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How to teach children phonics

If you’re the parent of a beginning reader, chances are you’re hearing a lot about phonics. Here’s what you need to know about how your child will learn phonics, and how you can help teach phonics at home.

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What exactly is phonics?
Phonics is knowing that sounds and letters have a relationship. In other words, it is the link between what we say and what we can read and write. Phonics offers beginning readers the strategies they need to sound out words. For example, kids learn that the letter D has the sound of “d” as in “doll.” Then they learn how to blend letter sounds together to make words like dog.

Why is it important?
In order for kids to understand what they read, they must be able to do it quickly and automatically, without stumbling over words. Phonics facilitates that process.

How does your child’s school teach phonics?
Systematically and sequentially. Teachers give children plenty of practice before moving on. Your child will read short, easy books, containing the particular letter sounds or words they’re working on. You can help them practice by providing similar books at home, such as this BOB Books Beginning Readers box set.

Here are more ways you can reinforce phonics learning at home:

  • Team up with the teacher. Ask how you can highlight phonics and reading outside of school, and share any concerns you have.В
  • Listen to your child read daily. If your child stumbles on a word, encourage them to sound it out. But if they still can’t get it, provide the word so they don’t get discouraged.
  • Boost comprehension. Ask questions like, “What do you think will happen next?” or “What did he mean by that?” Here are more great questions to ask during story time.
  • Revisit familiar books. It’s okay if your child wants to re-read favorite books from earlier years. In fact, it’s actually beneficial!
  • Read aloud. Choose books on topics that excite your child (get great suggestions from our numerous book lists), and read with gusto, using different voices for each character.
  • Spread the joy. Show your child how much you value reading by having plenty of books and magazines around the house. You’ll teach phonics as well as cultivate a lifelong love of reading.

Shop these great phonics box sets to get started! You can find all books and activities at The Scholastic Store.В

Flummoxed by phonics? Here’s the what, why and how of phonics to help guide you and your child.

How to Teach Children Phonics

Ladybird team

From making friends to confidence with letters and numbers, there’s a lot to learn when starting school. Children learn a lot through play – but these days, reading skills are also taught systematically, from the earliest days in nursery or reception class right through their first years in primary school.

It can be a bit of a puzzle to work out how best to support your child through the early stages of reading, especially since teaching methods may have changed quite a bit since you were at school! Read on if you’d like to find out what to expect as your child builds their reading skills, how to help them – and how you can both have fun while you do so!

How to Teach Children Phonics

Phonics buzz-words – decoded!

Phonics: using the sounds made by individual letters and groups of letters to read words.

Decoding: using your phonic knowledge to sound out and read words.

Grapheme: a written letter or group of letters, like ‘s’, ‘a’, ‘she’ or ‘air’. Some graphemes are single letters like ‘a’; others are digraphs like ‘ai’.

Digraph: two letters that make one sound together, like ‘sh’, ‘ai’, ‘oo’.

Phoneme: the sound a letter or group of letters make – e.g. the word ‘mat’ has three phonemes, ‘m’, ‘a’ and ‘t’. The word ‘through’ is longer, but it also has three phonemes, ‘th’, ‘r’ and the ‘oo’ sound in ‘ough’.

Sounding out: using your phonic knowledge to help you say each sound within a word, e.g. ‘r-e-d’ or ‘s-au-ce-p-a-n’.

Blending: running the sounds in the word together to read the whole word, e.g. ‘r-e-d, red’, ‘s-au-ce-p-a-n, saucepan’.

High-frequency words (also known as ‘common exception words’): the very important, very common words which we use a lot, but which aren’t always decodable using phonics. This includes crucial words like ‘the’, ‘one’, ‘where’, etc. Children are taught to recognise these words on sight – a few of these words are introduced and learnt at a time.

How to Teach Children Phonics

So, what is phonics, and why is it so important?

Phonics means using letter sounds to help you read words.

Most schools in the UK now teach reading through phonics. The reason phonics is so widely used is that research shows it works! That’s why the official school curriculum says that children need to be taught to read using a systematic phonics system.

In pre-school or nursery, before they even start learning letter names and sounds, children begin developing their listening skills so that they are tuned into the different sounds in words.

Then, usually in reception or year/primary one, the letters of the alphabet are introduced in a set order, and children learn one sound for each letter. At that point, they can sound out and read simple, short words like ‘c-a-t, cat’ and ‘s-u-n, sun’. Next, children learn that some letters make different sounds when you put them together, like ‘sh’, ‘ee’ and ‘ai’.

Once they’ve learned to read words with the most common letter-sound combinations, children move on to learn lots of alternative combinations. They practise reading increasingly complex words. By the time they finish their first year, most children will be well on the way to reading pretty much any familiar word in English! In their second year, children develop their skills still further, practising using phonics to read and spell words that are less familiar and more challenging.

Of course, while all this is going on, children are also learning to understand and enjoy what they read! From nursery and beyond, teachers share wonderful stories and non-fiction books with children and encourage them to think about, talk about and enjoy their reading.

Phonics is a teaching technique in which your child learns to recognize sounds and letters as well as how to blend them to make words. Once your child understands phonics, he can decode new words with greater ease 3. Phonics is taught in stages that progress in difficulty and take time to master.

Rhyme and Clap

The first step is to build your child’s phenomic awareness, helping him to recognize letters, sounds and syllables. Use activities, such as rhyming and clapping games, to make this process fun. For example, begin a rhyming game by saying a simple word, such as cat. Ask your child to respond with a word that rhymes with cat, such as hat, bat or fat. Clapping can help your child to recognize syllables. Show him how to clap to the syllables in his own name. If your child’s name is Edward, for instance, clap once for “Ed” and then a second time for “ward.”

Blend and Segment

Once your child becomes familiar with common letters and sounds, teach him the 44 phenome sounds by putting each sound on an index card. When you show the card to your child, utter the phenome and then have your child repeat the sound after you. This activity helps him to connect the printed letter with the sound. Then, teach him the skill of blending letters and sounds to make words. For example, say the letters “h,” “o” and “t” separately and then blend the sounds to say “hot.” Reverse the process — called segmenting — by having your child listen to a word and then figure what sounds are needed to make the word.

Cover the Alphabet and Letter Teams

Teach your child the alphabet so he also learns less common letters, such as “j”, “v” and “w.” Sing the “Alphabet Song” together and have him play with alphabet blocks or magnetic letters. Next, introduce him to letter teams — digraphs – in which two letters form one sound. Also, teach your child consonant clusters in which two consonants blend to make one sound, such as “fr,” “st” and “cl.” Use a whiteboard and write words with diagraphs or consonant clusters, but leave out letters. Help your child fill in the blanks 3. Have your child identify objects in pictures, such as a drawing of a frog by a tree.

Teach Long Vowels and Tricky Words

The next leap for your child is to learn that there is more than one way to make long vowel sounds, according to the BBC. For example, you can make a long “e” sound with “ea” and “ee.” Your child should also learn that long vowel sounds can be made when letter teams are split. The “a” and “e” in bake are no longer paired but separated to make the long vowel “a.” Finally, gradually introduce your child to tricky words that don’t follow the phonics’ rules, such as:

How to Teach Children Phonics

Y ou should teach your child to apply phonic knowledge as the first approach to spelling and reading.

There are 19 phonemes that have one sound that corresponds to a letter in the English Alphabet.

Phonemes are the smallest units, (think /a/ or “ah”), of sound.

To teach phonemic awareness to a child they need to learn these 19 basic sounds.

Phonics is based on teaching the sounds, not the letters.

How to Teach Children Phonics

The 7 remaining 7 alphabet sounds (think /th, br, ch,/) are called graphemes.

How to Teach Phonics to Children

Make words

As you teach your child the basics of phonics, they will start to make more words by using the basic phonic alphabet.

By learning the different sounds your child will be able to learn simple words using phonemes and graphemes.

How to Teach Children Phonics

After a short period of learning your child will be able to form longer words by using their basic phonic knowledge and combine more consonants to make more advanced words.

Teach your child that the letters should be blended, from left to right, so that they can read the words.

The reverse of blending is used to show how words can be separated into their individual phonemes for spelling.

As your child starts to see individual letters it should start to say the sound of the letter out loud. This is also called decoding.

They should also be able to put simple 3 letter words, consonant (C), vowel (V), and consonant (C), (CVC) words together such as sit, or bat, and say the whole word aloud.

While saying the words aloud they should also be shown how to write them down.

The writing is known as encoding.

How to Teach Phonics to Children with Letter Cards

At this 3 letter word stage, it is a good idea to make some “letter cards” using some of the basic letters and vowels that the child can use to form individual 3 letter words and say them out loud.

As your child progresses, past common 3 letter words, they will be able to make multiple 4 letter words using consonant clusters which are two consonants in the same word in a CCVC word such as drag, grab, and plug.

How to Teach Children Phonics

They will also be ready to do CVCC words like fold, cart, and silk.

Vowel digraphs are where two vowels next to each other make a different sound when said together such as – brain, fool, and stairs.

Next to learn is consonant digraphs where two vowels together make a different sound such as frog, chap, and stop.

While learning all of these different sounds is very important, the child must continue to form the letters into words (encoding) at the same time.

They should now be able to write a simple story and read it back to you.

Reading should be encouraged at this stage so they learn to read and spell more advanced words with ease.

Phonics is an excellent way to teach your child to read and write so they get a head start over all the other children in their class.

Go here to speed up this whole process and give your child an unfair advantage.

How to Teach Children Phonics

Reading opens up a new world of imagination and creativity. Nothing beats reading a storybook, not even watching a movie adapted from a book.

To be able to read at a young age means that your child will be able to follow instructions and lessons at school much easier, especially when they enrol into Primary 1.

Fortunately, one of the proven methods to support your child’s reading is phonics which helps your child to identify keywords, increase confidence in reading thus making reading enjoyable.

Here are some things you need to know about phonics and some tips to help your child learn it.

What is Phonics? Why is it important?

Phonics helps a person read words with the help of letter sounds.

Children in preschool or nursery learn reading faster when their listening skills are developed first. Teachers help them differentiate between different word sounds before moving to letter names. Likewise, you can do the same at home with your child.

The alphabet is also taught in a specific order and children are taught one sound per letter. As they progress, they will start sounding out words and read them out. They will also learn how certain letters produce different sounds.

Once they learn how to read words which uses simple tones, they will also learn complex words. When they finish primary 1, these children will now be able to use common words, spell and learn new words.

How Can You Help Your Child?

Keeping it easy and fun

Phonics helps children learn how to read faster and flawlessly as possible. It will also help them read the stories they like. Reading should be fun and it should not be seen as a chore to master.

