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How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

This document explains how to share a CD or DVD drive over a network in Windows Vista, 7, 8, and 10.

Sharing a CD/DVD Drive

Navigate to Computer. This step will differ depending on the version of Windows you have installed.

Windows Vista and 7: Open the Start menu, then click Computer.

Windows 8 and 10: Move your cursor to the bottom left-hand corner of your screen until you see a small image appear. Right-click on this image to open the Windows Quick Access menu, then select File Explorer. This should open a window in Computer.

In Computer, right click on the CD or DVD drive, mouse-over Sharing with and click on Advanced sharing.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Click on Advanced Sharing.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Check the Share this folder box. Put in an appropriate Share name. Click on the Permissions box.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Select Everyone if it is not already selected and check the Allow checkbox to the right of Read.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Click OK in the two windows to close them.

Accessing a Shared CD/DVD Drive

Navigate to Computer. This step will differ depending on the version of Windows you have installed.

Windows Vista and 7: Open the Start menu, then click Computer.

Windows 8 and 10: Move your cursor to the bottom left-hand corner of your screen until you see a small image appear. Right-click on this image to open the Windows Quick Access menu, then select File Explorer. This should open a window in Computer.

Click on Network in the left pane.

Select the name of the computer hosting the shared CD/DVD drive.

Note: If you do not see any devices on your network, you may need to turn on network discovery. To do this, go to the Network and Sharing Center, click on Change advanced sharing settings, and select Turn on network discovery.

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

From ultrabooks to netbooks, computers are shedding their optical drives. If you still use an occasional CD or DVD, you don’t have to buy an external optical drive – you can share another computer’s optical drive over the network.

The two computers must be on the same local network to share an optical drive. This requires using the Advanced Sharing settings in Windows – there’s no easy, HomeGroup-style way of doing this.

Sharing a Drive

First, open the Computer window (click Start and select Computer) on the computer with the optical drive.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Right-click the drive you want to share, point to Share with and select Advanced Sharing

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Click the Advanced Sharing button in the properties window that appears.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

In the next window, enable the Share this folder checkbox. Type a descriptive name – such as “CD Drive” – for the share, and then click the Permissions button.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Ensure that the Everyone group has Read access to the drive. If you require additional security – for example, if you’re not using a home network — you can restrict access to specific users. Click OK to save your changes after configuring the permissions.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

You may want to disable password-protected sharing to make this easier, assuming you’re on a secure home network. To do so, click the Network and Sharing Center link under Password Protection.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Click the Home or Work header, scroll down, and select Turn off password protected sharing to disable it. Click the Save changes button after you’re done.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

After you click the OK button, your drive will be shared on the network. You’ll see its address under Network Path in the properties window.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

An icon over the drive indicates that it’s shared. To stop sharing the drive later, go back into its Advanced Sharing window and uncheck the Share this folder checkbox.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Mapping a Drive

On your other computer, open Windows Explorer and click the Network option to view your network.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Browse to the share you created, then right-click it and select Map network drive.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

You can specify a drive letter for the shared optical drive and have it automatically become mapped each time you log in.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

The mapped drive will appear as its own drive letter in the My Computer window. Double-click the drive, or navigate to it in any application, to access its contents over the network.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

We’ve also covered using Paragon Net Burner, a third-party program, to share disc drives over the network.

If you use CDs or DVDs on a regular basis and want to share them with your friends via Windows – you don’t necessarily need an optical drive.

  • How to share data between 2 computers via LAN?
  • How to share and share files on Google Drive

Currently both Ultrabooks and netbooks are not capable of supporting optical drives . If you use CDs or DVDs on a regular basis and want to share them with your friends via Windows – you don’t need to buy an optical drive to install extra on your computer – you just need to use a different computer. Optical drive and share it on the network . In particular, 2 computers must be on the same network for the sharing process to take place smoothly.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

How to share a CD / DVD drive

If you already know how to share data via LAN or Wifi in this article: Instructions for sharing data via Lan, Wifi , the sharing of CD and DVD drives is the same.

First, on a computer with an optical drive, open the Computer window (click Start and select Computer).

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Then right-click the drive you want to share, click Share with and select Advanced Sharing

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

The properties window appears, click Advanced Sharing to continue.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

You tick the ‘ Share this folder ‘ and then name the drive in the Share name , for example here we named ‘CD Drive’, then you continue to click the Permission button.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

The Permission for CD Drive window immediately appears, click ‘ Everyone ‘ in the Group or user names section , then tick the Read box in the Allow column in the Permissions for Everyone box to allow everyone to have access. content in the drive. However, you can also reset access for specific users only if you prefer. Finally, click Ok to save the changes.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

If you are on a home network, you should remove the password setting option to make sharing easier. To do so, click the Network and Sharing link under Password Protection.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Next, click on Home or Work , search and tick the ‘ Turn off password protected sharing ‘ section to disable the password setting feature. Finally, click Save changes to finish.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

After clicking the Ok button, your drive will be shared online. You will see its address under Network Path in the Properties window.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

At the same time, an icon also appears next to the drive to indicate that it is being shared with others. To stop that feature, go back to the Advanced Sharing window and uncheck the Share this folder box .

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

How to access a shared drive from another computer on the network

On another computer, open Windows Explorer and click the Network option

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Then browse for the computers with the shared optical drive that you want to drag to your computer, right-click on it and select Map network drive.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

You can specify a character for the drive being shared and click on the ‘ Reconnect at logon ‘ box to allow the computer to automatically pull the drive when you log in. Then click Finish to complete.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

The downloaded drives will appear with the letter you just placed in the My Computer window

Double-click on it or navigate to it with any application that can start accessing the data inside the drive.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

In addition, you can also use Paragon Net Burner – a 3rd party program that also allows sharing the drive through a network connection.

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“How do you share a CD or DVD drive across a network?” This was the question that dropped into my head recently as it became apparent that I would need to access data on some archive DVDs. If I was using a standard PC this wouldn’t be a problem; as it is, I’ve been the owner of an Acer Iconia W700 for several months now and one of the key drawbacks of a tablet computer is that they don’t come with integrated DVD drives. Surely there must be a way to share the DVD drive on my wife’s laptop across the home network?

“How do you share a CD or DVD drive across a network?” This was the question that dropped into my head recently as it became apparent that I would need to access data on some archive DVDs.

If I was using a standard PC this wouldn’t be a problem; as it is, I’ve been the owner of an Acer Iconia W700 for several months now and one of the key drawbacks of a tablet computer is that they don’t come with integrated DVD drives.

Now, I do have one way around this problem. Recently I purchased a caddy for an old laptop DVD drive, but I haven’t got around to putting it together yet. Judging that clicking a few boxes on Windows would be quicker, quieter and less painful at 10pm one evening, I decided to look at the network option.

Surely there must be a way to share the DVD drive on my wife’s laptop across the home network?

Getting Started: Share the Drive

Often, wrestling control of the laptop and the latest Facebook games from the addicted claws of Mrs Cawley is a bit of a challenge. Fortunately, 10pm was a good time to attempt it.

The starting point of sharing a CD or DVD drive across a network requires you to first share the device, so on the computer with the drive you want to share, open Computer, right-click the appropriate drive and select Share with > Advanced sharing….

In the Properties box, click Advanced Sharing… and click check the Share this folder option in the following screen. You should then assign a meaningful name (“CD drive” or “DVD drive” both seem particularly apposite) and click the Permissions button.

The idea here is to ensure that the drive, once shared, can be accessed. Select the Everyone group and check the box to Read under Allow and click OK to confirm. On a home network, this should give you all of the security you need.

Setting Other Security Options

On a home network, you can disable password-protection on the drive, which by default requires you to have a user account and password for the computer with the shared drive.

You can change this in the Properties box on the Sharing tab, under the Password Protection setting – here, click Network and Sharing Center and click Home or Work (current profile), expanding the options to find Turn off password protected sharing. Select the option you want (off speeds things up on home networks but you wouldn’t want to make that choice in any other scenario) and click Save changes.

Note that there are many other options here, such as changing the encryption type, but the default options are best left alone unless you understand the effect changing them will have.

Once you’re done here, the Properties box will summarise the current sharing details, such as the network path and whether password protection is in use. Note that you can disable sharing later by opening the Advanced Sharing… screen and clearing the check in the Share this folder box.

Find & Map The Share

With the optical drive shared, you can now map a connection to it from your own computer. The process for this is similar to mapping any network drive.

On your desktop or in the Start Menu, right-click Computer, select Map network drive. and browse for the share you created earlier.

It is possible to map a drive letter that will be assigned to this drive each time you start your computer. Select the letter you want and check the Reconnect at logon box to do this, clicking Finish when you’re done.

When you’re ready to access the drive, load the disc into it and then return to your computer, double-clicking the device to begin reading the disc contents.

Alternatives To Sharing A CD Or DVD Drive

As mentioned, there are other ways of connecting a CD or DVD drive to a device that doesn’t come equipped with one (such as a Windows tablet, a MacBook Air or MacBook Pro or even an OTG enabled Android device). Similarly, you might have removed your DVD drive – perhaps from an older Macbook – but still require the ability to read optical drives from time to time.

While external DVD drives are inexpensive, if you have an old laptop with a standard removable slimline DVD drive you will be able to house this in an inexpensive caddy and connect it to your computer via USB.

These caddies (like the one pictured which I finally set up) are available for under $10 and can be powered from your computer’s USB drive or with an external USB-compatible power source. As the housings are manufactured to seat a standardised hardware format (the slimline optical drive), you should find that they’re virtually identical in construction and price.

Note that fitting a slimline DVD drive into one of these caddies is straightforward, but you will need to pay attention to the instructions provided in order to avoid problems (such as the case being too tight for the eject function, for example.)

Disposing Of An Old Laptop – What To Recycle, What To Keep provides more information for anyone stripping down a laptop for parts.

