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How to treat ringworm in guinea pigs

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Guinea Pig Ringworm – What Is It, What Are The Symptoms And How To Treat It.

Is your guinea pig’s coat looking a little patchy? Is the skin underneath somewhat scaly and dry looking?

If so, it might make you wonder “Do guinea pigs carry ringworm?”

Let’s find out how to treat ringworm in guinea pigs, and how to prevent reinfection.

We will also answer an important question for all guinea pig owners: can you get ringworm from guinea pigs?

Can Guinea Pigs get Ringworm?

Yes indeed, guinea pigs can get ringworm!

But before we go any further, let’s clear up a common misconception about the infection.

Ringworm is caused by a fungal infection, not a worm. The name of the fungus responsible is Trichophyton mentagrophytes.

According to a study published in 2012, this fungus we have come to know as “ringworm” is the most common fungal skin infection found in guinea pigs and rabbits.

Guinea pigs that are kept in hot, humid, overcrowded, and unsanitary conditions are at higher risk of developing the infection.

Signs of Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

The first sign of a ringworm infection is usually bald patches around the nose, which expose scaly, dry skin underneath.

These bald patches then spread over the face. If the infection is severe, it may also spread down the back of the guinea pig.

The affected areas are usually not itchy, but some guinea pig’s skin may become pus-filled, crusty and inflamed.

How do Guinea Pigs get Ringworm?

While ringworm is treatable and not considered a serious disease, it is highly contagious. For that reason, most cases of ringworm are introduced into a home with the arrival of a new guinea pig.

Being a fungal infection, ringworm is spread when spores move from one animal to the other.

It seems that these spores can spread when they become airborne. However, physical contact is the most likely way the infection will spread.

If a guinea pig was raised in an unclean environment, it is possible for it to be infected without showing any symptoms.

Once it is introduced into a new home, the infection can then spread rapidly to any other pets, or people, in the household.

As guinea pigs live in groups, it is possible that if one develops it the rest will follow.

As we mentioned, guinea pigs kept in hot, unsanitary conditions are most likely to pick up the infection. So, ideally having a good look at the place the guinea pig was raised will give you an idea of whether the new piggy is likely to carry the fungus or not.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Guinea Pig Ringworm Treatment

It is important to eradicate ringworm completely. Because the infection spreads so readily, it could end up being a real headache if you don’t treat it properly.

Guinea pig ringworm medication is systematic, not just topical. Your vet will likely prescribe an antifungal agent that will need to be taken orally, such as itraconazole or terbinafine.

Your vet will likely also direct you to wash your pig a couple of times a week with special anti-fungal shampoo.

A doctor will likely recommend that you decontaminate the area in which your piggy has been living to ensure the infection does not reoccur.

There are special preparations available for decontamination, but your vet may suggest something as simple as the correct dilution of chlorine laundry bleach to clean the guinea pig’s housing.

It is important to follow your veterinarian’s guidelines to a T, as using topical treatments on their own can result in your guinea pig developing a chronic, sub-clinical infection. This could lead to others in your household becoming infected.

Is Guinea Pig Ringworm Contagious to Humans?

In short, yes, it is. Most commonly, children will contract the infection, as they are the most likely to have close contact with the guinea pig.

If you or your child has caught ringworm from your guinea pig, you will likely see skin lesions appear around the face, neck and arms.

Often, the infection appears soon after a new guinea pig joins the family.

If you suspect people in your household have contracted ringworm, take them to the doctor for the appropriate treatment.

The guinea pig which introduced the infection will also need to be taken to the vet for treatment.

If you have any other animals in the household that could have caught the infection, it would be a good idea to talk to your vet about the proper steps to take to prevent the infection spreading further.

How to Prevent Guinea Pig Ringworm

The best way to keep your guinea pig ringworm free is to keep living quarters clean and dry. Try and keep your pigs in a cool spot that does not encourage the growth of fungus.

If you are adding a new guinea pig to your family, try and have a good look at where they have been living up till now.

Is the area clean and dry? Is the guinea pig living with other pigs? How healthy do they look?

If you want to be extra sure that your new furry friend will not bring unwanted fungal infections into your home, then house them separately for a couple of weeks, just to make sure they haven’t brought some nasties along with them.

In that time, try to keep contact with your guinea pig to a minimum.

Of course, you will have to clean out their cage and you will want to make friends with your new piggy. Close attention to hand washing or perhaps even some gloves might be in order during this period.

If your guinea pig shows no sign of guinea pig ringworm after this initial quarantine period, your new piggy is ready to move it with any other guinea pigs you may have!

Needless to say, they are also ready for lots of cuddles as well, without fear of an unwanted ringworm infection.

Despite its name, one of the common fungal infections in guinea pigs is the ringworm. It is caused by a dermatophyte fungus – one that is considered as a communicable disease called the Trichophyton mentagrophytes. It’s found that about 97% of ringworm infections are caused by this particular fungal species. This type of fungi grows quite rapidly compared to other species.

They are also usually found in wet places that are high in carbon content. It can take many forms of infections but for animals, it is usually characterized by a ring-shaped rash and is typically itchy.

Ringworm in guinea pigs is considered zoophilic in nature, but it could occasionally infect humans.

Animals may have ringworm through direct contact with an infected animal’s skin or by coming in contact with other things infected with the fungus such as furniture. The fastest and probably the most certain way to acquire the infection is through contact with damaged cells on the skin or nails.

Symptoms of Cavy Ringworm

The term ringworm came from its manifestation on the skin which is usually circular in shape. This lesion typically starts in the head as a bald patch which is crusty and flaky in appearance.

There are also cases where there has been no symptoms of alopecia or hair loss and appears only as broken hairs or just a red scaling on the skin. It becomes itchy and as a result may get irritated as the guinea pig will try to scratch it off.

The formation of the rash may start at the tip of the nose and then head towards the back of the guinea pig. When the ringworm infection in guinea pigs is severe, it spreads further down onto its tail but not affecting its hind legs.

When the face gets infected, you will see it around the eyes and ears. A moist, humid, and warm environment may make the symptoms worse.

Treatment For Ringworm In Guinea Pigs

If you are suspecting that your guinea pig is infected with ringworm, it is best to bring it immediately to a veterinarian for the right diagnosis and treatment. Physical examination and the use of an ultraviolet light to show the skin infection are done for initial diagnosis. Further examination would include scraping from the infected area to be taken to the laboratory for confirmation.

The treatment of guinea pig ringworm depends on how severe the infection is. It is usually a combination of topical and systemic treatments. The latter is used to treat the fungal infection itself while the topical antifungal treatments decrease the possibility of further contamination from the environment.

The lesions usually heal from one to three weeks depending on the severity of the condition.

Ingestion of antifungal medicine would usually last for 5 to 6 weeks treatment for the guinea pig. Some veterinarians would also prescribe a soothing shampoo to relieve the pain and itchiness. Some will also suggest vitamins and minerals in order to improve their immune system.

Typical antifungal shampoos are the same as those used by human beings since they contain the chemical called ketoconazole. An example of a veterinary prescribed topical shampoo is KetoChlor with active ingredients including ketoconazole and chlorhexidine gluconate.

Other available shampoos usually prescribed are Malaseb and Pharmaseb specifically formulated for animals. These veterinary shampoos basically combat both bacterial and fungal infections.