If you are helping your child out, do not forget these tips below to keep things fun:

Make your phonics session specific and short. Make sure to stop before your child gets bored. Usually, phonics sessions take only 10 minutes.

Try to add some fun and games when you do phonics sessions.

Do your phonics session when your child is not too distracted or tired from school or play. You should also set up a quiet room for them to concentrate during these phonics sessions.

As your child improves reading on their own, do not stop trying to read to them. Your child is still unfamiliar with certain words so you will need to help them with them. It is also a great way to bond with them, especially as you tell them the stories you love.

If you see that your child’s reading is not improving, don’t hesitate to speak to their teacher or engage an English tutor. Tell them what you have seen and ask what you can do to help your child. They will be able to determine what is wrong and what would fit your child’s learning style.

How to Teach Children Phonics

Preschool and nursery

Nowadays, plenty of nurseries and preschools incorporate phonics lessons in their curriculum. The popular frameworks used in schools are Jolly Phonics and Letterland.

During their classes, teachers can help children discover their learning style and help them use it to learn how to read. Children will learn how to read with the help of songs and play as they make different sounds. They will become familiar with these sounds and learn how to repeat them.

At this stage, your child is undergoing Phase 1 of understanding phonics. They will also be able to do the following:

Listen to the world around them and copy the sounds they hear. The most common sounds your child will mimic are animal sounds and cars.

Improvise in making these sounds with their body and voice.

Pick up rhyming words and learn how to spot them.

Listen to words and split them to determine the sounds which form the word.

These phonics do not sound like reading at first but it does create a good foundation for the next stage of phonics. To further encourage your child in phonics, you can revise what has been taught in school at home.

Phonic fun with young children

When teaching phonics, use your child’s likes and hobbies to get their attention. If they like cars, see how many car noises they could repeat. Would they be able to make the sound you are doing and tell you what car made that sound? You can also encourage them to make the right noises during playtime if they are playing with their cars or animal toys.

If you are going out with them, listen for sounds and see if your child can determine what made that sound. You can even ask them to repeat it for you.

Sing nursery rhymes with them or their favourite soundtrack. Are they able to keep up and recognize which words rhymes? While singing nursery rhymes, teach your child which words rhymes by clapping. When you repeat the song, will your child be able to recognize the words? Can they create their own rhythm which you can repeat?

How to Teach Children Phonics

Tips for parents and tutors: Phonics buzz-words

If you are still confused about what phonics means, here are some buzz-words that will guide you.

Phonics: uses sound made by letters and letter combinations to read words.

Decoding: uses phonics to read words.

Grapheme: a letter or a group of letters like “she”, “a” or “air”.

Digraph: two letters which make one sound when you read them, for example, “ai”

Phoneme: the sound letters or a group of letters make. For example, ‘hat’ has three phonemes.

Sounding out: uses phonics to say all the sounds found in a word.

Blending: mixes the sounds together to read a word.

Common exception words: words which cannot be read with phonics. Children are often taught these words early to help them spot these words. Some examples include ‘the’ and ‘where.’

Conclusion

Reading can help your child discover new worlds that would tickle their imagination. It will also help them understand the world better. With phonics, your child will be able to pick up reading faster and love it.

For more helpful tips to improve your child’s reading, here are some articles:

How to Teach Children Phonics

What is phonics?

Phonics is a method of teaching children to read by linking sounds (phonemes) and the symbols that represent them (graphemes, or letter groups). Phonics is the learning-to-read method used in primary schools in the UK today.

What is a phoneme?

A phoneme is the smallest unit of sound. The phonemes used when speaking English are:

How to Teach Children Phonics

Print out a list of phonemes to practise with your child or listen to the individual sounds being spoken with our phonics worksheets.

Phonics learning step 1: decoding

Children are taught letter sounds in Reception. This involves thinking about what sound a word starts with, saying the sound out loud and then recognising how that sound is represented by a letter.

The aim is for children to be able to see a letter and then say the sound it represents out loud. This is called decoding.

Some phonics programmes start children off by learning the letters s, a, t, n, i, p first. This is because once they know each of those letter sounds, they can then be arranged into a variety of different words (for example: sat, tip, pin, nip, tan, tin, sip, etc.).

Phonics learning step 2: blending

Children then need to go from saying the individual sounds of each letter, to being able to blend the sounds and say the whole word. This can be a big step for many children and takes time.

While children are learning to say the sounds of letters out loud, they will also begin to learn to write these letters (encoding). They will be taught where they need to start with each letter and how the letters need to be formed in relation to each other. Letters (or groups of letters) that represent phonemes are called graphemes.

How to Teach Children Phonics

Phonics learning step 3: decoding CVC words

Children will focus on decoding (reading) three-letter words arranged consonant, vowel, consonant (CVC words) for some time. They will learn other letter sounds, such as the consonants g, b, d, h and the remaining vowels e, o, u. Often, they will be given letter cards to put together to make CVC words which they will be asked to say out loud.

Phonics learning step 4: decoding consonant clusters in CCVC and CVCC words

Children will also learn about consonant clusters: two consonants located together in a word, such tr, cr, st, lk, pl. Children will learn to read a range of CCVC words (consonant, consonant, vowel, consonant) such as trap, stop, plan. They will also read a range of CVCC words (consonant, vowel, consonant, consonant) such as milk, fast, cart.

Phonics learning step 5: vowel digraphs

Children are then introduced to vowel digraphs. A digraph is two vowels that together make one sound such as: /oa/, /oo/, /ee/, /ai/. They will move onto sounding out words such as deer, hair, boat, etc. and will be taught about split digraphs (or ‘magic e’). They will also start to read words combining vowel digraphs with consonant clusters, such as: train, groan and stool.

Phonics learning step 6: consonant digraphs

Children will also learn the consonant digraphs (two consonants that together make one sound) ch and sh and start blending these with other sounds to make words, such as: chat, shop, chain and shout.

Encoding, or learning to spell as well as read

Alongside this process of learning to decode (read) words, children will need to continue to practise forming letters which then needs to move onto encoding. Encoding is the process of writing down a spoken word, otherwise known as spelling. They should start to be able to produce their own short pieces of writing, spelling the simple words correctly.

It goes without saying that reading a range of age-appropriate texts as often as possible will really support children in their grasp of all the reading and spelling of all the phonemes.

Phonics learning in KS1

By the end of Reception, children should be able to write one grapheme for each of the 44 phonemes.

In Year 1, they will start to explore vowel digraphs and trigraphs (a group of three letters that makes a single sound, like ‘igh’ as in ‘sigh’) further. They will begin to understand, for example, that the letters ea can make different sounds in different words (dream and bread). They will also learn that one sound might be represented by different groups of letters: for example, light and pie (igh and ie make the same sound).

Children in Year 2 will be learning spelling rules, such as adding suffixes to words (such as -ed, -ing, -er, -est, -ful, -ly, -y, -s, -es, -ment and -ness). They will be taught rules on how to change root words when adding these suffixes (for example, removing the ‘e’ from ‘have’ before adding ‘ing’) and then move onto harder concepts, such as silent letters (knock, write, etc) and particular endings (le in bottle and il in fossil).

Image: Shutterstock / iStock

The first step to learning any language is to master the alphabet. But not all children find it easy to read, write, spell or pronounce letters and words correctly. Some children may require a little extra care and attention from their parents or teachers.

Activities and games on phonics for kids are among the simplest and most practical ways of teaching children to connect the letters with their sounds. Phonics makes it easy for children to identify words and pronunciations to frame sentences. In addition to whatever they learn at school, children may practice phonics at home with activities or assignments.

In this post, MomJunction talks about how to teach phonics to kids and gives you a few ideas to make reading fun for them.

What Is Phonics?

Phonics teaches children to read and recognize the words by their sounds. The words are broken into the smallest of sounds, referred to as a phoneme, that help distinguish one word from another. Phonemes are comprised of one or more letters that spell or represent the sound in any word.

For example, the letter ‘a’, when used in different words, may have different sounds such as ‘a’, ‘ae’, ‘ai’ or ‘ay’. Examples of words with these sounds include ‘charm’, ‘aerobics’, ‘train’ or ‘play’. Usually, the individual sounds of a word are taught, and then they are all merged to form the whole word.

The Importance Of Phonics In Elementary Learning

As children grow and start learning on their own, they may come across certain unfamiliar words. Phonics makes it easy for them to understand and pronounce such complex words by helping them connect the letter to the sounds associated with it. This enables them to start reading independently and gradually progress into mastering their language skills.

Keep reading to find out how you can teach phonics to your kids at home.

11 Best Ways To Teach Phonics To Kids

There are many ways of teaching phonics to children. It can be through games, activities, or challenges that are interesting and fun as well.

Teach Your Child Phonics

Phonics is a widely used method of teaching children how to read. It is often referred to as instructional design for teaching children to read and is taught by teaching children to connect sounds with letters or letter groups. Teaching phonics has not come without controversy. Since the 19th century, critics were calling for the phonics teachings to be annulled from American schools. This ultimately led to the Look and Say approach of teaching with the Dick and Jane series of books and reading instructions.

Phonics repopulated and began to be used once again in the 1950’s and began increase in popularity in the 1980’s. The use of phonics still meets with controversy on this teaching method of reading verses other methods, such as sight words and word recognition. Yet, using the phonics method can help children with sounding out words in both reading and spelling subjects.

If you are interested in teaching your children the phonics method, here are some simple tips that will successfully help you with your venture.

Preschool
To start children out with the phonics instruction use alphabet flash cards to encourage the recognition of each letter. While you are teaching your child the letters of the alphabet be sure to make the sound of each letter. This will help children to begin to recognize the sound effect for each letter. You are encouraged to do the flash cards at least three-four times a week for ten minutes per visit. Unless your child is completely not in the mood to do so, it’s not recommended to push children when they are not in the mood as this will make them feel like learning the alphabet is a chore rather than a fun experience.

Make the experience fun for your child; dance around, give funny words for each letter while you are sounding them out or make the experience a blast. However you feel most comfortable doing it, just make sure your children have fun learning.

Take every opportunity to sound letters out to your child. When you are reading a book, stop a few times to go over different words with your child, without disrupting the flow of the story. When you are in a car sound out words you see on signs on the side of the road.

Main points to address:

  • Use the sounds of the letters when reading or practicing the alphabet.
  • Use flash cards to get to know the alphabet.

Grades K-3rd
There are a number of phonics programs for parents who would like help teaching their children the phonics games. Many phonics programs that you can purchase have music set to the background with the letters being sounded out. This can be a fun experience for children to dance and learn the letter sounds all while having fun.

