comes to diagnosing Internet connectivity issues. Hard-wired Internet cables can have an advantage over wireless as their single point of connectivity makes it easier to diagnose and troubleshoot issues. Wireless connections are also subject to more variables. These include the number of people in the room and where the user is standing in relation to walls and other barriers.

This isn’t an either/or proposition.

Of course, there’s no reason your office can’t have both WiFi and Ethernet. Many offices may still need a hardwired connection to handle heavy-duty operations, while providing WiFi for visitors or conference rooms. The most important thing for you to keep in mind is that Ethernet still performs better than WiFi for heavy data loads, and that your business can and should take advantage of WiFi improvements as they become the new industry standard.

Need help with your office’s IT? We can run a free assessment to help you improve your office efficiency.

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Nowadays it feels like everything connects to the internet in some way—from computers and smartphones to baby monitors and security cameras. All these devices in your home share your bandwidth. Every device on your network decreases your bandwidth a portion, especially over WiFi.

Think of it like traffic on the highway. During rush hour when there’s a lot of traffic, the cars travel slower than usual. This is the same for your internet connection. Congestion is caused when everyone in your home is accessing the internet at the same time. Add in some lane closures – like older devices running updates or back-ups – and your speed is further reduced.

Wired vs. Wireless

A hardwired connection will always beat WiFi. Wherever possible, use an ethernet cable to connect devices like smart TVs, gaming consoles, smart speakers, etc. This isn’t always possible, but when it is you’ll see a massive difference.

Number of Devices

The term “Internet of Things” is used to describe all the devices in your home that use an internet connection to exchange data. From doorbell cameras to Google Home Minis to smart locks—our homes are increasingly filled with the Internet of Things devices. Each of these devices connects to your internet network either through WiFi or a hardwire connection. Some of these devices – like cameras or 4K TVs – consume a lot of bandwidth.

It’s not unusual for your speeds to come down at night when everyone at home finishes dinner and starts streaming Netflix at the same time. More people online means everyone is more likely to experience slow speeds. Be mindful of the number of people and devices accessing your network.

Age of Devices

Your home network is only as strong as its weakest link. It’s possible for older devices on a network to slow things down for everyone else, even with a newer modem. Older computers, laptops, and mobile devices with slower processors could be putting the brakes on your connection.

With new technology coming out every day, we recommend upgrading your hardware every few years. Or remove that old computer or device from your WiFi network and only sign on when you are actively using it.

WiFi Routers

Like your devices, older routers will slow down your connection. If your router is more than three or four years old, it’s probably time to think about buying a new one.

If you are trying to push a lot of data to a lot of devices over an old WiFi router, we recommend looking into a mesh network like our HOP WiFi. A mesh network is basically a system of multiple WiFi access points that work together to blanket every corner of your home with a strong wireless connection. Unlike stand-alone routers that lose signal the farther you move away from them, mesh stations piggyback on one another to create a continuous wireless link throughout your home. By connecting all these access points together, you scale up the load your bandwidth can carry.

Viruses and Malware

Viral programs like malware and spyware will also slow down your connection. These programs download to your computer and lurk in the background. If this is the case, the spyware could be connecting to the internet without your knowledge and hogging your bandwidth. Always run internet security software, and never open email links or attachments from an unknown source.

There are several programs available to help manage and remove malware from your computer. Many of our customers use Malwarebytes or SpyBot Search & Destroy. These are both free programs that can be installed on your computer to assist you in removing Spyware and malware.

Run a Speed Test

If your network appears slow, try running a speed test. We recommend Speedtest by Ookla. You can download the desktop app for free on your computer or mobile device, or access it on our website. You can use it to check both your WiFi and wired connection; we recommend checking both.

Remember that all the devices in your home share bandwidth—when you conduct a speed test, any device in use will affect the result.

If you have questions about your internet or WiFi speed, call 360-321-TECH (8324). Our friendly tech support is available to help 24/7. Or give us a call at 360-321-1122 to learn more about HOP WiFi and our high-speed internet options.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

What is a router?

A router is a networking device that sends an internet connection on a “route” from the modem to other devices. The difference between a router and a modem can be confusing, but they are both related to connecting you to the internet. The modem is the device that brings the hard-wired connection via your ethernet cable into a house, apartment, or dorm, while the router is the device that transmits that internet connection wirelessly to multiple devices or users.

For your dorm room, it’s best to get a router because internet service may already be available to you by your college. You will also want to double check that your college approves of students having their own router.

Benefits of getting your own router

Many students choose to install their own WiFi router in their dorms because of the benefits in speed and security. Looking at getting your own router can be intimidating, but it is worth it and easier to do than learning how to do laundry.