Topical creams that are prescribed by veterinarians can be either be a miconazole or clotrimazole-based creams. Dipping solutions as a topical treatment may also be recommended and are probably one of the mildest but effective when there are infected, sensitive areas in a cavy.

This is also typically suggested for young guinea pigs. An example would be the enilconazole dip that is also highly used for dogs, cats, and horses.

A widely used medicine for oral guinea pig ringworm treatment is itraconazole because it lessens the stress to guinea pigs and touching your pet is kept at a minimum. It is also known to have lesser side effects compared to other antifungal drugs.

It might not be the cheapest antifungal medication out there, but it is worth the price due to its effectivity. Other medications that are used may include lufenuron and ketoconazole.

Do not attempt to self-medicate your guinea pigs especially without the proper diagnosis from a licensed veterinarian. There is a possibility that it may interact with other drugs or with hypersensitive animals so it is highly recommended to get a consultation first. Most of these treatments are veterinary-prescribed only for safety reasons.

Guinea pigs can be infected with ringworm just like us, cats, dogs and other animals. Ringworm is a fungal infection (not a worm, despite the name). This type of fungi is able to take nutrients from keratin; the substance that makes up hair, nails and skin. Therefore ringworm is literally feeding and thriving on the (usually top layer of dead) skin and fur of the animal (or human) it has infected.

Ringworm is considered common in guinea pigs. Some animals may carry the fungi without showing symptoms, they can still be carriers and transmit ringworm to other animals or people (when a human can catch a disease from an animal it is called a zoonosis).

It’s uncomfortable, irritating and highly contagious so if your guinea pig is showing signs of ringworm, you need to act fast to get rid of it.

Signs and Symptoms of Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

What does guinea pig ringworm look like and how can you tell if your piggie(s) might have it?

It’s a fungal infection of the skin, so it’s usually very noticeable in the form of missing patches of fur which may, but not always be in the rough shape of a ring or circle.

Whatever it might look like, it goes without saying that a trip to the vet should be the first port of call when any signs of skin irritation or infection are showing. When it comes to ringworm, acting quickly is important because you’ll want to get on top of this infection before it gets worse, and to stop it spreading to other pets and humans in the house.

Preventing Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Once you’ve successfully treated a ringworm problem, what can you do to make sure it never comes back again?

Can guinea pigs get ringworm from stress?

Although exposure to the ringworm fungus is needed for a guinea pig to get ringworm, if a guinea pig is under stress then their immune system can suffer; and this can make them more susceptible to a variety of health problems. This includes infections and ringworm which they can be more likely to succumb to with a compromised immune system. For overall health and wellbeing, guinea pigs should lead a stress-free life. Guinea pigs who have been rescued from poor conditions or mistreatment, or bought from pet shops where they’ve been kept in substandard conditions, need extra TLC to get their immune system back into strong condition; and it’s during these times that we should be extra vigilent in looking out for the signs of ringworm, as well as any other health problems.

First Things First

If you are reading this article, odds are, your guinea pig has contracted ringworm, or at least shows some of the symptoms of having contracted it. So I am quickly going to recommend a product that can really easily and safely get rid of your guinea pigs ringworm. I typically use this shampoo called ‘Ring Out Shampoo‘.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

This stuff safely gets rid of all the bacteria and fungus that will be harming your guinea pig. On top of that, unlike most other shampoo’s, rather than just washing them onto the ground, this shampoo will instead kill them all together, preventing the infection from reoccurring.

It was made using food grade chemistry which means… that this stuff will not irritate or harm your guinea pig’s skin, which is always the number one priority 🙂

Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Ringworm in Guinea Pigs.

The name ringworm refers to a fungal infection on the surface of the skin. It got it’s name because, long ago, people believed that the infection was due to a worm, but it is not. Ringworm is a fungal infection in the skin, usually caused by the Trichophyton mentagrophytes fungus. However, there are several common fungi that can cause ringworm – usually from a species of the genus Trichophyton or the genus Miscrosporum. The medical term for ringworm is tinea. Tinea is the Latin name for a growing worm.

The ringworm fungus is a dermatophyte, which means “skin fungi”. An infection with these fungi is sometimes known as dermatophytosis. The fungus can only live off the dead layer of keratin protein on top of the skin, so it will not usually invade and go deeper. It cannot live on mucous membranes, like in the mouth or nose.

Jump to:

What Are the Symptoms?

If your guinea pig has ringworm, the first thing you’ll probably notice are itching/scratching and bald patches, usually starting on the face and then spreading backwards along the back. If you look closely, inside the bald patches there will be red, scaly circular patches made up of concentric rings of overlapping scales.

How Do They Get It?

Ringworm can be caught from other animals or people who are infected with it, or from the soil, or from anything that touched infected soil. Bedding can become infected with it, as well, so if your guinea pig has it, change the bedding frequently until the infection is gone. Oftentimes, you cannot pinpoint exactly where it came from.

Can I Catch It?

Yes! Ringworm is very contagious. Of course, it also depends on which organism is causing the ringworm. Some of the ringworm fungi are only passed from people to people, some are able to be passed from animals to people, and some are passed from soil to animals or people. Anthropophilic species prefer people over animals, some geophilic (meaning “soil-loving”) species live in soil but only grow on feathers exclusively (or horses, or cattle…), and some prefer animals like guinea pigs and humans. But if it lives on a guinea pig, it can live on you, so handle an infected guinea pig with care. Wear rubber gloves and wash your hands immediately after handling him or her.

What Makes Ringworm Thrive?

The ringworm fungus loves heat and moisture, so it’s important to keep the infected area dry. Also make sure the environment is clean and dry – not damp with urine or water.

How Do You Diagnose Ring Worm In Your Guinea Pig?

You might be able to diagnose it just by looking at it and seeing the circular scaly patches. But a vet can use ultraviolet light and skin scrapings to diagnose it, as well. They could do a potassium hydroxide (KOH) preparation of a skin scraping and then view it under a microscope to confirm the diagnosis of a fungus.

How Do I Treat Guinea Pig Ringworm?

Ringworm needs to be treated with an anti-fungal medication, either topical or systemic. If the infection area is small, the vet might want you to apply a topical anti-fungal ointment for 7-10 days. If it’s more widespread, they might just want to administer anti-fungal medicine taken orally for several weeks (usually 5-6 weeks). I also recommend putting your guinea pig on some PRObiotics (not antibiotics). This will help regenerate your guinea pig’s immune system in a healthy and fast way.

What If I Want To Treat It Without Going to a Vet??

You can use a medicated Dandruff Shampoo like Head & Shoulders and bathe the guinea pig once a week for three weeks, making sure to rub it in on the affected area. After the bath, apply topical over-the-counter anti-fungal cream (like for athlete’s foot). Rub it into the affected area twice a day for two weeks.

What If I Have Multiple Guinea Pigs?

Because ringworm is contagious, you need to separate the infected guinea pig from the non-infected ones until the infection is cleared up. Also make sure all of the cages and living areas are cleaned and sanitized.

Is There a Way to Prevent It?

Well, obviously, prevent him from coming into contact with it! But, more practically, keeping the cage, bedding, and environment clean will help prevent any infected material from building up and becoming a main source of contagion.

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How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

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How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

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AmyHague

Junior Guinea Pig

I got my two boys Edgar and Oscar from Pets at Home just under 3 weeks ago now.