Follow the instructions on these programs for maximum success. If you do not purchase one of these phonics programs, you can always provide your own fun, by popping in your favorite music CD and dance around with the flashcards in hand. Just be sure to turn the volume down low enough for your children to hear you.

Children learn much faster when they are laughing and having fun, but even when you can’t have a blast together use all other teaching opportunities to sound out letters and words while traveling in the car, at the grocery store, at the doctor’s office, or anywhere else there are signs with words and letters.

Main points to address:

  • Have fun with the phonics program.
  • Take every teaching opportunity you have to sound out words and letters.

Resources
Resources that can help you in your venture include:

In this article we’ll be looking at easy ways to teach your child to read using phonics. Before we get into it the methods, let’s take a quick look at what phonics is all about. As well as why it’s essential to learn phonics.

What is Phonics?

Phonics is a teaching method that helps children understand the relationship between letters and their sounds.

By learning and understanding letters and their sounds, kids can successfully decode and read unfamiliar words. This leads to fluent reading, accurate spelling, a richer vocabulary and greater self-confidence.

This decoding skill acquired through phonics is a crucial part of reading and academic success. Which is one of the reasons why phonics is the recommended way of teaching kids how to read and write.

How to Teach Children Phonics

Why Phonics is so Important

Studies have repeatedly found phonics to be the best way to teach a child to read .

It not only teaches them how to decode words effectively, but it does so in a logical way. This logical progression ensures that kids learn easier concepts of the English language first, before moving on to more difficult concepts. This sets learners up to master reading, spelling and communication, as they have a clear understanding of how the language works, rather than outdated memorization techniques.

Phonics increases a child’s reading fluency, accuracy and comprehension. Due to fact that they spend less time trying to figure out how to pronounce a word, and can rather focus on understanding its meaning.

Phonics forms the foundation for reading words. And reading forms the foundation for all formal education. Without phonics, children will struggle to figure out unfamiliar words. Leading to frustration, loss of focus, and the inability to keep up with classmates.

Phonics is essential for developing your child’s reading ability in their early life, and for building a solid foundation for future academic success.

Having said that, let’s take a look at some of the basic principles to keep in mind teaching your child to read using phonics.

Basic Principles for Teaching Your Child Using Phonics

1 – Fun

It’s extremely important that your child has fun when learning to read. When they are enjoying themselves, they are ‘switched on’, and there’s a much higher chance that they will retain what’s being taught.

Never force your child to read, as this will lead to negative feelings towards books and learning in general. It’s crucial that your child has a positive experience when reading.

How to Teach Children Phonics

2 – Appealing to Your Child’s Interests

One way to ensure that reading is a positive experience, is to read stories that appeal to your child’s interests. This isn’t just limited to books and stories. When teaching them using phonics, you can also use individual words and sentences from their favorite topics.

3 – Keep Lessons Short

It’s good to teach phonics in short bursts. Several quick 4 – 5 minute sessions spread throughout the day will ensure that your child doesn’t get tired and lose interest. Numerous spaced out sessions will also bring about consistency. This consistency will help your child master phonics, as it will be ingrained in their daily life.

In total, the phonics lessons shouldn’t take more than 20 – 30 minutes each day. This however doesn’t mean that your child’s exposure to reading is limited to these sessions. You can and should be reading to them as well.

4 – Read to Your Child

Read to your child regularly, as this will instill a genuine love for reading.

You can even slip in a quick phonics lesson without your child realizing, by stopping every now and then to ask them to sound out a word or two with you.

How to Teach Children Phonics

5 – Begin with Phoneme Mastery

Phonemes are the individual sounds that make up words.

When a child masters these individual sounds, they are able to combine them (blending) to form words. From words they can read sentences. And from sentences, paragraphs, pages and books.

This is a logical progression, and it all starts with phonemes.

The more your child understands phonemes, the more accurate and efficient they’ll be in decoding and pronouncing words.

To master phonemes, it’s important for your child to first learn the letters in the alphabet, and their associated sounds. That’s the best place to begin.

Learning the Alphabet

When teaching your child the alphabet, you can choose to either start in alphabetical order (a, b, c, d), or you can choose to teach them some of the more common consonants and vowels first (a, c, t).

Remember, you’re teaching them the sound each letter makes.

It’s best to start slow and begin with just a few letters. It’s important that they master these first before introducing them to new letters. Once they have, you can even start teaching them some blending.

Before learning to read, most children learn the alphabet and the sounds letters make. Parents and teachers can facilitate this process by teaching phonics — the study of letter-sound or sound-symbol associations — to young children. The U.S. Department of Education and National Institutes of Health recommend that phonics instruction be explicit and systematic 1. Parents can begin teaching phonics before their children start school and later supplement school instruction at home.

Assess your child’s proficiency with phonics using alphabet flashcards. For children who have already begun reading simple words, include cards with blends like “sh” and “th.” Shuffle the cards and show them to your child, asking her to name each letter and the sound or sounds it can make.

Teach your child each unknown letter and its name. Sing the alphabet slowly while holding up a flashcard for each new letter or play “Go Fish” with alphabet cards. Use picture books for learning the alphabet, such as “The Alphabet Book” by Philip Eastman or “Dr. Suess’ ABC.” Read these books with your child, pointing out each letter and saying its name.

Consult your child’s list of unknown letter-sound associations and choose one association to teach at a time. For letters that make more than one sound, introduce one sound at a time. Teach new consonants that sound like their name and short vowels first. Next, teach consonants that do not sound like their name, such as h and w, and long vowels. Then teach consonant digraphs, such as th, ch and kn, and vowel combinations such as ea, ie and ow.

Practice letter-sound association with phonics flashcards. Gather up to 10 cards with short words that include the letter-sound association being practiced. Show them to your child, asking him to read each word. Shuffle the cards and repeat until he can accurately read all of the words.

Create words with your child using plastic letters or other letter manipulatives. Make simple words that focus on a target letter-sound association, like “sat” and “bat.” Ask her to remove letters and add new ones to make new words. Have her read each word she creates.

Play “I Spy” with your child, using a letter-sound association as your clue. For example, tell your child that you spy something that begins with “sh.” Take turns spying new objects.

Place a pile of about 10 pictures of everyday objects in front of your child. Ask him to sort the pictures into two groups: one pile with pictures whose names contain a target letter-sound association and another pile of pictures that do not.

Read a “decodable” book with your child that focuses on a chosen letter-sound association. A decodable book is one in which words are short, follow the basic rules of phonics and primarily contain only sounds your child has learned. Point out whatever association you are teaching and emphasize the sound it makes as you read.

Children may master new letter-sound associations within a hours, days or weeks. Let your child learn at his own pace.

May 10, 2020 By: B Marker comment

Dyslexic kids absolutely need research-based instruction or else they may not learn how to read at all. How do you identify a dyslexic child? Give him research-based instruction and see how quickly he progresses. If the child progresses quickly, he likely does not have dyslexia. If he progresses slowly, he likely has dyslexia. Unfortunately, many struggling readers have not received researched-based instruction at all. Someone who knows how to teach a dyslexic child to read (or any child for that matter) will use leveled texts, phonics books for beginners and explicit, systematic phonics instruction with interleaving. I’ll review what each of these are.

How to Teach Children PhonicsThis is a page in our short vowel book, “Cub can Run.”

Leveled texts are when the child reads with 92-97% accuracy.

All kids need leveled texts, but when you’re thinking of how to teach a dyslexic child to read, you must ensure that he reads within this 92-97% accuracy range. At the lower range, this means he reads 92 out of 100 words correctly. At the upper range, he reads 97 out of 100 words correctly. This is called his instructional reading level. At this level, he must read with a more advanced reading partner.

How to Teach Children PhonicsKids need to start with a very simple phonics book like this one found in our shop.

If you want your student to read independently, then make sure he’s reading with 98% accuracy or above.

If you want your dyslexic student to read on his own, give him a text wherein his accuracy rate is 98 out of 100 words (or better).

Teach beginning readers with phonics books.

Most companies wrongly advertise their K-2 books as phonics books. How do you identify true phonics books? I’ve provided a checklist. Real phonics books:

  • Do not repeat the same sentence over and over.
  • Are not guessable.
  • Do not allow the picture to cue the student. The picture is simply there for entertainment.

How to Teach Children PhonicsPhonics books become more advanced as students move through the code.

Use systematic phonics instruction.

Systematic means you introduce one sound at a time. Allow the student to learn the new sound to mastery, then introduce another.

A dyslexic student might learn short a and read words like map, cap, tan, ran…etc. When he gets good at reading short a words, he can read short i words like him, rim, nip, tip…etc. He proceeds in this manner–learning one sound at a time–until he knows the entire English spelling system.

Reading Elephant books introduce sounds in the following order: short vowels, consonant digraphs, consonant blends, silent e, long vowels… etc. Each book has a focus sound to help guide the teacher.

Explicitly introduce new sound patterns.

In explicit phonics lessons, the teacher directly teaches sound-symbol correlations. The teacher might write /ea/ on the board and say: “/ea/ says eeee as in sea, seal and team.” The teacher does not encourage guesswork at all. Instead, he directly tells the student the code and shows clear examples.

How to Teach Children Phonics

If you want your dyslexic child to build a lasting, strong reading foundation, use interleaving.

Interleaving is a critical part of k-2 reading instruction, yet it’s often left out of the conversation. Currently, most reading programs (whether they have phonics or not) do not incorporate interleaving. What is interleaving? It’s mixed practice: your student studies old and new phonics sounds so he cannot guess.

The following wordlist does NOT use interleaving: bean, mean, team, seal, tea, real, teal, heal, wean, dean, lean. This wordlist encourages bad guessing habits. Your student will not analyze the sound-symbol correlations, because he knows that /ea/ is always the vowel.

In contrast, a wordlist with interleaving will incorporate sound patterns the student learned in the past: bean, kite, can, team, web, pipe, seal, fit, tea, dine, lean. Notice how the student must analyze the sound-symbol correlations to figure out the vowel. This list will create lasting success.

How to Teach Children PhonicsThis oo worksheet includes interleaving.

How to teach a dyslexic child to read:

  • Use leveled texts.
  • Teach beginning readers with phonics books.
  • Teach phonics sounds explicitly.
  • Use systematic phonics: introduce one sound pattern at a time. Allow your student to practice to mastery.
  • Use interleaving or mixed practice. Make sure your student reviews old material with new phonics sounds.

For printable phonics books for beginning readers, check out our shop.

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Https bbc in 2olevwf alphablocks is the hit cbeebies tv show helping children learn to read. It is suitable for school teachers home school parents and other educators trying to help children learn to read.

How to Teach Children Phonics The Ultimate List Of Free Phonics Activities Phonics Activities

There s more of a shift to using phonics for spelling so that children use the phonics they know to help them work out how to spell a wider range of words.