Having your own private network brings the comfort of greater security and privacy. Data will only transmit through your network and not the broader network shared by the rest of campus. This means that when you log in to one of your accounts, that information isn’t being transferred through the school’s shared campus network. Plus, you get an extra layer of security by having your own login information to connect to your router, reducing the chances that anyone else gaining access to your personal information. Hackers who are after your personal information tend to use it to open credit cards or even sell it to others on the dark web. Having a unique login that only you and your roommates know keeps the chances of your internet being hacked, low.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Your own WiFi network is far more likely to keep up with your needs. Your college’s internet sends each student the information they are looking for through a range of frequencies, this is called bandwidth. Think of bandwidth like a freeway. A freeway can only have so many cars at a time, but when too many cars jump on, there will be traffic. With more traffic, all cars will take longer to get from point A to point B. The same goes for wireless internet traffic: when too many users are on one network, it can clog up and slow things down for everyone. Your own router will help you find the fastest route. (Plus, no more buffering when you’re binge-watching the latest episode of something instead of working on that paper. Don’t worry – we won’t tell!)

If you are thinking of getting your own router, the next question may be, “Which router should I buy?” Since dorm rooms are small, you don’t need broad coverage or access for an entire household. Go for a smaller router that fits your needs and makes sense for your budget.

Setting up your router

After purchasing your router, it’s time to set it up!

Your dorm or apartment should have an Ethernet wall port that is labeled “ENET” or “Data.” It looks like a telephone jack, but a bit wider. Or it may share an outlet with the cable jack. This port is where you will receive an internet connection.

Your router will have a port where the Ethernet cable plugs in. You may have to buy a CAT 5 or CAT 6 Ethernet cable to get started, though often this will come with your new router. Plug one end of the cable into the Ethernet wall port and the other end into the port on your router, which may be labeled “WAN,” “Internet” or simply “Ethernet” and will often be a different color such as yellow or green.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

The next step is to see if the wireless network can be accessed by your computer. There should be a sticker on your new router that will show the default login information. If not, you will be able to find the information in the instruction manual. You’ll want to find your SSID (Service Set Identifier), also known as the WiFi network name, on your computer or device. Enter the username and password, also typically printed on your router or in the user guide, to continue the login process. Once you’re logged in, you know all the cables are connected in the right places and you’re ready to get connected!

Get connected, safely

You’ve got your router up and running — now let’s make sure you stay secure. You’ll want to change the default login information you used to get set up because it will make it easy to hack in the future if you didn’t.

On the back of your router (where you found the default information) or in the instruction manual, you will find your router’s IP address. Most IP addresses look something like 192.168.1.1. Input your router’s IP address into a window browser, which will lead you to your router’s admin page. This page is like a control panel for the settings and configuration. The login information should be found on your instruction manual. If not, it can be easily found on the router brand website – just search for default username and password on their website.

The place to go to change your username and password will be different depending on the brand of router you purchased. It can either be under Wireless Settings or on the main page of your router. If it is in neither of these locations, look in your instruction manual. When coming up with a new username, have fun with it! Make sure you create a strong password that can’t be guessed. Avoid using any personal information like your birthday or even home address as your password and think of something complex with a mix of characters, numbers, and letters.

The place to go to change your username and password will be different depending on the brand of router you purchased. It can either be under Wireless Settings or on the main page of your router. If it is in neither of these locations, look in your instruction manual. When coming up with a new username, have fun with it! Make sure you create a strong password that can’t be guessed. Avoid using any personal information like your birthday or even home address as your password and think of something complex with a mix of characters, numbers, and letters.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Now that all the default information has changed and your router is up and running, go ahead and connect all your devices to your new WiFi network. Give your WiFi password only to friends that you trust – it will help to keep your new connection fast and more secure. With your new internet speed, you can get your assignments turned in on time and enjoy binging your favorite show… on your study break of course!

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

People can’t get enough Internet these days–and neither can some devices. Many now depend on an Internet connection to offer full functionality. In addition to TVs, various 4K-capable streaming devices, gaming consoles, and computers, there’s probably at least one can opener for sale that has an Internet port.

Lots of devices offer enhanced functionality when connected to the Internet, but sometimes a Wi-Fi signal just isn’t strong enough in some areas of your home. In some cases, the devices don’t even have Wi-Fi as an option. Even if Wi-Fi is available and functioning, wired Internet connectivity is still more reliable, faster, and more secure. So, it’s clear that wired Internet connections can still be quite useful.

Installing a wired Internet port is a task that can range from difficult to impossible, and it’s always expensive if you can’t do it yourself. But Powerline Networking, such as TP-Link’s Powerline AV Network Adapter Kits, can save the day. They let you set up wired Internet ports in just minutes without having to run cables or cut through walls—you can use your home’s electrical wiring.

The TP-Link Powerline Network Adapter Kits let you transfer Ethernet traffic through your home’s electrical wiring. The kits contain two modules that plug into outlets in your home and can then pass Ethernet traffic between them. One module plugs into an AC outlet somewhere near your router, and then an Ethernet cable makes the data connection between the module and the router. The other module plugs into an AC outlet in the room where you want to add an Internet port. You then plug your TV, Blu-ray player or gaming console into this module’s RJ45 jack. The modules are powered by the outlets into which they’e plugged, so there’s no need for power cords or batteries.