Conclusion: Sharing Is Good, But Not the Only Way

Although the option of having a working DVD drive is useful, optical discs seem to be falling out of favour, with flash drives and other portable solutions taking their place. While we’ve still got Blu-ray (and the sharing process is just the same as described above for DVD and CD drives), there will remain a place for optical discs.

Sharing an optical drive across a network might just be the most effective and economical way of getting around the lack of a suitable device on your own computer, but don’t overlook the benefits of an external optical device, whether this is a standard external drive or one cannibalised from an old laptop.

What is your preferred option for connecting an optical drive to a computer or tablet?

Here are the most amazing apps for Android that will change how you use and interact with your device on a daily basis.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

From ultrabooks to netbooks, computers are shedding their optical drives. If you still use an occasional CD or DVD, you don’t have to buy an external optical drive – you can share another computer’s optical drive over the network.

The two computers must be on the same local network to share an optical drive. This requires using the Advanced Sharing settings in Windows – there’s no easy, HomeGroup-style way of doing this.

Sharing a Drive

First, open the Computer window (click Start and select Computer) on the computer with the optical drive.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Right-click the drive you want to share, point to Share with and select Advanced Sharing

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Click the Advanced Sharing button in the properties window that appears.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

In the next window, enable the Share this folder checkbox. Type a descriptive name – such as “CD Drive” – for the share, and then click the Permissions button.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Ensure that the Everyone group has Read access to the drive. If you require additional security – for example, if you’re not using a home network — you can restrict access to specific users. Click OK to save your changes after configuring the permissions.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

You may want to disable password-protected sharing to make this easier, assuming you’re on a secure home network. To do so, click the Network and Sharing Center link under Password Protection.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Click the Home or Work header, scroll down, and select Turn off password protected sharing to disable it. Click the Save changes button after you’re done.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

After you click the OK button, your drive will be shared on the network. You’ll see its address under Network Path in the properties window.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

An icon over the drive indicates that it’s shared. To stop sharing the drive later, go back into its Advanced Sharing window and uncheck the Share this folder checkbox.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Mapping a Drive

On your other computer, open Windows Explorer and click the Network option to view your network.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Browse to the share you created, then right-click it and select Map network drive.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

You can specify a drive letter for the shared optical drive and have it automatically become mapped each time you log in.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

The mapped drive will appear as its own drive letter in the My Computer window. Double-click the drive, or navigate to it in any application, to access its contents over the network.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

We’ve also covered using Paragon Net Burner, a third-party program, to share disc drives over the network.

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Most desktop PCs ship with an optical drive, usually either a DVD drive or a Blu-Ray drive while mobile PCs may not always ship with one. Especially tablets, netbooks and other low cost or small form factor devices do not ship with one usually.

If you need to access files stored on a DVD, drivers for example, tools, or media then you have two main options to achieve that.

You can either move the files to an USB Flash Drive or online storage before you connect that drive to the mobile device, or share the optical drive over a local area network.

It is actually pretty simply to do so, provided that you have already set up a local area network. If you have not, you may want to check out Microsoft’s guide on the topic to get started.

One of the easiest ways to get started is to use the operating system’s Homegroup feature which is available on Windows 7 and newer versions of Windows. It is explained in detail on the Microsoft Support website.

Sharing a CD, DVD or Blu-Ray drive

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Do the following to share the optical drive of one computer on a local area network:

  1. Open Windows Explorer on the PC that has the optical drive.
  2. Locate the drive, right-click it, and select Properties from the context menu.
  3. Switch to the sharing tab in the properties window.
  4. Click on the advanced sharing button.
  5. Check “Share this folder”.
  6. Type a descriptive name under “Share name”, e.g. DVD Drive.
  7. The remaining settings are all optional. You can limit the number of simultaneous users, add comments, or define permissions or caching in detail. It is usually not required to make any changes here.
  8. Click ok.

Head over to the computer that you want to access the DVD drive on. Open Windows Explorer, and there the network listing. you should see the new shared folder here. Simply click on it to access its contents and work with the files stored on the disc.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Setup is not complicated and unless you make changes to your home network, it should work from that moment on directly without you having to modify anything anymore. The only requirement is that both systems need to be online and connected to the same network to share the optical drive.

It is often easier to share the DVD drive than to move files on optical discs to another location to access them on computer systems without optical drive. This is especially the case if you need to access discs frequently and not just once in a lifetime.

The CD/DVD drive of my notebook is broken. However, the drive from my desktop computer is working perfectly.

How can I access the CD/DVD drive from my desktop computer over the network? I want to put a DVD disc there and access it from my notebook.

Both computers have Gentoo/Linux. (but the solution ought to work on any Linux distribution)

3 Answers 3

I feel like a Samba / NFS setup is kind of a big hammer for this little nail. I found a blog post on this topic which shows the use of a tool called nbd — network block device. To use it, setup the server and client.

(The tutorial is written for Ubuntu with a CD device at /dev/cdrom , so you may need to adjust for your setup.)

On the server side (with the CDROM):

(You may get a warning about no configured exports – ignore it, we’ll set one up below.)

Edit the /etc/nbd-server/config file:

Then: sudo /etc/init.d/nbd-server restart

On the client side (access the server’s CDROM):

Now map the block device (where 192.168.1.100 is the ip address of the server):

Now you can mount /dev/nbd0 as if it was a CDROM on the client:

At first I thought about sharing the /dev/cdrom (actually, /dev/sr0 ) using either NFS or sshfs.

Then I tried that, and it does not work. Raw devices can’t be shared using these technologies.

However, I can mount the cdrom somewhere ( /mnt/cdrom and /media/cdrom are common places) and then share the mount point.

Using sshfs is easy to setup, as it doesn’t require root permissions nor any configuration file. It’s also “safe”, as the file access permissions will be basically the same as the logged in ssh user. However, using NFS will lead to better performance (because it has less overhead, as it doesn’t encrypt any data).

You can simply forget about hardware-supported CD-ROM servers or distributing CDs!

All you have to do is simply store the virtual CDs/DVDs in your network for access. Particularly in the case of parallel use, the high-speed advantages offered by Virtual CD are even more obvious. Of course, use in peer-to-peer networks is also easily possible.

What do I need?

Virtual CD is designed for operation in a network. Virtual CD is only to be installed on the client. Without more ado Virtual CD can then access virtual CDs stored on your file server or other shared computers over the network and insert these virtual CDs into virtual drives. Server components are not necessarily required.

When working with larger CD networks it is advisable to expand the installation to include the Virtual CD Network Management Server for easy management and control of the Virtual CD clients.

Who may do what?

As the administrator, you determine, which capabilities the network computers will have. You define who may create, delete, or edit virtual CDs/DVDs, who is administration-enabled, or who can merely read the virtual CDs/DVDs. You create a client setup of Virtual CD on your server and then install “your” version of Virtual CD.

Central administration of the virtual CDs

Virtual CD automatically recognizes all virtual CDs in the central directory on the file server. Virtual CD immediately shows or extracts just created or deleted CDs on all clients.

Full flexibility for the server

You prefer Linux servers and Window-clients? You can also store the virtual CDs on a Linus server and work on the Windows-clients as before. For the access all you need is a SMB or the like.

Dynamic availability

Mobile computers, such as laptops, can access both centrally and locally stored virtual CDs. If the computer is not networked, Virtual CD immediately extracts the central resources. If a computer is plugged into a network at a later time, all centrally stored virtual CDs become available again.

Showdown: The best laptops with DVD drive in 2022. Yes, you can still get them.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

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If you are looking to buy a laptop that comes with a DVD drive, you can still find them but your choices will be somewhat limited. Worry not, we spent a considerable amount of time finding and reviewing the best laptops with internal CD/DVD drives.

There was a time when most of the high-end laptops came with a CD/DVD player. However, so much has changed over the last few years, nowadays most manufacturers skip them to make these laptops lighter.

Although having a CD/DVD drive in a laptop is a great utility, in the past few years, moving from physically stored information to the cloud; a few of the situations have been listed below:

  • We now have services such as Amazon Prime or Netflix for watching movies.
  • Most of the previously available software in CD/DVDs are now easily downloadable from the internet.
  • USB & External HDDs are faster and an efficient way to transfer data from one PC to another.

To help you find the right laptop, we decided to do huge research and came up with a list of machines that not only come with a CD/DVD reader and burner but also come with the latest specs.

Things To Consider When Buying

Don’t want to read about the specifications? Jump to the list!

Most laptops with DVD / CD drives do not offer the best possible computer-using experience. However, we have reviewed some of the best laptops with DVD drives in the market and have made sure that the same machine can do normal stuff as well.

  • CPU: We recommend that the laptop with a DVD drive have at least a dual-core processor with a 1.6GHz base clock speed. We recommend getting a laptop with a modern Intel processor (i.e., Intel Core i7 or Intel Core i9), making the laptop energy-efficient and performing all the tasks without any issue.
  • GPU: If you are looking for a laptop with a DVD drive, then a laptop with an integrated GPU should do the job. However, we have also included some of the laptops that offer a dedicated GPU so that one can play popular games like PUBG, Fortnite, Overwatch, Minecraft, etc., without any issue. Do note that, having a laptop with at least 2GB GPU is very important in this modern age.
  • Display: Depending on the user requirement, one can get a laptop with a 13-inch, or even a 15-inch display. Besides the screen size, make sure that the laptop will have at least an HD resolution screen. However, the recommended screen resolution is 1080p and one can also opt for a laptop with a 4K resolution screen for an enhanced laptop user experience.
  • RAM: Any modern laptop should have at least 8GB of RAM and having anything less than that will hamper the overall computer user experience and the device will start lagging. Similarly, if you are looking to do some heavy tasks, then make sure that the laptop will have 16GB RAM.
  • Storage: Storage is also an important part of a laptop. It is advised to get a laptop with an SSD. However, if you are short on budget, then make sure that the laptop has an HDD with at least 1TB storage with higher RPM. If you are going for a laptop with an SSD, then make sure that it has at least a 256GB SSD, which is the bare minimum amount of storage that a modern laptop with a DVD / CD drive should have.