How to Teach Children Phonics

How to teach a child phonics. This is a proven technique that i have used with all of my children. Watch alphablocks full episodes on bbc iplayer. As seen on cbeebies.

What exactly is phonics. For more phonics learn to read. Join lotty on an amazing abc phonics reading for kids adventure with her friends fuzz chuck and chip.

Together they will learn the abc phonics capital and lowercase letters vowels letter. Learn phonics for kids alphabet sounds. The teacher explanation along with.

Teach your child to read phonetically in just one minute a day of practice you can have your child reading two and three letter. The phonics course is specially designed for kids to help them learn easily. Pebbles present phonics course level 1.

However it s not uncommon for year two children to need to revisit phonics they ve learnt in year one so don t worry if your child isn t completely confident yet. Kiz phonics is an excellent progressive program for teaching kids to read using a systematic phonics approach the kiz phonics program is carefully arranged by levels from preschool ages 3 4 kindergarten ages 4 6 1 st grade ages 6 7 2 nd grade ages 7 8. Phonics is an effective way of teaching kids how to read decode and eventually write english words.

How i teach my daughter english teaching reading spelling and phonics englishanyone. Teaching reading spelling and phonics. For more book and reading ideas sign up for our scholastic parents newsletter.

To teach phonics to a child begin by using flashcards so they can practice identifying letter sounds. When you hold up a card ask them to name the letter and tell you the sound that it makes. How to teach your child to read english fast fluent.

If you re the parent of a beginning reader chances are you re hearing a lot about phonics here s what you need to know about how your child will learn phonics and how you can help teach phonics at home. Note however that the art of teaching phonics is designed not only for younger kids but also.

How to Teach Children Phonics Handout Visual Aid For The 42 Sounds Used In The English Language

How to Teach Children Phonics How To Teach Your Child To Read Using Phonics Games Teaching

How to Teach Children Phonics Help Your Child Develop Phonemic Awareness And Teach Your Child To

How to Teach Children Phonics How To Teach A Child To Read The Ultimate Guide Teaching

How to Teach Children Phonics 7 Syllable Types Classroom Posters Teaching Phonics Phonics

How to Teach Children Phonics Phonics Cards Short O Sound With Images Phonics Flashcards

How to Teach Children Phonics Phonics Chart Sounds Learning Poster Phonics Sounds Teaching

How to Teach Children Phonics Phonic Sounds Wouldn T Hurt To Have This On My Wall With A

How to Teach Children Phonics Whimsy Workshop Teaching Clever Classroom Newsletters Phonics

How to Teach Children Phonics Phonics Flashcards For Children Long E Sound Phonics Flashcards

How to Teach Children Phonics Starting To Read It S Playtime Fun With Phonics Phonics

In this article we’ll be looking at easy ways to teach your child to read using phonics. Before we get into it the methods, let’s take a quick look at what phonics is all about. As well as why it’s essential to learn phonics.

What is Phonics?

Phonics is a teaching method that helps children understand the relationship between letters and their sounds.

By learning and understanding letters and their sounds, kids can successfully decode and read unfamiliar words. This leads to fluent reading, accurate spelling, a richer vocabulary and greater self-confidence.

This decoding skill acquired through phonics is a crucial part of reading and academic success. Which is one of the reasons why phonics is the recommended way of teaching kids how to read and write.

How to Teach Children Phonics

Why Phonics is so Important

Studies have repeatedly found phonics to be the best way to teach a child to read .

It not only teaches them how to decode words effectively, but it does so in a logical way. This logical progression ensures that kids learn easier concepts of the English language first, before moving on to more difficult concepts. This sets learners up to master reading, spelling and communication, as they have a clear understanding of how the language works, rather than outdated memorization techniques.

Phonics increases a child’s reading fluency, accuracy and comprehension. Due to fact that they spend less time trying to figure out how to pronounce a word, and can rather focus on understanding its meaning.

Phonics forms the foundation for reading words. And reading forms the foundation for all formal education. Without phonics, children will struggle to figure out unfamiliar words. Leading to frustration, loss of focus, and the inability to keep up with classmates.

Phonics is essential for developing your child’s reading ability in their early life, and for building a solid foundation for future academic success.

Having said that, let’s take a look at some of the basic principles to keep in mind teaching your child to read using phonics.

Basic Principles for Teaching Your Child Using Phonics

1 – Fun

It’s extremely important that your child has fun when learning to read. When they are enjoying themselves, they are ‘switched on’, and there’s a much higher chance that they will retain what’s being taught.

Never force your child to read, as this will lead to negative feelings towards books and learning in general. It’s crucial that your child has a positive experience when reading.

How to Teach Children Phonics

2 – Appealing to Your Child’s Interests

One way to ensure that reading is a positive experience, is to read stories that appeal to your child’s interests. This isn’t just limited to books and stories. When teaching them using phonics, you can also use individual words and sentences from their favorite topics.

3 – Keep Lessons Short

It’s good to teach phonics in short bursts. Several quick 4 – 5 minute sessions spread throughout the day will ensure that your child doesn’t get tired and lose interest. Numerous spaced out sessions will also bring about consistency. This consistency will help your child master phonics, as it will be ingrained in their daily life.

In total, the phonics lessons shouldn’t take more than 20 – 30 minutes each day. This however doesn’t mean that your child’s exposure to reading is limited to these sessions. You can and should be reading to them as well.

4 – Read to Your Child

Read to your child regularly, as this will instill a genuine love for reading.

You can even slip in a quick phonics lesson without your child realizing, by stopping every now and then to ask them to sound out a word or two with you.

How to Teach Children Phonics

5 – Begin with Phoneme Mastery

Phonemes are the individual sounds that make up words.

When a child masters these individual sounds, they are able to combine them (blending) to form words. From words they can read sentences. And from sentences, paragraphs, pages and books.

This is a logical progression, and it all starts with phonemes.

The more your child understands phonemes, the more accurate and efficient they’ll be in decoding and pronouncing words.

To master phonemes, it’s important for your child to first learn the letters in the alphabet, and their associated sounds. That’s the best place to begin.

Learning the Alphabet

When teaching your child the alphabet, you can choose to either start in alphabetical order (a, b, c, d), or you can choose to teach them some of the more common consonants and vowels first (a, c, t).

Remember, you’re teaching them the sound each letter makes.

It’s best to start slow and begin with just a few letters. It’s important that they master these first before introducing them to new letters. Once they have, you can even start teaching them some blending.

Monday, September 10, 2018

How To Teach A Child Phonics Pdf

In other words rather than teaching a child to recognise a word as a whole you teach them to break the word up sounding each of the sounds the letters make within a word. Which is then followed by reading sentences and simple stories.

How to Teach Children Phonics
10 Activities For Teaching And Practicing Letters And Sounds Make

The basic process of teaching phonics and phonemic awareness to children includes teaching them the letters and letter sounds.

How to Teach Children Phonics

How to teach a child phonics pdf. Once your child understands phonics he can decode new words with greater ease. Phonics is taught in stages that progress in difficulty and take time to master. Phonics for kids free pdf your baby can read infant toddler reading.

Thus phonemic awareness and phonics teaching need to be integrated. Phonics needs to be taught in an integrated literacy program. Then teaching children how to join those sounds together to make a whole word.

Kiz phonics is an excellent progressive program for teaching kids to read using a systematic phonics approachthe kiz phonics program is carefully arranged by levels from preschool ages 3 4 kindergarten ages 4 6 1 st grade ages 6 7 2 nd grade ages 7 8. Phonics for kids free pdf on the other hand if you find our teaching reading ideas using estrellitas program to be an exceptional resource for phonics for kids free pdf deluxe kit your baby can read deluxe kit. Students need to understand that a word is made up of a series of discrete sounds in order for them to make sense of phonics teaching.

The first step is to build your childs phenomic awareness helping him to recognize letters sounds and syllables. Phonics refers to a method for teaching speakers of english to read and write that language. Then you teach the child to combine or blend various letter sounds together to form words.

Take a look at these phonics rules that help kids learn to read and spell. The rules of phonics help kids make connections between written letters and letter combinations and word sounds. It is suitable for school teachers home school parents and other educators trying to help children learn to read.

English phonics for adults english phonics sounds english phonics worksheets phonic words in english jolly phonics phonics pronunciation learn phonics phonics for kids basic english for kids learning english for kids free download learn english for kids 1 learning english for kids free download pdf teach kid to speak english daily english conversation for kid kids english speaking english. Teaching kids to read using phonics means teaching the sounds made by individual letters or letter groups. Phonics involves teaching how to connect the sounds of spoken english with letters or groups of letters eg that the sound k can be represented by c k ck or ch spellings and teaching them to blend the sounds of letters together to produce.

How to Teach Children Phonics
Jolly Phonics Jolly Learning

How to Teach Children Phonics
Sh Phonics Lesson Plan Worksheets And Activities By

How to Teach Children Phonics
Phonics For All

You ask yourself , How can you teach phonics to children?

Phonics is necessary when teaching a child to read. Teaching phonics and helping children develop phonemic awareness is the key to mastering word structures. This is the first step toward successful reading. Children need to develop a knowledge of the letters and the sounds represented by the letters. Help them learn the connection between the sounds created by combining letters where words are formed.

By learning phonics and phonemic awareness, children gain the ability to pronounce words, develop clear speech, improve spelling, and develop self-confidence.

How to Teach Children Phonics

Three Basic Reading Principles

1) Appeal to your child’s interest. It doesn’t matter how simple the story is, make sure your child is enthused by what they are reading or listening to if you are reading to them.

2) Never pressure or force reading on your child. Anything forced will create a negative association and your mind will try to avoid negative things. Make reading fun, enjoyable and rewarding early in your child’s life. You will create a passionate little reader who cannot wait to learn more.

3) Teaching your child to read must begin with the mastery of phonemes – those individual sounds which makeup the words. Help them learn sounds and word structures. The rest will happen naturally.

Next you teach them to combine (or blend) various letter sounds together to form words, which is followed by reading sentences and simple stories.

How to Teach Children Phonics

This is a logical progression for children to learn reading. They will develop accuracy in decoding and pronouncing words. This method helps the child to learn to spell correctly. Gradually, the different elements of phonics are combined to produce new words. This will naturally lead to the discovery of new words through a process called automatic reflex.

In just 10 to 15 minutes per day, your reading “lessons” should be short ‘bites’ of information. These bites should be 2-3 minutes long, combining into the 10-15 minutes per day of instruction. The ‘bites’ do not need to be scheduled times; you can even use carpool time to help sound words of objects you see.

For older children, lessons can be slightly longer; however, several minutes per session is all that’s needed to help them master word/sound associations.