The TP-Link adapter kits provide Gigabit connectivity with speeds up to 2000 Mb/s. That’s fast enough to transfer large files or to stream video quickly to your 4K HDTV. The kits must plug into walls outlets and will connect to any device with an Ethernet port. All modules must be paired and the connection is secured with 128-bit encryption, so you don’t have to worry about anyone in your building freeloading off your Internet by plugging in their own powerline adapter.

TP-Link offers two Powerline Network Adapter Kits. The TP-Link AV1000 Gigabit Ethernet Passthrough Powerline Starter Kit adds a single Ethernet port to any room in your home, transfers data at up to 1000 Mb/s, and will automatically switch to Power-Saving Mode during low-usage hours. Alternatively, the TP-Link AV2000 2-Port Gigabit Passthrough Powerline Starter Kit is designed with two Gigabit Ethernet ports and delivers speeds of up to 2000 Mb/s. The AV2000 kit also uses 2 x 2 MIMO and Beamforming technologies to help maintain stable connections between the modules over long distances. Use either kit to wire up your computer, TV, Blu-ray player, gaming console, and can opener for fast and reliable Internet connections. Each kit comes with Ethernet cables.

TP-Link AV1000 TP-Link AV2000
Standards HomePlug AV2 1000 Mbps HomePlug AV2 2000 Mbps
Ethernet Speed 10/100/1000 10/100/1000
Ports 1 2
Buttons Pair/Reset Pair
Indicator Lights Power, Powerline, Ethernet Power, Powerline, Ethernet
Includes 1 x Ethernet Cable 2 x Ethernet Cable
Minimum System Requirements PC or other device with an Ethernet network port and two electrical power outlets PC or other device with an Ethernet network port and two electrical power outlets

Do you have experience with your own Powerline system? Any more questions? Please stop by the Comments section, below, and leave a message!

You can share an Internet/network connection from your PC to an Ethernet gateway on a Windows 10 PC if your PC has at least one Ethernet port, and another network adapter (typically Wi-Fi). The most common configuration is sharing a Wi-Fi connection to the Ethernet port. This can be useful if you do not have a router with DHCP enabled to which you can connect the Ethernet gateway (as the Ethernet gateway operates with DHCP enabled by default). It is important to understand that issues regarding this network configuration will be deferred to the party that supports your PC. But you should be able to connect an Ethernet gateway directly to a PC to receive an IP address and use the PC’s Internet connection using the steps below.

Steps

Open Windows Settings (click Windows Menu, click Settings icon).

Select the Network & Internet option.
How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Select “Change adapter options”.
How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

In the Network Connections window, find the network you wish to share from, right click, and select Properties (this would generally be a Wi-Fi connection).

Select the Sharing tab.

Check the checkbox for “Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s Internet connection.
How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

For the “Home networking connection:” drop down, select the Ethernet adapter to which you are connecting your Ethernet gateway.

Click the Ok button.

Connect the Ethernet port of your gateway to the Ethernet port on the PC using a standard Ethernet cable.

Power the gateway up.

If the gateway is able to successfully receive a valid IP address from the PC, the bottom LED will go solid green. If the bottom LED is solid green, you have successfully shared the Internet Connection from your PC.

Ethernet cable wiring

The Monnit Ethernet Gateway supports a straight through Ethernet cable with standard straight through wiring.

Conclusion

The above steps will allow your gateway to receive an IP address using DHCP from your Windows 10 PC. This can be useful if you are configuring your gateway for operation with iMonnit Online or using a local version of iMonnit software such as Express or Enterprise with the Ethernet gateway connected directly to the PC. Feel free to contact [email protected] with further questions.

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  • Enabling Local Configuration Page (HTTP Interface) of the Ethernet Gateway 4 through iMonnit Online
  • Testing a SQL Database Connection to your Enterprise Database in Windows

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How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Are you wondering how to share WiFi over Ethernet on Windows 10? if you do, then you have come to the right place as we will go through a quick guide on how to do so.

To get started with the guide, you first need a proper internet connection at your place. Make sure you are connected. Apart from that, you also need Windows 10. If you are using other Windows versions, then you may find it difficult to follow the guide.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

But, before we go on and share the tutorial, let’s learn why it necessary to know how to connect or share Wifi over ethernet using Windows 10.

Table of Contents

Why is it Important? And Use Case.

Modern desktop and laptops come with WiFi connectivity. This means that if you have a Wifi network at your home or work, you can easily connect with the network using the in-build WiFi solution.

However, not all device comes with a WiFi receiver. So, if you do not have an ethernet cable connected to that computer, you are not going to get the internet on that machine or device. Also, the machine that you want to connect should have an ethernet port so that the ethernet cable can be connected without any issue.

For example, there is an old TV that does have Wifi connectivity or maybe game consoles that are too old to have wireless connectivity. In all these cases, sharing your WiFi over ethernet is essential.

Also, ethernet cables are more reliable compared to WiFi connections as they do not suffer from any distortion and interference.

Now that we have understood the use case of sharing WiFi over ethernet and its importance let’s learn how to do it.

How to Share WiFI Over Ethernet on Windows 10

There are many ways you can share your WiFi over ethernet. Let’s go through them one by one below.