Very soon after having them I noticed the ringworm patch on Oscar, so they were taken to the companion care vets inside pets at home where pets at home paid for their treatment.

The vet prescribed itrafungol orally for 14 days for both boys.

They went back for their follow up check Monday. The vet was very happy with Oscars main patch on his back as it has healed nicely and the fur has started to grow back. However, she was converened that both the boys ears were still dry and flakey.

So, she has given me more itrafungol to give orally for a further 14 days, but this is to be commenced after a 7 day break from the treatment.

She also prescribed Imaverol, but not as a dip or bath, but to dilute and use to clean their cage and accessories with.

Just wondered if anyone else has had a similar sort of treatment in the past or if anyone has any opinions on this?

Thank you!

Wiebke

Moderator

I got my two boys Edgar and Oscar from Pets at Home just under 3 weeks ago now.

Very soon after having them I noticed the ringworm patch on Oscar, so they were taken to the companion care vets inside pets at home where pets at home paid for their treatment.

The vet prescribed itrafungol orally for 14 days for both boys.

They went back for their follow up check Monday. The vet was very happy with Oscars main patch on his back as it has healed nicely and the fur has started to grow back. However, she was converened that both the boys ears were still dry and flakey.

So, she has given me more itrafungol to give orally for a further 14 days, but this is to be commenced after a 7 day break from the treatment.

She also prescribed Imaverol, but not as a dip or bath, but to dilute and use to clean their cage and accessories with.

Just wondered if anyone else has had a similar sort of treatment in the past or if anyone has any opinions on this?

Thank you!

Your vet seems to be clued up on fungal treatment, which is a nice change!

Itrafungol is the currently best way you can get rid of ringworm, as it cures from inside out and reaches all the difficult to get to spots, too. It has been conceived as an interval course for cats, so your vet is doing right in ordering a break in between rounds.

Highly infective and transmittable ringworm is sadly quite common in young, stressed shop piggies whose not yet fully developed immune system is not able to cope with all the major changes to their short lives.

I instead of imaverol, we recommend F10 disinfectant to deal with a deep clean (as it is the only disinfectant that is proven to also kill fungal spores), but an imaverol should also do the trick against fungal and especially fungal spores; let it dry on the surface.
Further tips on hygiene and ringworm care are in this guide here: Ringworm: Hygiene And Pictures

You can try to give your boys a diluted imaverol dip (the recommended dilution is 1 : 50) to see whether you can get rid of the crusts on the skin; it is very good with that. Imaverol is mild enough to be used on young piggies. Be careful around eyes, mouth and ears (ideally you use a cotton bud), but at least imaverol doesn’t sting in the eyes.

if a second round of itrafungol is not doing the trick, your vet may have to look for alternative skin issues.

I have used these products (and over the years a range of others) and have made excellent experiences with them.

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Our Guinea Pig Food Pyramid A guinea pigs daily diet should contain: To prevent or treat your guinea pig for fleas make sure to talk to one of our nurses. mites & ringworm: cavies with these parasites act very similar or show similar skin lesions to ones with a flea infestation.

Guinea pigs are rodents related to the chinchilla • Carrots are an acceptable treat 3. High fiber Guinea pig pellets ringworm. Guinea pigs that develop swellings should be examined for abscesses or tumors. It is

Is common in guinea pigs due to this fact. Signs of hypovitaminosis C include bleeding, Never attempt to treat your guinea pig at home without first consulting your veteri- Ringworm is diagnosed by

Mycozole is designed as a topical spray for use on rabbits, guinea pigs, rodents, birds and reptiles. (ringworm) caused by, Treat all animals in a group concurrently.

Guinea pigs are not endangered or threatened in the wild. In South America, (“ringworm”)/mange dermatitis Arthritis/septicemia Bite wounds treat variety. Ensure a daily source of vitamin C in the diet,

Some breeders will routinely treat new guinea pigs in quarantine Peter Gurney describes the hair of guinea pigs suffering from ringworm as having a “greasy texture” and the surface of the skin showing a “deep layer of gritty scurfing

Guinea pigs are rodents related to the chinchilla and the porcupine. acceptable treat 3. High fiber Guinea pig pellets ringworm. Guinea pigs that develop swellings should be examined for abscesses or tumors. It is

What Are Dermatophytes? o. Skin infection caused by dermatophytes is referred to as ringworm, tinea, dermatophytosis or dermatomycosis. o. Different dermatophytes are more common in certain species, such as . guinea pigs are typically affected by

Including dogs, cats, and guinea pigs, are additional ways that fungi can be spread to the skin. Some types of fungal Ringworm typically refers to tinea corporis, the skin antifungal medication is appropriate initial treat-ment for skin infections (tinea corporis

Needs of guinea pigs. It is important to check the condition of your guinea’s skin regularly and treat them as early as possible if you Ringworm, Bumblefoot / sore, cracked feet, crusty nipples, crusty noses and mouth areas,

Guinea Pigs (or cavies) originate in the Guinea pigs can also get fleas or lice – treat this with ivermectin or permethrin safe as the alcohol can cause bronchoconstriction. Approximately 1 in 10 cavies is also a subclinical carrier of ringworm, a skin fungus visible as patchy hair

Dermatophytosis Importance Ringworm, Tinea, Last Updated: mainly in guinea pigs (which were usually Drugs available to treat dermatophytosis in animals include topical antifungal creams or shampoos, and

Domestic Guinea Pigs, Cavia porcellus, Imported from are the most common dermatophytes isolated from guinea pigs. Carman et al, (1979) were the first to report ringworm in guinea pigs in New It is used to treat non-specific dermatoses and ringworm in horses, cattle, dogs

And Chirodiscoides caviae in guinea pigs; Ornithonyssus bacoti and Demodex spp in hamsters and gerbils; selamectin treatment. Most selamectin treat- Beck W: Demodicosis and ringworm in hedge-hog – A new therapeutic approach. Kleintierprax 2003;48:157-160.

Many child care providers who care for children in their guinea pigs or hamsters. Injuries: Dog and cat bites are the most reported types of injuries caused by pets. Children commonly treat animals as if they were humans.

Mycozole is designed as a topical spray for use on rabbits, guinea pigs, rodents, birds and reptiles. (ringworm) caused by, Treat all animals in a group concurrently.

Pocket Pets: a term used to describe small pets once only thought of as lab animals, such as gerbils, hamsters, guinea pigs, mice and rats. Zoonoses Rabies Rabies Cont. Rabies Cont. Rabies in Numbers Toxoplasmosis Toxoplasmosis Toxoplasmosis Ringworm How to Treat Ringworm

Ringworm, also known as tinea corporis, is a skin infection caused by fungus. Here’s how to treat the fungal skin infection.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Ringworm, medically known as tinea corporis, is a common fungal infection characterised by scaly red and often circular patches on the skin. Ringworm can be transmitted through contact with animals, but has nothing to do with worms.

To ease your itchy skin we look at ringworm causes, symptoms and treatment tips:

What is ringworm?

Ringworm is a skin infection caused by fungus. Fungal infections can appear anywhere on the body, including the scalp, groin, feet and toenails.

The fungi that causes a skin infection of this type can be divided into three groups according to their favourite hosts or sources:

  • Geophile – from soil sources
  • Zoophile – from animals
  • Anthropophile – from humans

The fungi that are usually responsible for ringworm are zoophile and are transmitted primarily through contact with animals. It can be transmitted from person to person too and much more rarely, from contact with soil. The scientific term for ringworm is tinea corporis.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

What causes ringworm?