Phonics and Ear Training

One way to start teaching phonics to children is with ear training. Ear training helps children develop the understanding that words are made up of smaller units of sound known as phonemes. Each phoneme is combined into a variety of sounds and words.

Start with very short sessions, as already mentioned. A few minutes a day is all that you need. The key is consistency and patience.

During these sessions, sound out words slowly and distinctly. You can do this without even making the child aware that you are teaching them. Simply take words used every day and blend sounds into your sentences.

For example, if you wanted to ask your child to drink his milk, you could say: “Joe, d-r-i-n-k your m-ilk.” The words drink and milk are sounded out slowly and distinctly. The level of sound separation can be set by you to increase or lower the difficulty. If Joe has a tough time figuring out that d-r-i-n-k means drink, you can lower the difficulty by blending the word as dr-ink instead. Break the word down into basic letters and sounds that the child understands.

You could also simply pick different words and play blending sounds games. Simply say the sounds of the word slowly and ask them to guess what you are saying.

Steps to Teach Phonics to Children

This concept of individual sounds forming words may take some time for your child to grasp. Some will pick it up quickly, and others may take longer. But if you keep it up, your child WILL catch on. Below are some sample words which you can use to play blending sounds activities with your child.

J-u-m-p J-ump
R-u-n R-un
S-i-t S-it
S-t-a-n-d St-and
M-i-l-k M-ilk
S-t-o-p St-op

The first word is more segmented than the second word, it will be more difficult to sound out. Please note that hyphens are used to indicate the letter sounds instead of slashes.

ie: J-u-m-p /J/ /u/ /m/ /p/

This is done to make things easier to read; however, when you read it, you should not read the names of the letters, but instead say the sounds of the letters. This type of ear training for phonics and phonemic awareness should continue throughout the teaching process, even well after your child have grasped this concept.

How to teach phonics to children starts small and then adds content to match the abilities of your child.

It can be used for all words of increasing difficulty. Again, please always keep in mind that not all children can readily blend the sounds to hear the word, so you must be patient, and drill this for days, weeks, or even months if needed. Consistency and repetition are the keys to success. Small sessions done consistently will pay dividends.

Preschoolers are like sponges, so this is a great age to introduce them to phonic sounds for learning how to read. They like to have fun by playing phonics games to assist with phonemic awareness. Incorporate as many of the senses as possible, so that the child can make the phonics a part of them. A strong phonic foundation helps develop a better reader.

Focus on Sounds

When teaching phonics, focus on the sounds that each letter makes, instead of the name of the letter. While some letter names automatically translate into the sound the letter makes, such as “b” says /b/, others are more confusing, such as “c” says /k/. Children just beginning to learn their phonics are often confused by the letter names, and it can take them a little longer to learn the sounds. As the child becomes more confident in his sounds, the letter names will quickly come.

Play games that focus on the beginning sounds, such as “I Spy” with objects around the environment. Introduce objects by emphasizing the beginning sound. “This is a b-b-b-ball.” Sort or match pictures based on their beginning sound. Have the child collect pictures or objects that begin with the same sound as her name. Read books that focus on a particular sound, but try to read it using the phonic sound, instead of using the letter name.

Develop Awareness

Help the child develop an ear for phonics by doing phonemic awareness activities. These can be as simple as reading rhyming books and teaching nursery rhymes. Read poetry by children’s favorites, such as Shel Silverstein or Jack Prelutsky. Sing rhyming songs, such as “Down By the Bay”. Leave out the ending rhyme to see if the child can guess it. Make up lists of rhyming words and get silly, then have the children predict their own rhymes.

Practice oral blending by isolating sounds in a word for the child to guess. An example would be, “What word is /k/-/a/-/t/?” Take it a step further and ask the child what the sounds are in the word “cat”. This will allow the child to eventually sound out and phonetically spell words.

Visual Recognition

Maria Montessori always said that the hand was the direct link to the mind, so she taught phonic sounds with her sandpaper letters. As the child traces the letter, they say its sound. This process is repeated time and time again so the child can internalize the sound. Usually about three sounds are introduced at once, in what is called the first period. Later, in what is known as the second period, they are asked to choose the focus sound out of a group of sounds. Finally, the child is asked to name each sound while pointing to it. An example of the three periods is as follows:

  1. First period: “This is /m/. This is /s/. This is /t/.”
  2. Second period: “Point to /m/. Point to /s/. Point to /t/.”
  3. Third period: “What is this sound?”

Phonic sounds can also be introduced through other tactile methods at first, such as by tracing, painting, and by gluing something that starts with that letter on to a print out of that particular letter. An example of this would be, gluing macaroni to the letter M or beads to the letter B.

Make numerous cards with lower case letters printed on them. Have the children go around the classroom labeling objects with their beginning sounds. They can even label other people in the room including each other!

Creating a Good Foundation

When teaching phonics to your class, focus on the phonic sounds, instead of the letter names, as you are working on phonemic awareness activities. Then move into visual recognition of the phonic sounds as you incorporate them into reading activities. The more senses involved, the more likely the child is to learn them. The stronger the foundation, the better a reader the child will become.

This post is part of the series: Preschool Beginning Reading Tips for Teachers and/or Parents

In this series, you will find great tips and suggestions on how to get started reading in the preschool classroom or even at home. You will find tips on phonemic awareness and development, how to develop reading skills through games and fun activities, and there is even a great book review!

You ask yourself , How can you teach phonics to children?

Phonics is necessary when teaching a child to read. Teaching phonics and helping children develop phonemic awareness is the key to mastering word structures. This is the first step toward successful reading. Children need to develop a knowledge of the letters and the sounds represented by the letters. Help them learn the connection between the sounds created by combining letters where words are formed.

By learning phonics and phonemic awareness, children gain the ability to pronounce words, develop clear speech, improve spelling, and develop self-confidence.

How to Teach Children Phonics

Three Basic Reading Principles

1) Appeal to your child’s interest. It doesn’t matter how simple the story is, make sure your child is enthused by what they are reading or listening to if you are reading to them.

2) Never pressure or force reading on your child. Anything forced will create a negative association and your mind will try to avoid negative things. Make reading fun, enjoyable and rewarding early in your child’s life. You will create a passionate little reader who cannot wait to learn more.

3) Teaching your child to read must begin with the mastery of phonemes – those individual sounds which makeup the words. Help them learn sounds and word structures. The rest will happen naturally.

Next you teach them to combine (or blend) various letter sounds together to form words, which is followed by reading sentences and simple stories.

How to Teach Children Phonics

This is a logical progression for children to learn reading. They will develop accuracy in decoding and pronouncing words. This method helps the child to learn to spell correctly. Gradually, the different elements of phonics are combined to produce new words. This will naturally lead to the discovery of new words through a process called automatic reflex.

In just 10 to 15 minutes per day, your reading “lessons” should be short ‘bites’ of information. These bites should be 2-3 minutes long, combining into the 10-15 minutes per day of instruction. The ‘bites’ do not need to be scheduled times; you can even use carpool time to help sound words of objects you see.

For older children, lessons can be slightly longer; however, several minutes per session is all that’s needed to help them master word/sound associations.

Phonics and Ear Training

One way to start teaching phonics to children is with ear training. Ear training helps children develop the understanding that words are made up of smaller units of sound known as phonemes. Each phoneme is combined into a variety of sounds and words.

Start with very short sessions, as already mentioned. A few minutes a day is all that you need. The key is consistency and patience.

During these sessions, sound out words slowly and distinctly. You can do this without even making the child aware that you are teaching them. Simply take words used every day and blend sounds into your sentences.

For example, if you wanted to ask your child to drink his milk, you could say: “Joe, d-r-i-n-k your m-ilk.” The words drink and milk are sounded out slowly and distinctly. The level of sound separation can be set by you to increase or lower the difficulty. If Joe has a tough time figuring out that d-r-i-n-k means drink, you can lower the difficulty by blending the word as dr-ink instead. Break the word down into basic letters and sounds that the child understands.

You could also simply pick different words and play blending sounds games. Simply say the sounds of the word slowly and ask them to guess what you are saying.

Steps to Teach Phonics to Children

This concept of individual sounds forming words may take some time for your child to grasp. Some will pick it up quickly, and others may take longer. But if you keep it up, your child WILL catch on. Below are some sample words which you can use to play blending sounds activities with your child.

J-u-m-p J-ump
R-u-n R-un
S-i-t S-it
S-t-a-n-d St-and
M-i-l-k M-ilk
S-t-o-p St-op

The first word is more segmented than the second word, it will be more difficult to sound out. Please note that hyphens are used to indicate the letter sounds instead of slashes.

ie: J-u-m-p /J/ /u/ /m/ /p/

This is done to make things easier to read; however, when you read it, you should not read the names of the letters, but instead say the sounds of the letters. This type of ear training for phonics and phonemic awareness should continue throughout the teaching process, even well after your child have grasped this concept.

How to teach phonics to children starts small and then adds content to match the abilities of your child.

It can be used for all words of increasing difficulty. Again, please always keep in mind that not all children can readily blend the sounds to hear the word, so you must be patient, and drill this for days, weeks, or even months if needed. Consistency and repetition are the keys to success. Small sessions done consistently will pay dividends.

How to Teach Children Phonics

Cecil Sesco

Teaching Phonics to Children

Phonics is a necessary part of any good method of teaching children to read. Teaching Children phonics and helping them develop phonemic awareness is the key to mastering words, which is the first key step toward successful reading. Children need to develop a knowledge of the letters, the sounds represented by the letters, and the connection between sounds created by combining the letters where words are formed. This is an essential part of mastering reading, and enabling children to become independent readers. By learning phonics and phonemic awareness, children gain the ability to pronounce new words, develop clear articulation, improve spelling, and develop self confidence.

When it comes to teaching your children to read, it must include three basic principles:

1) Reading for the child, whether it’s a word, sentence, or story, must appeal to your child’s interests.

2) Never pressure or force your child into reading, turning it into a negative “event” in their life. It should be a fun, enjoyable, and rewarding experience. This will take ample amounts of patience on the part of the parents, and some creativity.

3) Teaching your child to read must begin with the mastery of the phonemes – the individual sounds which makeup the words.

The basic process of teaching phonics and phonemic awareness to children includes teaching them the letters and letter sounds; then you teach the child to combine (or blend) various letter sounds together to form words; which is then followed by reading sentences and simple stories. This is a logical progression for children to learn reading, where they develop accuracy in decoding words and pronouncing words. This method of teaching also helps the child to spell correctly. Gradually, the different elements of phonics are combined to produce new words, and leads to the discovery of new words by the child using this process which becomes an “automatic reflex”.