Using Connectify Hotspot

You can also use third-party solutions to connect WiFi over ethernet. One such solution is Connectify Hotspot. It is a virtual router software that enables you to share WiFi over Ethernet on Windows 7, 8, and 10. Apart from that, it also comes with a lot of features.

To get started, you first need to download it on your machine. You can download it from here: https://www.connectify.me/.

Also, it enables you to share almost all types of internet connection, including LTE, 3G, 4G, and so on!

Once you have the Connectify hotspot installed, you need to run the program. From there, you now need to click on the Wired Router tab.

From there, you need to select the internet that you want to share by choosing it to “Wi-Fi.”

Also, you need to choose the Ethernet adapter under the Share Over Option.

Lastly, you need to click on “Start Hotspot” to start the network and share the internet, creating a wireless ethernet cable setup.

Using Windows 10 Internal Feature

If you are not comfortable using a third-party solution, then you can also do it using Windows 10 features.

Below are the steps to do so.

  1. Step 1: Right Click on the Windows start button, and you will see a menu pop up.
  2. Step 2: From there, you need to click on Network Connections.
  3. Step 3: Once you do so, you will be redirected to the network windows. From there, click on change adapter settings.
  4. Step 4: Now, you will be redirected to the list of all the network connections available online.
  5. Step 5: From there, right-click on your Wi-Fi adapter and then go to properties.
  6. Step 6. Now you need to toggle the option “Allow other network users to connect.”

Once done, then you need also to select the Ethernet port through which you want to allow the connection.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Once done, you will be able to share your internet connection(share internet) through the ethernet over WiFi.

Also, make sure that you choose the right ethernet to share the internet. If you do not make the right choice, then your connection sharing will fail. This is specifically true for those who have VPN software installed as it can create virtual ethernet ports and list them there.

Creating an internet bridge

You can also create Wifi to ethernet bridge and share the internet using the bridge connection. To do so, you need to right-click on the start button or simply press Windows Key + X and then select network connections.

Now, you need to select the networks that are related to the WiFi and the ethernet adapter that you will be connecting. Once selected, right-click on them and then click on “Bridge Connections.”

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Internet Connection Sharing Using Hosted Network Feature

You can also use the hosted network to share the network connection, i.e., the internet connection. Hosted Network is available within the Windows Network Shell utility. It creates a virtual wireless adapter and hence enables you to share the internet using software-based access points.

However, before you start configuring, you need to learn if your wireless adapter supports the Hosted Network feature or not.

To do so, you need to open the command prompt with admin priveledges.

Now, you need to type the following command in the command prompt and then press enter.

NETSH WLAN show drivers

Once done, it will output a detailed report containing an IP address. There, check out if the Hosted network supported feature is YES or not. If it is YES, then your computer supports the feature, and you can create a network connection using the adapter.

To create the Hosted Network, you need to type the following command in the command prompt.

NETSH WLAN set hostednetwork mode= allow ssid= key= “

Here, you can change the name of the virtual network and choose the key according to your requirement.

Once this is done, you will now be able to see the new virtual adapter being created in the Local Area Connection.

It’s now time to sharing an internet connection using the Hosted Network. Right-click on the newly created adapter and then click on connection properties.

Now go to the “Sharing” tab and then click the box where you allow other users to connect to the internet.

Once done, click on the home network connection and select the newly created virtual adapter.

Click on “OK,” and you are done!

Conclusion

This leads us to the end of our sharing WiFi over ethernet on Windows 10. So, are you able to follow the guide? Comment below and let us know.

The purchase of new equipment for home or office always entails a minor potential inconvenience of setting it up. Of course, some people enjoy tinkering around the house, so installing new devices is nothing but a delight. However, there are also people who find it a chore, who want to get it over with as soon as possible, or who do not want to risk damaging the equipment.
LigoWave is here to make your access point setup experience simple and smooth. Below are some general guidelines on how to set up an access point and what is necessary for the setup.

Please note that these guidelines are of general nature and may differ depending on the device or system.

Necessities. There are several things that users will need in order to set up their access points:

  • an access point – the main item on the list. Access points provide an additional location for end devices to connect to a local area network, thus expanding the LAN’s area of coverage.
  • a switch or router – devices necessary for the distribution and management of data transferred to, among, and from access points and end devices within a local area network.
  • Ethernet cables – wires necessary for high-speed data transfer among access points and other devices.
  • an AC/DC adapter (if supplied) – some access points may need a power adapter to function. However, most modern access points support Power over Ethernet (PoE), which eliminates the need for external power adapters.
  • a computer – may be necessary for basic (or advanced) access point or network configuration.

If it is a wireless router, place it in a location that would be appropriate, keeping the potential location of the access point in mind. This guarantees effective distribution of coverage and minimized interference levels.

If it is a switch or a wired router, then deploy it in a location where it would not interfere with any activities and the surrounding interior solutions.

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

If the local area network has other wireless devices, such as a router, place the access point in a location where its wireless signal would have minimum or no interference with other wireless devices within the LAN and where it would provide effective coverage with respect to the premises.

If the purpose of the access point is to introduce wireless connectivity to a wired LAN, then place it in a location where the wireless signal would cover the greatest possible area with the least number of obstacles and the least amount of interference.

