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How to take out contact lenses with nails

Without stabbing yourself in the eye with your KLAWS.

Kylie Jenner’s signature style would be nothing without her claws — or, rather — klaws. Long, acrylic nails are showing up on a lot of people including Kylie, Zendaya, and Rihanna. While you may be very tempted to try these out yourself, you may also have a lot of reservations, especially if you’re a person who wears contacts. The idea of repeatedly stabbing yourself in the eye with an acrylic nail may be enough to turn you off to the idea altogether, but I’m here to tell you there’s hope.

Not only is it not that difficult to handle your contacts with long nails, but there are many methods to do it. I’ve rounded up the best to assure you that wearing contacts is the least of your fake nail worries (seriously, buttoning shirts is much, much harder).

Taking out your contacts seems like a much bigger feat than putting them in since, with shorter nails, you can easily pinch them out with two fingers. This method doesn’t work so much when your nails are long. Katie Huynh shows you how to pull down underneath your eye with one finger, then drag and pinch your contact out with the other. It’s much easier than it sounds, promise.

Another approach involves taking both of your index or middle fingers and pinching your contact out from the sides.

This last method is similar to my own approach, and involves taking your index and middle finger, pinching your contact from the sides, then pulling it out.

Personally, I take my thumb to pull down on the skin underneath my eye, then use my index finger to pull down my contact, and then pinch it out. TBH, contacts are weird regardless of nail length and it takes a lot of maneuvering and practice to figure out what works. By trying out each of these methods, you’ll be able to figure out which approach is best for you and be a Kylie Klaw pro in no time.

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Inserting and removing contacts successfully is most definetly a learned skill. If you add donning acrylic nails into the mix you’re challenge is made twice as difficut. It’s important to use proper sanitation, with or without acrylics; however you’ll want to take extra care when handling contact lenses with fake nails, as acrylics can be a hotbed for bacteria growth. You will also need to avoid excessive contact between your nails, lenses, and eyes to prevent potential scratching and tearing of your lenses and/or eyes. To safely remove your contacts with fake nails trying using the forefinger and thumb method.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

You Will Need

  • Contact lens solution
  • Eye drops
  • Mild soap
  • Nail brush
  • Contact lens case
  • Lint-free towel

Step 1

First, wash your hands thoroughly with mild antibacterial soap. In addition to cleaning your hands and fingers, use a nail brush to scrub underneath your acylics to remove any deposits that may transfer to your fingers and eyes during the process.

Step 2

Next, open both sides of your contact lens case. Rinse out the inside of the case with warm water. Leave the case open in preparation to store contacts when you remove them. Dry your hands and nails completely with a lint-free towel. [If your contact lenses are daily disposables, you can eliminate this step.]

Step 3:

Using eye drops place a few drops in one eye, with the contact still in place. According to the Contact Lens Wearer guide, lubricating your contacts prior to removal allows them to slide out of your eyes with ease. This is especially beneficial when wearing acrylics, as the length of the nails adds difficulty to the removal process.

Step 4:

Now, use the forefinger and thumb method recommended by the Contact Lens Wearer Guide. Hold your free hand, palm facing upward, under your eye and position it to catch the lens. Place the outer side of your thumb on top of your bottom eye lid. Press it back to expose the bottom of your eye. Next, place your forefinger at the center of your top eyelid. Lightly press your thumb and forefinger at their respective positions and blink repeatedly. Your contact lens should fall into your free hand. Do not attempt the pinch method, which involves touching your finger to the eyeball. You want to avoid direct contact between your eyes and your acylics nails.

Step 4:

Finally, transfer the contact lens carefully from your palm to your contact lens case and add a few drops of lens solution to the case. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for the next eye.

Wondering how to remove contact lenses for the first time? Or, are you an experienced contact lens wearer looking for a way to improve your removal technique? Removing your contact lenses will become very quick and easy once you’ve practiced a few times. Our opticians have put together the most common methods of removing contact lenses, so you can find the easiest way that works for you: just watch the video below for a step-by-step tutorial on how to take out contacts.

It’s good to keep your contact lens solution, eye drops, contact lens case and anything else you’ll need handy, so you won’t need to reach for them. If you’re going for daily disposable contacts, you can just use the solution in the blister pack to rewet the lens – and you can just throw away after removing.

Not quite sure what method is best for you? Reach out to our friendly optical experts 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by phone on 020 7768 5000 (UK) or 1 800 870 0741 (US), live chat on our website, or email [email protected]

Other methods to try

The ceiling method

This technique is perfect for those with long nails, as you use the pads of your fingers to remove the lens.

Slide to the side

This method works by moving the lens off the curvature of your eye and into the white, where it’s easier to pinch off.

Wondering how to put in contacts? We’ve put together 3 different methods, so you can find one that works for you.

Step by step: removing contact lenses

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

1. Thoroughly wash and dry your hands

Before you start, wash your hands thoroughly using tap water and antibacterial soap. This is integral to all things eye care, in order to avoid dry eyes or eye infections caused by harmful bacteria. Drying your hands well gives you a good grip: the most hygienic method is using either a lint-free towel or an air dryer.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

2. Gently pull down your lower eyelid

Starting with the same eye every time, use the middle finger of your non-dominant hand to gently pull down your lower eyelid, then pull up your upper eyelid to hold your eyelashes against your brow.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

3. Gently pinch the contact lens off

Place your index finger and thumb on either side of the contact lens, and then gently pinch it off.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

4. Look up and slide the lens down

Look up and gently slide the lens down onto the white of your eye, then off onto your finger. Repeat for the other eye.

Repeat for the other eye

Now all you need to do is repeat these steps for your other eye and you’ve safely removed your contacts. Simple, isn’t it!

Frequently asked questions

How do you remove contact lenses for the first time?

Start with the same eye every time, to avoid accidentally mixing up your lenses. Use your non-dominant hand to pull down your lower eyelid and gently pull up your upper eyelid to meet your eyebrow. Now use your dominant hand (the one you use to write) to pinch off the contact lens and remove it from your eye – to do this, place your first finger and thumb on either side of the contact lens, and gently pinch it. Look up and gently slide the lens down, onto the white of your eye, then slide it off onto your finger. All you need to do is repeat for the other eye.

How do I remove a contact lens without pinching it?

While pinching a contact lens off is a popular removal method, you can use the pads of your fingers to sweep the lens down. This is particularly useful for those removing contact lenses with long nails. First, wash your hands thoroughly and dry them well. Reach over to the eye you are removing your lens from and pull the eyelid and lashes up to maximise space. Using the middle finger, pull your lower eyelid down. Look up to the ceiling, and position your index finger at the bottom of the lens and gently apply pressure to sweep the lens down. The lens will naturally want to drift back to the center of your eye, as that’s where it’s made to fit, but keep trying until you feel it dislodge. Once it’s moved off the center of your eye towards the white part, you should be able to pull it down with the pad of your finger.

How do I store monthly contact lenses?

If you wear monthly contact lenses, make sure that once removed they are placed in fresh solution and stored securely in a clean contact lens case. If you want to switch to daily contact lenses, speak to your optician or eye doctor and they’ll be able to help you.

Why is it so hard to remove contact lenses?

Blinking when something is close to your eye doesn’t make taking your contact lenses out very easy, does it?! It might feel difficult to remove contact lenses the first few times you try, but all it takes is a bit of practice and patience and you’ll be a seasoned pro in no-time. Just watch our video tutorials a few times to get the moves down – and make sure you give your eyes a break between goes by using eye drops or artificial tears.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

I may earn money or products from the companies mentioned in this post. This is at no extra cost to you.

Flashback to 2008-ish. I was around 14 years old and dying to shed my shy, geek status. I set out to accomplish that goal by ridding myself of glasses and getting contacts.

Off to the optometrist I went and when I was unable to get the contacts in and out myself at my appointment they sent me home with some overnight lenses to practice with.

After two weeks of practicing for hours everyday I was still unable to get those suckers out. Gross, huh? Well the Doc thought so too and an appointment was made so that the eye doctor could take them out for me and I would go back to my trusty glasses.

But in the immortal words of Marilyn Monroe, “Guys don’t make passes at girls who wear glasses.”

That was not going to me! I made a last ditch effort and finally conquered the contact lenses.

Having contacts didn’t make me any less shy and boys didn’t make passes but the victory was still momentous and some confidence was gained.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

I’ve now had contacts for over 15 years and have gotten mostly used to touching my eyes on the daily. But there is one thing I was never able to solve — how to remove contact lenses when you have long nails.

To be honest I didn’t worry about this for a long while. The square and squoval shapes that were popular during my high school years never had any appeal to me.

Fast forward to the present day however and I am in love with the ballerina/coffin nails.

And so I have been facing a dilemma for the past couple of years…how to get my coveted nails without ripping my cornea off every night?

I practiced with press on nails but always had to end up either cutting them or removing them completely at bedtime. I tried lots of different finger holds but just couldn’t get a good grip.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Then as fate would have it I came across the q-tip method for removing contacts.

GAME CHANGER!

The Q-tip method is so simple and goes as follows:

Grab an earbud and bend it

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

I bend mine into three roughly equal pieces — two sides and a center.

Dip Q-tip in contact solution

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

This step is optional but wetting your q-tip first will help keep fuzz off your lenses.

Pinch to Remove Contact Lenses

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Bring the q-tip up to your eye and pinch as though you were using your fingers. This does take a little practice to get the motion and angle right but is so easy once you get the hang of it.

Give yourself a pat on the back, you’ve successfully removed your contact lenses with long nails.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Head over to the opposite eyeball, repeat, and relax. You’re all done.

Speaking of acrylic nails….

I’ve been practicing a new technique for doing your own acrylics at home.

Dip Nails!

That’s what you see me modeling in these photos. Obviously I have a lot of practice to get them actually looking good but I can’t wait to master the technique and show you all how to do them. And maybe also teach you to avoid some of the pitfalls that I’m currently figuring out!

This also leads me to one of my biggest nail style tips. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again — nude nails! They match everything and if you do a crappy job (cough, cough) or they start to chip it is way less noticeable than if you had used a dark or bright color.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Well folks, that’s all for today but I hope that this is helpful for some of you and let me know in the comments if you want to learn to do dip nails.

Question by Guest | 20/12/2011 at 16:27

I wear contact lenses occasionally and I like to make the nails very long. These two things together, I never had dared before, but soon it should be.

So, my question to all people out there, who wear contact lenses and have long claws at the same time: How do you do it? I think it would be quite difficult. I can still imagine the insertion of the lenses quite good, but what about removing them?

Lipstick

In fact, the insertion with long nails resembles the insertion of lenses with short nails, only that the lens is not on the top of the finger tip during insertion, but slightly below at the surface of the finger.