Teaching phonics to children should take 10 to 15 minutes each day, and these “lessons” should take place in several small sessions each day – such as 4 or 5 session lasting 3 to 5 minutes each. For older pre-school children, lessons can be slightly longer; however, several minutes each session is all that’s needed.

One way to start teaching phonics to children with with ear training – by helping them develop the understanding that words are made up of smaller units of sounds, or known as phonemes, and when you combine these sounds, a word is formed. You can start this with very short sessions, as already mentioned. A few minutes a day is all that you need. The key, however, is consistency and patience.

During these short sessions, sound out words slowly and distinctly. You can do this without even making the child aware that you are trying to teach them. Simply take words from your everyday speaking to your child and include oral blending sounds into your sentences. For example, if you wanted to ask your child to drink his milk, you could say: “Joe, d-r-i-n-k your m-ilk.” The words drink and milk are sounded out slowly and distinctly. The level of sound separation can be set by you to increase or lower the difficulty. Thus, if Joe has a tough time figuring out that d-r-i-n-k means drink, you can lower the difficulty by blending the word as dr-ink instead.

Alternatively, you could simply pick different words and play blending sounds games with your child. You simply say the sounds of the word slowly, and ask the child try to guess what you are saying.

This concept of individual sounds forming words may take some time for your child to grasp. Some children will pick it up quickly, while other children may take longer, but one thing that’s certain is that if you keep it up, your child will catch on. Below are some sample words which you can use to play blending sounds activities with your child.

J-u-m-p J-ump
R-u-n R-un
S-i-t S-it
S-t-a-n-d St-and
M-i-l-k M-ilk
S-t-o-p St-op

The first word is more segmented than the second word, and will be more difficult to sound out. Please note that hyphens are used to indicate the letter sounds instead of slashes.

ie: J-u-m-p /J/ /u/ /m/ /p/

This is done to make things easier to read; however, when you read it, you should not read the names of the letters, but instead say the sounds of the letters. This type of ear training for phonics and phonemic awareness should continue throughout the teaching process, even well after your child have grasped this concept. It can be applied to words with increasing difficulty. Again, please always keep in mind that not all children can readily blend the sounds to hear the word, so you must be patient, and drill this for days, weeks, or even months if needed. Consistency and frequency is the key to success here, and not sporadic binge sessions.

Buried deep in johnson s article is the suggestion that some children can acquire phonics generalizations by reading. How to teach phonics this week the guardian teacher network explores the range of resources that are available for teaching phonics.

How to Teach Children Phonics Rules Posters Coloured Pdf Spelling Rules Learning English

Phonics pdf printable.

How to Teach Children Phonics

How to teach a child phonics pdf. Phase 3 phonics letters and sounds assessment sheets. With the grammar 1 student book children can build upon the reading and writing skills they learned with jolly phonics and begin to learn the rudiments of grammar. Kindergarten phonics worksheets practice 2 phonetic exercises pdf.

Jolly phonics teacher manual pdf. Esl flashcards printable pdf worksheets picture cards. When you hold up a card ask them to name the letter and tell you the sound that it makes.

Printable board games free board games to print with matching game. Kindergarten phonics worksheets related pdf free download preschool. Teaching phonics and related phonics skills such as phonemic awareness is a more effective way to teach children early reading skills than is embedded phonics or no phonics instruction.

Words beginning with the letter h intimidating that start. Free phonics board games children s songs children s phonics. Jolly phonic stories pdf teaching jolly phonics phonics und.

Jolly phonics worksheets printables pdf phonics practice worksheets short vowel u for sounds worksheet test. Bpst 3 basic phonics skills test recording sheet by teach me first. 60 kindergarten free phonics worksheet kindergarten english for.

Phonics is an effective way of teaching kids how to read decode and eventually write english words. Teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons. Introduce the rudiments of grammar teach spelling systematically.

The oxford reading tree floppy s phonics sounds letters systematic. Primary children learning with a jolly phonics reading. Kindergarten phonics worksheets pdf omegaproject info.

Note however that the art of teaching phonics is designed not only for younger kids but also. Phonics sight words printable games by primary teaching ideas tpt. Teach child how to read sunday september 1 2019.

Pdf the effectiveness of using phonics instruction and storybooks. Sadlier phonics level b grade 2 student edition. To teach phonics to a child begin by using flashcards so they can practice identifying letter sounds.

Printable phonics flashcards words printable phonics flashcards pdf. Phonics phase 5 board games by funkyphonics teaching resources. Image result for jolly phonics worksheets child printables pdf.

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Teaching phonics to children is fun for a while, but it can easily become boring if you are teaching it too often. When you need to use the same strategy and book over and over again, the fun challenges and lessons simply lose their charm. So, instead of trying to find some fun ways in the old ways, you can try out these five activities that help in teaching phonics.

Need some flashcard help? Check out our massive list of free ESL flashcards!

Use Picture-Taking

Give the learner a camera and send them on an adventure. Ask him to search for objects and take photos of one object per letter. Starting from an airplane or an ant to a zebra or a zipper, they can take pictures of all kinds of things. The only rule with this activity is to take one picture for each letter.

Photography is a great way to learn many skills and if used right, it can help you teach a child anything you want while having fun in the process. In addition to developing their photography skills, you will be teaching them to pay attention to details, revise the alphabet and its order, and simply get creative. But most importantly, you will be teaching them phonics.

Once children gather these photos, you can create a whole alphabet book by using those pictures. This activity can be so fun, you will probably be able to use it for a long, long time.

Note: if you’re teaching young learners you can still do this – just stick to items in the classroom!

Play Alphabet Ball

Have you heard of the Alphabet Ball game? Physical activity is good for everyone, but learning in the process is also possible. In fact, children can learn better when they are having fun, so why not combine exercise with phonics teaching?

This game can be adapted to many subjects you need to teach and has several levels of play. It can be used for toddlers, preschoolers and school-age children. All you will need to get is a marker and a ball – children will surely want to play.

Spell Words for Them

‘’When you spell the words for a student phonetically, they can learn how to spell by listening and writing at the same time. I find that the more often you do this, the better can the student comprehend the phonetic sounds of our alphabet’’ – says Sandra Jefferson, a psychology expert.

The first and second activity promoted creativity and physical exercise in addition to learning phonics, while this one boosts the writing skills. It is definitely an activity to consider – teaching a child to write and understand phonics at the same time is a grand achievement for both the learner and the teacher.

All you have to do here is get a notebook and give it to the child. Aid him in creating a list of his favorite games, toys, or friends he plays with. Spell every word phonetically until the child writes it all by himself.

Use Phonics Books

There are many phonics books (check out our list of top ESL books) out there to use, but you can also create your own books. Every time you introduce a new rule to the learner, create a new page in the book. All it takes is using a marker to write a large letter in the form of the phoneme on a page. Then, you can let the learner color or decorate it. This should help the phoneme to stick to their mind.

If you wish to use a ready phonics book, find a variety of them. Include those that fit the learner’s knowledge level and tackle it step-by-step. You can even combine different books to make learning more fun.

Of course, it is best to do all the reading in a special corner for reading . This corner should always contain the books that teach phonics, so that the child can get back to them whenever he feels the need to do so. Make this spot very comfortable, so that the child looks forward to learning in it.

Watch DVDs

Using only books and physical activities will eventually become boring and you might need to introduce something new to the classroom. Teach a child phonics by using phonics DVDs. There are many available on the market.

When you select a video for the student to watch and learn phonics, make sure to watch it with him. You can let the child watch the entire DVD and talk to him when it ends. Asking them to recall what was said and done in the video can prove to be an excellent way to reinforce their knowledge, and can make for a really fun conversation.

All these activities can be combined and implemented through various levels and learning stages, as well as different age groups of children. Remember – these are to aid you in teaching phonics, not take over your task to do so. So, use them in combination with your own set of teaching skills , and you will find that learning can be very enjoyable both for you and the learner.

This post was written by Diana Clark, a former teacher that gave up her educator career for something she always dreamed about – writing. Diana is a freelance writer at Awriter . Feel free to follow Diana on Twitter .

How to Teach Children Phonics

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One of the most common difficulties a child will encounter when learning to read is the failure to understand phonics, that is, how written spellings represent the sounds of spoken words. To help teach your children phonics skills, try engaging them in activities at home that incorporate the following:

Playing with your child is actually enormously significant to their language development. As you play with them, in whatever activity, whether it’s building Lego, block towers, train tracks, playing with dolls in their dollhouse, or drawing, be intentional about using language. This can feel stilted and unnatural at first, but it becomes easier with time. There are few different types of ‘talk’ you can use—this helps you have a means of discussing things if you’re struggling:

Parallel Talk – This focuses on what the child is doing. You simply report back to the child what they are doing. For example, ‘You are pushing the blue train along the train track’, or ‘you are building a high block tower’. In this way you link language to what they are doing, thereby making direct links between words and things in the mind of the child.

Descriptive Talk – This focuses on the object. You provide words and descriptors for the things your child is playing with. For example, you might say, ‘the red play dough is squishy’, or ‘the blocks tumble down to the ground’.

Self Talk – Using this kind of talk, you focus on what you are doing. ‘I’m drawing a purple butterfly with green polka dots’, or ‘I’m rebuilding the block tower now’. This type of talk may seem unnecessary, but it actually helps kids develop their own language skills, and the more words they have in their memory banks, the better readers that they will be.

Singing is often overlooked as a valid means of developing the language ability of children. But it shouldn’t be. Nursery rhymes were de rigueur once upon a time, and for very good reason. Anytime that you mix words, meter, and music together, you actually end up with an incredibly powerful learning tool. Words alone are powerful, but add rhythm, meter, and melody, and you have something that can burrow further into the mind than a burr under the saddle of a Palomino.

So sing to your child. Sing with your child. Teach them your favorite songs, and learn the ones that they enjoy. Here are a few to jog your memory to help you get started:

  • The Eensy Weensy Spider
  • Twinkle Twinkle little Star
  • Mary had a Little Lamb
  • It’s Raining it’s Pouring

And, of course, we cannot neglect the fine art of reading. In concentrating on phonics games that help develop a child’s understanding of phonics, it must never be done at the expense of actually sitting down and reading books to and with children. Reading to your child teaches them that books are enjoyable things to engage with. It also models book-handling skills, as well as the fluent reading of a text. They pick up a lot about how to read, just by listening to a parent or caregiver read to them.

The understanding of phonics for kids is very important to their reading ability. While emphasis on phonics can, at times, overshadow that of reading, the goal for any phonics game is to get kids reading real books.

