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How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Let’s admit, our work computers, personal devices, and even smart home devices were under the risk of near-constant attacks from various hacking threats. To deal with such risks, security researchers recommend setting up a VPN or Proxy servers.

Both Proxy servers and VPNs were meant for security and privacy purpose, but they are a bit different. The proxy server is just another computer that sits between you and your ISP. Proxy servers were usually configured in corporate environments to filter web traffic.

Lots of businesses use proxy servers to block access to certain websites or provide network users with more anonymity. However, few sites restrict access to computers that connects through a proxy server. So, if you are having trouble accessing a few websites, then it’s time to check the proxy settings.

How To Check The Proxy Server Settings in Windows 10

Even if you have not set a proxy server on your PC, sometimes computers accidentally or malicious get set to use a proxy server. So, in this article, we have decided to share a few best methods to check the proxy settings in the Windows 10 computers.

1. Using Windows 10 Settings App

You can check the Proxy settings of your computer via Windows 10 Settings app. Just follow some of the simple steps given below.

Step 1. First of all, click on the Start menu and then on ‘Settings’. On the Windows Settings, click on the ‘Network & Internet’ option.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Step 2. From the right-hand side, select ‘Proxy’

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Step 3. From the Proxy panel, you will be able to review the proxy settings. In most cases, everything should be set to off.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

If anything is turned on, then your web traffic is going through a proxy, and you could feel your internet connection being slower than usual.

2. Through Control Panel

If you are not using the latest version of the Windows 10 operating system, then you could choose to use the Control Panel to access the proxy settings. Follow some of the simple steps given below to check the Proxy Server Settings on your PC.

Step 1. First of all, click on the ‘Start’ button and search for Control Panel.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Step 2. Open control panel, and click on the ‘Internet Options’

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Step 3. Under the Internet Properties, click on the ‘Connections’ tab.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Step 4. On the Connections tab, click on the ‘LAN settings’

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Step 5. Here you will be able to see the Proxy server settings.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

That’s it! You are done. This is how you can check the Proxy server settings on your computer via Control Panel.

So, this article is all about how to check the Proxy Server Settings on your computer. I hope this article helped you! Share it with your friends also.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Have you heard of a proxy server before? It’s possible for someone to use the Internet on a daily basis and not know of the existence of proxy servers. Despite this, proxy servers have found homes in all kinds of environments, from within the home to big businesses and companies. This is due to the wide variety of roles they can perform, from regulating Internet connections to providing an extra layer of security. With Windows 10 becoming commonplace, users may be unsure how to use a proxy server in Windows 10.

So, what are they? And if you want to use one, how do you set up a Windows 10 machine to use it?

What Proxy Servers Are

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

When you access the Internet, your IP address is broadcast to the websites and services you use so they know where to send their data to. This is usually fine, but for users who want to hide their IP address due to privacy and security issues, it can be troublesome.

The solution to these problems is a secondary server that handles your data before it goes to the Internet. This is called a proxy server. This serves as your “middle man” between your computer and the Internet. You send data to the proxy server, and it passes the data along to where it needs to go. That way when you use the Internet, your proxy server’s IP is broadcast instead of your own PC’s.

How They’re Used

How are proxy servers used in the computing world?

Personal Use

For one, someone can turn a spare PC they have into a proxy server, then route their Internet through it. When they access the Internet, they broadcast the proxy PC’s IP rather than the user’s. This is useful for an added layer of security, as malware and malicious attacks looking for IP addresses will target the proxy server rather than the user’s PC.

As a Service

People can use paid-for or free proxy servers as a service provided by companies. This is useful if the proxy server is in a different country! A UK user, for instance, can have a US proxy server handle their data, allowing them to access US-restricted websites. Be careful when using a free proxy server, however; it might be logging all the information that passes through it!

In Businesses

Businesses also make use of proxy servers. Not only do businesses use them to maintain anonymity and protect themselves from cyber attacks, but they can route their employees’ web traffic through the proxy server. They then give the proxy server rules and regulations on how the ‘Net can be used, and the proxy server will monitor all the Web traffic using said rules and block any that disobeys them.

How to Connect to a Proxy Server in Windows 10

If you’re interested in proxy servers, you can set up a Windows 10 machine to connect to one. Before you start, however, you’ll need to find a proxy server Windows 10 can use so you can redirect your traffic to it. Either find a good proxy service, or set up a PC to act as a proxy server yourself. If you need some help, we’ve covered a few places you could get a proxy server. The following steps are also useful if you’re working on a network that requires you connect through a proxy server.