It becomes more difficult when taking out the lenses: Many take out their contact lenses by letting the fingers pointing almost into the eye. But this should be avoided with long fingernails, because you need the fingertips to remove the lenses (the fingernails can damage the lenses otherwise!).

With long fingernails, the nails have to show over the eye, so that the tip of the finger is in the height of the eye at the contact lenses.

Either, you take the index finger and the ring finger and hold them horizontally and parallel to your eye, as if you want to see through between the two fingers. The nails then show out of the eye and you can remove the lenses.

Alternatively, you can also use both forefingers of your two hands and hold them perpendicular parallel to your eye, so that again the nail is protruding from the eye.

Which technique is more suitable for you, you just have to try.
23/12/2011 at 11:04

I got some contacts yesterday and my optician told me to nip them and pull them out but I’ve got long nails and keep scratching my eyeballs.

Lmao RB – My nails are natural though thank god – I think I’d have no chance of getting them out with fake ones.

That’s what I did yesterday I just sort of slid it into the corner of my eye and got it out from there but it flippin hurts!

7 Answers

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

First, you do not need to cut your nails.

Don’t listen to the other person suggesting tweezers either. The chances of you scratching your eye and your expensive contacts is much great if you try pulling it out with tweezers or your nails.

1) Try to find your shortest nail that is (not your thumb) on your dominant hand.

2) Extend that finger until it is completely taunt and you can feel your skin stretch a bit. I normally do mine in a gun like shape where my index finger is extended and my thumb just sticks out.

3) Angle the pad of your finger on you contact and make a pulling down motion (from your nose to your ears) to the edge of your eye. Your contact should start to hit your bottom eye lash line.

4) As soon as you get the lip on your eye lash line, angle your fingers down ward and it should stick to the bottom of your finger.

Deposit in your contact solution and do the next eye.

When you get used to having and removing contacts, this becomes almost second nature. It also depends on how your blink reflex is. Also, if your wearing single use contacts, this will be easier. Fresh contacts are easier to put in and take out. And older pair of contacts aren’t as easy to remove.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Hard contact lenses, also known as Rigid Gas Permeable lenses, are made of a hard plastic that allow oxygen to reach your eyes. Hard contacts do a better job of correcting some vision problems than soft lenses. When you first receive your hard contacts, you should practice putting them in and taking them out until you’re comfortable with the procedures. Ohio State University’s Casey Eye Institute recommends removing your hard contact lenses from your eyes every evening before bed. Sleeping in your contacts can lead to ulcer, infections and compromised vision.

Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry your hands. You want to keep germs and bacteria away from your lenses. Use a soap that doesn’t contain moisturizers, which can coat your contacts when you handle them.

Cup your left hand under your right eye. Bend your head over the cupped hand.

Look down at your cupped hand. Place your right index finger alongside your eye.

Pull the corner of your eye outward by applying pressure on your index finger. Blink. The hard contact lens should pop out, into your cupped hand.

Repeat this procedure with your left eye, cupping your right hand under the eye and tugging at the corner of the eye with the left index finger.

Your contact may not pop out if your eyes are too dry. Use wetting drops in your eye before you attempt to remove the contact if this is a problem for you.

Always insert and remove your contacts in the same order, to help you keep track of which contact goes in which eye, since the prescriptions for each eye may be different.

Always clean your contacts and store them in wetting solution in a case after you remove them from your eye.

In this Article

In this Article

In this Article

If you’ve just gotten fitted with contacts for the first time, you may have questions about how to wear and take care of them. It may not be as simple on slipping on a pair of eyeglasses. And it may take longer to get used to them.

Here’s what contact lens beginners should know.

Types of Contact Lenses

It’s important to know what kind of contacts your eye doctor has ordered for you. Soft lenses are the most commonly prescribed because they’re flexible and tend to be more comfortable.

Hard lenses are also called gas-permeable (GP) lenses. They’re more rigid and may sharpen your vision better than soft lenses can. Your optometrist or ophthalmologist may suggest hard lenses if you have astigmatism or allergies.

Soft contacts come in different kinds, including:

  • Daily disposable (you throw them out every day)
  • Extended-wear disposable (replaced every 1, 2, or 4 weeks)
  • Toric (for moderate astigmatism, when your eye is more oval than round)
  • Bifocal (corrects your vision for both nearsightedness and farsightedness)

Hard contacts last longer, up to several months. If you plan to store them for a long time, use a dry case without contact solution to avoid possible contamination.

How to Put Your Contacts In

It may take some practice to get the hang of it.

  1. Wash your hands with soap and dry them.
  2. Open your contact lens case or package. Always keep the other eye closed so you won’t mix up right and left lenses.
  3. Use your fingertips, not nails, to slide one lens into the palm of the hand that you don’t write with. Rinse the lens with contact solution.
  4. Place the lens on the tip of your index or middle finger of your dominant hand.
  5. Check that the lens isn’t damaged and make sure it’s right side up. The edge of the lens should form a bowl. If it’s inside out, carefully flip the lens.
  6. Hold your upper eyelid open with your pointer or middle finger of your non-dominant hand. Hold your lower eyelid with your middle or ring finger of your dominant hand.
  7. Using a magnifying mirror, try to look forward, or up if you can’t look straight ahead. Place the lens in your eye.
  8. Close your eyes slowly and let the lens settle into place. The lens should feel comfortable and you should see clearly. If not, take it out, rinse with the solution, and try again.
  9. Repeat with your other eye.

Continued

How to Remove Your Contacts

Be sure to take your lenses out on schedule, depending on whether they’re dailies or longer wearing. Here’s how:

  1. Wash your hands with soap and dry them.
  2. Use the middle finger of your non-dominant hand to hold open your upper eyelid.
  3. Use the middle finger of your dominant hand to hold open your lower eyelid. Pinch the lens with your index finger and thumb and take it out. You can also try sliding the lens downward first, and then pinching it out.
  4. Repeat with your other eye.

How to Clean and Store Your Contacts

There are two main types of cleaning solutions.

Multipurpose solutions are the most common. They can clean and disinfect your lenses and keep them moist overnight in a case. You can get multipurpose solution for either hard or soft lenses.

Hydrogen peroxide-based solutions are a good choice if you have allergies or are sensitive to chemicals. But they require an extra step. You add a neutralizing disk to convert the solution to saline so it won’t sting your eyes.

It’s not safe to use saliva, tap water, or even rewetting drops to clean or rinse your lenses. They don’t disinfect and could cause an infection.

Tips and Guidelines

Here are some rules to help keep your eyes healthy if you wear contact lenses.

  • Replace contacts as often as your doctor recommends.
  • Use unscented soap to wash your hands.
  • Dry your hands well with a lint-free cloth.
  • Don’t re-wear daily disposable lenses or reuse old solution from the case.
  • Replace the contact lens case every 3 months.
  • Don’t sleep in your contacts, especially daily-wear lenses.
  • Avoid showering or swimming with your contacts in.
  • Use only rewetting drops specifically made for contacts. Don’t use regular eye drops.
  • Get your eyes checked every year.

When to Call Your Doctor

Problems with contacts may include infection or lenses that don’t fit well. Take out your contacts right away and call your doctor if you have:

Sources

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Contact Lenses for Vision Correction,” “Contact Lens Types,” “Contact Lens Cleaning Solution Basics,” “How to Put in Contact Lenses.”

Kellogg Eye Center, Michigan Medicine: “Contact Lenses,” “Insertion and Removal of Soft Contact Lenses.”

Just got fitted for contact lenses – first time ever wearing them and I’m in my 40’s! Doc said I may have to cut the nails short on my thumb & forefinger. ack! Anyone have a way to get around this? I watched a couple of You Tube videos on how to remove contacts, but no one had long nails.

Yay! Thanks for the replies. I’m glad I can keep the fingernails. I had never heard of those removal tweezer things either, so I’ll look around for one.

12 Answers

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

I use the side of my pointer finger and the side of my thumb –

first I use the side of my pointer finger to touch the bottom of the lens and slide it down off my cornea – then I pinch the lens with the side of my pointer finger and the side of my thumb. The nails never get in the way!

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Pretty much what the others said that had long nails. My nails aren’t short either so I just use the balls of my pointer finger and push the contact to the side of my eye, which causes it to roll up and I blink the contact out in 3 seconds or less. I don’t like the pinch your contact out with your pointer and thumb method anyways, it could scratch your eyes.

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You can get a suction-cup device from an opthamology professionals. In addition to the obvious scratching hazard, fake nails are magnets for bacteria, so you are right to be concerned. In the late 1990s, eight infant deaths in a neonatal intensive care unit at an Oklahoma City hospital were apparently caused by infections from bacteria spread by long fingernails. The longer one wears artificial nails, the more likely there will be disease-causing organisms living underneath the nails and even on their surface. Hand-washing isn’t as effective for fake-nail wearers as it is for others.

You just have to position your fingers differently, that’s all. Instead of using the tip of your finger you can use the side. It may feel awkward at first, but you’ll get the hang of it. Be careful with the tweezers like things. You could scratch your eyes if you don’t use it properly. I suggest talking to your optometrist about it and see if he can show you how to use them.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Someone gave me this great tip – just move them from side to side a little before you try to remove them. I just do it with the fleshy part of my forefinger. My nails aren’t uber long but they’re not short either.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

I have long fingernails and contact lenses for years so when I take them out I use the ball of my fingertips. You kinda have to make your figers that you use to take them out turn away from your face. It’s not hard to do. And you also don’t scratch your eye with your nails.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

I used to have long nails (don’t bother now), but the only way I could do it was to place the pad of my finger on the lens and slide it down. Folds the lens in half, but it’s out. Gotta do it fast, of course, and you might drop it, but a little practice should refine your technique.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

trim back the nails a bit on those fingers, as they grow back you’ll get used to putting them in with long nails. It worked for me

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

short neat nails are nice and also neat. I dont like long nails because dirt can get under all of them and it look nasty

its digusting and gross when somebodys nails are usually all chewed up to the end.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Small is a lot better! Long nails are called “ghetto claws” for a reason. They make you look like no-class trash.

It’s pretty simple. Take a look below!

Share this:

To take your lenses out:

First you should wash, rinse and dry your hands, then follow these steps:

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Look up and pull down
your lower eyelid with
your middle finger.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Using your index finger,
slide the lens down to
the white of your eye.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Pinch the lens between
your fingers and remove
it from your eye.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Fill the empty lens
case with solution.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Wet each side of
the lens with
the solution.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Rub each lens for
20 seconds with
your finger.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Rinse each side of the
lens for 10 seconds
with a steady stream
of the solution.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Place lenses in case,
tighten lids and wait
overnight or at least
six hours.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Removing contact lenses can be a daunting prospect for first-time wearers.