Ringworm is usually transmitted through contact with animals, such as dogs, cats, calves, hamsters and guinea pigs.

Most mammals have at least one type of fungus, and usually the animal and fungus live in peaceful coexistence without the animal ever showing any symptoms. This does not mean that the fungus cannot be transmitted to humans.

Ringworm isn’t a very contagious disease but as well as from animals, you can catch it from contact with another person who has ringworm or from being in contact with their clothes, towels or bed linen.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Who is at risk of ringworm?

While anyone can get ringworm, the following groups of people are at particular risk:

• Children

Adults can become infected, but children who come into close contact with animals are particularly susceptible to ringworm and can pass it on easily to other children.

• People who work with animals

Farmers and people who work with animals that have fur are at increased risk.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Ringworm symptoms

Common ringworm symptoms include the following:

✔️ Typically, scaly red patches on the skin, the size of which varies from a few millimetres to several centimetres in diameter.

✔️ The patches are ring-shaped or oval and the edges are red and scaly. Inside the ring, the skin may be a bit scaly but looks normal in all other respects.

✔️ The fungus spreads from the centre of the patch but the activity is confined to the outer edge.

✔️ The infected areas are usually itchy.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Ringworm diagnosis

The rash itself will usually provide ample evidence for the diagnosis by your doctor. A skin scraping may be taken for cultivation and microscopic examination.

Ringworm treatment

Depending on the severity of the infection, ringworm can be treated by using anti-fungal cream or by taking anti-fungal tablets. Many anti-fungal creams, including clotrimazole and miconazole, can be bought over the counter from your pharmacist. Have a chat with them as to whether the cream is appropriate for you and how often to apply it. Anti-fungal tablets have to be prescribed by a doctor because they aren’t safe for everyone. They are usually reserved for when creams haven’t been effective or an infection is particularly severe.

Ringworm will usually disappear relatively quickly, but the treatment should normally be continued for a while after the rash improves to eradicate the fungus.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Ringworm prevention

Can you prevent a ringworm infection? Fungi that can cause a skin infection are present everywhere and are difficult to avoid. However, if you are concerned about catching ringworm, refrain from direct skin-to-skin contact with people or animals suspected of having a fungal infection and wash towels and bed linen frequently.

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How can you tell the difference between mange and ringworm in guinea pigs?

It can be difficult to tell the difference between mange and ringworm, but there are things you can look out for.

With mange, the hairs usually break off at the base, whereas in ringworm, they often break off part way down the shaft. Mange is most common in the autumn, and is often brought on by the stress caused when moving animals indoors for the winter.

Mange is usually more common than ringworm. So, if you’re unsure which your guinea pig is suffering from, the first line of defence is to treat the affected guinea pigs with Beaphar Anti-Mange Spray . If no improvement is seen after 10 days, a ringworm treatment can be applied, such as Beaphar Anti-Ringworm Spray . It is important to treat all the animals in the cage or hutch at the same time and to thoroughly clean out and disinfect their housing. We recommend using Beaphar Deep Clean Disinfectant .

If you are concerned about the health and welfare of your pet or require a diagnosis to be able to appropriately treat them, you must seek veterinary advice. Your vet will be able to determine the problem. They will take a skin scraping to examine under a microscope and/or examine affected guinea pigs under UV light (which causes ringworm to fluoresce).

Both mange and ringworm are zoonotic, meaning they can be passed from pets to people. If you suspect your pet is infected it is important to:

  • Always wear gloves when handling your pet or cleaning their house
  • Wash your hands after handling your pet, the hutch, their bedding or any objects which your pet may have been in contact with
  • Thoroughly disinfect any potentially contaminated areas

If you have young children, it may be best to avoid contact between them and your guinea pigs until they have been successfully treated.

You should also separate the affected guinea pig from their companions, completely clean and disinfect the hutch and run area, and completely change the bedding.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

  • How to treat ringworm in cats
  • How to treat ringworm in the cat
  • How to treat shingles folk remedies
  • How to cure ringworm in cats at home

Disputes depriving well destroyed when kvartsevanie premises with bulb and wet cleaning of the surfaces of the chlorinated solution. During the treatment of rooms of people and animals inside shouldn’t be.

Now cats for that reason not put to sleep, vets prescribe different treatment methods, which are reduced to the outer wounds and the adoption of integrated medicine. Also, some veterinarians are doing double and triple vaccination from depression, considering them as one of methods of struggle. However, in the West, like vaccinations, for example, “Poliwag” or “Wandern”, is used only as a preventive measure, but not for treatment.

Ringworm is a skin disease caused by fungus. A nasty fungal diseases that are easily transmitted to the human and animals in contact and treated for quite a long time.

At the time of illness deprive the cat should be isolated in a separate room or even a large cage. Especially important is quarantine in the house if there are children or other animals.

Treatment of the foci

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs
To lubricate the parts of the skin affected by ringworm, very effective are antifungal creams that are sold in pharmacies and can be used for the treatment of humans and animals. Treatment with ointments cats need to keep them licking the medication, otherwise you may get poisoned. The best are these ointments and creams as “Fungoterbin”, “Terbinafine”, “Nizoral”, “is not”, “the last time”. There are special veterinary ointment: “Yam”, “Sulfur-tar,” spray”, Zoomicon”, but they are more toxic means.

Complex preparations

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs
For large lesions or if the disease is not amenable to external treatment is prescribed complex medication for ingestion. They come in the form of tablets and injections. Some owners of cats are easier to give pills. If the cat resists and doesn’t eat the medication can go for treatment to a veterinary clinic for staging shots or do them yourself.

Good results show the drugs as “Rumiko” and “Itraconazole”. They are available as capsules with the microgranules. Average weight cat quite one-fourth of the capsules. Granule sleep and interfere in breadcrumbs, then in this form swallowed by the cat.

From injections effective “Griseofulvin” and “Terminated”. They are available in the form of solutions for injection in ampoules of 5 ml. Cat is administered not more than 1-2 ml Injections are cats doing in the thigh 2-3 times at intervals of 3-5 days.

Treatment from ringworm can take anywhere from 14 days in mild cases, up to two months – in severe forms of the disease.

Signs but usually do not eliminate the organism and fatal antibiotic-induced enterocolitis is always a concern in treating guinea pigs. Antibiotics implicated include penicillin, aminoglycoside (ringworm) in the guinea pig and rabbit causing patchy alopecia While clinical

Including dogs, cats, and guinea pigs, are additional ways that fungi can be spread to the skin. Some types of fungal infections can spread from Ringworm typically refers to tinea corporis, the skin lesions. when treating refractory cases for prolonged periods

Peter Gurney describes the hair of guinea pigs suffering from ringworm as having a “greasy texture” and the surface of the skin showing a “deep layer of gritty scurfing Get a positive diagnosis before treating for ringworm.

Guinea pigs provide an inexpensive, readily available and high quality meat for are the most common dermatophytes isolated from guinea pigs. Carman et al, (1979) were the first to report ringworm in guinea pigs in New Zealand It is also very effective in treating dermatoses

Ringworm: Dermatophytes, which are fungi, Appropriate testing and treating of research dogs and cats for intestinal parasites will prevent the spread of ascarid between animals and lower the risk for personnel. hamsters and guinea pigs.