And don’t forget, you can always buy an external DVD drive. So if you don’t need it all the time, this might be a good solution. They are very inexpensive at around $20 – $30.

Minimum & Recommended System Requirements

Minimum System Requirements Recommended System Requirements
Processor 10th Gen Intel Core i3 9th Gen Intel Core i7
RAM 8GB 16GB
Storage 512GB HDD 512GB SSD
Display 13-inch FHD (1920 x 1080) 15.6-inch FHD (1920 x 1080)
Graphics Integrated Intel HD 615 2GB NVIDIA GeForce MX250
Battery Integrated with at least 2GB VRAM Integrated with at least 2GB VRAM

7 Best Laptops with DVD Drive in 2022

You could be a grad school student or a working professional, a laptop with a DVD should have hardware specifications so that it can handle everyday stuff without running into any issues. One can easily use a laptop that comes with a DVD drive to watch movies, browse the internet, and play casual games without any issue.

If all you would be doing is playing DVDs on your laptop, then you shall consider getting a Portable DVD player. But, if you want to do more than just watch movies or listen to music, then consider getting any of the laptops below.

If your Mac has an external optical drive connected, you can share the drive with another Mac on the same network with macOS 10.14 or earlier installed.

Note: You can’t access a shared optical drive on a computer with macOS Catalina 10.15 or later installed.

Set up a Mac to share its optical drive

On a Mac that has an optical drive connected, choose Apple menu

> System Preferences, then click Sharing .

Select the DVD or CD Sharing checkbox.

To be notified when a computer tries to access your optical drive, select “Ask me before allowing others to use my DVD drive.”

Use another computer’s optical drive

On a Mac with macOS 10.14 or earlier installed, you can access an optical drive shared from a Mac or Windows computer on the same network.

On the computer that has an optical drive, make sure DVD or CD drive sharing is set up, then insert a disc into the drive.

On the Mac that doesn’t have an optical drive, click the Finder icon in the Dock to open a Finder window.

Select Remote Disc under Locations in the sidebar, then double-click the computer that is sharing the optical drive you want to access.

If you don’t see a Connect button, click Ask to Use, then wait for a response from the other computer.

For information about the kinds of optical media that can be shared, and how to set up a Windows computer to share its optical drive, see the Apple Support article Use the CD or DVD drive from another computer with your Mac.

How do I use an external DVD drive in Windows 10?

How do I use an external DVD drive in Windows 10?

  1. Press Windows key + R to open the run command.
  2. Type devmgmt. msc and press enter to open device manager.
  3. Expand DVD/CD-Rom drives and check if the external DVD drive is listed.
  4. If so, right click on it and uninstall it.
  5. Restart the computer.

How do I get my external CD drive to work?

Insert one end of the USB cable into the external CD drive. Plug the other end of the cable into your computer’s USB port. Allow the computer to install the drivers for your external CD drive. Usually the computer will recognize the external drive and automatically install the drivers for the device.

Why is my CD drive not detected?

Corruption in Windows

If the CD-ROM works in Safe Mode but not in normal Windows, a running program is causing the issue, or the drivers are corrupt. Open Device Manager, highlight and remove the CD-ROM by pressing the delete key. … Windows should then detect the CD-ROM and reinstall it.

Do external DVD drives work with Windows 10?

Easy Installation – Fortunately, most Windows 10-compatible external CD/DVD drives do not require additional download and installation of drivers. Just plug it directly into your Windows computer, it will install automatically within seconds, and you can see this external device.

How do I get Windows 10 to recognize my DVD drive?

Boot to the Windows 10 desktop, then launch Device Manager by pressing Windows key + X and clicking Device Manager. Expand DVD/CD-ROM drives, right-click the optical drive listed, then click Uninstall. Exit Device Manager then restart your computer. Windows 10 will detect the drive then reinstall it.

Why can’t I play DVDs on Windows 10?

Microsoft has removed the built-in support for video DVD playing in Windows 10. Therefore DVD playback is more troublesome on Windows 10 than on previous versions. … So we recommend you to use VLC player, a free third party player with DVD support integrated. Open VLC media player, click Media and select Open Disc.

How do I know if my CD drive is working?

How Do I Tell If My CD Drive Is Working?

  1. Check Operation. Press the button to open the CD-ROM drive. The drive should open to accept a CD. …
  2. Check the Drive. Click “Start” on the taskbar. Click “Computer” on the right side of the Start menu. …
  3. Check Device Manager. Click “Start” on the taskbar. Click “Control Panel.”

How do I play a CD on my laptop without CD drive?

In this guide, we’ll give you the facts on how to play a DVD or CD on a desktop PC or laptop with no disk drive.

These tips work for desktop PCs, too.

  1. Use an external DVD drive. Shop HP External Drives Now. …
  2. Create ISO files for virtual disks. …
  3. Rip files from CD, DVD, or Blu-ray. …
  4. Share CD and DVD drives over Windows network.

When I put a CD in my computer nothing happens Windows 10?

This probably occurs because Windows 10 disables autoplay by default. Hold down the Windows + R keys to open the Run window. … Select Browse and navigate to the TurboTax CD on your CD/DVD/RW drive (usually your D drive).

How do I enable my CD drive?

How to enable the DMA settings of a hard disk drive, CD-ROM, CD-R/RW and DVD-ROM drive?

  1. Start Control Panel.
  2. Double-click System.
  3. Click the Device Manager tab.
  4. For hard disk drive, click to expand Disk Drive. …
  5. Right-click on the necessary drive and click Properties.
  6. Click the Settings tab.
  7. Select the DMA option.

How do I fix my CD drive not reading?

HP PCs – CD/DVD Drive Cannot Read Discs (Windows 10,

  1. Step 1: Confirm if the disc is causing the issue. …
  2. Step 2: Run the Hardware and Devices troubleshooter. …
  3. Step 3: Test the drive for a hardware failure. …
  4. Step 4: Check the drive status in Device Manager. …
  5. Step 5: Enable AutoPlay. …
  6. Step 6: Restore the PC to an earlier state.

How do I connect my CD drive to my computer?

How to Install a CD/DVD Drive in a PC

  1. Power down the PC completely. …
  2. Open the computer to install the CD or DVD drive. …
  3. Remove the drive slot cover. …
  4. Set the IDE drive mode. …
  5. Place the CD/DVD drive into the computer. …
  6. Attach the internal audio cable. …
  7. Attach the CD/DVD drive to the computer using an IDE cable.

What is the best external DVD drive?

The Best External DVD Drives

  • LG 8X Multi Ultra Slim GP65NB60. Connectivity. USB 2.0. DVD Support. DVD/CD. …
  • USB 2.0 Pick. Asus ZenDrive. Connectivity. USB 2.0. DVD Support. …
  • Blu-Ray Pick. Pioneer BDR-XD05B. Connectivity. USB 3.0. DVD Support. …
  • Dell Pick. Dell DW316. Connectivity. USB 2.0. …
  • MAC Pick. Apple USB SuperDrive. Connectivity. USB 2.0.

How do I install CD drivers on Windows 10?

Open the file to start installation.

  1. Insert the disc into your PC, and then follow the instructions on your screen. You might be asked for an admin password.
  2. If install doesn’t start automatically, check your AutoPlay settings. …
  3. You can also choose AutoPlay defaults for removable drives and memory cards.

Can’t find DVD CD ROM drives in Device Manager?

Try this – Control Panel – Device Manager – CD/DVD – double click the device – Driver’s Tab -click Update Drivers (this will likely do nothing) – then RIGHT CLICK the drive – UNINSTALL – REBOOT this will refresh the default driver stack. Even if drive is not shown continue below.

Laptops With Cd Dvd Drive – Best Buy

6 Best Laptops with CD Drive in 2021 [Buyer’s Guide .

Best Laptops with CD/DVD Drive to Buy in 2020 – iAnyShare

Well, if you don’t have a working CD/DVD player at home there’s not much choice. You could get a laptop with a CD/DVD drive. But the chances of finding one that plays discs are next to impossible in 2020. So, how do you start your search for the best laptops with CD/DVD Drive in 2020?

Explore external CD drives for laptops | Amazon.com

Minutes can hang like hours. What would help is some entertainment to pass the time. A laptop DVD unit can provide that. Laptop DVD players, DVD drivers for laptops, and laptops with a CD/DVD drive can play movies, TV shows, or other enjoyable content.

How do I play or burn a CD/DVD if my computer doesn’t have .

Answer: Modern computers, especially laptops, rarely come with an optical drive, such as a CD or DVD player. So is it possible to play or burn CDs and DVDs if your computer doesn’t have a CD or DVD drive? Yes. But you still need an optical drive. The easiest way to play or burn CD/DVD discs is to buy an external optical drive.

How Do I Install Software from a CD When My Laptop Lacks a .

First, you can buy or borrow an external drive. A quick check of Ebay reveals tons of USB DVD burners selling for $20-40. Might be a handy item to have on hand.

Windows 10 Won’t Recognize CD Drive: Problem Solved

If you open the Device Manager/Disk Management to check and can not find the CD drive connected to PC, you should consider there are problems with the driver. It may be out of date. In this case, you should update the drivers to the latest version and see whether your CD drive can be recognized. Three: Windows 10 CD drive access denied.

Best Laptops With DVD/ CD Drives – 2021 Reviews

The optical drive is a DVD-RW, which is plenty capable. You will be hard-pressed to find a better laptop with a CD drive in the budget market than the HP Flyer Red. It packs enough horsepower to be the main household laptop, all at an affordable …

HP Notebook PCs – Installing Software from Discs Without a .