Even long-time wearers can find adapting to something new a bit pesky. What can you do?

Relax! Everything gets easier once you’ve had some practice at it—and that includes removing contacts. Don’t fret if you’re having a little trouble at first. That’s entirely normal.

To help out, here are some tips for removing your contact lenses that will make the process (and your routines for sleep) go a little smoother.

Before you remove contact lenses

One of the most important things you can remember about removing your contacts is to always wash your hands with soap and water first. Wipe your hands dry to minimize the amount of water that gets on your lenses.

Another important tip for removing (and inserting) contact lenses is to start with the same eye every time. This reduces the chances of an accidental switcheroo. (Remember, your contact lenses, like your shoes, have a right and a left side.)

How to remove contact lenses

Ready to remove your contacts? Let’s go!

1. Stand in front of a well-lit mirror, especially in the beginning.

3. Take your non-dominant hand and use your index finger to raise your upper eyelid away from your eye.

4. With your dominant hand, use your middle finger pull down your lower eyelid.

5. With the pads of your index finger and thumb, gently squeeze the lens to pull it down and away from your eye. Don’t fold or pinch with more force than necessary.

6. Place the lens into the palm of your other hand.

You’re done! It really is easy to do.

Cleaning contact lenses

Improper handling and cleaning of contacts is a major cause of eye infections and other problems. If you don’t wear daily disposable contact lenses, one of the best things you can do to protect your eyes and vision is to make cleaning a part of your daily removal routine.

Cleaning contact lenses quick and simple. All you need to do is:

  • Once your lens is in your palm, squeeze fresh cleaner onto its surface.
  • Rub the lens with the pads of your fingers for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat for the other side of the lens.
  • Put the lens into your case, cover it with fresh solution, and then cap.

Having trouble removing contact lenses?

Here are some things to consider:

  • Rewetting drops or lubricants can make it easier to lift the lens from your eye. Dry eyes let the lens stick a little more closely.
  • There can be an adjustment period when you’re starting or switching contact lenses. Give yourself enough time to remove your lenses calmly without rushing.
  • Slide the lens to the white of your eye, especially if you’re worried about discomfort. Pulling the lens toward your lower lid can also help lift it off the surface of your eye.
  • If edges of your lens stick together, add a drop of fresh cleaning solution and gently rub until they separate.

If you continue having trouble removing your contacts, talk to your eye doctor. He or she may recommend contact lens removal tools that can help make the process easier. These are usually small suction tools or soft-tipped tweezers that help lift the lens.

Remember, all contact lenses are ultimately delicate, and they’re also medical devices. Following the care instructions provided by your eye doctor and your contact lens and cleaning solution manufacturers is critical to protecting the health of your eyes and vision. Never start or switch contact lenses without consulting your eye doctor.

Nothing in this article is to be construed as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the recommendations of a medical professional. For specific questions, please see your eye care practitioner.

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Getting started with contact lenses? We want to make sure your eyes stay happy and healthy while wearing them. If you’ve got a question about your lenses, like how to put them in, take them out, or clean them – have a look through our tips and advice.

Tips for comfortable wearing

Have a look through some of our top tips for wearing your contact lenses comfortably.

  • Wash and dry your hands before handling your lenses or touching your eye
  • Stop wearing your lenses if your eyes become red or sore – contact us for advice
  • Clean your lens case regularly and allow it to air dry
  • Check that the prescription on the lens packaging is correct
  • Check your contact lens solution instructions before use
  • Insert your lenses before applying eye make-up Return for all the aftercare visits recommended by your optician
  • Contact us if you have any concerns or queries, however trivial they may seem
  • Stop wearing your lenses if your eyes become red or sore – contact us for advice
  • Throw away your lenses after the recommended period
  • Clean your lens case regularly and allow it to air dry
  • Replace your lens case regularly Replace the tops of solution bottles after use
  • Use fresh solution to store your lenses
  • Dispose of solution bottles after the recommended period
  • Use tap water to store, clean or rinse your contact lenses or case Ignore problems or discomfort with your lenses
  • Reuse the solutions of saline in your lens case Wear your lenses longer than advised
  • Ignore problems or discomfort with your lenses Hesitate to contact us if you have a problem
  • Handle your lenses with sharp nails as they can easily tear
  • Use tap water to store, clean or rinse your contact lenses or case Use your lenses for swimming, hot tubs or water sports, unless wearing goggles
  • Wear your lenses when showering unless you keep your eyes firmly closed
  • Lick your lenses
  • Sleep in your lenses (unless advised by your optician, as this can increase the risk of infection)
  • Wear your lenses if you are using eye drops prescribed by your doctor
  • Change your cleaning regime without contacting us for professional advice
  • Reuse the solutions of saline in your lens case

How to put in your contact lenses

If you’re having trouble putting in contact lenses, this quick video should tell you everything you need to know.

  1. First wash and dry your hands.
  2. Open the foil (for daily disposables) or case lid (for reusable lenses), and scoop your lens out using your index finger.
  3. Check the lens looks okay – it should be a bowl shape. If it has a lip it means it’s inside out. Before you put it on, hold it up and check for any tears or bits of debris.
  4. If it’s dirty then use some fresh solution to clean it, but if it’s damaged you’ll have to throw it away.
  5. The easiest way to insert your lens is to place it on the tip of your index finger and with your free hand, pull the top eyelid up – this will help you to stop your blinking reaction.
  6. Pull your bottom eyelid down and bring the lens towards the centre of your eye.
  7. You won’t have to press it onto your eye – it will go into place on its own (good news if you’re a bit squeamish about touching your eye).
  8. Pull your bottom eyelid down and bring the lens towards the centre of your eye.
  9. You won’t have to press it onto your eye – it will go into place on its own (good news if you’re a bit squeamish about touching your eye).
  10. Once the lens is on move your eyes from side to side and then close them both. This gets rid of any air bubbles trapped under the lens and makes sure it’s in the right position. Then just repeat on the other eye. Easy peasy.

How to take out your contact lenses

You’ve mastered putting them in, but what about taking them out again? Have a look at this video about removing your lenses (all without touching your eye).

1 Before you do anything, make sure you wash and dry your hands.

2 Look straight into the mirror, tilt your head down slightly and pull your lower eyelid down.

3 Using your finger move the lens down onto the white of your eye and then gently pinch it out.

4 Now just repeat on the other eye. Simple.

Cleaning contact lenses

It’s important to clean and take care of your lenses, so that the risk of eye infections is kept to a minimum. If you wear reusable lenses, you’ll need to stick to a cleaning routine to make sure your eyes stay in tip-top condition.

1 After taking out your lenses, rub them gently with a few drops of solution for about 20 seconds.

2 To store your lenses, place them carefully in your contact lens case. The case should be clean and filled with fresh solution.

3 If you’re unsure about the best way to keep your lenses and case clean, check the instructions on your solution to make sure you’re doing everything exactly as you should.

4 Don’t forget: never use tap water to clean your lenses or contact lens case as this can lead to eye infections.

Meet The Contact Lens Specialists

*note – gas permeable lens removal instructions are coming soon

You have your contact lenses on, maybe you have worn them a good portion of the day and now it is time to remove them.

The first step is to wash your hands. Just as when you put your lenses on, you want to use a soap that does not have excessive perfumes or moisturizers, such as aloe, in it.

You now have clean hands and are positioned in a clean area with a mirror. If you need a good mirror, you can click here for a good selection

Avoid Injury:
check to be sure the lens is still there before removing it

Remember the lens is resting in front of the colored area of your eye. If you are not sure the lens is still there, cover the other eye and check your vision. If you can see clearly, the lens is there. (If you are nearsighted, look far away to test if the lens is still on, if you are farsighted, look up close)

Steps to remove your soft contact lens

  • Hang your head low and look upwards into the mirror. This should expose some white of the eye below the lens.
  • With your clean finger, slide the lens to the white of the eye. DonВ’t let go of the lens.
  • with your finger and thumb, gently pick the lens up off the white of your eye.
  • Clean the lens as prescribed by our office.
  • Repeat for other eye.
  • ThatВ’s really all there is to it.

Some possible challenges and solutions:

If you have trouble keeping your eye open, use your other hand to hold the upper lids and lashes while the hand that is getting the lens also holds the lower lid.

If you arenВ’t able to slide the lens, remember to stare in the mirror. If you lose your focal point in the mirror, then your eye has moved and hence the lens has also moved. It is very important to keep focused on one spot through the entire process.

If you have trouble picking up the lens, try sliding even further to the white of the eye. The further from the cornea you are able to slide the contact lens, the easier it will be to pick up.

If you have long nails, do not use them to pick up the lens. Rather, slide the lens all the way down to the lower lid and let it roll over the lid. The lens will basically be pushed out of the eye and end up on your finger or lower lashes.

If your eye starts to irritate, you probably rubbed too much along the lower lid margin. This tends to sting after a while. Take a break and come back later.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

It’s estimated that 45 million people in the United States wear contact lenses. These small lenses can make a huge difference in the quality of life for wearers, but it’s important to handle them safely. Improper care can cause all sorts of issues, including serious infections.

Whether you’ve been wearing contacts for years, or are about to use them for the first time, here are the safest ways to put in, remove, and care for your lenses.

Step-by-step instructions

  1. First, wash your hands thoroughly and dry them well.
  2. Open your contact lens case and use your fingertip to put the first contact lens in your non-dominant hand.
  3. Rinse the lens with contact lens solution. Never use regular water.
  4. Put the lens on the top of the index or middle finger of your dominant hand.
  5. Check to make sure the lens isn’t damaged and that the correct side is facing up. The edges of the lens should turn up to form a bowl, not flip out. If it’s inside out, gently flip it. If the lens is damaged, don’t use it.
  6. Look in the mirror and hold your upper and lower eyelids open with the hand not holding the lens.
  7. Look in front of you or up toward the ceiling and place the lens in your eye.
  8. Close your eye slowly and either roll your eye around or press gently on the eyelid to settle the lens in place. The lens should feel comfortable, and you should be able to see clearly after blinking a few times. If it’s not comfortable, gently take out the lens, rinse it, and try again.
  9. Repeat with the second lens.

The most common type of hard lens is called a rigid gas permeable lens. These hard lenses allow oxygen to get to your cornea. They’re also more durable than soft lenses, so they last longer. Soft contact lenses are a more popular choice than hard lenses, though.

On the downside, hard contact lenses are more likely to cause infections. They may also be less comfortable than soft lenses.