Step 3. Connect the Cables. There are several cables that the user will need to connect.

  1. Use an Ethernet cable to connect the access point to the router. The cable should be inserted into a LAN port on the router and into the main Ethernet port on the access point. This introduces the access point to the router’s created local area network.
  2. Use an Ethernet cable to connect the router to the computer. The cable should be inserted into a LAN port on the router and into the Ethernet port on the computer (typically there is only one). This puts the computer onto the network and allows direct access point and LAN management.
  3. If it is necessary to provide access to the Internet over the local area network, use an Ethernet cable to connect the router to the modem. Insert the cable into the main Ethernet port on the router and into the Ethernet port on the modem (typically there is only one).

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

Step 4. Configure. Modern technologies have practically done away with the inconvenience of manual LAN setup, let alone Internet access setup. Once everything is properly connected and the devices have acknowledged each other’s presence on the network, the user is ready to go.

If any basic setup is necessary either for the access point or for the network in general, the computer or the user manual should provide instructions on what specific steps to take.

Users can also change optional and advanced router settings by connecting to the router via the computer using the IP address 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 (or the address noted in the manual).

Step 5. Viola! The setup is complete! User can now enjoy expanded wireless coverage and improved wireless signal with the newly deployed access point!

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Table of Contents

    • Read Me First
    • Introduction
    • Quick Start
    • Sync Photos and Videos across Devices
    • Sync a Photo Library across Devices
    • Send Photos and Videos to Others
    • Broadcast and Share Photo Albums
    • Choose a File Sharing Method
    • Use OS X File Sharing
    • Sync Files and Folders across Devices
    • Sync Folders with Others
    • Broadcast Download Links
    • Send Files to Others
    • Share Documents with Others
    • Send Contacts to Others
    • Sync Contacts across Devices
    • Sync Contacts with Others
    • Broadcast Calendar Events
    • Sync Calendars and Reminders across Devices
    • Sync Calendars and Reminders with Others
    • Sync Email across Devices
    • Share Optical Discs with Other Macs
    • Share Printers on Your Local Network
    • Share Your iOS Device’s Internet Connection
    • Share Your Mac’s Internet Connection
    • Broadcast and Share Your Mac’s Screen
    • Broadcast Your iOS Device’s Screen
    • Broadcast Audio from Your iOS Device
    • Share iPhone Calls and Texts across Devices
    • Broadcast Browser Tabs to Other Devices
    • Sync Browser Bookmarks across Devices
    • Send Web Links to Others
    • Sync Passwords across Devices
    • Sync Passwords with Others
    • Use iCloud Family Sharing
    • Broadcast and Share Games and Game Stats
    • Send Radio Stations to Others
    • Send iTunes Playlists to Others
    • Broadcast an iTunes Library in Your Home
    • Share Tasks among Devices with Handoff
    • About This Book
    • About the Author
    • About the Publisher
    • Copyright and Fine Print

Share Your Mac’s Internet Connection

If your Mac connects to the Internet via an Ethernet cable, it can create its own Wi-Fi hotspot to share that connection with another Mac, an iOS device, or any other device with Wi-Fi. In other words, it acts as a software base station.

However, note the following qualifications:

  • Your Mac can’t re-share an existing Wi-Fi connection. But if you happen to have an Internet connection through another hardware port (a Thunderbolt or FireWire port, for example, or a USB-to-Ethernet adapter), it can share that connection.
  • The range and throughput of your Mac-created Wi-Fi network won’t be as good as what you would get from a stand-alone Wi-Fi router, such as an AirPort Express.

Enable Internet Sharing

  1. Go to System Preferences > Sharing.
  2. Select Internet Sharing in the list on the left . (You can’t select the checkbox itself until you’ve completed a few more steps.) How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices Select Internet Sharing to start—but you can’t check the box (yet).
  3. On the right, from the Share Your Connection From pop-up menu, choose Ethernet (or whichever other hard-wired connection your Mac uses for Internet access).
  4. In the To Computers Using box, select the Wi-Fi checkbox . How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices Share an Ethernet connection over Wi-Fi.
  5. Click Wi-Fi Options, choose a network name and channel (or just keep the defaults), choose WPA2 Personal from the Security pop-up menu, and enter (and confirm) a password. Click OK.
  6. Select the checkbox next to Internet Sharing on the left.

Your Mac’s Internet connection is now shared via Wi-Fi.

Note: You can use the same method to share an Internet connection on another interface—for example, you could share a Wi-Fi connection over Thunderbolt—but I cover only Ethernet-to-Wi-Fi here because it’s the most common scenario.

Note: For vastly more detail about Wi-Fi networks of all sorts, including software base stations and ad hoc networks, see Glenn Fleishman’s Take Control of Your Apple Wi-Fi Network.

Connect from Another Device

Once your Mac is sharing its Internet connection over Wi-Fi, the network name you chose in Step 5, previously, should appear in the Wi-Fi menus of all nearby devices.

On a Mac, choose the network name from the Wi-Fi menu to connect. Enter the password when prompted.