Insert the software CD into the CD/DVD drive. In Windows Vista, click Start, Computer, and then double-click the CD/DVD drive. In Windows XP, click Start, My Computer, and then double-click the CD/DVD drive. Select all files and folders, then right-click and select Copy.

CD/DVD Drives – Walmart.com

Shop for CD/DVD Drives in Blank Media. Buy products such as Lychee External CD DVD Drive USB 3.0 High Speed Data Transfer Combo Drive Rewriter Burner (Black) at Walmart and save.

How to Share CD & DVD Drives Over the Network on Windows

From ultrabooks to netbooks, computers are shedding their optical drives. If you still use an occasional CD or DVD, you don’t have to buy an external optical drive – you can share another computer’s optical drive over the network. The two computers must be on the same local network to share an optical drive.

Amazon.ca: external cd/dvd drive for laptop

External DVD Drive, USB3.0/Type-C DVD CD ROM +/-RW Player for Laptop, Optical Disk Burner with 2 USB3.0 Port, SD/TF Port, Micro USB Type C Cord for PC …

Installing on a Computer with No CD Drive | Articles .

Copy the CD files to a USB flash drive. Insert the CD into any computer that has a CD/DVD-ROM drive. Cancel the installation if it starts. Open a File Explorer window. (Hold down Windows key on your keyboard and click the E key, bring up File Explorer.) Right-click the CD/DVD ROM drive and choose Open or Explore. You should be able to see all the files and folders on the CD.

Installing software to a Computer with no CD drive .

You can share a CD drive on another machine and install it over the network. Or you can copy the files from the CD to a USB drive and install it that way. You don’t have to use the CD. Another option would be to download the software directly from the …

Amazon.co.uk: external cd dvd drive for laptop

Rioddas External CD Drive, USB 3.0 Portable CD/DVD +/-Rw Drive Slim Dvd/CD Rom Rewriter Burner For Laptop Desktop Pc Windows 10/8/XP Apple Mac Macbook Pro 4.3 out of 5 stars 8,037 £24.99 £ 24 . 99 £33.99 £33.99

How can i open the DVD, BluRay or CD drive in Windows 10 .

Resolving the problem of a CD / DVD-ROM drive in Windows 10, the Troubleshooting in Windows 10 for computer problems , Hardware and Sound, see the section Device Configuration . If non methods help, you should revert to the previous version of the operating system, or use a Windows 10 recovery point where all devices worked stably.

5 Best External CD/DVD Drives Reviews of 2021 .

Since you can connect the unit to both a laptop and a desktop PC the cable is made twice as long as most of the external CD drives on the market. Its length is 60 cm (23.6 inches), so you can connect it to a desktop with ease. Also, you are welcome to take the DW316 on business trips due to its lightweight and detachable power cable design.

How to fix a CD-ROM, DVD, or disc drive . – Computer Hope

Click or double-click the System icon. In Windows XP and earlier, click the Hardware tab and then the Device Manager button. In Windows Vista and later, click the Device Manager link on the left side of the System window. Within Device Manager, verify …

how to: Re-enable CD/ROM drive – Microsoft Community

process which solves the issue. Try this – Control Panel – Device Manager – CD/DVD – double click the device – Driver’s Tab – click Update Drivers (this will likely do nothing) – then RIGHT CLICK the drive – UNINSTALL – REBOOT this will refresh the default driver stack.

The Best External CD/DVD Drives in 2021 – The Tech Lounge

External DVD drive is a great solution if you own a netbook or your PC has a broken built-in DVD drive. The best external DVD and CD drives are compact and lightweight, so they won’t take much space in your bag but will be a great bonus for your 2-in-1 laptop or gaming PC. How to Choose The Best External DVD Drive

Not all computers have a CD, DVD, or Blu-ray drive. If you have a computer with Windows 10, you can also use another PC via the network share without additional software. We’ll show you how this works on this guide.

Share the DVD drive on the network

Nowadays they mostly get the newest Laptops Supplied without a CD, DVD drive. The USB-Stick practically replaced the drives on the computer. However, there may still be times when you want to transfer data from a CD or DVD drive to your computer.

One possibility is to use an external drive that is connected to the USB port can be connected to the computer.

However, if you do not have an external drive, you can use a computer with a CD,
Share this DVD or Blu-ray drive in the network and use it with all existing PCs.

Share DVD drive in Windows 10 in the network

In order for you to be able to access the DVD drive from the other PCs, it must first be released in the network. To do this, do the following:

1. Start the Windows Explorer z. B. with the key combination Windows + E.
2. Click on “This PC” so that all connected drives are displayed.
3. Make a right click on the DVD drive and selects in the selection menu “Properties” File
4. In the opened window, click at the top “Release” and then click the button “Advanced Sharing…”.
5. Check the box next to “This one folder release ”.
6. Assign a name for the share.
7. One click on OK the share is set up and that Drive is available in the network.

As of now, the link is the properties of the network path. We need it on the computer without a drive that can access it. Example: In our example: \\ Home-pc \ dvd

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

CD drive over the network

When you are done sharing the drive, restart the computer that does not have a drive.

Connect the DVD drive to another computer via the network, this is how it works:

1. Start the Windows Explorer z. B. with the key combination Windows + E.
2. Click on “This PC”.
3. At the top, click “Connect network drive”.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

4. Select a drive letter in the small open window.
5. In the “Folder” field, enter the Network path one from the computer who shared the drive.

In our example: \\ Home-pc \ dvd

click on “Complete”.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

You will be asked to provide your login details. Here you have to enter the data from the computer where the drive is installed.

From now on, the CD DVD or Blu-ray drive will appear in Explorer from Windows 10 displayed. It is important to know that the speed of data transmission depends on the network value.

When sharing doesn’t work

If Windows 10 cannot find the drive in the network then file sharing is disabled. To do this, do the following:

  1. Opens the Control Panel. The easiest way to do this is to press the key combination [Windows key] + [X].
  2. Click at Network and internet on View network status and tasks.
  3. Click on the left Change advanced sharing settings.
  4. Click on news Profile.
  5. Under Network Discovery choose you Turn on network discovery File
  6. The File and printer sharing you choose the option Enable file and printer sharing.
  7. Finally click on Save Changes.

Get full access to Windows 8.1: The Missing Manual and 60K+ other titles, with free 10-day trial of O’Reilly.

There’s also live online events, interactive content, certification prep materials, and more.

Clearly, the computer industry thinks the DVD is going away. More and more people rent movies by streaming them from the Internet instead of renting a disc. More and more software comes as a download instead of on a CD or a DVD. And more and more, new laptop models (not to mention tablets) don’t even come with DVD drives.

How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Figure 27-13. Here’s the procedure for sharing your DVD drive so that it appears in the Computer windows of other machines on the network. Top: In the Computer window, right-click the DVD drive and share it. Bottom left: Click Advanced Sharing. Bottom right: Share the drive and name it.

But discs aren’t completely dead. Sooner or later, you might wind up wishing you had a DVD drive in your tablet or superthin laptop.

Fortunately, there’s a workaround. If another Windows PC on your network has a DVD drive, you can share it over the network so that it appears on the screen of your laptop or tablet. Here’s how to do it (follow along in Figure 27-13):

On the PC with the Drive

In the Computer window (press +E), right-click the DVD drive; from the shortcut menu, choose “Share with”→“Advanced sharing” (Figure 27-13, top) .

You’ve just opened the DVD drive’s Properties box, already on the Sharing tab (Figure 27-13, bottom left).

Click Advanced Sharing .

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How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

Related

  • How to Network With a Virtual PC
  • How to Access Seagate GPT Protective
  • How to Ping a Computer Behind a Router
  • Syncing On HomeGroup
  • How to Use a Printer With Two Computers Without a Router

When it comes to computer problems in the office, Murphy’s Law often applies – PCs fail when you need them most. If you attempt to install an application from a CD, and the computer does not recognize the disc, the media could just be defective. If you’re sure the disc is okay, replacing the optical drive in a desktop PC is not too difficult. However, if you don’t have time to replace a faulty CD/DVD drive, you can use network sharing or a portable storage device to install the program from the disc.

Use Network CD Drive

Go to another computer connected to the same network router as the PC with the defective CD/DVD drive. Insert the installation disc with the data you need into the optical drive of the second computer. If the AutoPlay window opens, close it.

Press “Windows-E” to open a new File Explorer window. Click “Computer” in the navigation pane.

Right-click the drive letter of the CD/DVD drive, and then click “Properties.” Click the “Sharing” tab.

Click the “Advanced Sharing” button. Enable the “Share this Folder” option in the Advanced Sharing window, and then click “Permissions.”

Select the “Everyone” option in the Groups or User Names list, and then enable the “Full Control,” “Change” and “Read” options under the Allow header. Click the “OK” button to close the Permissions window.

Click “Apply,” then “OK” in the Advanced Sharing window. Click “Apply,” then “Close” in the Properties window for the CD/DVD drive.

Go to the computer with the defective optical drive. Press “Windows+E” to open File Explorer, and then click “Network” in the navigation pane. Wait a few seconds for computers on the local network to appear in the Network folder.

Double-click the network name of the computer in which you inserted the optical disc. After you double-click the name of the computer, File Explorer displays the shared drives, folders and devices on the computer. Double-click the drive letter of the optical drive on the remote computer.

Double-click the “Setup.exe” or “Install.exe” file on the remote optical disc, and then follow the prompts to install the program normally. Alternatively, copy files from the disc in File Explorer just as you would from a local drive or disc.

USB Flash Drive

Go to a computer with a working CD/DVD drive. Insert the disc into the optical drive and close the AutoPlay window if it appears.

Plug the USB flash drive into an empty USB port on the computer. Wait a few seconds for Windows to detect the flash drive and initialize it.