Guinea pigs are like people; If there are reddish circular patches with broken hairs in the middle, it could well be ringworm (which is a fungus, not a worm), which needs treating by a vet as soon as possible. If the guinea pig is scratching like crazy and has red,

Needs of guinea pigs. treating them with the care they deserve. Put the popcorn back into your guinea’s step. Hard, cracked skin is now a thing of the past. Dogs with Ringworm: MicroNeem / Manuka & Neem Shampoo / Kwench Lotion.

Mycozole is designed as a topical spray for use on rabbits, guinea pigs, rodents, birds and reptiles. Ringworm is infectious to humans so it is advisable to wear gloves while handling and treating animals in which ringworm has been diagnosed or is suspected.

Guinea Pigs were used in case ofin vivo experiments. prepared and applied against induced ringworm in Guinea Pigs, with subsequent removal of infections in less than 60 Treating skin disorders with traditional medicine is increasing in the developed countries also (13).

THE NATURAL HISTORY OF MICROSPORUM was apparently a common cause of ringworm infections among swine (4, 14, 15). mounts of skin scrapings taken from the M. nanum guinea pigs (FIG. 19). None were detected in the C. keratinophilum guinea pigs.

Ringworm This is not, as it sounds, Remember some animals, especially hamsters, guinea pigs and rabbits like to nibble! Make sure if you are cuddling them to keep the central line away from nibblers! need treating by the vet.

Skin infection caused by dermatophytes is referred to as ringworm, tinea, dermatophytosis or guinea pigs are typically affected by Use disposable garbage bags to cover clothes while treating infected cats or working in contaminated rooms. o.

From cats but also from dogs, guinea pigs, rabbits, mice and rats. Keep pets which trigger asthma outside the house. Talk to the doctor before treating any ringworm on yourself. Other worms that live in the gut of animals such as dogs,

guinea pigs or hamsters. Injuries: Ringworm is a fungal skin infection which can be spread from dogs, cats, is harming a child or if the child is treating the animal inappropriately. Check rooms where children are napping

Rabbits, guinea pigs and rodents. Xenex Ultra is available in packs containing 6 pipettes. handling and treating animals in which ringworm has been diagnosed or is suspected. Wash hands with soap and water after application. Adverse reactions:

Asthma, especially from cats, dogs, guinea pigs, mice, rats and horses. Keep pets which trigger asthma outside the house. If possible choose pets which don’t have fur, such as before treating any ringworm on yourself. Other worms that live in the gut of animals such as dogs, can cause

Ringworm: Dermatophytes, which are fungi, Appropriate testing and treating of research dogs and cats for intestinal parasites will prevent the spread of ascarid between animals and lower the risk for personnel. hamsters and guinea pigs.

Shows evidence of Chorioptes spp. skin mites thus confirming the diagnosis Mites cont. Currently most breeders are treating mite outbreaks each ear Ringworm Many hedgehogs who They Are Hearty Insect Eaters Unlike rabbits, guinea pigs and many small rodents

Handling and treating guinea pigs 24. Handling and treating rats and mice 25. Weighing small animals 28. Treating birds 30. Preventative health measures 30. Treatment for disease 30. work only on the area to which it is applied—eg ringworm ointment or.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Ringworm (tinea corporis) is an infection of the skin caused by tiny fungus spores that reproduce in the dead outer layers of your skin. It’s contagious as long as any spores are alive. This means it can spread on contact to other parts of your body, or to other people, even when you’re being treated.

While ringworm may clear up on its own, there’s no set timetable for this. It’s best to seek treatment.

Several different species of fungus can cause tinea.

The name ringworm comes from the circular, ring-like appearance of the red, itchy spots that tinea causes on the skin of your trunk or extremities. Tinea can cause infections on other parts of the body, but then it often doesn’t have the same appearance as ringworm.

Ringworm is highly contagious, and it spreads easily from person to person (and even from animal to person).

Athlete’s foot (tinea pedis) and jock itch (tinea cruris) are caused by the same organism as ringworm. It’s called ringworm when it appears on other parts of your body.

The feet and the crotch area provide a warm, moist environment for the microscopic fungal spores, known as dermatophytes, to live and reproduce. Their food supply is the protein, or keratin, that is found in your skin, especially the dead outer layers.

Athlete’s foot is often spread in showers and locker rooms because the fungal spores can live and reproduce in puddles and wet spots, especially when the water is warm.

Once the fungus has infected your feet, you can spread it to other parts of your own body by touching.

Sharing towels, clothing, and bedding can spread it from person to person.

Ringworm and pets

You can also catch ringworm from an infected pet, though this is less common. But the species of fungi that causes ringworm in pets is different from those common among humans. These fungi may sometimes be transferred to a person in close contact with the pet, but the ringworm is not as likely to spread from that person to another.

Microsporum canis (M. canis) is the most common form of ringworm in pets. Cats and dogs can both carry it, but cats are considered the most important hosts. It’s also regularly found on horses and rabbits. Long-haired breeds such as Persian cats and Yorkshire terriers are reported to be more susceptible.

Both humans and animals can be carriers without showing symptoms of ringworm infection.

The incubation period for ringworm in humans is usually one to two weeks. Because the fungal spores are present before you see the ringworm outbreak, you can catch it from someone even before it shows up on them.

There are also some people and animals who can have ringworm but show no symptoms. They can still transfer the ringworm to you.

M. canis, the common cause of ringworm in pets, can be seen under an ultraviolet light (black light). Under an ultraviolet light, it may appear on the fur within seven days of exposure. But it takes two to four weeks for the symptoms to show up on the animal’s skin. During that time, your pet may be infectious without your seeing any symptoms.

As long as the fungal spores are present in the skin, the ringworm can be spread from person to person, or animal to person. You don’t stop being contagious when you start using antifungal medication. However, once you start treatment, if you cover the lesions you can significantly decrease the risk of spreading them to others.

The condition is contagious until all the spores are eliminated from your skin. It’s difficult even for a doctor to know when all of the fungal spores have been killed.

The fungal spores can also stay alive on clothing, bedding, and elsewhere as long as their food supply (dead skin cells) is present, and they have a moist and warm environment. Spores can live for as long as 12 to 20 months in the right environment.

There’s no set time limit for a ringworm infection. Without treatment, it may go away on its own in a matter of months in a healthy person. Or it may not.

Ringworm on the body is usually treated with a topical ointment such as terbinafine. A four-week course is common , but the time can vary.

With treatment, a ringworm infection on a part of the body without hair (glabrous skin) is likely to clear up within two to four weeks of the start of treatment.

More serious cases, and infections in the scalp, can require oral antifungal pills. In this case, too, you’re contagious until all the fungal spores are eliminated.

Dedicated to rescuing the abused, unwanted and abandoned

A condition where the skin can grow thick crusts of fungus. It can be in the ears and the rectum as well as the body. It usually starts as a bad case of dandruff and is transferable to other guinea pigs.

Treating a fungal skin infection can last up to four weeks or more. Wood often harbours fungal spores so the use of a wooden hutch, houses and toys during treatment are not recommended. Infected hutches etc should be disposed of.