Reading Eggs uses a synthetic approach to phonics with lessons that help kids map each letter or letter combination with the appropriate sound. Each letter of the alphabet is introduced in its own lesson, allowing kids to focus on the correspondence between a particular letter and its appropriate sounds, thus reinforcing the alphabetic principle. All the lessons in Reading Eggs build one upon the next so that by Lesson 9, kids read their first book. All activities in the programme, including the phonics games, have as their focus the reading of real books.

From Lesson 9 on, kids read an e-book in each lesson. All of the books dovetail seamlessly with the content of their respective lessons; therefore, all phonics instruction that kids receive and engage with in a lesson is put to immediate use reading real texts. The lessons are engaging and highly engaging, and reward kids for every lesson they complete. This keeps kids immersed in the learning environment, and motivated to continue reading.

Ann Logsdon is a school psychologist specializing in helping parents and teachers support students with a range of educational and developmental disabilities.

How to Teach Children Phonics

Phonics instruction is a teaching method that teaches the relationship between sounds and the letters we use to represent them. Phonics is a long-standing teaching method that is good for teaching children to decode words. Phonics instruction typically begins by teaching children that sounds are represented by specific letters. Children then learn that combinations of letters are grouped together to make more complex groups of sounds to make words.

Phonics skills are important for children to be able to read fluently. Children who master phonics learn to recognize individual sounds and how to blend them together to read words. Many children with learning disabilities in reading have difficulty with phonics skills. However, they often respond well to phonics instruction.

Benefits of Phonics Instruction

Some reading research suggests that phonics instruction is an effective strategy to use with reading disorders and can be used along with word recognition strategies. Students with dyslexia are more likely to make gains in reading skills when they receive solid instruction in phonics.

As with many types of academic intervention, phonics is most effective when used as early as possible in a child’s school career. Direct instruction with phonics using multisensory strategies has also shown promise in remediating learning disabilities in reading. This type of instruction is typically most effective when delivered individually or within small group instruction in a systematic and intensive program.

Guidelines for Instruction

Phonics instruction teaches that there are 44 sounds made by the 26 letters of the English language. The goal of phonics instruction is to teach those sound and symbol relationships to enable children to read and write words. It is recommended that instruction:

  • Be systematic, focusing on a few regular sound and spelling patterns and progressing through more complex irregular sounds and spellings.
  • Should include a lot of drill and practice (but this can and should be made enjoyable rather than grueling).
  • Should include immediate feedback from teachers when students need correction to keep them from learning errors.
  • Should include a frequent assessment to ensure children are progressing.
  • Should include words at the student’s developmental level.
  • Should use multisensory methods and materials.
  • Should use words students will use in everyday interactions and classroom work and then progress to more unfamiliar or complex material as the child is ready for it.
  • Should include a frequent review of previously learned material so children will retain skills.

Activities to Develop Phonics Skills

There are many activities you can do at home to help children develop phonics skills:

  • Play a game with your child where you take turns coming up with words that begin with the same sound. It is helpful to start with consonants. (sat, sing, silly) Spend time on each letter separately.
  • Create flashcards with words that begin with the same sounds.
  • Make your own multisensory materials and have your child write the words you came up with that start with the same sounds.
  • Practice nursery rhymes to develop your child’s awareness of how words can sound the same. Rhyming books are also helpful to teach and reinforce this skill. Read to your child while pointing to the rhyming words. Have your child write the rhyming words using multisensory materials.
  • After your child is comfortable with beginning consonants, practice words with long vowels. Again, spend some time with vowels individually. Have a “long A week” where you and your child watch for long A words in books and in conversation.
  • Work on long and short vowel flashcards.
  • Work on consonant-vowel-consonant flashcards.

As always, keep your practice at home fun and enjoyable. Remember that reading is difficult for a child with learning disabilities, and the more you can do to make it fun, the better. If you find that your child is having difficulty with some of your activities, perhaps she is not ready, and you may want to go back to something she has learned well to increase her confidence.

Working With the Teacher

Share any concerns you have with her teacher. Also, be sure to ask your child’s teacher if she has specific suggestions on how you should work with your child. Your child will learn more effectively if what you do at home is consistent with the activities he is doing in school.

Published by KidsEngCollege Editorial Team on November 16, 2018 November 16, 2018

Preschool age is a period of rapid changes in terms of language and speech development. As a child’s vocabulary is growing, the semantic and syntactic structure of their language is becoming more complex. A three-year-old preschooler ought to have a vocabulary of around 1000 words. At that age, preschoolers are beginning to understand and use the relationship between letters and sounds and start to rely on their language and speech to express their needs, thoughts, and emotions.

This skill becomes especially important as children become readers. Phonics, or the idea that letters represent the sounds of spoken language, requires letter recognition, sound recognition, and their associations. This means that a child must recognize letters when reading words and then make their corresponding sounds to read words and sentences.

Activities to Teach Preschoolers Phonics Easily

Phonics instruction helps preschoolers learn the relationship between the letters (written language) and sounds (spoken language). There are a variety of creative activities to teach phonics to preschoolers in an engaging way. These activities can be used both in the classroom and at home to help preschoolers learn and practice the connections between letters and their sounds. Furthermore, these activities can be adjusted to meet different needs and levels of development of each preschool child learning to read.

Here are eight creative phonics challenges that will get children excited about learning and help them discover language.

  1. Play “I Spy” Letters

A hunt for letters is an original and fun way to familiarize the preschoolers with phonics. Gather old books, magazines, and newspapers and dive together into “I Spy” phonics activities – pick one letter and ask the child to spot everything in a book or magazine that has the same phonetic sound. Then cut those items out and ask the child to make flash cards together with you. This will allow the child to have the visual of the word along with the letter he/she is learning.

  1. Read Phonics Books

Many learning programs include phonic books that are a great resource for readers-beginners. Help the child tackle letter sounds and visual of the words by flipping through the pages and reading each word together. As the child learns to read more and more words, his confidence will rise and he will look forward to getting his hands on more books, which is a habit that will promote a lifetime love of reading.

  1. Write Letters on the Board

Write some letters on the board. Then read them out loud, one word at a time and ask the children to try and spell words only using the letters written on the board. Encourage them to think of as many words as possible. However, make sure to stop after each word to write the correct spelling on the board, so you can go through them repeatedly, spelling each word.

  1. Spell Words Phonetically

While the children practice their writing, spell words for them phonetically. Make sure to sound out every letter so they can write letters for themselves. For example, for the word Cat, sound out ‘cuhh’ so the child writes letter C, then ‘aah’ for A and so on.

  1. Play Alphabet Ball Game with Preschoolers

Use outdoor play time to teach children phonics. “Alphabet Game” is a multi-layered game that can teach children letters, sounds, and words while having fun and burning their energy.

Alphabet Ball Game Rules

  • You call out a letter and the child must respond with a word that begins with that letter.
  • After that, you throw the ball to the child.
  • When the child catches the ball, he/she calls out the next letter.
  • When you respond with an appropriate word, the child throws the ball back to you and so on.
  • To make the game more challenging, create certain rules, such as that the same word or letter cannot be repeated.
  1. Play Online Games Together

Research suggests that it is the nature of the screen time rather than the length that matters. In other words, instead of worrying about how much screen time is too much, parents and teachers should encourage children to engage in hi-tech activities that will promote learning, imaginative expression and creativity.

There are many online phonics games for preschoolers that can help them learn and understand the relationship between written language (the letters) and spoken language (sounds). Some of these fun phonics games are:

– Matching the rhyming words – children look at pictures and listen to words to find rhyming pairs

– Naming the vowel – children must sort out vowels to unlock the next level in the game

– Letter sounds match-up – kids focus on letters and the sounds these letters make.

These and other online phonics games are a fun and engaging way to help young learners learn and master phonics.

  1. Two Sounds Activity

This activity is a great way to practice sound distinction. Write two words that represent the two different sounds, e.g., PEN and HEN and show them pictures that represent those words. Then ask the children to sort those words under the appropriate column by marking an ‘X’ under the correct column.

  1. Missing Sound

Present an image on the board and write all but one of its sounds. For example, place a picture of a fish and write “ish” beside the picture. Ask the preschoolers to provide the missing sound, not the letter. To make this game more interesting, you can organize it as a group activity/contest.

To teach phonics to preschoolers, read aloud to them. Choose books that the child finds interesting and reread them often. Also, you can boost comprehension by asking the child questions such as “What did he/she mean by that?” or “Why did you think that happened?”

If a child stumbles on a word while reading, encourage them to sound it out and repeat. If they still can’t do it, sound out the word for them so they don’t get overwhelmed and frustrated.

Phonics is understanding the relationship between sounds and letters, offering the beginning readers the strategies they need to sound out the words with the main aim of good comprehension of language. However, in order to understand what they read, children need to be able to read automatically and phonics enables that process.

As always, please leave your comments down below or feel free to drop us an email with any questions you may have!

Brought to you by the KidsEnglishCollege™ Editorial Team.

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How to Teach Children Phonics

Help support your child’s phonics learning at home with a practical, targeted eBook. You’ll find out how children are taught to read using phonics, with a description of the six phonics phases and how they are introduced to children in Reception, Year 1 and Year 2, then read definitions of key phonics vocabulary. General tips to help your child are accompanied by a collection of colourful, engaging phase-by-phase phonics activities.

Teach your child phonics is a reference guide and home-teaching kit which will help you understand exactly what phonics skills your child is expected to have mastered by the end of KS1.

Primary school teacher and parent Catherine Race has prepared a mixture of information, tips and activities to ensure that you have the right facts at your fingertips to check your child has fully grasped the phonemes in each phonics phase, using the same methods that they are taught (rather than confusing them with information about how you learned to read!). You’ll be able to print off highly targeted worksheets to help them practise and boost their confidence as they progress through their phonics learning journey.

In Teach your child phonics, you’ll discover:

  • The vocabulary/terminology your child is being taught at school, so you can refer to the same concepts at home.
  • An explanation of the methods they use in the classroom so you don’t end up doing more harm than good by trying to teach them in a different way.
  • Why it is so important to support your child’s reading at home and how phonics can help them learn to read in a stress-free, enjoyable way.
  • Liz Dunoon
  • /
  • 26. Apr
  • /
  • Reading & Spelling

How to Teach Children Phonics

How to Teach Children PhonicsHi everyone It’s Liz Dunoon here

Does your child know that different letters represent different sounds in words? If so, they are well on their way to grasping a major step in the learn to read and spell process. If not keep watching or reading.

Today I’m going to show you how to teach your child to read from home using phonics and phonemic awareness also known as synthetic phonics, and blending sounds.

When my three children were in primary school they all experienced learning difficulties and I helped them to catch up at school and have great success. As a qualified teacher who specialises in learning difficulties and literacy, I have since helped 100’s of children to learn to read and spell from home.