Press “Windows+E” to open File Explorer. Click “Computer” in the navigation pane, and then select the drive letter of the CD/DVD drive. Right-click the drive CD/DVD drive letter, and then click “Open.”

Press “Ctrl+A” to select all of the files and folders on the disc. Press “Ctrl+C” to copy all of the files and folders to the Windows Clipboard.

Click “Computer” in the navigation pane again. Double-click the drive letter of the USB flash drive in the File Explorer window. Press “Ctrl+V” to copy all of the files and folder from the optical disc to the flash drive.

Remove the USB flash drive and connect it to the computer with the defective optical drive. Open File Explorer run the “Setup.exe” or “Install.exe” file from the flash drive just as you would from an optical disc. Alternatively, copy needed data from the USB flash drive to a folder on the PC.

  • Ask Leo!: Can I Just Copy an Install CD to a USB Device and Use It That Way?
  • Computer Hope: How Do I Copy Files?
  • PCWorld: How to Use Windows 8’s Cool New File-Copy Feature
  • Computer Active: How Can I Download Drivers for Laptop if I Can’t Get Online?
  • Microsoft Windows: Tips for Fixing Common Driver Problems
  • PC Advisor: How to Use Windows 8’s New File Explorer
  • TechRepublic: Windows 8 – New File Explorer Features
  • The installation or file transfer may take a little longer than normal when using the CD/DVD drive in a network computer. Nevertheless, the process should complete relatively quickly over a wired network connection. Wireless network connections may cause significantly slower transfer rates.
  • You cannot run installation routines for operating systems or other applications that require boot files from a USB drive simply by copying them from a disc. When you copy and paste data from disc to a USB flash drive, the process only copies the files and folders – not the boot image. Nevertheless, you can use the copy and paste process to transfer virtually all “non-boot” images from disc to a flash drive successfully.

Jeff Grundy has been writing computer-related articles and tutorials since 1995. Since that time, Grundy has written many guides to using various applications that are published on numerous how-to and tutorial sites. Born and raised in South Georgia, Grundy holds a Master of Science degree in mathematics from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

–> share-line

–> –> –> –> plus

You can use VMware Remote Console to add and manage CD/DVD drives on your virtual machine.

Procedure

  1. Access the target virtual machine in VMware Remote Console .
  2. If you want to configure a new CD/DVD drive, add it to your virtual machine.
  1. Open the virtual machine settings in VMware Remote Console .
    • On Windows, select VMRC > Manage > Virtual Machine Settings .
    • On Linux, select Virtual Machine > Virtual Machine Settings .
  2. Open the Hardware tab and click Add .
  3. Select CD/DVD Drive and click Finish .
  • Open the settings for the target CD/DVD drive.
    • On Windows or Linux, open the Hardware tab and select the desired CD/DVD drive.
    • On macOS, select the desired CD/DVD drive under Removable Devices .
  • Specify connection settings for the drive.
    • To connect the drive immediately, select Connected (Windows or Linux) or Connect CD/DVD Drive (macOS).
    • To connect the drive each time the virtual machine is powered on, select Connect at power on .
  • Select whether the drive connects to a drive or image on your local machine or on the remote server.
  • Select the desired disk drive or disk image.
  • What to do next

    If you no longer need a configured CD/DVD drive, you can remove it from the virtual machine.

    • On Windows or Linux, select the target CD/DVD drive and click Remove .
    • On macOS, power off the virtual machine. Select the target CD/DVD drive and click Remove CD/DVD Drive .

    One of the things I missed the most when I replaced my late 2012 MacBook Pro with my brand new MacBook Pro is the optical drive. I didn’t really use it that often, but I did use it, and I knew I’d miss it. Yes, an external CD/DVD drive works just fine and iCloud (as well as other cloud-based services) have made it easy to transfer files digitally. But in a pinch, you might just want to access files from a disc on another computer.

    This is where Remote Disc comes in. It’s a Mac feature that lets you view and access files on a Mac or PC with an optical drive from a Mac that doesn’t have one. Here’s how to set up and use it.

    The minimum requirements

    Most importantly, the Mac you are trying to access a Remote Disc from can’t have a built-in optical drive. If it does, you just won’t see Remote Disc as an option in Finder.

    The disc you are trying to access must also support Remote Disc. Remote Disc does not support certain types of media, mainly copy-protected media like movies and music. You can’t access audio CDs, Blu-ray or DVD movies, copy-protected games, recordable CDs or DVDs that you want to burn or erase, and Microsoft installation discs.

    How to set up Remote Sharing on Mac

    From one Mac to another, Remote Disc is just about as simple as can be. It’s just a matter of ticking a box in your System Preferences.

      On the Mac with an optical drive, click on the Apple Menu icon.

    Launch System Preferences.

    Tick the box for DVD or CD Sharing.

    To protect your content, tick the box for Ask me before allowing others to use my DVD Drive.

    When DVD or CD sharing is on, a green light will appear on the Sharing page.

    How to set up Remote Sharing on Windows PC

    Sharing your CD or DVD drive from a PC is not any harder than sharing from a Mac, but you do have to install some additional software first.

    1. Download and install Apple’s DVD or CD Sharing software onto the PC.
    2. Open your PC’s Control Panel.
    3. Click on Hardware and Sound.
    4. Click on DVD or SD Sharing Options.
    5. Tick the box for DVD or CD Sharing.
    6. To protect your content, tick the box for Ask me before allowing others to use my DVD Drive.

    If your PC has firewall software in place, add ODSAgent and RemoteInstallMacOSX to the programs that your firewall will allow.

    How to access files from a Remote Disc on your Mac

    Once you’ve enabled Remote Disc on either a Mac or a PC with an optical drive, you can access it in Finder on your Mac.

      Open a Finder window on the Mac without an optical drive.

    Scroll down the sidebar menu and select Remote Disc under Devices.

    Click Connect or Ask to Use in the upper left corner of the Finder window.

    If you have enabled the requirement to ask first, go back to the computer with the optical drive and click Accept.

    After you’ve connected to the computer with the optical drive, you’ll see the files in the CD or DVD. Double click on a file to open it or drag the file to your desktop to save a copy.

    How to disconnect your Mac from the Remote Disc on another computer

    When you’re finished getting what you need from the CD or DVD on the computer with the optical drive, you can disconnect from it by clicking on Disconnect in the upper left corner of the Finder window.

    If you don’t see the Disconnect button in Finder, you can click on the Eject button next to Remote Disc in the sidebar of the Finder window.

    You can also simply eject the CD or DVD from the computer with the optical drive. You will be prompted to confirm that you want to remove the disc.

    Any questions?

    Do you have any questions about accessing a Remote Disc on your Mac? Put them in the comments and I’ll help you out.

    Updated February 2018: Rewrote for macOS High Sierra.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Optical media is a dying format, thanks largely in part to services such as iTunes and the App Store, so it’s no surprise that Apple has been slowing phasing out a built-in drive from their Mac lineup, leaving just the entry-level 13″ MacBook Pro unchanged.

    While OS X is compatible with a wide range of USB optical drives (including Apple’s own USB SuperDrive), it includes a built-in feature that allows it to share the optical drive of another Mac or PC on the same network, called Remote Disc.

    A History of Remote Disc

    When the original MacBook Air launched in 2008, it was the first Mac in over a decade designed without a built-in optical drive. Although the launch was only six years ago, neither the App Store or Mac App Store existed, and software was still most commonly distributed on CDs and DVDs.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    For MacBook Air owners wanting to still install software from CDs and DVDs, many of whom need a way of installing Microsoft Office, Apple introduced a Remote Disc, providing local network access to another Mac or PC’s optical drive.

    Limitations

    Despite it’s supposed versatility, Remote Disc is rather limited. It can only really be used with data CDs and DVDs, such as software installers. The feature doesn’t support audio CDs, video DVDs, OS installations and games that require constant disc access. Writing to CDs and DVDs is also not possible. To avoid these limitations, a USB optical drive would be needed.

    Prerequisites

    Remote Disc hasn’t really changed since it was introduced, requiring at least Mac OS X 10.4.11 or above on the host Mac that’s equipped with an optical drive. Indeed, the Windows software that provides this functionality from a PC hasn’t even been updated since it was released, still sitting at v1.0.

    If your Mac lacks a built-in optical drive as standard, Remote Disc will be available for you to use.

    Setting Up Remote Disc

    Remote Disc is rather straightforward to set up and, once configured, can be left on for continued access. It’s important to note that Remote Disc isn’t secure, data is not encrypted when transmitted over the network and access control is done by requesting permission.

    Host Mac

    To enable Remote Disc on your host Mac, open System Preferences and select Sharing.

    Provided your Mac has either a built-in optical drive or an external one attached, the option DVD or CD Sharing will be the first in the list of sharing services that OS X can provide. Enabling it will provide access to your Mac’s optical drive over the local network.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    As you’ve probably noticed, the Mac I’m using as a host is a MacBook Air. This simply has a USB optical drive attached, allowing Remote Disc functionality.

    As far as controlling access to your Mac’s optical drive, you have the choice of requiring a remote user to ask for permission before accessing the optical drive. If you have a number of drive-less Macs within the home and a SuperDrive-equipped iMac, it makes sense to not need permission. For more public networks or work environments, requesting permission is advisable. For the purposes of this guide, enable the option so that our remote user needs to ask permission before using the optical drive.

    Host PC

    Nearly half of all Mac users are new to the platform, having switched to the Mac from a Windows PC. Providing the ability for new Mac users to be able to use their PC’s optical drive is a smart way of ensuring that their transition is as seamless as possible.

    To enable Remote Disc within Windows XP SP2 or above, you’ll need to install the DVD or CD Sharing Update 1.0 for Windows.

    Although the system requirements state it is compatible with either Windows XP or Vista, it is compatible with Windows 7 and 8.