What to do about a fungal skin condition

He should be kept in a plastic cage which should be disinfected daily during treatment. Your guinea pig’s coat needs stripping of all fungal spores. His hair should come out easily with a gentle tug. The problem is that pulling out the hair can lead him to further scratching and fitting, so keep him indoors and smother him in aqueous or E45 cream. The next day strip as much of his coat as you can without putting him into a fit. He will look a poorly soul but it’s the only way.

If your guinea pig is causing lesions/ wounds to his body by scratching and/or biting, a bandage can be used to protect him. Vetrap, which is stretchy and self-sticking is recommended for this task, replacing daily. A small gauze square over wounds on his back can be used under the bandage. Dispose of bandage and gauze on removal by carefully cutting through it with scissors.

Get him on a course of Itrafungol from the vet at 0.5mls, twice daily. Combine this treatment with anti-fungal bathing, weekly for 3-4 weeks. We prefer to use Ring-o-cide or Sporal D available on-line or at some farm merchants. To tide you over you can use Nizarol from the chemist. Leave the shampoo on for 15 minutes before rinsing, tugging out as many hair roots as possible. A sheep dip, Imaverol from the vet can also be used to kill any remaining fungal spores. A topical spray would be Myconozole from the vet or Daktarin spray from the chemist.

Note: we always treat for mange at the same time as a fungal skin infection as it is almost impossible to tell them apart.

Causes of a fungal skin condition: poor hygiene: our damp climate or a damp enclosure, especially in an old wooden hutch which could harbour fungal spores: not enough grooming to get rid of dead hairs; skin and coat neglect.

Prognosis for a fungal skin condition: very good if done correctly but can take around four weeks. You must keep at it or it will return . We would recommend you burn your old wooden hutch.

Prevention of a fungal skin condition: check the skin and coat regularly. Brush out dead hairs. Treat for dry skin with Nizarol shampoo from the chemist. Bath regularly. Dispose of any old wooden hutches or toys as they may harbour fungal spores. Do not keep the guinea pig outside in damp conditions.

What is ringworm?

Ringworm is a skin disease caused by a fungus that can infect many mammals including rabbits and guinea pigs. The medical terms for ringworm infections are “dermatophytosis” and “dermatomycosis.” There are several different types fungus that can cause ringworm; the most common type to cause disease in rabbits and guinea pigs is Trichophyton mentagrophytes; Microsporum canis may also cause disease.

How is ringworm transmitted?

Ringworm is most commonly found either on an infected animal or in the living quarters of infected animals. Spores from infected animals can be shed into the environment and live for over 18 months. Cats and other rabbits or guinea pigs are often the source of infection. They can be asymptomatic carriers and harbor and shed the organism without showing signs of infection. Ringworm can be transmitted by direct contact with an infected animal, or contact with an item (e.g.; grooming brush, bedding) that is contaminated with the spores. The incidence of infection varies with geographical area and environment. Young animals and those under stress (e.g.; overcrowding, high humidity, poor sanitation, malnutrition) are often at an increased risk of developing ringworm.

What are the signs?

Rabbits and guinea pigs with ringworm usually have patchy areas of hair loss that are dry and scaly. In rabbits, the lesions often start on the head, legs, and feet. In guinea pigs, the face and ears are affected first. In both animals, lesions may spread to other areas of the body, and may become reddish and often itch. If the animal scratches, it may result in more trauma to the skin and a secondary bacterial infection.

How is ringworm diagnosed?

Ringworm can be diagnosed through several different methods. A popular but not completely accurate way to diagnose the disease is through the use of a specialized black light called a Wood’s lamp. Several species of the ringworm fungus will fluoresce when exposed to a Wood’s lamp. However, it is estimated that up to half of the most common species of M. canis do not fluoresce, and T. mentagrophytes does not fluoresce, so this is not a good diagnostic tool in rabbits and guinea pigs.

Another method for identifying ringworm is to pluck hairs from around the lesion and examine them under the microscope using a preparation of KOH (potassium hydroxide) to make them more visible. Between 40% and 70% of the infections can be diagnosed this way.

The best and most accurate way to identify a ringworm infection is by collecting scales and crust from the lesion and performing a culture. There are special culture mediums designed specifically for identifying ringworm infections. Your local veterinarian can easily perform this routine culture.

How is ringworm treated?

Most rabbits will recover from the disease without treatment if any underlying environmental or nutritional factors are remedied. To treat rabbits and guinea pigs with isolated lesions, the area around the lesion should be thoroughly clipped down close to the skin. Care should be taken when clipping not to irritate the skin, as this may make the infection spread. Also realize that the clipped hair, clippers, and any grooming instruments that come into contact with an infected animal will harbor the spores and must be heat or chemically sterilized before being used on any other animal. Depending upon the extent of the lesions, they may be treated with keratolytic, miconazole shampoos, lime sulfur dips, and/or topical anti-fungal medications (e.g.; miconazole or clotrimazole cream). It is recommended that all animals in the household/colony be treated. Oral medications are also recommended. Griseofulvin should not be used in breeding or pregnant animals. Butenafine may be used in guinea pigs. Itraconazole has also been used in rabbits and guinea pigs. Treatments are usually continued for at least 2 weeks after the lesions have resolved and/or until there are two negative fungal cultures.

Because the ringworm fungus can survive for such long periods in the environment, it is critical that an effective cleaning plan be implemented. The spores are very resistant to most cleaners, however, bleach diluted to 1:10 with water or enilconazole (0.2%) will kill most of the organisms. All grooming tools, bedding, and kennels should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected. Carpet should be disinfected. Heating and cooling ducts and furnaces should be professionally vacuumed and filters replaced. Furniture and drapes should be vacuumed and the vacuum cleaner bags should be disposed of promptly. These cleaning measures will need to be continued during the duration of the treatment and for several weeks afterward. Clothes of the owners may also harbor spores, and should be washed thoroughly.

Is ringworm transmissible to people?

Yes. Ringworm can be transmitted between rabbits, guinea pigs, and people. Persons with suppressed immune systems, such as those with HIV infections or AIDS, and those undergoing chemotherapy may be especially vulnerable. Persons should wear gloves when handling affected animals and wash hands well afterwards.

Article by: Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith

My guinea pig has ringworm, I got the medicine for him, and i have been giving it to him for about 2 weeks now. I was just wondering if it’s still contagious? I know that in humans, after like, 48 hrs, its not. But is it the same in guinea pigs?

3 Answers

Ringworm in some cases has to be treated for several weeks before it is fully under control. It is a Zoonoses so is transmittable to humans.

The transmission time depends on how bad the fungus infection is and how quickly it is spreading.

Use the treatment as suggested by your vet and wear gloves at all times whilst the infection is still suspect.

Only when you have returned to your vet and the Guinea Pig has been given the all clear do you conclude that the infection has dispersed.

Make sure you clean the hutch/cage out with a animal disinfectant such as Virkon which is to treat such bacteria in the cage on a daily basis to reduce the risk of reinfection.

Fast Ringworm Cure?

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Ring worm in most mammals is typically self limiting (meaning is will eventually go away-though it can take several months) however, yes it is contagious and can be passed on to humans. Ring worm is not a worm but a fungal infection of the skin. Your vet will be able to diagnose with a quick skin scraping. It is treatable with anti-fungal medications. Do not treat with home remedies like tree tea oil as these preps are toxic to many small animals. Make sure you cover all exposed skin when handling your guinea and wash your hands thoroughly to prevent infecting yourself. Also the caging and carrier must be thouroughly washed to prevent reinfection of your pet and infecting you. Straight apple cider vinegar works wells as an anti-fungal on these surfaces and is safe. Do not use bleach as it is toxic.