Despite their differences, you can put hard and soft contacts in the same way, following the steps outlined above.

If you’ve just started wearing contact lenses, know that they may feel slightly uncomfortable for the first few days. This is more common with hard lenses.

If your eye feels dry once you’ve put in your lens, try using rewetting drops made specifically for contacts.

If a lens feels scratchy, hurts, or irritates your eye after putting it in, follow these steps:

  1. First, don’t rub your eyes. This can damage your contact lens or increase the discomfort.
  2. Wash and dry your hands well. Then remove the lens and rinse it thoroughly with contact lens solution. This can get rid of any dirt or debris that may be stuck to the lens, making it feel uncomfortable.
  3. Inspect the lens carefully to make sure it’s not torn or damaged. If it is, discard the lens and use a new one. If you don’t have a spare, make sure to follow up with your eye doctor right away.
  4. If the lens isn’t damaged, carefully reinsert it into your eye once it’s been thoroughly rinsed and cleaned.
  5. If your lens is often uncomfortable and the above steps don’t work, or you also have redness or burning, stop wearing your lenses and call your doctor.

Getting started with Contact Lenses

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Inserting Contact Lenses

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

The Two-Hand Placement Technique
• With the lens on your index finger, use the middle finger of the other hand to pull the upper lid against the brow.
• Use the middle finger of your placement hand to pull down the lower lid and then place the lens centrally on your eye.
• While holding this position, look downward to position the lens properly.
• Slowly release your eyelids.
• You won’t have to press it onto your eye – it will go into place on its own.
• Once the lens is on, move your eyes from side to side and then close them both. This gets rid of any air bubbles trapped under the lens and makes sure it’s in the right position.

Then just repeat on the other eye. It’s that simple.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Removing Contact Lenses

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Caring for your Lenses

Caring for your lenses means, caring for your eyes. Learn about how to clean your lenses and what you can do to make sure you wear your lenses comfortably.

Cleaning contact lenses: Did you know that proper cleaning and rinsing of the contact lenses can eliminate over 90% of the harmful bacteria that may be on them?

An area which is important for you to comply with is proper lens care and maintenance. It’s important to clean and take care of your lenses, so that the risk of eye infections is kept to a minimum. If you wear reusable lenses, you’ll need to adhere to the recommended cleaning routine to make sure your eyes stay in excellent condition.

• Any contact lens that has been worn must be cleaned and disinfected before being placed back into the eye.
• After taking out your lens, put a few drops of the multipurpose solution on your palm and rub the lens gently for about 20 seconds.
• Remember to rinse your lens with a jet of multipurpose solution before placing the lens into the lens case.
• To store your lenses, fill each chamber of the lens case with fresh multipurpose solution, place them carefully in your contact lens case, close the lid and leave the lenses to soak until you reuse them again.
• Always carefully read and follow the instructions on ‘How to use,’ which come along with the multipurpose solution.
• Remember: never use tap water to clean your lenses or contact lens case as this can lead to eye infections.
• Lens case cleaning is often overlooked. Ensure the lens case is rinsed and air dried daily and changed frequently, ideally monthly.

We want to make sure your eyes stay happy and healthy wearing contact lenses. If you’ve got a question about your lenses, like how to put them in, take them out, or clean them – have a look through our tips and advice.

Getting started with contact lenses

Let’s start with the basics.

How to put in your contact lenses

If you’re having trouble putting in contact lenses, this quick video should tell you everything you need to know.

Putting in contact lenses

  1. First wash and dry your hands.
  2. Open the foil (for daily disposables) or case lid (for reusable lenses), and scoop your lens out using your index finger.
  3. Check the lens looks okay – it should be a bowl shape. If it has a lip it means it’s inside out.
  4. Before you put it on, hold it up and check for any tears or bits of debris.
  5. If it’s dirty then use some fresh solution to clean it, but if it’s damaged you’ll have to throw it away.
  6. The easiest way to insert your lens is to place it on the tip of your index finger and with your free hand, pull the top eyelid up – this will help you to stop your blinking reaction.
  7. Pull your bottom eyelid down and bring the lens towards the centre of your eye.
  8. You won’t have to press it onto your eye – it will go into place on its own (good news if you’re a bit squeamish about touching your eye).
  9. Once the lens is on move your eyes from side to side and then close them both. This gets rid of any air bubbles trapped under the lens and makes sure it’s in the right position.
  10. Then just repeat on the other eye. Easy peasy.

How to take out your contact lenses

You’ve mastered putting them in, but what about taking them out again? Have a look at this video about removing your lenses.

Taking out contact lenses

  1. Before you do anything, make sure you wash and dry your hands.
  2. Look straight into the mirror, tilt your head down slightly and pull your lower eyelid down.
  3. Using your finger move the lens down onto the white of your eye and then gently pinch it out.
  4. Now just repeat on the other eye. Simple.

Looking after your contact lenses

If you look after your lenses, you’ll look after your eyes. Learn about how to clean your lenses and what you can do to make sure you wear your lenses comfortably.

Cleaning contact lenses

It’s important to clean and take care of your lenses, so that the risk of eye infections is kept to a minimum. If you wear reusable lenses, you’ll need to stick to a cleaning routine to make sure your eyes stay in tip-top condition.

Cleaning your contact lenses

  1. After taking out your lenses, rub them gently with a few drops of solution for about 20 seconds.
  2. To store your lenses, place them carefully in your contact lens case. The case should be clean and filled with fresh solution.
  3. If you’re unsure about the best way to keep your lenses and case clean, check the instructions on your solution to make sure you’re doing everything exactly as you should.
  4. Don’t forget: never use tap water to clean your lenses or contact lens case as this can lead to eye infections.

Tips for comfortable wearing

Have a look through some of our top tips for wearing your contact lenses comfortably.

It can be tricky to learn how to put contacts in, especially if you’re new to them. Our opticians have put together the most common methods to apply your contacts, so you can find the easiest way that works for you. Wondering how to put in contact lenses for the first time? Or, are you an experienced contact lens wearer looking for a way to improve your technique? Watch the video below for a step-by-step tutorial on how to put in contacts.

The most popular method: applying front-on

Not quite sure what method is best for you? Reach out to our friendly optical experts 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by phone on 020 7768 5000 (UK) or 1 800 870 0741 (US), live chat on our website, or email [email protected]

Other methods to try

Side Application

This method is perfect for those that are a little squeamish at the thought of touching their eye.

Looking Up Application

This technique is great if you’re a little nervous about seeing something coming directly into your eye.

Wondering how to remove contact lenses? We’ve put together 3 easy-to-follow video tutorials, so you’ll be sure to find one that works.

Before you start, wash your hands thoroughly using tap water and antibacterial soap. This is integral to all things eye care, in order to avoid dry eyes or eye infections caused by harmful bacteria. Drying your hands well gives you a good grip: the most hygienic method is using either a lint-free towel or an air dryer. It’s good to keep your contact lens solution, eye drops and anything else you’ll need handy, so you won’t need to reach for them. If you’re going for daily disposable contacts, you can just use the solution in the blister pack.

Step by step: applying contact lenses

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

1. Prepare the lens

Remove the lens from the packet and place on the opposite fingertip to the eye you wish to put it in. Make sure your lens is in the correct position, it should be bowl-shaped in appearance. The lens should sit on the flat part of the tip of your finger, for easier application.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

2. Place the lens over your iris

Hold your eye open with your middle finger on the lower eyelid, and your index finger holding your eyelashes against your brow. For the right eye use your right hand to hold open your right eye and use your left hand to insert. Simply repeat for your left eye.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

3. Insert and centre the lens

When applying the lens, look straight ahead into the mirror, trying not to move your upper eyelid or blink. Once the lens is in place, wait a few seconds for the lens to settle, then look left, right, up and down to allow it to sit comfortably. Finally, slowly remove your finger from your eyelid and gently close your eye.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

4. Adjust for comfort

If it feels like it isn’t sitting comfortably, there may be an air bubble. Keeping your finger on the centre of the lens, move it around a little to dislodge any air that may be trapped underneath, so the lens fits closely to the shape of your eyeball. You can also close your eye and gently massage your eyelid with your fingertip to move the lens to the centre of the iris. If your lens still doesn’t feel comfortable, remove it, clean it with solution, give your eyes a break and return to step 1.

Frequently asked questions

What is the easiest way to put in contact lenses?

Our opticians have put together 3 different methods of putting in contact lenses, so you can find the one that works best for you. Here is a step-by-step tutorial of our easiest, most popular method:

How do you put in contacts for the first time?

New to contact lenses? We’ve got you covered. It might feel daunting to put in contact lenses, but all it takes is a bit of practice and patience. It’s important to follow the hygiene advice your optician gave you and wash your hands thoroughly before handling contact lenses. Then, watch our handy step-by-step video tutorials a few times through and find the method that works for you.

Why are my contacts so hard to put in?

If you’re having trouble putting your soft contact lenses in, it’s often because you blink before the lens touches your eye. That’s perfectly normal, as it takes a little practice to overcome the fear of inserting contact lenses. Once you get the moves down and feel comfortable and relaxed, putting your contact lenses in will be easy as pie.

How do you stop yourself from blinking when putting in contacts?

Blinking doesn’t make the process of putting in contacts easy! Practice not blinking by placing your index finger on your upper eyelid and your thumb on the lower eyelid, gently holding your eye open. After a few tries, you’ll feel comfortable and confident, so you won’t need to blink.

How long does it take to put in contacts for the first time?

Applying contacts can feel daunting when you’re new to them, so give yourself some time to practice and familiarise yourself with the process. Expect it would take your eyes around 10 to 12 days to adjust to the feeling of contact lenses. Allow for some downtime for your eyes too, as they may get irritated after a few goes, so keep your eye drops handy.

Are contacts hard to put in and take out?

Yes, putting your contacts in can be really easy. All it needs is a bit of practice and patience and you’ll be a seasoned wearer in no-time. Watch our video tutorials for different methods for applying your contacts and find the one that works for you – or speak to your optician at your next eye test.

What should I do if my lenses feel uncomfortable?

The first step is to double-check which eye the lens is for. This prevents discomfort and vision problems, especially if your eyes have different prescriptions. Also, check the lens for any rips, tears, or debris before applying. If you discover a rip or tear, discard the lens. Should you discover any makeup, dust or debris give the lens a thorough cleaning in solution.

If you’re happy with the fit, enjoy your comfortable and clear vision. Now you’ve mastered putting in your contact lenses, why not learn how to take out contact lenses in our companion guide. If you’re still having issues with your lenses, book an eye test to speak to your optometrist or eye doctor and they’ll be able to help.