    Once the software is installed, launch DVD or CD Sharing from the Start Menu (or wherever the heck Windows 8 puts it). You’ll see the same options that OS X provides, simply enabling or disabling the service and an option for requiring permission.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    One common misconception is that, as Windows PCs cannot access files on a Mac-formatted drive, the same applies to a Mac software CD or DVD. This isn’t the case and Windows can happily read Mac CDs or DVDs as both OS X and Windows use the same common filesystem for structuring data on an optical disc.

    Remote Mac

    Now that the service is enabled, we can now remotely access our host Mac’s optical drive.

    Your remote Mac should display an option within a Finder window’s sidebar, under Devices, labelled Remote Disc. Ensure both Macs are running on the same local network and then select it.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    As Remote Disc broadcasts its availability over the network, the host Mac should be seen within the window. Since it is also available on a Windows PC on the local network, it too will be displayed.

    Double-click the Mac and, if you enabled the option to require permission before using, click the Ask to use. button.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    A dialog box will appear on the host Mac detailing the user and Mac that is requesting permission to access its optical drive, giving you the ability to deny or allow access.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    The same dialog box also appears when the request is sent to a Windows PC.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    After clicking Accept, the remote Mac can now access the CD we have in the host computer’s drive and will allow us to install software or copy files from the inserted disc.

    Wrapping Up

    Back when Remote Disc was introduced, it served a genuinely useful need that meant new MacBook Air owners could rest easy, knowing they could install software residing on DVDs with some degree of ease.

    Nowadays, Remote Disc is likely a feature of OS X you’ll never need to use, though it’s certainly useful to have in the event that you may need to copy files or install some software from an optical disc.

    But 3rd-party USB optical drives are so cheap that it’s worth purchasing one just to have handy. As OS X natively supports USB optical drives, there really isn’t any point in purchasing the Apple USB SuperDrive for anything other than aesthetic reasons. It’s oddly limited to being compatible with Macs that don’t feature a built-in optical drive, meaning it cannot be used on other Macs, such as ones with a broken SuperDrive, or PCs.

    I personally own a Samsung 8x USB DVD Writer that costs less than $30 and, although I’ve used it only a handful of times, it has been for uses where Remote Disc just wasn’t an option. It’s also far more versatile than Apple’s own.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    The biggest drawback of the otherwise great Mac Mini (and indeed some other Apple Macs, especially the laptops) is they come with no optical drive. This is not usually a problem, as most things install quickly over the Internet. But what if you sometimes need an optical drive? What if you want to turn your DVD collection into MP4 files on a hard drive instead of discs on a shelf or you need to rip your music CDs into iTunes?

    You could just buy an external optical drive, but if you already have a desktop or laptop PC (or access to a friend’s), you can just share the drive on the PC over the network and leech files from it. This saves you money, and to be honest, it’s fun to do. Obviously there are limitations to this approach, but for emergencies, it’s good to know.

    Why a PC? Well, statistically it’s more likely in an emergency that you’ll be able to find a friend who has a Windows PC than one who has a Mac. And also a person with a Mac might not have an optical drive either, so you’d be back to square one.

    In this article we cover sharing and connecting to another computer’s optical drive to copy files to the Mac Mini. Do note that this applies to all other Macs as well.

    Share PC Drive

    If the target computer is on the network, in order to access the drive, you first have to make sure that sharing is enabled for that drive.

    On the PC, open Windows Explorer. Find the optical drive and right-click on it. Choose “Share with -> Advanced Sharing” from the drop-down menu.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Or click Properties, then the Sharing Tab, and click the Advanced Sharing button under your DVD/CD drive.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Tick the checkbox marked “Share This Folder” and give it a name so you can identify it on the network. Click Add and name it.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Now this drive is being shared on the network.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Click okay, and the PC part of it is done.

    Link to Drive from Mac

    Once the drive is shared on the PC, you are ready to go back to the Mac and load the optical drive in the Finder.

    In Finder, choose the menu item “Go -> Connect to Server.”

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Click Browse and you will see a list of shared folders on your network.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Locate the name of your shared folder, the DVD drive on the PC, and double-click it. You will then be presented with a window, and at the top of it it gives you the option to “Connect As.”

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Click the button and type in the user name and password from the target PC.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Once that is done, you will see the DVD drive on the target PC.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Once you’re in, there are a variety of things you can do:

    • You can copy files by dragging them from the PC directory to the Mac file system, either into a folder or onto the desktop.
    • You can use open-source DVD ripping software like Handbrake to burn movies as MP4s onto your Mac. Load your DVD in the PC drive, and go to it on the Mac.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    While you could point Handbrake at the drive directly and rip it from there, the connection can be slow, especially if both the PC and the Mac are using WiFi for network connectivity.

    For speed, the best option is to copy the “VIDEO_TS” folder from the PC DVD over to a directory on the Mac and then operate Handbrake on the files locally on the Mac. Sometimes the copy protection won’t let you do that, but it’s worth a try.

    Installing from the DVD probably won’t work. The PC can’t read data DVDs meant for a Mac; it can’t mount the file system. The same goes for dual system DVDs which are partitioned for both Mac and PC; you can see the DVD with the Mac over the network, but you will only see the PC partition. So, in real terms, it’s mostly not possible to install anything.

    That said, if you need to get software from a PC data DVD to load into Wine or other PC software emulation on the Mac, then that would work.

    Conclusion

    So there you have it, borrowing a DVD drive from a PC to copy things to your “optically-challenged” Mac.

    If you enjoyed this article or have any questions, please let us know in the comments below.

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    Phil South has been writing about tech subjects for over 30 years. Starting out with Your Sinclair magazine in the 80s, and then MacUser and Computer Shopper. He’s designed user interfaces for groundbreaking music software, been the technical editor on film making and visual effects books for Elsevier, and helped create the MTE YouTube Channel. He lives and works in South Wales, UK.

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    Rip from networked / shared CD-ROM ?

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    Rip from networked / shared CD-ROM ?

    Post by Overzeetop » Fri Jan 01, 2010 3:54 pm

    I’ve got a netbook, and wanted to try and rip some CDs to it via MM. It’s a full Win7 environment, all 64 bit. Home Premium on the “server” which has the DVD-RW drive and Pro on the netbook. I’ve shared the drive with read/write access, but MM doesn’t recognize it as a CD drive that can be ripped. I also can’t play the CD files.

    Any suggestions on how to make this work?

    Just to head off the “rip the discs on the server”. the netbook is my 7 year old’s computer. I’d like her to rip her music herself, onto her PC. The server is in a closet, and the DVD drive which is shared is a USB drive that sits in the playroom. For a variety of reasons, I’d rather have her work almost exclusively on her netbook for this.

    Re: Rip from networked / shared CD-ROM ?

    Post by Teknojnky » Fri Jan 01, 2010 6:35 pm

    its not possible to use cd-roms like this.

    when you share the drive on your pc, it does not show up as a cd on remote computers, it shows up as a regular folder.

    the only possible way to do what you want is to find some type of client/server remote cd mounting software. That will mount a fake ‘virtual’ cd on the netbook and connect to the cd server and make it appear as a real local cd rom.

    your other option is to plug the usb cdrom (the existing, or buy a new one) into the netbook directly.

    Re: Rip from networked / shared CD-ROM ?

    Post by Overzeetop » Fri Jan 01, 2010 10:35 pm

    Re: Rip from networked / shared CD-ROM ?

    Post by RickMM » Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:37 pm

    I know this is an old post but I’m wondering if this issue is still an limitation with WWM?

    On my home network I have 2 PCs. I want to speed up the ripping process by using another optical drive. I have a spare internal optical drive on computer B that I want to ‘share’ with Computer A which has WWM installed. Can I ‘share’ the optical drive on PC B and use it to rip CDs to PC A using WWM (installed on PC A)?

    Re: Rip from networked / shared CD-ROM ?

    Post by dtsig » Mon Jul 08, 2019 10:14 am

    Not affiliated with MediaMonkey . just a RABID user/lover
    DTSig

    Re: Rip from networked / shared CD-ROM ?

    Post by RickMM » Wed Jul 10, 2019 6:13 pm

    Re: Rip from networked / shared CD-ROM ?

    Post by Peke » Wed Jul 10, 2019 7:27 pm

    Hi,
    Removable drives share is difficult at least and in case of CD-Rome where direct Stream Access is needed thru ASPI layer it is not possible.

    Theoretically it would be possible thru full Virtualization where custom Virtual CD-ROM driver (Both Server and Client side) would be made and you would be able to assign there still it would be very difficult to maintain and too much factors would be involved.

    Re: Rip from networked / shared CD-ROM ?

    Post by RickMM » Wed Jul 10, 2019 7:42 pm

    Thanks Peke. It’s not worth the hassle.

    I have moved onto plan ‘B’ ie install a free copy of MMW onto PC B and rip away onto PC B’s HDD. Then copy over the flac files to PC A where my ‘master’ MMW install resides and then rescan for the copied folders/files. With 2 CD drives in operation I’m hoping to half the time I need to rip my collection.

    Re: Rip from networked / shared CD-ROM ?

    Post by Peke » Wed Jul 10, 2019 9:35 pm

    Hi,
    Why You moved your FLAC files over to new PC.

    Here what I would do:
    1. Install MMW Portable on PC A at C:\MMWPortable
    2. Copied MM.DB from c:\User\[USERNAME]\AppData\Roaming\MediaMonkey\MM.DB to c:\MMWPortable\Portable\MM.DB
    3. Made sure that files are playable.
    4. Copied whole folder C:\MMWPortable to USB Drive (Note Files are still on HDD of PC A)
    5. Plug it in PC B
    6. Copied fole \MMWPortable from USB to PC B c:\MMWPortable
    7. Started c:\MMWPortable\MediaMonkey.exe
    8. As I have two Drives I would Added 10-20 CD in MMW library (File -> Add rescan to library on inserted CD)
    9. Made Sure that few CDs have correct basic Metadata
    10. Set RIP Path to “c:\RIP CDs\\[ ] \. ”
    11. Start Ripping CDs and while CDs Ripping correcting Metadata for the rest of CDs I added into Library
    12. When Added CDs goes below 5, while Ripping I would Use Second Drive to add another 10 in Library and remove Those I already Ripped
    13. Repeat 8-12 till All CDs are ripped

    I have done that using 3 CD-Roms on 600+ CDs and after I got the hand of it I estimated that I saving 5-10 Minutes per CD RIP and My metadata were much more accurate, also I could Stop anytime and continue without worry.