To connect to a proxy server, right click the Start button, then click the cog to open Settings.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

In the Settings window click “Network & Internet.”

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

On the left-side bar, click “Proxy.”

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

You’ll find yourself in the proxy server settings. This window contains all the settings Windows 10 offers for a proxy server. You have a few options here; if you have a script to automatically set up your proxy, you can enter it by clicking “Use setup script,” then enter the location of the proxy setup script into the box.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

However, it’s more likely you’ll only have two pieces of information: an IP address and a port. The IP address will be a string of numbers separated with three dots (10.10.10.10). The port number will be between one and five digits (3333). You may receive an address where both are combined, separated with a colon (10.10.10.10:3333). In each of these cases you’ll want to use the manual proxy setup to access the proxy server.

First, under “Manual proxy setup” switch on “Use a proxy server,” then enter the IP address and the port into their respective boxes. You don’t need to worry too much about the big box below unless you want to exclude specific addresses from using the proxy.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Regardless of what option you chose, clicking “Save” will save your proxy options. Now your Windows 10 machine will use the proxy server when connecting to the network.

By Proxy

Proxy servers can fit a wide range of uses, from security measures to accessing restricted content. Now you know what they are, how they work, how to find a proxy server Windows 10 can redirect traffic to, and how to connect to it.

Do you use a proxy server for personal or professional use? Let us know below!

Simon Batt is a Computer Science graduate with a passion for cybersecurity.

Whether it’s for work or personal use, you can connect to a virtual private network (VPN) on your Windows PC. A VPN connection can help provide a more secure connection and access to your company’s network and the internet, for example, when you’re working from a coffee shop or similar public place.

Create a VPN profile

Before you can connect to a VPN, you must have a VPN profile on your PC. You can either create a VPN profile on your own or set up a work account to get a VPN profile from your company.

Before you start:

If it’s for work, look for VPN settings or a VPN app on your company’s intranet site while you’re at work, or contact your company’s support person.

If it’s for a VPN service you subscribe to for personal use, visit the Microsoft Store to see if there’s an app for that service, then go to the VPN service’s website to see if the VPN connection settings to use are listed there.

Select the Start button, then type settings. Select Settings > Network & internet > VPN > Add VPN.

In Add a VPN connection, do the following:

For VPN provider, choose Windows (built-in).

In the Connection name box, enter a name you’ll recognize (for example, My Personal VPN). This is the VPN connection name you’ll look for when connecting.

In the Server name or address box, enter the address for the VPN server.

For VPN type, choose the type of VPN connection you want to create. You’ll need to know which kind of VPN connection your company or VPN service uses.

For Type of sign-in info, choose the type of sign-in info (or credentials) to use. This might be a username and password, one-time password, certificate, or a smart card if you’re connecting to a VPN for work. Enter your username and password in the respective boxes (if required).

Select Save.

If you need to edit the VPN connection info or specify additional settings, such as proxy settings, choose the VPN connection and then select Advanced options.

Connect to a VPN

When you have a VPN profile, you’re ready to connect.

In Settings, select Network & internet > VPN.

Next to the VPN connection you want to use, select Connect.

If you’re prompted, enter your username and password or other sign-in info.

When connected, the VPN connection name will display Connected underneath it. To see if you’re connected to the VPN while you’re doing things on your PC, hover your mouse pointer over the Network icon on the far right of the taskbar, then see if the VPN connection shows.

Tip: You can also connect to a VPN through quick settings and the notification area. To add VPN as a quick setting, select the Network icon on the taskbar, then select Edit quick settings > Add > VPN > Done.

Whether it’s for work or personal use, you can connect to a virtual private network (VPN) on your Windows 10 PC. A VPN connection can help provide a more secure connection and access to your company’s network and the internet, for example, when you’re working from a coffee shop or similar public place.

Create a VPN profile

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Before you can connect to a VPN, you must have a VPN profile on your PC. You can either create a VPN profile on your own or set up a work account to get a VPN profile from your company.

Before you start:

If it’s for work, look for VPN settings or a VPN app on your company’s intranet site while you’re at work, or contact your company’s support person.