Contents

Reasons for choosing contact lenses

Each wearer has a different reason for using contact lenses. However, in our experience the major reasons why our customers want the option of contact lenses in addition to glasses are:

  1. Convenience: for example daily disposables require no cleaning or care (unlike glasses)
  2. “The Look”: many wearers prefer the look of contact lenses to glasses and find that it is a confidence booster
  3. Sports Use: many people could not enjoy their favourite sports without contact lenses. Often people will begin wearing contact lenses for sport and end up using them in all walks of their lives because of the benefits they discover

Types of contact lenses

Contact lenses can be split into the following groups:

  1. Daily Disposables – replaced with a fresh pair of every day
  2. Two Weekly Disposables – replaced with a fresh pair every two weeks
  3. Monthly Disposables – replaced with a fresh pair every month
  4. Extended Wear Lenses – can be worn continuously whilst awake and asleep
  5. Toric Lenses – for patients who suffer from astigmatism
  6. Multi-Focal Lenses – provide all in one vision correction for patients who cannot see clearly over long and short distances
  7. Coloured Contact Lenses – fashion lenses for people who fancy a change from their natural eye colour

The majority of contact lenses purchased are soft and Lenstore.co.uk only stocks soft contact lenses. Hard (or “Rigid Gas Permeable”) contact lenses do exist and are typically for patients who suffer from severe astigmatism and irregular corneas. Your Optician will let you know if hard contact lenses are the most appropriate for your eyes but for the majority of people soft lenses provide the best option.

How to get contact lenses for the first time

If you currently wear glasses and want to try contact lenses the first thing you should do is book a contact lens examination with your Optician. He / she will take you through the whole process of getting fitted for contact lenses. Your Optician will first check if your eyes are suited for contact lenses (most people’s are). He / she will then train you in how to insert and remove your contact lenses and will also show you how to clean and take care of them. Next you’ll be given a trial set of contact lenses which normally last a week. At the end of the trial week you visit your Optician again and he / she will ensure that your eyes have reacted well to the lenses. At that point you’ll buy three months supply of contact lenses from your Optician and wear them. After three months, you’ll visit your Optician for the last time during the fitting period and he / she will write you a prescription. Make sure you grab a copy of your prescription. You’ve now been officially fitted for contact lenses and can buy them from whichever supplier you choose.

Putting your contact lenses in

Helpful Tip: get into the habit of putting your right eye’s lens in first. It’ll reduce the chances of mixing up your contact lenses.

It does take a little practice to perfect your technique so don’t despair if you’re finding it difficult for the first few days or weeks. If you continue to have difficulty inserting your contact lenses then make an appointment with your contact lens Optician who should be happy to observe your technique and help you improve it.

Removing your contact lenses

Helpful Tip: get into the habit of removing your right eye’s lens first. It’ll reduce the chances of mixing up your contact lenses.

Cleaning and storing contact lenses

Warning: please never use water to clean or store your contact lenses. Water does not have the necessary contents to disinfect your contact lens correctly. In fact, cleaning your contact lenses with water may lead to a contamination of your lenses and has been known to cause irreparable harm to the eye.

If you wear daily disposables you do not have to worry about storing your contact lenses as outlined above. However, if you drop your lens or something gets caught in your eye you may have to clean it in which case you should follow the procedure outlined in Steps 1 and 2 above.

How long to wear your lenses for

In general most soft contact lenses have a recommended wearing time of not more than 10-12 hours continuously for up to 5 days a week. It’s recommended that you wear glasses for a couple of days a week to ensure that your eyes receive more than enough oxygen to stay healthy. Extended wear lenses can be worn whilst you are both awake and asleep for up to a week. However it’s important to realise that the recommended wearing time for a contact lens will vary by the type of lens and the wearer. Contact lens manufacturers provide wearing guidelines for your lenses (usually found on the packaging). Please follow the wearing schedule suggested by your Optician as he / she is uniquely well placed to advice you.

When to get in touch with your Optician

You should get in touch with your Optician if you are:

  • Close to the expiry date of your prescription / due for a contact lens examination (typically every 12 months)
  • In need of a copy of your contact lens prescription
  • Experiencing a deterioration in the standard of your vision with contact lenses
  • Considering changing to a contact lens solution which was not recommended by the person who fitted your contact lenses

If you experience any of the following symptoms / irritations in your eyes please firstly take your contact lenses out of your eyes (even if wearing them seems to lessen the discomfort or symptoms) and secondly get in touch with your Optician as soon as possible:

  • Feeling of discomfort
  • Redness
  • Excessive watering
  • Visual disturbance

If your Optician is not available immediately and the problem is causing your severe disturbance you should consult you GP or go to Accident and Emergency at your local hospital. You can, of course, also call Lenstore.co.uk during our office hours and we will advise you on the best of course of action. We will do our very best to help you.

Aftercare

“Aftercare” is the medical care and advice that should be provided to you after you buy a pair of contact lenses. At a minimum, contact lens aftercare should include both advice on and helping to make arrangements for:

  • Regular contact lens examinations
  • Where you can go in an emergency
  • What signs or symptoms you should watch out for
  • How to remove your contact lenses during an emergency
  • Who your local contact for advice is

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

We’ve become accustomed to recycling cardboard boxes, aluminum soda cans, plastic water bottles, magazines and other items that we once threw in the trash.

You might not, however, have considered recycling your old contact lenses. Yes, contact lenses can be recycled. But disposing of your contacts in an eco-friendly manner isn’t, unfortunately, as simple as tossing them into a recycling bin.

Follow along to learn the eye-opening do’s and don’ts of properly disposing of your used contact lenses:

Don’t put contact lenses down the drain

An estimated 45 million Americans wear contact lenses. Based on one study, millions of those wearers could be clogging our waterways with their used contacts.

In 2018, an Arizona State University study of contact lens wearers found 15-20% of them were flushing their old contacts down the toilet or washing them down the sink’s drain.

On a national basis, the researchers reported, that would amount to 1.8 billion to 3.36 billion lenses being flushed every year.

Put another way, that would translate into 20 to 23 metric tons of plastic trash winding up in our wastewater each year.

As noted by wellness website mindbodygreen.com, contact lenses don’t biodegrade easily because they’re medical devices that are designed to withstand punishment.

“Flushing contact lenses is particularly concerning because their size and flexibility allow them to slip through filters meant to keep nonbiological waste out of wastewater treatment plants,” according to mindbodygreen.com.

Don’t mix contact lenses with the rest of your garbage

Old contact lenses don’t belong in the same trash bag as your expired yogurt and other discarded food, grass clippings and other yard waste, worn-out appliances and tired-looking furniture.

Mindbodygreen.com says that while adding contact lenses to your everyday trash means that plastic won’t flow into our water systems, it’s still being dumped at a landfill.

That’s no better than flushing your contact lenses.

Don’t put contact lenses in the recycling bin

Contact lenses themselves shouldn’t join bottles, cans and other recyclables at your house.

“Due to their size and packaging materials, recycling facilities typically cannot handle contact lens processing, so they are diverted to landfills,” mindbodygreen.com says.

There is, though, a way to recycle the plastic blister packs that contain your contacts.

Online magazine Mental Floss recommends putting empty blister packs inside plastic bottles and then dropping them into your recycling bin once you’ve filled up the bottles.

Remember to remove the foil that covers the blister packs before you shove them into those plastic bottles, though.

Everclear

Clearly is excited to offer a brand-new contact lens that allows you to experience optimal comfort and extraordinary performance for less. Everclear™ contacts offer high-tech lenses featuring high oxygen flow-through, consistent moisture balance, and UVA/UVB protection—at a price as low as $3 per box!

Everclear™ is available in daily, weekly, and monthly varieties at Clearly.ca

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with NailsHow to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Contact lens recycling — it’s a thing

We’ve gone through a few don’ts regarding disposal of contacts. Now, we’ve got one great “do” for you.

In 2016, Bausch + Lomb teamed up with TerraCycle, a handler of hard-to-recycle waste, to create the ONE by ONE Recycling Program.

The program is designed to recycle contact lenses, blister packs and blister-pack foil.

As of April 2019, the recycling program had diverted more than 9.2 million used contacts, blister packs and foil from waterways, landfills and traditional recycling facilities.

Altogether, those materials weighed nearly 28 tons (roughly equivalent to four large African elephants).

How does the ONE by ONE program work?

Once you’ve collected your old contacts, blister packs and foil, you can pick one of two recycling paths:

Take the waste to a local eye doctor’s office. Find a vision practice near you participating in the contact lens recycling program. At this time, drop-off locations aren’t available in Alaska and Hawaii.

Ship it to TerraCycle. If you go the shipping route, you’ll place the waste in a sealed cardboard box and then drop off the box at a UPS location or schedule a pickup from your home. Free shipping labels are available.

You don’t need to wash the contact-lens waste before you recycle it, but you should be sure the blister packs are free of liquid.

“Once received, the contact lenses and blister packs are separated and cleaned,” Bausch + Lomb says.

“The metal layers of the blister packs are recycled separately, while the contact lenses and plastic blister pack components are melted into plastic that can be remolded to make recycled products.”

Fortunately, the program accepts used contact lenses and other contact-lens recyclables from any manufacturer, not just Bausch + Lomb.

For every qualifying shipment weighing at least 2 pounds, Bausch + Lomb will donate $1 per pound to Optometry Giving Sight, a global fundraising initiative that seeks to prevent blindness and impaired vision.

Think of recycling your contact lenses as a “win-win” with little effort on your part. Your contact lenses and their packaging are recycled, and you’re helping programs to prevent blindness.

Where does it all go?

Your contacts and packaging are turned into “a variety of post-consumer products, such as recycled picnic tables and garden beds,” Amy Butler, vice president of global environment, health, safety and sustainability at Bausch Health, said in 2018.

That could make it a “win-win-win,” for just a little bit of extra work on your part.

IS YOUR CONTACT SUPPLY RUNNING LOW? Find an eye doctor near you to schedule a contact lens exam and fitting.

Glasses can be a pain for active kids, but contact lenses bring a lot of responsibility. Optometrists explain how to determine what’s best for your kid.

By Jill Buchner October 12, 2018

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

If your kid’s glasses are getting in the way of their soccer game or if they’ve lost or broken too many frames to count, you might consider contact lenses. But is it a good idea to give contact lenses to kids? We asked optometrists what parents need to know before making the switch.

When are contact lenses a good idea for kids?