On an iOS device, tap Settings > Wi-Fi, tap the network name, and enter the password when prompted.

Ad Hoc Wi-Fi Networks

You may be aware of another way to create a Wi-Fi network with your Mac: choose Create Network from the Wi-Fi menu. Doing this sets up what’s called an ad hoc, or computer-to-computer network. It’s a handy way for two or more devices to communicate with each other when there’s not a central Wi-Fi network they can all connect to. But ad hoc networks created this way don’t let a Mac with an Internet connection (via Ethernet, say) share that connection with other devices over Wi-Fi.

Also of note: prior to Yosemite, ad hoc networks supported only the older, insecure WEP encryption standard as an option. Starting with Yosemite, instead of increasing encryption, Apple removed it altogether—ad hoc networks in Yosemite and later are always completely open.

Network Username and Password

In order to connect to IUP’s network, whether wired or wireless, you’ll need to know your network username and password. This is the same as your MyIUP username and password. You can set or reset your password through the iaccounts website.

Game Machines, Smart Devices, and Other Network Devices

On a device that has an internet connection: Open up a browser and go to https://iconnect.iup.edu/

  • Click on the checkbox next to I agree to the Terms & Conditions and then click Next to continue.
  • Choose the option Resnet Gaming and Smart/IoT Devices. You will be prompted for your IUP username and password.
  • You will be asked to choose which type of device to register.

If you’re connecting a game machine it is strongly recommended that you use a wired connection.

For wired devices:

  • Choose Register Unsupported Wired Device
  • You need to put in the wired MAC address of your wired device. You should be able to find this on the network settings on the device you’re trying to connect. This is an unique combination of numbers 0-9 and letters A-F.
  • Once you register the correct MAC address for your device, you can plug your device’s Ethernet cable into an active port in your room (any port ending in “A” is active). Make sure the device is set to use the wired connection and that all network settings are “automatic” (do not hardcode any network information). You may need to restart your machine, but once it’s registered it should work.
  • For wireless devices:

    • Choose Register Unsupported Wireless Device
    • You need to put in the wireless MAC address of your wireless device. You should be able to find this on the network settings on the device you’re trying to connect. This is an unique combination of numbers 0-9 and letters A-F.
    • Once you register the correct MAC address for your device, you can go through the wireless setup on the device and connect to wireless SSID “netregonly” and put in the password the registration page provides. You may need to restart the device, but it should work.
  • Some troubleshooting tips:

    • Double-check your MAC address. if any one digit or letter is wrong, registration will not work
    • Double-check that you input the wireless password correctly for “netregonly”
    • If you cannot find the MAC address of your device, see if you can find instructions online on how to navigate the menus. All devices are different.
  • Connecting your Computer

    To connect your computer to IUP’s wireless please see IT Support’s instructions.

    To register your computer for the wired connection in your room, plug in and try to use a web browser. You should be redirected to IUP’s iconnect page. Follow the instructions to update your computer to use the network using your network account information. You can also go to the iconnect web page to update your computer in advance. See information about in-room ethernet connections.

    Phones and Other Supported Mobile Wireless Network Devices

    The IT Support Center has instructions on connecting Personal Mobile Devices to the wireless network connection. Any smartphone or tablet should be able to connect to IUP’s wireless network.

    Devices such as laptops, smartphones, and tablets should all be able to use the wireless connection. You can get help connecting to the wireless at the IT Support Center.

    Printers

    You cannot connect a printer to IUP’s network. If you have a wireless printer, please disable the wireless to prevent interference. If your printer supports Bluetooth, you can print wirelessly that way.

    IUP does not provide support for personal printers. You can use a personal printer connected directly to your computer using a USB cable.

    Hubs/Routers/Switches

    You cannot use any device to extend the network. Any attempt to use such devices can result in the suspension of your network privileges. See IUP’s Acceptable Use Policy (pdf) for more details.

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

    Ethernet and Wi-Fi are two different ways to connect a computer to your home network and internet service. Many home routers allow you to connect using either method. Ethernet uses physical cables and can deliver faster speeds, less interference and sometimes better security. Wi-Fi uses signals sent through the air, making it easier to move devices around your home, and a Wi-Fi connection is secure and speedy enough for many purposes. Some modern devices, like smartphones, only support Wi-Fi, not Ethernet.

    You probably have a lot of questions: Which is more reliable? Which is more secure? How do I make up my mind? Read on for answers.

    Understanding Ethernet connections

    Many computers and some other devices let you set up a hardwired Ethernet connection to your router and the internet. Look on your router, which is often provided by your internet service provider, for jacks that look similar to phone jacks and are labeled Ethernet or LAN (local area network). If your router supports phone service, make sure the jack you’re looking at is an Ethernet jack, not a phone jack.

    Consult your router’s manual or your internet provider if you’re not sure if your router supports it.

    You can also look on your desktop or laptop computer and other devices for a similar jack, also often labeled Ethernet or LAN. Check with your computer’s manufacturer if you aren’t sure if it has an Ethernet jack built in. With some devices, you may be able to get an adapter that will let you plug an Ethernet jack into another port on the device, such as a USB port.