Promoting Safe Pet Ownership

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea PigsAs with most “pocket pets,” guinea pigs don’t get a lot of attention in the scientific literature. As a result, we are limited in what we know about certain diseases in this species, and we tend to rely a lot on personal experience, small case studies and extrapolation from other species. It’s not that these sources of information are bad, they’re just not a replacement for larger, more controlled studies.

A recent study in the journal Mycoses (Kraemer et al. 2012) provides a rather comprehensive overview of ringworm (dermatophytosis) in these little fuzzy critters. The authors surveyed 74 owners of guinea pigs with ringworm and veterinarians. Here are some highlights from the results:

  • 97% of ringworm infections were caused by Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Ringworm can be caused by a few different species of fungi, with a different organism, Microsporum canis, being most common in dogs and cats.
  • 43% of the time, a new guinea pig was introduced into the household in the weeks preceding the onset of disease, and around one-third of affected guinea pigs had been in the household for less than 3 months. That’s not too surprising, since new animals are often a prime source of infectious diseases. It shows the importance of ensuring that new pets are examined carefully and are healthy before they are brought into the household. It’s certainly no guarantee that there won’t be problems, since healthy-appearing animals can be shedding various infectious agents, but it helps reduce the risk.
  • Ringworm lesions were most common around the head. Hair loss was the most common sign, with scaling and crusting also common.
  • Signs of ringworm were also present in other guinea pigs in the household in over one-third of cases.
  • Various treatments were used and some animals weren’t specifically treated. In fact, 7/8 of the guinea pigs that did not receive specific anti-fungal therapy got better. It’s known that ringworm can be self-limiting (meaning the animal will get better on its own over time). However, treatment can speed the process up and decrease the likelihood of transmission to other animals or people.
  • In 24% of cases, people in the household also had signs of ringworm, on the head, neck and arms. Children were most commonly involved. That’s not too surprising since kids probably had more contact and closer contact with the animals than their parents.

While not a severe disease, ringworm is a problem because it’s highly transmissible. It can easily and quickly spread between animals, and between animals and people, and elimination of ringworm from a highly contamination household can be a major hassle. Presumably the risk of widespread environmental contamination is less with guinea pigs compared to dogs and cats because of their smaller size and tendency to be kept confined to cages most of the time.

Ringworm should be considered in any guinea pig that develops hair loss or other skin/hair problems. This is particularly true if it’s a new acquisition or if a new guinea pig has been introduced to the household recently.

If ringworm is suspected, a prompt visit to the veterinarian is in order. The guinea pig should be handled sparingly (or ideally, not at all) until the cause of the skin disease is identified. Close attention should be paid to hand hygiene, and even the use of gloves could be considered, although gloves aren’t a cure-all and people sometimes misuse gloves to such an extent that they actually increase the risk of spreading disease.

If a new guinea pig is obtained, it’s ideal to have it examined by a veterinarian before it comes into the household. I’m a realist and realize this is unlikely, but it’s ideal. In lieu of that, it’s important to get a guinea pig from a reputable source, to ensure that other guinea pigs from the same source don’t have skin disease, and to carefully examine the animal for skin lesions before it gets home. It’s also ideal to keep any new guinea pig in its own cage for a couple weeks to act as a quarantine period and allow for identification of any incubating diseases.

If owners of an infected guinea pig develop skin lesions, they should be examined by their physician, and make sure the physician knows they have been in contact with an infected animal.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Ringworm is often seen in cats, even indoor cats. But despite the name, it doesn’t involve any worms. Thankfully, this highly contagious and non-life-threatening infection is avoidable and treatable if you know what to do.

What Is Ringworm?

Ringworm is a fungal infection that infects many different species of animals. It’s also referred to as dermatophytosis. In cats, about 98 percent of ringworm cases are caused by the fungus Microsporum canis.   Cats are often infected with this fungus since it’s easily transmitted. Ringworm affects the top layer of the skin and occurs when the fungi or its spores make contact with a cat’s skin. It’s very similar to other fungal infections, such as athlete’s foot.

Signs of Ringworm in Cats

Ringworm lesions create hairless, scaly, red rings on the skin. They’re also often quite itchy. These round lesions usually appear on the front legs, ears, or other parts of a cat’s head but can pop up anywhere, especially in severe infections. You’ll notice ringworm when petting your cat. You’ll first see a small patch of hair loss, and then upon further examination, you’ll find a red ring in this patch of hairless skin.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Causes of Ringworm

Cats can carry the fungal spores of ringworm and show symptoms of the disease, or not show any symptoms at all. Spores can spread to other cats quite easily, either directly or indirectly.   Your cat can get an infection when in direct contact while touching another animal who has ringworm. Your cat can get ringworm indirectly by simply touching the bedding, food and water dishes, toys, and other items that a carrier or infected pet has come in contact with.

Can You Get Ringworm From Your Cat?

Ringworm is a zoonotic disease, which means it can spread from an animal to a human.   A ringworm infection in a person typically occurs after a person has pet an infected or carrier cat, but it can also occur after simply handling items that were used by an infected cat. Immune-compromised individuals, such as the elderly and very young, are more prone to contracting ringworm.

How to Diagnose Ringworm

To confirm that a round lesion is ringworm and not another type of hair or skin issue, your vet may perform tests for a diagnosis:

  • Wood’s lamp: A special black light called a Wood’s lamp causes the fungus to glow a yellowish-green color.   It’s a simple and non-invasive test to perform, but it’s not always accurate. The lamp could make other things glow, including dead skin cells, topical ointments, and other fibers, so it’s just one test used for evaluation.
  • Microsporum: Your vet can look for fungal spores, called Microsporum, under a microscope. A piece of clear tape placed on the lesion picks up cells that can then be stained. A special purple stain causes the ringworm spores, which look like small ellipses with lines in it, to be visible under a microscope. The spores can still be hard to see even with this test.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

These different tests will verify that your cat has ringworm. Your vet will then be able to treat the fungal infection with appropriate medication. Your vet may also ask you if you have any lesions that look similar to your cat’s lesions, as another indication of this zoonotic disease.

Ringworm May Mimic Other Diseases

Ringworm lesions can look similar to other issues, which is why it may be necessary for your veterinarian to run more than one test. For example, fleas and mange (both the demodectic and sarcoptic types) can cause hair loss and itching. Some cats will lick their fur off and irritate their skin until it’s red due to allergies or stress and anxiety. A misdiagnosis can mean your cat will be given the wrong kind of medication.

How to Treat Ringworm

If your veterinarian has diagnosed your cat with ringworm, they’ll likely prescribe an anti-fungal medication to treat the infection.   Itraconazole is a medication frequently used medication for pets with ringworm. But due to the size of the capsules, it typically has to be compounded into a liquid solution in order to dose it for a cat.

Sometimes topical ointments are used to treat ringworm in conjunction with oral treatments.   By using both oral and topical treatment regimens, you’ll kill both the spores on the skin and suppress the infection in the cat systemically.

Finally, if you have a cat with ringworm, you’ll need to treat your home environment in order to kill any remaining spores. Use the correct ratio of diluted bleach solutions on surfaces after your general cleaning routine in order to kill the spores of the ringworm fungus.   Keep the bleach solution in contact with a surface for a full ten minutes to ensure that the area is disinfected.