One of the primary reasons for kids to switch to contacts is to make it easier for them to be physically active, says Daniel Rayman, an optometrist with an interest in children’s vision who practices in Richmond Hill and Bolton, Ont. “Whether they’re active in sports or dance, having glasses on the face is inconvenient,” he says. Not only are glasses more likely to get banged up during a soccer game, but the frames can get in the way of a child’s peripheral vision. Kids who participate in sports and activities can switch to contacts every day, or just when they have games or practice. How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails3 common eye problems in kids: What you need to know

Some kids may also want to switch to contacts because they feel self-conscious in glasses, but Rayman says this is becoming less common, because so many funky frames are in style that many kids think it’s cool to wear glasses.

Contact lenses can also be a better option for some kids from a vision perspective. Christine Misener, an optometrist in Ancaster, Ont., says that contacts are a particularly good option for kids who have much worse vision in one eye than the other. “With glasses, when you have one lens that’s a lot stronger than the other, there can be some difference in image size between the two eyes that prevents the eyes from working well together as a team,” she explains. “It can be more comfortable and visually beneficial to consider contact lenses in that situation.”

When is a child ready for contact lenses?

Rayman says he starts prescribing contact lenses for kids starting around ages eight to 10, because that’s typically when kids have developed the dexterity and responsibility that’s needed to insert and remove contact lenses, and develop healthy habits around their eye health. Misener says there’s no minimum age when kids are ready, but they have to demonstrate that they practice good hygiene. She asks parents how good their child is at washing their hands and brushing their teeth every night, and whether they keep their room tidy. “The parent is the one who knows the personality and the responsibility of their child best,” she says. But she also finds out how badly the child wants contact lenses. “They’re the one who has to learn how to take them in and out of their eye and be comfortable with that stuff. All three parties—the optometrist, the parent and the child—everybody has to be on the same team, and everybody has to be motivated.”

Are all children eligible for contacts?

Aside from not being ready for the responsibility of contact lenses, some kids with certain eye diagnoses will not be candidates for contacts. For example, some people have abnormalities in the shape of their eye, or, if a child has an astigmatism, they might require hard reusable contact lenses, rather than disposable ones, which are usually too difficult for kids to care for, says Misener. Plus, some kids have anxiety about touching their eyes. In those cases, it’s best to stick to glasses.

What do parents need to know about giving kids contact lenses?

When an optometrist prescribes your child contact lenses, they’ll train your child the correct technique for inserting and removing them. Kids need to remember to wash their hands before touching their lenses or their eyes in order to prevent the spread of bacteria, and remember to take their contacts out before bed and insert fresh ones in the morning. While most optometrists would only recommend daily lenses for kids so there’s no bacteria from reuse and no messing around with cleaning solution, hygiene is still vitally important. “There’s a risk of eye infection if you don’t clean your hands properly, or if you over-wear your lenses,” says Misener.

Of course, parents can help with some of these daily tasks, but ultimately, the child needs to be confident enough to do it themselves in case, for instance, a lens falls out at school and they have to put in a new one. On that note, Misener suggests, kids should always be carrying an extra pair of lenses in their backpack. Plus, she requires patients to have a pair of glasses for backup at home. Since contacts are only worn during the daytime, kids will need those glasses to get to bed, if they wake up and have to go to the bathroom, or to help them get around first thing in the morning. “It’s important that any child who needs vision correction have vision correction all the time,” says Misener.

Are contacts more expensive than glasses?

Since your child still needs to have backup glasses on hand, you can expect that adding contacts will run you a bigger bill, but there are some benefits to contacts that could save you money. For one thing, if your kid is in sports where glasses are easily damaged, you won’t be replacing those nearly as often. Plus, Misener says a lot of kids have rapidly changing prescriptions as they’re growing, so ordering a three-month supply of contact lenses sometimes makes more sense than continually replacing glasses.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

It’s a misconception that dry eyes and contact lenses are like oil and water. Sure, having dry eyes means the tear film meant to moisturize your eyeballs isn’t working as well as it should, but it doesn’t rule out your ability to wear contacts. It can, however, make the whole thing a little more challenging, Alisha Fleming, O.D., an optometrist at Penn Medicine, tells SELF. “Improper contact lens wear and care can cause dry eye issues and can also exacerbate dry eye issues,” Dr. Fleming says. If you have dry eyes and wear contacts (or want to), follow these rules to make the experience go as swimmingly as possible.

It seems obvious, but be real, how often do you do this? If your answer isn’t “every single time, even when I’m exhausted and my bed is calling to me,” that’s a problem. Touching your contacts with clean hands makes it less likely that you’ll transfer infection-causing pathogens from your fingers to your lenses and into your eyes, Nicky Lai, O.D., associate professor of clinical optometry at The Ohio State University, tells SELF. The American Optometric Association (AOA) specifically recommends washing your hands with water and mild soap, then thoroughly drying them with a lint-free towel before you handle your lenses.

Doing so puts you at a higher risk of developing an infection on your cornea (the transparent, dome-shaped surface of your eye), the AOA says. That’s because sleeping in your contacts doesn’t allow your eyes to receive as much oxygen as they otherwise would, creating a potential breeding ground for things like bacteria, Dr. Lai says. Corneal infections can also lead to corneal ulcers, which are essentially sores on the surface of your eye.

Even if you escape that fate, sleeping in your contacts can mess with your natural tear film and make your dry eyes worse, Dr. Lai says, so it’s a no-go all around.

If you wear your lenses until they’re practically crumbling out of your eyeballs, this one’s for you. Somewhere on the box your contacts come in, it should tell you how often to wear a fresh pair. Make your eye doctor proud—and keep your eyes safe—by following those instructions.

Even if you’re meticulous about cleaning your lenses after every wear, debris can build up on them over time, making it harder for tears to spread evenly across your eyeballs, Vivian Shibayama, O.D., an optometrist and contact lens specialist with UCLA Health, tells SELF. As you can imagine, this won’t do your dry eyes any favors. And if you’re not meticulous about cleaning your lenses while using them for way too long, it’s even easier for them to collect irritating debris and microorganisms like bacteria that can cause infection.

Topping off the solution in your contact lens case makes sense from a thrifty perspective, but it’s not a good idea. Instead, the AOA recommends dumping out the old stuff and putting in new solution every day. “After the lens is removed from the case and placed on the eye, the case should be emptied and rinsed with contact lens solution, then set upside down to dry on a clean tissue paper,” Dr. Lai says. “Reusing contact lens solution decreases the effectiveness of the disinfection properties of the solution,” Dr. Lai explains, which can lead to issues like inflammation and infection. Here are other contact lens case mistakes you should never make, FYI.

Artificial tears are often the first line of defense if you have dry eyes. You should actually use them even when your eyes feel fine because that helps to prevent dryness from cropping up, the Mayo Clinic says. “I tell my patients to use drops like sunscreen,” Dr. Shibayama says. “They should be used before the eyes feel dry, just like we use sunscreen before we become burned.”

While it’s tempting to wear your contacts from the time you open your eyes until you conk out at night, this really isn’t a great when you have dry eyes. “It’s a good idea to let the eyes breathe for a few hours without the lens,” Dr. Shibayama says. This allows your eyes to get good exposure to oxygen and receive nourishment from your natural tear film without lenses in the way.

Hi guys! So I just got contacts today and I find them do difficult to take out. I’m too freaked out to pinch it right off of the iris. What I do is slide it to the white part (which I HATE the feeling of) then pinch it from there. Do you think it’s easier to just pinch it from the iris? Thank you!

5 Answers

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

I’ve had soft contacts for over 20 years and i have NEVER done the pinch from the Iris method. If you look towards your nose as you take them out and slide the lens to the outer corner of the eye it starts to crumple and comees off easily. No risk of scratching yoru eye adn incredibly easier.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Hi, I wear contacts to and I leave it on the Iris and I pinch the bottom of my contacts and take them out, very easy. Good luck hope this helped!

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

For me, the pinching technique is hard. But let me show you a way. But make sure that your hands are cleaned and nails are not long!

1st: use your one hand (left handed or right handed).

2nd: use your middle finger, pull the lower part of your eye down.

3rd: with the other hand, also use middle finger to pull the upper part of your eye up.

4th: now with your index finger, slowly touch the lens and slide it down. The speed of you sliding the lens down need to be normal, not too slow or too fast! Just gently normal speed.

5th: do it until the lens pop out of your eyes.

This is my personal experimented. When I first got my contact lenses, I put them in my eyes, they were really easy to do. But when I tried to get them out, it was hard. I did try the pinching one, hard though! My eye felt really weird when I squeeze my iris and tried to take out the lens. So I tried the sliding down and then the lens just pop out! really easy and not felt anything. But if you can’t do that technique, please ask your eye doctor for advices.

Inserting your contact lenses is easy, but can take some getting used to, so we’ve compiled this simple step-by-step guide on how to correctly insert and remove your lenses.

Cleanliness

First things first, make sure your hands are clean and dry. Using clean hands to insert your contact lenses is the best way to avoid infection. Remember how your mom always used to remind you to wash behind your ears; well don’t forget to wash under your fingernails too. Girls we know you love those long polished nails, but if you’re new to wearing contact lenses we suggest you cut those pretties nice and short, at least until you’re used to putting your contacts in.

Preparing your lenses

Contact lenses are basically tiny little suction cups so to make sure they stay put they need to be the right way around and not inside out. So place your lens on the tip of your index finger and compare it to the images below. An easy way to remember this is that your contact lens should look like a bowl and not like a saucer.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

Inserting the lens

    Now your lenses are ready it’s time to put them in your eyes.
    So here’s what you do; Look up.
    Using your middle or ring finger, hold the lower lid of your eye open.
    Gently place the contact lens on the white part of your eye. Don’t blink right away or your contact lens could fold or fall out.
    Slowly release your lower eyelid and close your eye.
    Look around and blink a few times to help the contact lens settle.
    Do the same for your other eye and enjoy being able to see the world with perfect vision.

Removing contact lenses

Holding your eye open like you did to insert the lens, look up and gently place your finger on the lens. Slide the lens onto the white part of your eye and carefully pinch the lens with your thumb and index finger to remove it.

Troubleshooting

Can’t stop blinking? Try opening your mouth. This tightens a muscle in your face that makes it more difficult to blink.

Contact lens feels scratchy? You may have a dust particle trapped between the lens and your eye, using clean hands gently sliding the lens onto the white part of your eye and back usually fixes this. If it still feels uncomfortable try removing the lens and rinsing it in solution.

Is your contact lens moving when you blink? It may be inside out. Try reinserting the lens, making sure it’s the right way around.

How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

It can be very frustrating to tear a contact lens. You might wonder, why can’t they just make them out of a stronger material? Currently more than 30 million Americans wear contact lenses and most of them choose soft contact lenses because the soft lens material is very comfortable and is able to let a great deal of oxygen to the cornea keeping them healthy. But this comfort comes with the price of the potential for damage. Read on to learn some tips for preventing rips in your contact lenses.