    You’ll need an Ethernet cable to connect your device to your router. Different cables are capable of different speeds, so check the device and the router to see what type of cable you need to get the optimal internet speed. Remember, while they may look similar, phone cables and jacks can’t be used for Ethernet.

    Using a Wi-Fi connection

    Your Wi-Fi router, either from your internet provider or one you purchased yourself, is wired to your internet source connection and allows you to connect your devices to the internet wirelessly. Most modern computers and other devices, including smartphones, tablets, smart TVs, video game systems and smart home devices and systems, are compatible with Wi-Fi.

    Wi-Fi allows devices to communicate with each other without needing to be physically connected with cables. Wireless connectivity technology continues to improve, with new Wi-Fi standards , established by the IEEE, launching roughly every five years.

    To make the connection from your router–wired to the source of your internet service–to your wireless devices, you’ll need to know the network name and password. You’ll find them printed on your device.

    How to choose Ethernet or Wi-Fi

    If your router supports both Ethernet and Wi-Fi, and your devices do, too, you can decide which connection method to use for each. You can connect some devices using Ethernet and some using Wi-Fi, or simply use only one system for everything.

    Many people choose Wi-Fi because it’s so convenient: You can use devices anywhere in your home within signal range and be able to connect to the internet without the need for running cables. And when you have house guests, they can connect their own devices to your network without the need for additional cables or adapters.

    That said, people often choose to use an Ethernet connection when they’re concerned about internet speed and reliability. Internet bandwidth, meaning how much data you can transfer at once, tends to be faster with a modern Ethernet connection versus a modern Wi-Fi one. And latency, the measure of time between a user’s action and a device’s respons e, tends to be lower. Ethernet is also often less prone to interference from other devices, including your neighbor’s Wi-Fi connections and some household equipment, like an older microwave oven.

    For many applications for work and fun, though, Wi-Fi is fast and reliable enough. You may wish to start with Wi-Fi and switch to Ethernet if you find that speed is really critical.

    Wi-Fi and Ethernet security

    Modern Wi-Fi is fairly secure, although you should make sure you set a secure password and turn on encryption. Also remember that anyone who has your Wi-Fi password can access your network, so make sure to change it if you’re not sure you trust everyone who may have learned it over time.

    Ethernet is generally even more secure, as it’s harder for hackers to invade your systems if they need to tap into a physical cable versus accessing signals sent through the air.

    Many people conduct secure transactions, such as banking, online shopping and sending personal messages, using Wi-Fi without issue. It’s helpful to know that many websites and apps add their own layer of encryption on top of what’s on your home network, helping to keep your connections secure.

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    Table of Contents

    WARNING

    Enabling Internet Sharing on your computer increases your security risk. We do not recommend enabling this unless you are in a trusted network. Sharing internet across devices can impact performance and reliability of connection.

    This article is provided as a guide and outside of 8×8 Support scope, we are unable to assist with troubleshooting should there be any issues getting the feature to work correctly. Please contact your computer device manufacturer for assistance with this feature.

    Objective

    This will show how to Share Internet from a Mac/Windows to Your Phone

    Applies To

    • All SIP phones that 8×8 supply

    Procedure

    1. Connect the Ethernet cable to the Mac

    2. Launch System Preferences from the  Apple menu and click on Sharing

    3. Click on Internet Sharing from the left menu

    4. Select the pull-down menu next to Share your connection from: and choose Ethernet

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

    5. Alongside To computers using: check the box next to Ethernet

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

    You’re done. Your Mac is now sharing its wireless internet connection to a device connected to the Ethernet port.

    Windows

    1. Select the Start button, then select Settings
    2. Network & Internet

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

    1. Change Adapter options

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

    1. Select the Ethernet connection that you are using to connect to the phone you want to share internet with

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

    1. Select the Sharing tab and select allow other users to connect through this computers internet connection

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

    1. From the Home networking connection: drop-down select the interface needed and press OK

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

    You’re done. Your Windows Machine is now sharing its wireless internet connection to a device connected to the Ethernet port.

    Additional Information

    If your device only has wired internet you will need two network ports.

    Using this method will require the handsets to have a separate power supply as the sharing device will not provide power.

    Welcome to Residence Internet

    Internet service is provided for the Residence buildings at the University of Calgary campus. Internet connection allows you to connect to the internet letting you browse the web, check your email, or access online resources. Internet is available in all residences as part of your residence fees.

    You can connect to the service using your IT account and have instant internet access to wireless and/or wired internet depending on building coverage. Internet is suitable for regular academic activities (email, internet browsing). It is not suitable for activities requiring guaranteed high bandwidth or for devices that will not allow you to use WPA2-Enterprise authentication with login credentials (examples of this would be gaming consoles and smart TVs). For those devices you can use airuc-guest network.

    Getting Connected

    There are two ways to connect to the internet depending on your location, wireless and/or wired.

    • For residents, you will need a valid eID or IT account.
    • You can use the computers in the Library or Residence Services Office to register your account.
    • For Seasonal Residence guests, call the Campus Service Centre at 403.220.8300.