    After all is done then only thing I would Need is to:
    1. copy MM.DB and FILES from PC B to PC A (I would Move whole c:\RIP CDs\ not changing any structure)
    2. Select ALL Files under \RIP CDs\ In my library
    3. File -> Locate Moved/missing tracks and Pointed to just copied C:\RIP CDs from PC B
    4. MMW should find all files -> OK to update location
    5. All is there.

    One user that RIPPED 2k+ of CDs told me that this approach as appearing slower on start, but in the end according to him it saved him weeks.

    Microsoft neutered Windows Media Player in Windows 10 so it won’t play DVDs unless you pay up. But you have a few options. Here’s how to get your own Windows DVD player.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Video-streaming services are all the rage, but many of us still have pretty hefty DVD collections. Unfortunately, if you pop a DVD into your Windows 10 computer, you may bump into trouble because Windows 10 Media Player doesn’t support regular DVDs. So how can you play your favorite discs in Windows 10?

    Don’t panic. You have a few options. Several PC brands bundle in multimedia software through which you can play a DVD, though sometimes these products are limited in nature. Microsoft offers a Windows DVD Player app, but it costs $15 and has generated a number of poor reviews. A better option lies in free, third-party programs. Products like VLC Media Player, 5KPlayer, Kodi, Daum’s Pot Player, and Leawo Blu-ray Player can play your DVDs with little muss or fuss. Let’s look at your options.

    Microsoft’s Windows DVD Player

    The Windows DVD Player app sold in the Microsoft Store is a barebones affair, but it works (at least most of the time). You may first want to check out the seven-day trial version. To do this, click the ellipsis next to the Buy button and select Free Trial. However, this free version won’t actually play DVDs, rather it simply tells you if it’s compatible with your PC’s built-in DVD player.

    You’ll notice from the reviews that Microsoft’s DVD Player doesn’t get stellar grades; it has an average three out of five stars. Many people complain that the app doesn’t work right or consistently. Others gripe about spending $15 for an app they feel should be free.

    If you decide to open your wallet, download and launch the app. Insert a DVD into your drive and click Play. You’ll have access to the usual array of commands, including Play, Pause, Stop, Fast Forward, Rewind, Control Volume, and Resize Screen.

    VLC Media Player

    Developed by the folks at VideoLAN, VLC Media Player is a versatile multimedia player; it can play music and videos stored on your PC or home network, as well as DVDs, CDs, and Blu-ray discs. VLC Media Player is free, though you can always donate some funds to its development.

    First, download and install the software from the VideoLAN VLC Media Player website. Launch VLC Media Player, insert a DVD, and it should rev up automatically. If not, click Media > Open Disc > DVD, then click the play button. You’ll find a full range of buttons to control playback.

    PCMag-Recommended Windows Accessories

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    5KPlayer

    5KPlayer can play high-def videos, DVDs, and even online radio stations. A built-in Apple AirPlay feature lets you stream audio and video from your iPhone. You can also snag videos from YouTube and other streaming services.

    Download and install 5KPlayer, then launch the software. You are asked to register by entering your name and email address in order to freely download videos and tap into Apple’s AirPlay. Enter the registration code you receive by email, and you’re good to go.

    Pop a DVD in your drive and press the button for DVD. Click OK, and your DVD starts playing. Onscreen controls let you play, stop, jump ahead, skip behind, and change the volume. Yes, watching a DVD is as simple as that. But 5KPlayer is packed with so many other cool features that it’s truly a robust and resourceful multimedia player. This one’s a winner.

    A free and open-source program, Kodi is a multi-talented player that can handle stored videos, music, games, and DVDs. By attaching a personal video recorder to your computer, you can even access live TV and radio.

    On a Windows 10 PC, download and install Kodi from the program’s Download page or from the Microsoft Store.

    Insert your DVD and open Kodi. At the main screen, choose which type of media you want to play and where to access it. For a DVD, just click the option for Disc, and your movie or TV show should automatically rev up. If not, click the Play Disc button. By default, Kodi plays your DVD in full-screen mode, though you can change this through the program’s settings. Click the screen to display the control panel and you can pause, stop, resume, jump to the next scene, or go back to the previous scene.

    The program helpfully shows you the name of the DVD, elapsed and total time, the current time, and the time the video will finish if you watch it without stopping. After a few seconds, all that information fades away so you can enjoy your media in full-screen glory. Press the Esc button at any time to access Kodi’s main menu and settings. As one example, I wanted to change the default view from full screen to windowed, something I was able to do at the Display screen under Settings.

    Daum’s Pot Player

    A multimedia program from the folks at Daum, Pot Player can handle video, audio, DVDs, and Blu-rays, among other formats. The software even supports certain types of 3D glasses so you can immerse yourself in 3D videos. Download and install Pot Player from the website. Choose either the 32-bit or 64-bit flavor, depending on your version of Windows 10.

    Launch the program from its Start menu shortcut and insert your DVD. Click the hamburger icon and select Open > Open DVD to fire up your disc. You’ll find the usual onscreen buttons to control media playback and more.

    Leawo Blu-ray Player

    Leawo Blu-ray Player is a free and versatile media player that can handle content from Blu-ray discs, DVDs, folders, and ISO files. The program is simple to use. Just pop in the disc, and Leawo should automatically detect it. Click the icon for the disc to play it. You can play, pause, stop, go forward, go back, and even loop the video from your disc.

    A disc menu displays all the major titles and sections so you can jump to a specific one. You can also bounce back and forth between windowed mode and full-screen mode.

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    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Caitlin writes: I love, love love my new MacBook Air, but it only just dawned on me that it doesn’t have a DVD drive. Do I need to buy another piece of hardware to play/open a DVD?

    Hi Caitlin! Apple does, indeed, sell a so-called “SuperDrive” ($80) that’ll connect to your Air’s USB port, and there are also several third-party gadget manufacturers that offer MacBook-compatible CD/DVD optical drives for as little as $50.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    You can share a DVD drive on a Mac or PC with an optical drive-less Mac thanks to the Remote Disc feature.

    But here’s the thing: you don’t necessarily need to cough up more money just to access the occasional DVD- or CD-ROM.

    The MacBook Air (as well as other optical drive-less Macs, such as the Mac Mini and the new “retina” MacBooks) comes with a feature called “Remote Disc,” which lets you wirelessly borrow the optical drive of almost any nearby Mac or PC.

    If you want to share a Mac’s DVD drive, all you need to do is tweak a few settings. On the Windows side, you’ll need to download a small (and free) utility; once that’s done, though, the process is almost exactly the same as it is on a Mac.

    It’s a nifty, money-saving feature, but there are a few of downsides:

    • You can only access data CDs and DVDs that aren’t copy protected—in other words, no audio CDs or video DVDs, and no copy-protected game discs;
    • You can’t burn a DVD or CD;
    • Because Remote Disc works its magic over Wi-Fi, data transfers will be somewhat slower than they would over a USB-connected or built-in disk drive.

    So, ready to open a DVD with Remote Disc? Let’s get started…

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Just open the Sharing preferences panel to share your Mac’s DVD drive.

    With two Macs:

    • First, make sure your MacBook Air (or other drive-less Mac) and the Mac with the drive you’d like to share are both connected to the same local Wi-Fi network (like your home network).
    • On the Mac with the optical drive, click the Apple menu, select System Preferences, then click the Sharing icon.
    • Check the box marked “DVD or CD Sharing.” You may also want to check the box labeled “Ask before allowing others to use my DVD drive” if you’re sharing your drive over a public Wi-Fi network.
    • Now, go to your MacBook Air, open a new Finder window (click the desktop, then click File, New Finder Window), then find and click Remote Disc in the sidebar (you should see it under the Devices heading).
    • You should see a Mac icon labeled with a username (such as “benpatt,” in my case). Click the icon, and the name of any DVD or CD sitting in the remote Mac’s optical drive should appear.
    • Click the remote drive (you may have to click “Ask to use” if the “Ask before allowing others to use my DVD drive” setting is enabled), and voilà—the contents of the disc should pop into view. Go ahead and double-click or drag-and-drop files as you normally would.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Yep, the Mac’s Remote Disc feature works on Windows PCs, too.

    With a Mac and a PC:

    • Want to borrow the optical drive on a Windows PC? No problem. First, you’ll need to install Apple’s “DVD or CD Sharing Update for Windows”; just visit this page, click the blue Download button, then follow the instructions.
    • All set? Open the Windows Control Panel, click the Hardware and Sound heading, then click DVD or Sharing Options.
    • Check the box labeled “Enable DVD or CD Sharing” (and, optionally, the “Ask me before allowing others to use my DVD drive” setting).
    • Make sure both your PC and your Mac are connected to the same local Wi-Fi network, then insert a disk into your PC’s optical drive.
    • From here, you can follow the same steps as above (starting with the fourth step) to remotely access the DVD or CD in your PC’s optical drive from your Mac.

    Looking for more Mac tips? Click here!

    Finding this in a small, simple package has been much tougher than I ever imagined.

    Here’s what I need:
    I need to be able to place a CD-ROM drive for employee use as simple as possible–no computer, no nas towers, nothing complicated. Just a basic looking CD-ROM drive that someone can access without knowing what it’s connected to. I will be accessing this drive via a site-to-site vpn that’s already in place.