Avoid using fingernails–Contact lens tearing is commonly caused by using fingernails to handle lenses. When removing your lenses, use your thumb and forefinger to slide the lens to break the suction then remove. Never use your nails to pinch from the center. Keep your nails short and filed to prevent accidental nicks.

  • Unfold in solution–If your lens gets folded by accident, pulling the edges apart with your fingers could result in a rip. Instead, place your lens in a pool of saline solution in the palm of your hand. Gently massage the submerged lens until the moisture helps it open without damage.
  • Keep them moist–A dry lens is an easily damaged lens. Never store your lenses dry, always store them in solution. If your lenses have become dry in your eyes, use rewetting drops before taking them out. Avoid using water or any other liquid than contact solution on your lenses.
  • Keep lens case full–Being conservative can be a virtue but not when it comes to filling your lens case with solution. If the case is only partially full, the lens can adhere to the dry wall, and when you go to take them out, it can cause a tear.
  • Ask about the modulus– All contacts may look roughly the same, but there are variations between contact lens styles–design, oxygen permeability, material. One of the main variations is something called the modulus which is the measurement of the material’s resistance to deformation under tension. A higher modulus number means a slightly stiffer lens which is easier to handle while a lower modulus lens would tend to be floppier requiring more handling and potential for tearing. However, these lower modulus lenses, such as the Coopervision Proclear line, have a high water content and are associated with a higher comfort level. If you have an issue with your lenses tearing, ask your eye doctor about the best modulus for you.
  • What to do with a torn lens– If you have torn a lens, never keep wearing it, even if it’s just a small tear along the side. Any torn edge can scratch the cornea. To remove a torn lens, wash your hands then add some rewetting solution to fully lubricate the lens preventing any bits from sticking to the eye. Pull your lower eyelid down using your thumb and forefinger and use the index finger to slide the larges part of the torn lens down to the lower part of the eye. Use your thumb and forefinger to take the lens out of your eye then examine your eye for any pieces that may remain.
  • Peace out, irritation.

    How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

    If you prefer contacts over glasses, you’ve probably experienced itching or redness in your eyes from your makeup at one point or another. Luckily, by making a few easy changes to your beauty routine, you can ensure that you never deal with frustrating irritation again. Just follow these ophthalmologist-approved tips, and your peepers will thank you.

    Always Put in Your Contacts First
    Okay, this may seem obvious, but it’s a good rule to remember. “When you use makeup first, whether it’s a powder that’s not pressed or a fiber mascara that coats the lashes, and then you put your contacts on, you may already have makeup in your tear film—the thin coating that protects the eye,” says Rebecca Taylor, M.D., an ophthalmologist and spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. This, she says, can not only lead to irritation because you’re putting the contacts on a dirty surface, but it can also increase your risk of getting an eye infection. Ew.

    How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

    Pick the Right Products
    If you wear contacts, powder eye shadow is a good option because it’s pressed and there’s little chance that it’ll make its way into your eyes. If you want to use loose powder, though, you need to be careful. Make sure to wet your makeup brush before applying because that’ll help it adhere to the skin, says Taylor.

    When it comes to liner, Taylor says liquids are a safer choice for your eye health than pencils—regardless of whether or not you wear contacts. “You can get so far down in a pencil liner that the wood scrapes or cuts the eyelid,” she says. As for mascara, Taylor recommends staying away from fiber lash mascara—a type of mascara that contains tiny pieces of fibers made of materials like nylon, silk, or rayon inside the tube, which coat the lashes to create fullness—since the fibers can flake and fall into the eye.

    How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

    Be Careful About How You Apply Eyeliner
    When you apply eyeliner to your waterline (the inner lash line), you risk scratching your eye or contact lens—and getting even more debris in the tear film, says Taylor. In fact, a new study done by the University of Waterloo found that 15 to 30 percent more particles of liner moved into this protective layer of the eye when liner was applied directly to the waterline, causing irritation, dryness, infection, and even blurred vision. Yikes. So, it’s a good idea to limit your liner use to the outside of your eye. Here’s how to nail the perfect cat eye.

    How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

    Remove Your Contacts Before Taking Off Your Makeup
    “When you remove your eye makeup, you most likely use a solvent to take the makeup off,” says Taylor. “[But] you don’t want your contact to be a reservoir for chemicals [like oil and alcohol] on the surface of your eye.” Once you’ve taken your lenses out, you can focus on scrubbing your makeup off without scratching a lens or coating it with oil. Stick to these cleansing habits, and you won’t have to be limited to one-day contacts to maintain your eye health, says Taylor.

    Hayley Williams

    How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

    Contact lenses are the best — but they can be incredibly tricky to get in. If you’re just getting started with contacts, or if you’ve always had trouble, here’s one easy trick to help you get them in.

    I started wearing glasses when I was eight, and as an active kid I switched to contact lenses not long after. I don’t have any problems inserting them after so many years, but there’s one small thing I do that makes it so much easier. Maybe it won’t work for everyone, but hopefully it will help.

    Starting with the contact lens on the index finger of your dominant hand, use the middle finger of that hand to pull down your bottom eyelid and your other hand to pull up the top lid. Now here’s the trick: while you position the lens over your eye, focus your vision in the middle distance — for instance, looking at yourself in the mirror. If you try and look at the contact lens that’s now very close to your eye, you’ll instinctively try to blink.

    Still focusing on the mirror, bring the contact lens right down to your eye and as soon as its almost touching, change your focus to look at the contact lens. The shift in focus should pop the lens straight onto your eye with little fuss.

    Of course part of the ‘trick’ of getting contacts in is just practice — the more you have your fingers close to your eye, the less your eyes ‘respond’ to the invasion of their space. Good luck!

    Do you have a different trick to help get your contacts in? Let us know in the comments!

    More Articles

    You will need to properly remove your eyeglass lenses if you are changing frames or if you would like to clean or adjust the lenses. For plastic frames, you can pop the lenses out with a little pressure. For metal frames, you can release the lenses by loosening the screws on either side of the glasses. Work with a gentle hand to avoid damaging the frames or the lenses.

    Evaluate the glasses to determine the best way of removing the lenses. Lenses will either be a pop-out style or held in place by screws at the temples.

    How to Get the Lens Back Into a Pair of Glasses

    Hold the lens using your microfiber cloth. This will protect the lens from scratches while you work.

    Use the small screwdriver from the eyeglass kit to loosen the screw located at the temple of your glasses. As you loosen, the frame will release and the lens will pop out. Repeat on the other side.

    How to Remove Logos From Glasses

    Heat the rim of your plastic frames using the hair dryer. This will warm the plastic to allow for easy lens removal.

    Use the microfiber cloth to hold the lens and gently press the back of the glass forward. The back is the surface closest to your eye. Press near the top of the lens and continue pushing with an even, yet gentle pressure until the lens pops out. Repeat on the other side.

    Place a towel under your work area to protect the lens from damage if they pop out suddenly.

    Inserting a contact lens the wrong way round doesn’t just make the lens ineffective at correcting vision. It can be an uncomfortable experience, and may cause damage to your eye if worn for long periods of time.

    It can be difficult to tell when your contact lenses are inside out, unless you know what to look out for. This article takes a look at several methods you can use to ensure your lenses are the correct way round, every time.

    Wash your hands with antibacterial soap and dry them with a clean, lint-free towel before handling contact lenses.

    Side look

    1. Find a well-lit area and put your contact lens on the tip of your finger, so that the edges are pointing upwards.
    2. Bring your finger down to eye level.
    3. Look at your lens. If the sides are rolled along the edge or folded up, then they’re inside out.

    The ‘taco’ test

    1. Hold a lens near its centre, between the tips of your forefinger and thumb.
    2. Gently squeeze the lens as if you were trying to fold it in half.
    3. While squeezing, look at the edge of the lens. If it’s pointing upwards, or if the edges appear to meet, then the lens is the correct way around. If it bends outwards towards your finger and thumb, then the lens is inside out.

    Check laser markings

    Some contact lenses have small laser markings, which can help you when checking if the lens is inside out. Usually, this will take the form of a sequence of numbers and/or letters.

    1. Place your lens on the tip of your finger.
    2. Hold the lens up to a bright light.
    3. If the number/letter sequence reads correctly, then the lens is properly oriented.
    4. If the number/letter sequence is in reverse, the lens is inside out.

    Secondary navigation

    How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

    allOver images / Alamy Stock Photo

    Cleaning and using your contact lenses properly will help keep your eyes healthy and free from infections.

    wash, rinse and dry your hands thoroughly before touching your lenses

    only wear your contact lenses for the recommended time

    always have an up-to-date pair of glasses for when you take your lenses out

    have regular contact lens check-ups, even if everything seems OK

    get advice straight away if you’re having any problems with your contact lenses, such as sore, red or swollen eyes – remove your lenses until you are told it is safe to start using them again

    do not wear any contact lenses, including novelty lenses, that have not been properly fitted to your eyes

    do not put water or saliva on your lenses or in your eye when you’re wearing them

    do not pick up a dropped lens and put it straight back into your eye without cleaning it thoroughly

    do not carry on wearing your lenses if they look damaged, they do not feel comfortable when wearing them, or your vision is blurry

    do not sleep in your lenses unless your contact lens practitioner says it’s OK to do this

    do not wear your lenses while swimming or playing water sports

    do not wear your lenses in the shower or hot tub

    do not wear someone else’s contact lenses or share your lenses with anyone

    do not reuse a daily disposable lens

    do not use eyedrops while wearing your lenses unless your contact lens practitioner or eye specialist (ophthalmologist) says it’s safe to do this

    Soft, daily disposable contact lenses

    Daily disposable lenses do not need cleaning or disinfecting because they’re only worn once then thrown away.

    To keep your eyes healthy if you wear disposable lenses:

    • make sure you put them in the right way round
    • check them for faults or damage before putting them in
    • never reuse them

    Reusable contact lenses

    There are 2 types of reusable lenses: soft and hard.

    • soft reusable lenses – these can be reused daily for a set period of time, usually 1 week or 1 month
    • hard reusable lenses – also known as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, these can be reused every day for up to a year

    Soft and hard reusable lenses have to be disinfected with contact lens solution every day to prevent infections. Your contact lens prescriber will tell you how to do this.