If it’s for a VPN service you subscribe to for personal use, visit the Microsoft Store to see if there’s an app for that service, then go to the VPN service’s website to see if the VPN connection settings to use are listed there.

Select the Start button, then select Settings > Network & Internet > VPN > Add a VPN connection.

In Add a VPN connection, do the following:

For VPN provider, choose Windows (built-in).

In the Connection name box, enter a name you’ll recognize (for example, My Personal VPN). This is the VPN connection name you’ll look for when connecting.

In the Server name or address box, enter the address for the VPN server.

For VPN type, choose the type of VPN connection you want to create. You’ll need to know which kind of VPN connection your company or VPN service uses.

For Type of sign-in info, choose the type of sign-in info (or credentials) to use. This might be a username and password, one-time password, certificate, or a smart card if you’re connecting to a VPN for work. Enter your username and password in the respective boxes (if required).

Select Save.

If you need to edit the VPN connection info or specify additional settings, such as proxy settings, choose the VPN connection and then select Advanced options.

Connect to a VPN

When you have a VPN profile, you’re ready to connect.

On the far right of the taskbar, select the Network icon (either or ).

Select the VPN connection you want to use, then do either of the following depending on what happens when you select the VPN connection:

If the Connect button displays under the VPN connection, select Connect.

If the VPN section in Settings opens, select the VPN connection there, then select Connect.

If you’re prompted, enter your username and password or other sign-in info.

When connected, the VPN connection name will display Connected underneath it. To see if you’re connected to the VPN while you’re doing things on your PC, select the Network icon (either or ) on the far right of the taskbar, then see if the VPN connection says Connected.

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Web sitemizde size en iyi deneyimi sunmak için çerezleri kullanıyoruz. Hangi çerezleri kullandığımız hakkında daha fazla bilgi edinebilir veya ayarlardan kapatabilirsiniz.

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To find out which version of Windows your device is running, press the Windows logo key + R, type winver in the Open box, and then select OK.

Here’s how to learn more:

Select Start > Settings > System > About.

Under Device specifications > System type, see if you’re running a 32-bit or 64-bit version of Windows.

Under Windows specifications, check which edition and version of Windows your device is running.

Related links

If you’re having a problem with activation, see Activate in Windows.

If you forgot the password you use to sign in to Windows devices or email, see How to reset your Microsoft password.

For info about updating Windows, see Windows Update: FAQ.

Find operating system info in Windows 10

To find out which version of Windows your device is running, press the Windows logo key + R, type winver in the Open box, and then select OK.

Here’s how to learn more:

Select the Start button > Settings > System > About .

Under Device specifications > System type, see if you’re running a 32-bit or 64-bit version of Windows.

Under Windows specifications, check which edition and version of Windows your device is running.

Related links

If you’re having a problem with activation, see Activate Windows.

If you forgot the password you use to sign in to Windows devices or email, see How to reset your Microsoft password.

For info about updating Windows, see Windows Update: FAQ.

Find operating system info in Windows 8.1 or Windows RT 8.1

To find out which version of Windows your device is running, press the Windows logo key + R, type winver in the Open box, and then select OK.

If your device is running Windows 8.1 or Windows RT 8.1, here’s how to learn more:

If you’re using a touch device, swipe in from the right edge of the screen, tap Settings, and then tap Change PC settings. Continue to step 3.

If you’re using a mouse, point to the lower-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer up, click Settings, and then click Change PC settings.

Select PC and devices > PC info.

Under Windows you’ll see which edition and version of Windows your device is running.

Under PC > System type you’ll see if you’re running a 32-bit or 64-bit version of Windows.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Related links

If you’re having a problem with activation, see Activate Windows 7 or Windows 8.1

If you forgot the password you use to sign in to Windows devices or email, see How to reset your Microsoft password.

For info about updating Windows, see Windows Update: FAQ.

Find operating system info in Windows 7

Select the Start button, type Computer in the search box, right-click on Computer, and then select Properties.
How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Under Windows edition, you’ll see the version and edition of Windows that your device is running.

Support for Windows 7 ended on January 14, 2020

We recommend you move to a Windows 11 PC to continue to receive security updates from Microsoft.

Related links

If you’re having a problem with activation, see Activate Windows 7 or Windows 8.1.

If you forgot the password you use to sign in to Windows devices or email, see How to reset your Microsoft password.

This article provides help to solve an issue that occurs when you use apps that connect to the Internet if you use an Internet proxy server that requires authentication.