    An IT Account is your access to the digital resources offered by the university. If you do not have an IT Account follow the link and register. Your password will be the same as the one you use to access sites such as my.ucalgary and D2L. It also serves as your username and password for your online connections.

    Upon connection to the wireless network, you will be prompted to accept a security certificate. This is normal and part of the verification process. Accept the certificate and you will be able to continue. Failure to accept means you will not be able to access the internet.

    Available Network Connections –

    There are three internet connections available to students living on campus:

    • AirUC – Residence

    AirUC – Residence is your connection to the internet while you’re living in residence. Find AirUC-Residence in your wireless network – sign in using your UCalgary IT account (same username and password used to log into my.ucalgary).

    AirUC-Secure is the encrypted wireless network at the University of Calgary. It is available in all buildings on campus, as well as outdoors, AirUC-Secure is the preferred wireless connection for students requiring access to the Internet.

    Eduroam (EDUcation ROAMing) is a wireless network service that allows students, faculty and staff from participating educational institutions to securely access the Internet while visiting other member universities. Users simply use the credentials from their home institution to access the Eduroam network.

    Available Network Connections – Varsity Courts

    There is one internet connection available for students living in Varsity Courts:

    • VCWiFi
    • Password: FamilyHousing!

    Windows 10 ships with the Internet Connection Sharing feature to quickly share the internet through other devices via Ethernet and WiFi, and here’s how to set it up.

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

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    On Windows 10, Internet Connection Sharing is a feature that has been around for a long time, and as the name implies, it allows you to share an internet connection with other devices through an Ethernet port.

    Although you would typically connect devices to a network switch to access the internet, sometimes, you may not have enough ports or a long enough cable to make the connection. So, the Internet Connection Sharing feature available on Windows 10 lets you extend the internet to other devices.

    This is similar to the mobile hotspot feature. However, the difference is that using the Internet Connection Sharing feature, the sharing happens through an Ethernet or WiFi adapter while using the mobile hotspot feature, the sharing happens through a WiFi adapter.

    In this guide, you will learn the steps to share an internet connection to other devices using the Internet Connection Sharing built-in to Windows 10. This process requires two network adapters, one that has to be connected to the internet and another to provide other devices access to the connection.

    Share internet through Ethernet on Windows 10

    To share an internet connection with other devices on Windows 10 via Ethernet, use these steps:

    Open Settings on Windows 10.

    Click on Network & Internet.

    Click on Status.

    Under the “Advanced network settings” section, click the Change adapter options button.

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devicesChange adapter options

    Right-click the adapter with the internet connection you want to share on Windows 10 and select the Properties option.

    Click the Sharing tab.

    Check the Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s internet connection option.

    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devicesEnable Internet Sharing Connection

    Use the “Home networking connection” drop-down menu and select the second Ethernet (or WiFi) network adapter that other devices will use to connect to the internet.

    Quick note: If you select a WiFi adapter, you are then technically enabling a mobile hotspot.

    (Optional) Clear the Allow other network users to control or disable the shared internet connection option.

    Click the OK button.

    Once you complete the steps, connect the device or network switch to the Ethernet port to provide internet connectivity. Since there is no DHCP server to offer networking configurations, the devices participating in the internet sharing will negotiate an automatic private IP address. If you prefer, you could configure each device with a different static TCP/IP address.

    We focus this guide on Windows 10, but this feature is also available on Windows 11 and older versions, including Windows 8.1 and Windows 7.

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    How to share a wired ethernet internet connection with all your devices

    Related

    • How to Perform a Connection Test on an iMac
    • How to Set Up a Wireless Modem on an iPad
    • How to Clean Up Old Internet Connections
    • How to Disable Connect Automatically on a Mac
    • How to Set Up a Netgear Router for iOS

    Internet Sharing exists as a feature within Mac OS X that allows you to broadcast your Mac’s wired connection as a Wi-Fi connection point. The feature turns your Mac into its own Wi-Fi router and provides a useful option when traveling for business-related events. When connecting to the Internet at hotels and other locations that charge a per-device access fee, you don’t need to pay a separate fee to connect both your Mac and iPhone. For Internet sharing to work, you must use an Ethernet cable to connect to the Internet on your Mac.

    Connect an Ethernet cable between your Mac and the modem you use to connect to the Internet. Follow any prompts to access the Internet in your browser and pay any required fees.

    Click “System Preferences” in the Dock.

    Select “Sharing” in the Internet & Wireless section.

    Click the “Internet Sharing” option, select the “Share Your Connect From:” drop-down menu and choose “Ethernet.”

    Select the “Wi-Fi” check box, check the box for “Internet Sharing” in the sidebar and click the “Start” button, when prompted.

    Select the “Wi-Fi Options” button, select the “Network Name” field and input a name for your network. Choose the “Password” field and then click the “Confirm Password” field to type and confirm a password for the network. Click the “OK” button.

    Tap the “Settings” app on your iPhone, select the “Wi-Fi” option and choose the network you created. Enter a password and confirm the password, when prompted. Click the “OK” button to connect to the Internet.