    To look after your reusable lenses safely:

    • clean your lenses after you take them out by rubbing them with your contact lens solution
    • rinse your lenses with contact lens solution after cleaning them
    • leave them in the disinfecting solution overnight
    • never reuse disinfecting solution or top it up – throw it away and use fresh solution every time
    • only use the solution recommended by your contact lens practitioner, and follow the instructions carefully
    • follow your practitioner’s instructions for cleaning your storage case (do not use tap water)
    • replace your lens case at least once a month
    • never decant your solution into smaller travel-size bottles

    When to get medical help

    If you think there’s a problem with your lenses take your lenses out and go to your prescriber.

    Get advice straight away by calling 111 if you have:

    • blurred vision
    • painful, red or swollen eyes
    • a white or yellow spot over the coloured part of your eye

    Page last reviewed: 28 May 2020
    Next review due: 28 May 2023

    Always wash your hands with a mild soap and dry with a lint-free towel before handling your lenses.

    Clean, rinse and disinfect your lenses each time you remove them.

    Always handle the same lens first to avoid mixing up the right and left lenses.

    Remember to handle your lenses gently.

    Removing the lens from your eye

    1. Look up and pull the lower lid down with your middle finger.
    2. Place your index finger on the lower edge of your lens, and slide the lens down to the white of your eye.
    3. Squeeze the lens lightly between your index finger and thumb and remove gently.
    4. Repeat for the other eye

    Contact Lens Care

    • Clean, rinse, and disinfect your contact lenses after each time you wear them
    • Clean contact lens case after every use with warm soapy water, and let air dry or dry with clean paper towel
    • Use fresh solution every day. Never “top up” existing solution as the lenses will not get properly disinfected

    Additional Information

    – Never sleep in your contact lenses

    -Avoid Hot tubs and swimming with contacts lenses in

    – If your eyes experience any redness, discomfort, or mucus type discharge – remove contact lenses immediately, and contact our office at 817-310-0289 or schedule an eye exam online.

    Sleeping in contacts, using eye drops that “get the red out,” and more bad habits that can lead to serious eye problems when contact lens wearers are careless

    For those of us not endowed with 20/20 vision, corrective lenses are a fact of life. Sure, eyeglasses are easy to throw on, but they can be impractical (ever tried to do hot yoga while wearing a pair?). Contact lenses, on the other hand, are better suited for sweaty activities, beach days, and date nights, which may explain why more than 30 million Americans choose to wear them.

    But those slippery plastic discs come with a slew of issues of their own. After all, you can’t just pop them in without a second thought-contact lenses are a medical device, reminds Thomas Steinemann, M.D., and professor at Case Western Reserve University. The problem: Lots of us do just pop ’em in and forget about ’em. We also tend to believe seriously risky myths (“I can keep these in overnight!”, “Water works as contact solution, right?”) that could hurt our eyes big time. So it’s time to set the record straight-make sure you’re keeping your peepers in tip-top shape by learning the truth about common contact misconceptions.

    Myth: Lenses Can Be Worn Past the Recommended Time Limit

    Reality: Overwear is common, but not the way to go. “Many people try to extend the use of their contacts to save money, but that’s penny-wise and pound-foolish,” Steinemann says. The reason: Lenses get worn out and coated with germs. Over time, this can cause infections. So if your lenses are supposed to be replaced after two weeks, don’t wear them for a month! (Same goes for dailies-they need to be thrown out each night.)

    Myth: You Don’t Really Need to Clean Your Lenses Each Day

    Reality: If you have lenses that need to be cleaned daily, do it, well, daily-and dump out the old solution. First, always wash your hands with soap and water, Steinemann says. Then, after you put the contacts in, clean the case, rubbing it with a clean finger and solution in the morning, then letting it air dry during the day. At night, wash your hands, take out your contacts, and let them soak in fresh (not used!) solution overnight. Not taking these steps can put you at serious risk for keratitis, research shows.

    Sound like too much effort for your busy life? (We know how it goes.) Dailies may be a better idea. “They may cost a little more upfront, but in the long run, the price will even out since you’ll save on the cost of cases and lens solutions,” Steinemann says.

    Myth: Tap Water Works as Contact Solution in a Pinch

    Reality: “This is absolutely forbidden,” Steinemann says. Even if your tap water is safe enough to drink, it’s not sterile enough to clean contacts with. The reason: Water can contain a parasite called an acanthamoeba-and if this organism gets in your eye, it can cause a serious cornea infection called acanthamoeba keratitis, which is difficult to treat, and may even lead to blindness, studies suggest. Oh, and we hope this is obvious, but never spit on your lenses to clean them either!

    Myth: You Can Shower (and Swim) in Them

    Reality: Since the acanthamoeba parasite is commonly found in multiple water sources, this means you really shouldn’t wear contacts while you shower, let alone swim. “If you do swim in contacts, take them out as soon as you get out after washing your hands thoroughly,” Steinemann says. Throw them away, or clean and disinfect them overnight before wearing them again. Bottom line: Water and contacts don’t mix. (Also, if you’re still showering with super hot water, cut it out! This is The Case for Cold Showers.)

    Myth: Colored Cosmetic Lenses Are Safe

    Reality: Turning your eyes golden to go with your Twilight Halloween costume isn’t worth it. “It’s actually illegal to sell cosmetic contacts without giving an official assessment and fitting by an eye doctor,” Steinemann says. Why? The size and shape of your cornea partly determines what type of lens you should wear-if they don’t fit correctly, they can rub and cause microabrasions, which can let in germs that cause infections. Bottom line: Skip the illegal cosmetic lenses, and instead get them through an eye doctor or other eye care professional, who can give you a prescription.

    Myth: You Only Need to See Your Doc Every Couple of Years

    Reality: Go at least annually to check your prescription, which is only good for one year, Steinemann says. Other than that, listen to your body. If you’re experiencing any light sensitivity, redness, or pain, take out your contacts and see a doctor ASAP. It could be anything from allergies to an infection from bacteria, fungus, or even an amoeba-and if you wait too long, you could run into serious trouble, Steinemann says. For information on healthy contact lens wear, check out the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.

    How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

    Whether you’re brand new to wearing contact lenses or a seasoned pro, accidents can happen. No matter how careful you are, chances are, you’ll accidentally rip a contact lens at some point in your life.

    Do you currently have a ripped contact lens on your hands? Or perhaps you want to prepare for a worst-case scenario? Either way, you might be wondering what to do next.

    Can you still wear your contact even after it’s ripped? We’ve got this question covered, plus more. Read on to learn how you can handle this type of situation.

    Can You Wear Ripped Contact Lenses?

    If you only remember one thing from this article, make it this: never, ever, ever wear a torn contact lens. It doesn’t matter if it feels fine in your eye. You need to take the contact out and throw it away pronto!

    Risks of Wearing Ripped Lenses

    Torn contacts will not function as well as intact ones. This is because ripping prevents the lens from maintaining the specific curvature needed to match your eye. As a result, it will not have a good fit.

    Ripped lenses are also less likely to stay centred on your eye. If they move away from the middle of the eye or move around too much, you’ll end up with blurred vision.

    Most importantly, a torn contact lens is dangerous. It’ll have a jagged edge that could scratch your cornea, the front surface of your eye. Not only that, but it could also get trapped beneath your eyelid. You’ll likely find this irritating and very difficult to deal with. Just take it out and trash it.

    What to Do if Your Contact Lens Rips

    How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

    Clearly, wearing ripped contact lenses is a bad idea. So, what are you supposed to do? If your contact rips, you should throw it away and put in a new one. Check the new lens first to make sure it doesn’t have any rips or jagged edges.

    If your contact lens tears after you’ve put it in, carefully take it out and throw it away as soon as you realize it’s torn. If you don’t have an extra lens on hand, wear your backup glasses until you can get new contacts.

    What if the Lens Stays in Your Eye?

    Sometimes, when your contact rips, a piece of it can get left behind in your eye after you’ve removed the lens. Trying to remove the lost bit of plastic can lead to irritation. But it’s even more irritating to leave it in.

    Try to locate the torn piece, then use your fingertip to slide it toward the outer corner of your eye so you can pull it out. It may help to put some eye drops in to lubricate the piece, and then blink to dislodge it.

    If you can’t find the piece but you feel it, call your eye doctor and get in to see them as soon as possible. If that’s not fast enough go to a walk in clinic or urgent care centre. A doctor will use a slit lamp to locate the torn piece. He or she can also put in a special coloured dye that helps locate and remove it.

    How to Prevent Future Rips

    Once you’ve dealt with one ripped contact lens, you’ll want to do everything you can to avoid dealing with one again. Luckily, there are lots of things you can do to reduce the likelihood of ripping a contact lens. Here are some specific steps you can take:

    Inspect Your Lenses First

    How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

    Always inspect your contact lenses before putting them in your eyes. Give them a once over (while wearing your glasses if necessary) to check for rips, chips or jagged edges. If you see any issues, throw the lens away and start over with a new one. It’s good to have a backup supply on hand in case something like this happens.

    It’s a smart idea to contact the manufacturer if most of your new lenses have damage. You can also try and switch up the contacts brand. Talking to your doctor can point you in the right direction.

    Clean Them Properly

    Make sure you’re cleaning your contact lenses according to their instructions. Keep them moist and make sure your lens case is always full of contact solution. If you don’t do this, they’ll dry out and become more prone to tearing.

    Remember to be gentle when handling your contact lens. You can rub them gently to get rid of deposits. But if you rub too vigorously, you could end up ripping them.

    Unfold Them in Your Contact Solution

    How to Take Out Contact Lenses with Nails

    Sometimes, your contact lenses accidentally fold over when you take them out. If this happens, put the lens back in the contact solution before you unfold it. This will help you unstick it more easily, and you’ll be less likely to tear it in the process.

    Avoid Taking Contacts Out of Dry Eyes

    Allergies, excessive screen time or dry weather conditions can cause your eyes to dry out. When this happens, your contact lenses can dry out too. This makes them more prone to ripping. If your eyes feel dry, use a few drops of rewetting solution on the lenses and your eyes before taking them out.

    Don’t Rub Your Eyes While Wearing Contacts

    Rubbing your eyes while wearing contact lenses increases your chances of ripping them. It also makes you more susceptible to corneal abrasions. If your eyes feel itchy and you have to rub your eyes, take your contacts out first.

    Keep Your Fingernails Neat and Trimmed

    Finally, know that long or jagged fingernails can easily rip the delicate material of your contacts. Keep your nails neat and trimmed to reduce the risk of tearing them. When you remove your contacts, be sure to use the pads of your thumb and index finger rather than your fingernails.

    Do You Need to Replenish Your Contact Lens Supply?

    Do you need to replace ripped contact lenses or just replenish your supply? Check out the brands we carry and what’s on sale. Or do you just want to learn more about contact lenses and your eyes? Read up on more tips and tricks about caring for your contacts.