Applies to: Windows 10 – all editions, Windows Server 2012 R2
Original KB number: 2778122

Symptoms

If you use an Internet proxy server that requires authentication, you may encounter problems when you use apps that connect to the Internet.

Proxy servers that require authentication either require a username and password to access the Internet or authenticate users by using their current domain credentials.

Depending on your proxy configuration, you may encounter one of the following problems when you use Microsoft Store apps:

You cannot install updates that are available in the Microsoft Store, and you may receive one of the following error messages:

This app wasn’t installed – view details.

Something happened and this app couldn’t be installed. Try again. Error code: 0x8024401c

You cannot install new apps and may receive one of the following error messages:

Your purchase couldnt be completed. Something happened and your purchase cant be completed.

Something happened and this app couldn’t be installed. Try again. Error code: 0x8024401c

When you start the Microsoft Store app, you may receive the following error message:

Your network proxy doesn’t work with the Microsoft Store. Contact your system administrator for more information.

Apps that are included with Windows 8 may indicate that you are not connected to the Internet. If you installed other apps from the Microsoft Store while you were connected to a different network, those apps may also indicate that you are not connected to the Internet. The apps may display one of the following error messages:

There was a problem signing you in.

You are not connected to the Internet.

Live Tiles for some apps may not update their content or may never show live content.

Windows Update may not check for updates or download updates, and you receive error code 8024401C or the following error message:

There was a problem checking for updates.

Resolution

The issues that are discussed in this article are resolved in Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2.

More information

If you are using Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012, you can reduce the effect of these issues by enabling unauthenticated access through the proxy server. We recommend that you enable unauthenticated access only for connections to URL addresses that are used by each app that has a problem. Some proxy servers may suggest that you create an allow list of URL addresses.

To resolve these issues as they relate to using Microsoft Store apps or to using Microsoft apps that are included with Windows 8 or Windows Update, you can include the following addresses in an allow list on the proxy server and enable HTTP and HTTPS access to them:

  • login.live.com
  • account.live.com
  • clientconfig.passport.net
  • wustat.windows.com
  • *.windowsupdate.com
  • *.wns.windows.com
  • *.hotmail.com
  • *.outlook.com
  • *.microsoft.com
  • *.msftncsi.com/ncsi.txt

To resolve these issues for other apps, you may have to contact the application vendor for information about the URL addresses that you should include in your allow list.

One common thing many people do to protect their identity when visiting certain websites or while working on the Internet while away from home, is to make use of proxy servers. Anonymous proxy servers will hide your real IP, which is useful if you’ve been banned from certain forums or websites for any reason, but people also use proxy servers for business reasons as well.

When you’re at the office, you may want to use your company’s internal proxy servers to access the Internet, but while you’re roaming or at home you just want your computer to automatically detect proxy settings.

Before we get into the ways that you can automate your computer through scripting, let’s take a quick look at the manual way people would have to do this. Most people know how to configure their LAN settings – it’s one of the first things you should check if you’re ever having Internet connection problems. Typically you want your proxy settings to be set to “Automatically detect settings” when you’re at home or at a public hotspot.

However, at work, you’ll need to set up a proxy server. You do this within “Internet Properties” in the control panel by clicking on the “LAN settings” button.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Inside your network settings dialog, you’ll see the two settings – you either have a proxy server enabled or you don’t. This is the setting that you want to toggle when you switch from your home network to a work network, or if you want to switch to running under a “cloaked” anonymous IP server.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

You can also find these settings in your registry (click Run and type “regedit“), and this is what you want your scripts to edit. By changing the registry settings, you’re essentially changing those settings in the LAN Settings window.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

What we really want to do is toggle those settings only when and where you really want to. There are three scenarios that I’m going to cover, and you can copy and paste the code to tweak it to your liking. You can put the script in your startup folder so that it launches whenever you boot your computer, or you can just run the scripts whenever you want your computer to automatically set the correct IP settings.

The three scenarios I’m going to provide scripts for include the following.

  • Prompt the user whether or not they want to use an anonymous proxy for Internet access.
  • Prompt the user to type in the name of the proxy server they want to use.
  • Automatically check whether you’re home or not, and set the appropriate proxy server settings.

The cool thing about Windows Scripting Host is that each of these options aren’t that hard to do.