    I’ve looked at attaching a usb CD-ROM to a router usb port–seems like this isn’t supported.

    I’ve looked at attaching a usb CD-ROM to a USB NAS adapter–seems like these don’t support CD-ROMs.

    I’ve looked into USB extension devices so I can just remotely attach the drive locally–these devices require the usb device and system to be on the same subnet (can’t do this over vpn).

    The only thing I’ve found that seems to fit the bill is an old beast–the Axis StorPoint e100. You could connect either scsi or ide cd-rom drives to it and it seemed to work really well. But it’s hard to find one of these and it’s still going to require a full height 5.25″ enclosure as well.

    Any other ideas to this challenge? I thought something like this would be simpler these days.

    Copy the CD-ROM to a file share and call it a day?

    Can’t do that. Each day there’s a different CD to put in that drive. I need to access that data over the VPN so I can copy it to the share. All the user have the ability to do is change the cd (and even they screw this up every so often). Hence why it just needs to be a very basic ‘push the button, and put the cd in the drive’ type of operation from the user standpoint.

    Is there not a network solution out there? I’ve seen tons of threads in my searches of people looking for the same thing, but no solution. I’m hardly believing that a solution does not exist.

    Your “no computer” requirement is stupid.

    Buy a cheap mini-PC, plug a USB DVD drive into it, and share it. Done.

    Your “no computer” requirement is stupid.

    Buy a cheap mini-PC, plug a USB DVD drive into it, and share it. Done.

    Why do you need to access the data over the VPN? Have the (cheap, small) computer either make and ISO and upload it automatically or pull the files off when a new disk is inserted and send that to the network. A little scripting makes that very easy to do. You can even pop out the disk when done.

    I still don’t see anything the StorePoint can do that a simple workstation can’t.

    Why do you need to access the data over the VPN? Have the (cheap, small) computer either make and ISO and upload it automatically or pull the files off when a new disk is inserted and send that to the network. A little scripting makes that very easy to do. You can even pop out the disk when done.

    I still don’t see anything the StorePoint can do that a simple workstation can’t.

    Because I’m not on site and there’s no one I want messing around with a computer on site.

    I don’t need an ISO or anything fancy, just the files. But with all the point of sale gear and other inter-connected pci compliant systems there, I don’t want any rogue system thrown into the mix where someone could say, ‘Hey, that’s not compliant!’ even though it’s on a completely separate network. And I don’t want someone jacking around with it either (although I could take the kvm off of it and make it boot headless).

    I also don’t want the hassles of yet another system to manage with all the updates and crap. I just want a solid-state device that will work, day-in and day-out. Aside from the Axis unit, there’s a NAS that has the ability to share a usb-attached cd-rom, but it’s $200 and it’s way overkill since the drive bays would be sitting empty. Same for a full computer since it’s in the same price range.

    Ideally, a usb to nas adapter like the ones addonics makes would have been able to handle a cd-rom. Then this would have been super easy. I’ve searched quite a bit for a simple solution, and if someone else already has experience with one, I’d love to hear about it.

    The problem is that USB optical drives use SCSI Multi-Media Commands to communicate with the host. A full PC running a full OS will have all the drivers needed to send the commands and to mount the ISO9660 or UDF filesystem.

    The USB port on a consumer grade router is very far down on the feature list. The designers only put the bare minimum effort to support simple USB Mass Storage devices and the most popular filesystems. They are not going to put any effort into supporting archaic technologies such as optical media.

    Even if a designer wanted to offer this feature, the challenge is extreme. While you might only want to read the files off the disc, a consumer would expect the drive to be fully functional. This means playing copy-protected Blu-ray movies and writing to blank discs. I guess it might be theoretically possible using SCSI MMC commands to an iSCSI bridge connected optical drive. The client PC will need an iSCSI Initiator driver. There is no way a consumer grade router maker would consider something so complicated.

    From ultrabooks to netbooks, computers are shedding their optical drives. If you still use an occasional CD or DVD, you don’t have to buy an external optical drive – you can share another computer’s optical drive over the network.

    The two computers must be on the same local network to share an optical drive. This requires using the Advanced Sharing settings in Windows – there’s no easy, HomeGroup-style way of doing this.

    Sharing a Drive

    First, open the Computer window (click Start and select Computer) on the computer with the optical drive.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Right-click the drive you want to share, point to Share with and select Advanced Sharing

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Click the Advanced Sharing button in the properties window that appears.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    In the next window, enable the Share this folder checkbox. Type a descriptive name – such as “CD Drive” – for the share, and then click the Permissions button.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Ensure that the Everyone group has Read access to the drive. If you require additional security – for example, if you’re not using a home network — you can restrict access to specific users. Click OK to save your changes after configuring the permissions.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    You may want to disable password-protected sharing to make this easier, assuming you’re on a secure home network. To do so, click the Network and Sharing Center link under Password Protection.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Click the Home or Work header, scroll down, and select Turn off password protected sharing to disable it. Click the Save changes button after you’re done.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    After you click the OK button, your drive will be shared on the network. You’ll see its address under Network Path in the properties window.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    An icon over the drive indicates that it’s shared. To stop sharing the drive later, go back into its Advanced Sharing window and uncheck the Share this folder checkbox.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Mapping a Drive

    On your other computer, open Windows Explorer and click the Network option to view your network.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Browse to the share you created, then right-click it and select Map network drive.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    You can specify a drive letter for the shared optical drive and have it automatically become mapped each time you log in.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    The mapped drive will appear as its own drive letter in the My Computer window. Double-click the drive, or navigate to it in any application, to access its contents over the network.

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    Share DVD Movies to Devices/PC Over Network with One DVD Drive

    You also can copy DVD to hard drive on PC with DVD Drive and DVD Ripper. Then put the DVD backup onto sharing folder of Plex or NAS, Cloud Storage. Afterwards, you can play DVD movies on your PC, Tablet, Laptop, Netbook, NoteBook, iPad, iPhone, Samsung Galaxy Note 7, PS4, Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, etc.

    Now saying copy DVDs to hard drive, using DVD rip software is the best way to put DVDs to computer. Then we need to think about the question – how to rip DVDs to hard drive with DVD ripping software? Here we’d like to take – Pavtube BDMagic for example to introduce the steps.

    Pavtube BDMagic is a top-ranked DVD ripping software that facilitates ripping the content of a DVD to computer hard drive and converting to other popular video formats, such as rip DVD to MP4, AVI, WMV, FLV, MOV, MPEG1/2, etc.

    It offers powerful yet easy-to-use functions, excellent video/audio quality, and fast ripping speed. This DVD ripping software also has the ability to decrypt DVDs, remove copy preventions, and make disks unrestricted and region-free.

    Free download and install:

    How to Copy DVD to Hard Drive with Pavtube BDMagic?

    How to share cd & dvd drives over the network on windows

    1. Insert DVD disc into DVD drive or get DVD folder/ISO file ready. Launch Pavtube BDMagic and then click the “Files” button to import source DVD movies.

    2. Click the drop-down box of “Format” button and then select option to set a profile as output format. You could edit output profile as you player.

    3.Click the big “Convert” button and then set output directory to save final converted DVD files. After that, click the bottom “Convert” button to start converting.

    After the conversion, you can put the DVD rips onto Plex sharing folder or save DVD on NAS to share your DVD movies over Network.

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  • DVD ROM shares in SAMBA

    I have recently installed SAMBA on ubuntu 14.04 and configured some shares, most of which are working. but I am having issues sharing the DVD drives.
    A connecting windows 7 pc reports that “you do not have permissions to access \\192.168.1.100\DVD-ROM Drive 0. “

    Section of smb.conf file:

    Also a section from my fstab file:

    Re: DVD ROM shares in SAMBA

    I have recently installed SAMBA on ubuntu 14.04 and configured some shares, most of which are working. but I am having issues sharing the DVD drives.
    A connecting windows 7 pc reports that “you do not have permissions to access \\192.168.1.100\DVD-ROM Drive 0. “

    Re: DVD ROM shares in SAMBA

    I did some playing around. Somehow, I have the second drive working and the first one still not.

    I changed my fstab to:

    and my smb.conf to:

    The interesting part is the ownership as you mentioned:
    ls -al of the root dir showed:

    I checked and DVD-ROM Drive 1 is working and DVD-ROM Drive 0 is not. Ican’t understand why the first one is owned by nobody and the group is 401.
    I tried change it with chown but this failed.

    Last edited by x-terry; August 16th, 2014 at 02:41 AM . Reason: update

    Re: DVD ROM shares in SAMBA

    I did some playing around. Somehow, I have the second drive working and the first one still not.

    I changed my fstab to:

    and my smb.conf to:

    The interesting part is the ownership as you mentioned:
    ls -al of the root dir showed:

    I checked and DVD-ROM Drive 1 is working and DVD-ROM Drive 0 is not. Ican’t understand why the first one is owned by nobody and the group is 401.
    I tried change it with chown but this failed.

    What this means is that you get to set the ownership at mount time ( the default is 0 (root)).

    It is entirely possible to the file manager, in the absence of any specific data, to make a guess as to the ownership. Using your reference to the user nobody and the group of 401, I would say the guess was due to the share parameter of guest ok = yes, as it forces all users to be identified as nobody. The group 401 has no named identity. The OS uses the uid and gid. Let’s see what you get by posting the results of this command

    You can’t change anything once the DVD is mounted so chmod and chown don’t help in this instance.

    I would have added something like this to the mount options

    In this manner the first user of the system (maybe you) would become the owner:group-owner of the DVD file system.

    The reason cdrom1 works is that the others group has r-x (read and eXecute permissions). These are the 3rd set of permissions (r-xr-xr-x ) as in: owner:group thers.

    Last edited by bab1; August 16th, 2014 at 03:55 AM .