Watch the video here So here is a great way to help your child to practise their phonemic awareness skills. Let’s start with simple, two letter word parts with a single vowel letter first and then a consonant.

ap’ has “ a- “ and “ puh ”. That is two phonemes or sounds. Ask your child if they can hear two sounds. Get them to put a dot above the “ a- ” and a dot above the “ puh ”. To show the two sounds they can hear. Then get them to say them one after the other “ a- “ ” puh ”, “ a- “ ” puh ”, “ a p ”. Blending the two sounds together, is what makes two single sounds become a word part. Like in the words; ‘ m a p’ , ‘ c a p’ and ‘ s a p’ .

Let’s try that with ‘em’. ‘em’ has “ e- “ and “ mmm ”. That is two sounds. Ask your child if they can hear two sounds. Get them to put a dot above each sound they can hear. Then get them to say each sound one after the other until they blend them to make the word part “ e- “ “ mmm” . Blending these two phonemes makes them into a word part in words like; ‘ h e m ’, ‘ th e m’ and more complex words like ‘ f e m i n i n e ’.

You can do this with lots of word parts. This is training your child’s ears and their brains to hear all the different sounds, because the English language is a code, a sound-symbol code, and that is what phonics is. It is a tool to break the sound symbol code of reading and spelling English words.

Here is a list you can explore with your child or student

How to Teach Children Phonics

The next logical step is putting a single consonant on to the beginning of these word parts to make simple, 3 letter; consonant – vowel – consonant words’ also known as ‘CVC’ words. Very soon, you will have a child who is decoding and reading these simple words. Make sure they indicate how many sounds they can hear each time by putting a dot at the top of each letter or sound… or another fun way is showing you the number of sounds on their fingers or showing you the right number of blocks to indicate how many sounds they can hear. For these examples, it will be 3 each time. Remember we are learning to blend the single sounds together to make simple CVC words.

“ mmm ” “ a- “ “ puh ”. Remind the learner that they have to hold each sound, or keep each sound going, until they get to the next one. “ rrr ” “ e- “ “ puh ”

Here is a list of simple CVC words which you can explore with your child or student

How to Teach Children Phonics

If you want more information on how to teach your child to read and spell and find how out to access posters and many more educational resources… Join me on my free webinar by clicking the link below.

Did you learn phonics when you went to school? If so comment below… What tools did your teacher use?

I’ll see you next time in video 7, which is called: How to teach your child to read from home using sight words.

To watch more videos on how to teach your child to read and spell from home join my Youtube channel here:

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How to Teach Children Phonics

‘Phonics’ is a common parenting buzzword these days. You might have seen the word pop up when you were researching about enrichment classes for your kids. Or maybe you have passed by a banner or a poster advertising teaching of phonics classes for children.

But what exactly is phonics? What sort of benefits does it have for our children and why is it useful? And when should we start teaching phonics to our kids?

What is phonics?

Phonics refers to the relationship between letters and the way they sound. It is one of the basic building blocks of the English language. Phonics is an excellent way of teaching children how to read. The aim is to help readers to identify the sounds that the letters make to help them string together the collective sounds that make a word.

Why is phonics important for children?

Because phonics knowledge leads to word knowledge, when children understand the concept of phonics, it means that they will be able to apply their knowledge and read longer words that they have not seen before. If children learn reading by rote, they will not know how to read unfamiliar words.

Studies have shown that learning phonics can have a dramatic positive effect on helping children learn how to read fluently, accurately, and capably – with little effort.

I’m convinced! So when should children start learning phonics?

Research shows that children are ready to start phonics programmes when they have learned to identify all the letters of the alphabet – which is usually somewhere between three and four years of age. Pre-readers can only understand the basic concept of phonics when they already know what the letters look like and can name them.

Secondly, children are also ready to learn phonics when they have phonological awareness. It means that they are able to separate words into their various different sounds (did you know English has 44 syllable sounds?) and pronounce them. Phonological awareness is learnt through singing, rhyming, and dividing words into individual sounds. That is just one reason why the MindChamps Reading Programme uses ‘Say and Sing Phonics’, a specially crafted method for learning phonics that integrates music into the learning experience.

Children can also start on phonics when they can confidently grasp the idea of how reading works. This means that our kids benefit greatly from being read to often. When adults read books to children, the kids develop an understanding that the combinations of letters on the page represent words. They grow familiar with the concept of uppercase and lowercase letters. On top of that, they know that in English, words go from left to right. These are all concepts that will help kick off your children’s phonics learning journey.

The earlier your child is able to start a phonics class, the easier and faster the journey into the world of reading!

What is a recommended phonics class for my children?

Enrichment classes can be a great way to introduce your children to phonics. Teaching phonics to children by trained and experienced educators is important, as not all teachers have received specific instruction in phonics. Furthermore, remember that phonics is only one element. It works best when it is integrated into a comprehensive literacy programme that includes practice in comprehension, fluency, vocabulary, writing, and thinking.

The MindChamps Reading Programme is a recommended phonics class that is your one-stop answer to all these requirements. It has three different levels that for children between three and seven years of age. On top of that it interweaves phonics instruction into a holistic reading approach for the best possible results.

Children can learn quickly by sounding out words, letter by letter—but somehow, the method is still controversial.

How to Teach Children Phonics

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Now that it’s summer, I have a suggestion for how parents can grant their wee kiddies the magic of reading by Labor Day: Pick up Siegfried Engelmann’s Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons. My wife and I used it a while ago with our then-4-year-old daughter, and after a mere 20 cozy minutes a night, a little girl who on Memorial Day could recognize on paper only the words no and stop and the names of herself and her family members could, by the time the leaves turned, read simple books.

My wife and I are not unusually diligent teachers. The book worked by, quite simply, showing our daughter, bit by bit, how to sound out the words. That’s it. And yet in the education world, Engelmann’s technique is considered controversial.

Engelmann’s book, which he co-wrote with Phyllis Haddox and Elaine Bruner, was first published in the early 1980s, but it was based on work from the late 1960s. That’s when Engelmann was involved in the government-sponsored Project Follow Through, whose summary report compared nine methods for how to teach reading and tracked results on 75,000 children from kindergarten through third grade. The results, though some critics over the years have rejected them on methodological grounds, were clear: The approach that proved most effective was based on phonics—teaching children how to sound words out, letter by letter, rather than encouraging students to recognize words as single chunks, also called the whole-word system. Specifically, the most successful approach supplemented basic phonics with a tightly scripted format emphasizing repetition and student participation, often dubbed “direct instruction.” As I have previously explained for NPR, the results were especially impressive among poor children, including black ones.

At the preschool at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign that Engelmann ran with the education researcher Carl Bereiter starting in 1964, phonics-based direct instruction helped even 4-year-old kids understand sounds, syllables, and rhyming, so that they entered kindergarten reading as proficiently as 8-year-olds. Nine other sites across the country had comparable results. Direct instruction has boosted student performance in a similar fashion since in Houston in the 1970s, and in Baltimore and Milwaukee in the late 1990s to early 2000s.

In 2001, students in the mostly black Richmond, Virginia, district were scoring abysmally in reading—just less than 40 percent of third-grade students passed the state reading test. Four years later, after the district switched to the direct-instruction method, 74 percent of third graders passed it. By contrast, in 2005 over in wealthy Fairfax County, where teachers scorned the phonics-based-reading instruction method (dismissing it as impersonal “drill and kill” is common), only 59 percent of the county’s black third graders taking that test passed it, despite plush school funding.

One survey found that only 15 percent of classes for elementary-school instructors offer lessons in how to teach direct instruction. Many specialists insist that kids learn to read English better using the whole-word method. The idea is that English spelling is so irregular that it’s inefficient to try to teach kids to link how letters sound to how words are written.

Among education specialists, a school of thought has grown up around the idea, espoused by the psycholinguists Ken Goodman and Frank Smith, that people don’t mentally associate letters with sounds—that real reading is a kind of elegant guesswork that relies on context. But researchers have deep-sixed that notion again and again, as Mark Seidenberg showed a few years back in his marvelous Language at the Speed of Sight.

Some educators also believe that teaching reading in the same way to all kids according to a set program is too mechanical for a diverse student body with differing skills and predilections, and that learning to read should come through “discovery” and “exploration.” This approach is often titled “balanced literacy,” in which teachers present a class with general strategies but nudge students to help one another learn to read in “reading circles” or via engaging texts on their own, with occasional check-ins from the teacher. The general expectation is that students will marvel their way into reading via assorted individual pathways. That sounds good, and kids from book-lined homes can often manage under this system, but again, Engelmann’s method has worked on kids of all backgrounds. It’s designed to.

As Seidenberg describes in his book, nationwide the phonics and whole-word camps have clashed over and over again, such that some districts use one method and some the other, with many alternating between the two. Some, of course, combine the approaches. But given Engelmann’s findings, this back-and-forth is like a pendulum swing among doctors between penicillin and bed rest. Penicillin is clinical and one-size-fits-all; bed rest allows for improvisation and feels right.

My daughter’s public-school teachers when she was 4, thoroughly excellent at what they did, nevertheless told me that the school district didn’t consider kids my daughter’s age “ready” to read. It was time for Engelmann’s book.

The process wasn’t difficult in the least; it was joyful. First came learning some sound-letter correspondences, such as the sound “ih” for i. But especially neat was watching the main jump—from p-i-g to understanding that the letters correspond to sounds that you link together into pig. Under the Engelmann method, children start by uttering the sounds in sequence—“p”, “ih,” “g”—and are then asked to “say it fast,” upon which, after some preliminary squeaks and pops, they get to “pig.”

Next, the book shows them words that rhyme: big, dig, wig. This cues them to the fact that words can differ by just one sound, which is crucial in reinforcing that the “ig” part means “ihg” and not a separate “ih” and then a “g.” The book presents letters with some shortcuts—lines over vowels to indicate the long ones, silent letters printed smaller (we called those the “stupid letters”).

What about those words with irregular spellings? The book dribbles them in slowly but steadily. Many of the most common words are irregular—said, I, have, you—and so kids get lots of practice with them in the reading passages. And so my daughter learned to read, within about the stretch on the calendar it would take to watch all of Sanford and Son at a rate of one episode a day.

Did my daughter, as the child of two hyper-literate people with doctorates, have some kind of leg up? I doubt it. Some kids pick up reading with minimal guidance as early as 3; she wasn’t one of them, nor had she given indication of any impending breakthrough. Besides, Engelmann’s book is designed for kids of average intelligence and has worked with legions of them over the decades.

Get Engelmann’s book and try it—you will watch your child discover the ability to read on your lap, via you carefully teaching her how to do it! Then pass the word on.