This script will pop-up a message box asking whether or not the user wants to use a proxy server. If yes, then the script will enable proxy servers and fill in a hard-coded anonymous proxy server. You can tweak the script to use your favorite anonymous proxy. Here’s what the script looks like:

When you run it, the user sees the following prompt:

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

A “Yes” loads the anonymous proxy as your proxy server and sets “ProxyEnable” to 1. A “No” sets the proxy to default all zeros, and disables the proxy setting.

The other approach is to ask the user what exact server they want to use. This allows the flexibility of changing the proxy server constantly without the need to edit the script itself. You can do this by changing the “MsgBox” command to an “InputBox”.

When you save this as a .wsf file and run it, the following window will appear.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Just type in your preferred proxy server, click okay, and your Internet settings are automatically updated.

This next script is a little bit more flexible, so it’s also a little longer. But what it can do is check your current IP address, and if it is within the range that you expect when you’re on your home ISP, it’ll disable using a proxy server. If it sees that you’re not on your typically home IP domain, it’ll automatically configure your internet with a proxy server that you can hard code into the script.

Here’s what the script looks like.

You set set this up to run on startup, and the computer will automatically configure the Internet settings as needed. The program will show you your current IP each time – if you don’t want that, just remove the “WPScript.Echo” line. When I run it here at home, it recognizes I’m on my safe home ISP and disables the anonymous proxy.

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

If you were on a public hotspot, it would recognize the foreign IP address and enable the cloaked proxy instead.
These are just a few examples of the sort of automation you can build into your Windows PC with Windows Scripting Host.

It’s easy to lose track of what’s happening on a Windows server, particularly when something goes awry. There are hundreds of processes, scheduled tasks, rules, handles, and privileges going on at the same time. The more you know about the goings on of the computers you’re responsible for—whether Windows, Linux, or any other operating system—the easier it is to fix if things go south.

Fortunately, you have help. There are many command-line utilities for Windows systems (desktop and server), as well as small, official tools that help you get a grip on what’s going on at all times. In this article, I introduce you to some you should know about. These may not surprise you if you’re an experienced Windows admin but can serve as a checklist for your fix-it toolbox.

I share both free tools and PowerShell or CMD command-line commands. Naturally, the options extend far beyond my list here.

When you don’t want to or (feasibly) can’t get local access to your server, turn to remote tools including WinRS/WinRM or PowerShell remoting, or stick to options such as remote desktop solutions .

See what’s running automatically

Microsoft’s Autoruns has been on my list of tools for more than 15 years now. Every server admin should have it handy. It gives you a complete overview of all processes that run at Windows startup (whether server or client) and all scheduled tasks, services, drivers, Winsock providers, DLLs, and more.

Once a month, I go through the exhaustive list of items and hunt for new entries (Why is it here? Where is it coming from? Do I need it?). I also look at entries marked in yellow or red (the items that try to launch a nonexistent file—usually a good source for troubleshooting).

In particular, third-party services and scheduled tasks get my full attention. I want my server to run as cleanly as possible.

Big plus: The recent versions allow you to check any file for any form of malware, known and especially unknown, using VirusTotal.

Monitor all processes live

One of the most fascinating things to observe on your server, and a great way to troubleshoot problems or performance issues, is Process Monitor, which displays a live view of all file, process, and registry activity. In just 10 minutes, my Windows server recorded 8 million events.

Process Monitor

Things can get quite wild, as Process Monitor lists every single event or process. But with a little know-how, you can filter the information. If you suspect that a certain process or service is thrashing your hard drive or crashing at a specific point, naturally you need to find out why. You can isolate it by right-clicking and selecting Include . Look at what’s happening (under “Operation”), then check the “Results” and the “Details” for further diagnosis. That likely shows whatever is odd and why .

Network commands you need to know

Getting a grip on your network connections is easy: Turn to the old familiar command line. Windows Server comes with a handful of commands to run in a command-line window that should help you get a sense of network connectivity.

First, fire up the command prompt and type in netstat . Netstat (available in all versions of Windows) lists all active connections from your local IP address to the outside world. Add the -b parameter ( netstat -b ) to get a list by .exe files and services so you know exactly what’s causing the connection.

Then there’s ipconfig /all —an all-time classic command-line command that gives you the status of all network adapters.

At the command line, type in net statistics for a list of core performance data, such as network errors, hung sessions, bytes received, SMBs received/transmitted, write/read errors, etc. This includes all data since the last reboot—oh, and that also gives you the server’s uptime!

Last but not least, there’s PathPing . It combines Ping and Tracert and lets you trace and get statistics on a specific route. Type in pathping IPADDRESS for information on latency, loss packets, and more, after just a few seconds of tracing.

Export server application or system logs to CSV

Event Logs aren’t the fastest way to check up on system or application errors. Using a simple PowerShell command ( Get-EventLog -Log “Application” or Get-EventLog -Log “System” ), you can get a full list of all events in the most critical categories.

But log files often are huge, and it is not feasible to read them. Instead, export these logs into a CSV file on a regular basis. Using Excel to filter and search is far simpler than messing with Event Viewer .

Unsure how to get started with containers? Yes, we have a guide for that. Get Containers for Dummies.

Check Active Directory health

My primary tool to diagnose domain controllers is Microsoft’s Domain Controller Diagnostic Tool. Run it from C:\Program Files (x86)\Resource Kit . To perform a comprehensive check on all Active Directories, run dcdiag /e /v /c whereupon you get information on abnormal system behavior such as hard disk errors and network problems. Adding /fix runs some basic (safe) DNS repairs. However, don’t count on those or get your hopes up. In my experience, you end up fixing most issues by hand!

WMIC: The be-all and end-all of status checks

Another useful Microsoft-provided built-in tool is the Windows Management Instrumentation Command-line utility. Running WMIC from a command line gives you dozens of tools to check up on hardware and software server activity. I regularly use several of its tools:

  • DiskQuota: Lets you check whether users have reached their disk space limit.
  • Group: Lists all user accounts and groups.
  • IRQ: Provides a full list of server IRQs. This is great for hardware troubleshooting, especially when you have multiple network adapters.
  • Printer and printjob: Gives a detailed overview of active connected printers and outstanding print jobs.
  • Share: Provides an overview of all resources shared by your server.

Beyond status dashboards

The commands here let you dive deeper into system status than you can with a Windows server overview status dashboard. Often, they let you fix things immediately. It’s a more hands-on and thorough approach .

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

In the Windows environment, a stupidly easy way to speed up load times (as in loading web pages) is to disable the automatic detection of a proxy server, because the vast majority of you out there don’t use a proxy at all.

What is a proxy server concerning internet connectivity?

A server that acts as an intermediary for clients (like your computer) requesting stuff from the internet. And believe me when I say that you would know it if you had to connect through a proxy from home just to load web pages and other data from the internet.

Why does Windows sometimes enable automatic proxy detection even if you don’t use it?

The culprit for enabling the auto-detect of proxy server is usually the IE installer itself. For example, if you upgraded from IE8 to IE9, the IE9 installer does ask you if you want auto-proxy detect turned on. Most people not knowing any better (and how would you?) will just enable it.

Is the auto-detection of a proxy server browser-specific?

No. In the Windows environment, once proxy auto-detection is enabled, it affects all web browsers installed in Windows.

What happens when auto-detection of proxy is enabled?

A very annoying 1 to 5 second pause before any web page is loaded using any browser; it is most noticeable on browser startup when loading your home page for whatever it may be.

How to disable auto-detection of a proxy server in Windows

Note 1: These instructions are the same whether you’re running XP, Vista or 7.

Note 2: If there is anything there in your proxy settings (mentioned in a moment), copy the information down first before disabling in case anything goes wrong. If something does go wrong and your internet connection stops working, you can simply go back and put things back the way they were.

Note 3: This is for home users only. It is normal in many college/university/office environments that the internet connectivity does run through a proxy server.

Step 1. Open the run dialog

Press the keystroke combination +R or (or Start button) and then click Run.

Step 2. Type inetcpl.cpl and press Enter

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Step 3. From the Internet Properties window that appears, click the Connections tab

Step 4. Once you have clicked the Connections tab, click the LAN settings button

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Step 5. Copy any information (if any exists), uncheck all boxes, click OK

Usually, the only thing checked here if anything at all will be the Automatically detect settings checkbox. If it is, deselect it.

If there is anything else listed here, copy it down first before doing anything else.

Uncheck all the boxes and you will end up with this:

How to tell whether your windows pc is using a proxy server

Back at the Internet Properties window, click OK again.

If you had the Automatically detect settings box checked and nothing else checked/filled out, having it unchecked will eliminate that extremely annoying 1 to 5 second auto-detection proxy pause.