How to Prevent Ringworm

Ringworm is highly contagious in cats but it’s also preventable if the appropriate steps are taken. Washing your hands before and after handling your pet is the easiest way to decrease the likelihood of you or your cat from becoming infected with ringworm. Aside from that, don’t let your cat play with cats that don’t live within your household, maintain a sanitary living environment for you and your cat, and if you have ringworm, refrain from touching your cat until your doctor has determined that you’re free of the infection.

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My guinea pig has ringworm, I got the medicine for him, and i have been giving it to him for about 2 weeks now. I was just wondering if it’s still contagious? I know that in humans, after like, 48 hrs, its not. But is it the same in guinea pigs?

3 Answers

Ringworm in some cases has to be treated for several weeks before it is fully under control. It is a Zoonoses so is transmittable to humans.

The transmission time depends on how bad the fungus infection is and how quickly it is spreading.

Use the treatment as suggested by your vet and wear gloves at all times whilst the infection is still suspect.

Only when you have returned to your vet and the Guinea Pig has been given the all clear do you conclude that the infection has dispersed.

Make sure you clean the hutch/cage out with a animal disinfectant such as Virkon which is to treat such bacteria in the cage on a daily basis to reduce the risk of reinfection.

Fast Ringworm Cure?

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Ring worm in most mammals is typically self limiting (meaning is will eventually go away-though it can take several months) however, yes it is contagious and can be passed on to humans. Ring worm is not a worm but a fungal infection of the skin. Your vet will be able to diagnose with a quick skin scraping. It is treatable with anti-fungal medications. Do not treat with home remedies like tree tea oil as these preps are toxic to many small animals. Make sure you cover all exposed skin when handling your guinea and wash your hands thoroughly to prevent infecting yourself. Also the caging and carrier must be thouroughly washed to prevent reinfection of your pet and infecting you. Straight apple cider vinegar works wells as an anti-fungal on these surfaces and is safe. Do not use bleach as it is toxic.

What is ringworm?

Ringworm is a skin disease caused by a fungus that can infect many mammals including rabbits and guinea pigs. The medical terms for ringworm infections are “dermatophytosis” and “dermatomycosis.” There are several different types fungus that can cause ringworm; the most common type to cause disease in rabbits and guinea pigs is Trichophyton mentagrophytes; Microsporum canis may also cause disease.

How is ringworm transmitted?

Ringworm is most commonly found either on an infected animal or in the living quarters of infected animals. Spores from infected animals can be shed into the environment and live for over 18 months. Cats and other rabbits or guinea pigs are often the source of infection. They can be asymptomatic carriers and harbor and shed the organism without showing signs of infection. Ringworm can be transmitted by direct contact with an infected animal, or contact with an item (e.g.; grooming brush, bedding) that is contaminated with the spores. The incidence of infection varies with geographical area and environment. Young animals and those under stress (e.g.; overcrowding, high humidity, poor sanitation, malnutrition) are often at an increased risk of developing ringworm.

What are the signs?

Rabbits and guinea pigs with ringworm usually have patchy areas of hair loss that are dry and scaly. In rabbits, the lesions often start on the head, legs, and feet. In guinea pigs, the face and ears are affected first. In both animals, lesions may spread to other areas of the body, and may become reddish and often itch. If the animal scratches, it may result in more trauma to the skin and a secondary bacterial infection.

How is ringworm diagnosed?

Ringworm can be diagnosed through several different methods. A popular but not completely accurate way to diagnose the disease is through the use of a specialized black light called a Wood’s lamp. Several species of the ringworm fungus will fluoresce when exposed to a Wood’s lamp. However, it is estimated that up to half of the most common species of M. canis do not fluoresce, and T. mentagrophytes does not fluoresce, so this is not a good diagnostic tool in rabbits and guinea pigs.

Another method for identifying ringworm is to pluck hairs from around the lesion and examine them under the microscope using a preparation of KOH (potassium hydroxide) to make them more visible. Between 40% and 70% of the infections can be diagnosed this way.

The best and most accurate way to identify a ringworm infection is by collecting scales and crust from the lesion and performing a culture. There are special culture mediums designed specifically for identifying ringworm infections. Your local veterinarian can easily perform this routine culture.

How is ringworm treated?

Most rabbits will recover from the disease without treatment if any underlying environmental or nutritional factors are remedied. To treat rabbits and guinea pigs with isolated lesions, the area around the lesion should be thoroughly clipped down close to the skin. Care should be taken when clipping not to irritate the skin, as this may make the infection spread. Also realize that the clipped hair, clippers, and any grooming instruments that come into contact with an infected animal will harbor the spores and must be heat or chemically sterilized before being used on any other animal. Depending upon the extent of the lesions, they may be treated with keratolytic, miconazole shampoos, lime sulfur dips, and/or topical anti-fungal medications (e.g.; miconazole or clotrimazole cream). It is recommended that all animals in the household/colony be treated. Oral medications are also recommended. Griseofulvin should not be used in breeding or pregnant animals. Butenafine may be used in guinea pigs. Itraconazole has also been used in rabbits and guinea pigs. Treatments are usually continued for at least 2 weeks after the lesions have resolved and/or until there are two negative fungal cultures.

Because the ringworm fungus can survive for such long periods in the environment, it is critical that an effective cleaning plan be implemented. The spores are very resistant to most cleaners, however, bleach diluted to 1:10 with water or enilconazole (0.2%) will kill most of the organisms. All grooming tools, bedding, and kennels should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected. Carpet should be disinfected. Heating and cooling ducts and furnaces should be professionally vacuumed and filters replaced. Furniture and drapes should be vacuumed and the vacuum cleaner bags should be disposed of promptly. These cleaning measures will need to be continued during the duration of the treatment and for several weeks afterward. Clothes of the owners may also harbor spores, and should be washed thoroughly.

Is ringworm transmissible to people?

Yes. Ringworm can be transmitted between rabbits, guinea pigs, and people. Persons with suppressed immune systems, such as those with HIV infections or AIDS, and those undergoing chemotherapy may be especially vulnerable. Persons should wear gloves when handling affected animals and wash hands well afterwards.

Article by: Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith

If you’re new to cats, you might think this condition involves worms, but actually, nothing could be farther from the truth – it’s a common skin infection caused by a fungus that lives on the dead tissues of skin and hair. This dead tissue is completely normal and happens all the time in animals as well as humans.

Ringworm is highly contagious and can be passed from animals to humans. You can catch it by touching an infected person or animal. You can also catch it by touching objects or surfaces that had contact with the infected animal such as towels, blankets, carpets and grooming supplies. So the answer to the question, “Can I get ringworm from my cat?” is a resounding “YES!

Ringworm in cats is usually seen on the skin around the face, ears, chest, forelegs and along the ridge of the back. It results in itchy, scaly and reddened skin, as well as bald spots, and often looks like a red, hairless patch in the form of a ring (hence the name).

Cat Ringworm Facts

  • Ringworm can affect all kind of animals, including dogs, cats, cows, goats, pigs, rabbits, birds, guinea pigs and horses. But cats tend to get ringworm more often than dogs do, possibly because cats carry the spores for a longer time than dogs do and that enables the infection to take hold.
  • Studies have shown that up to 13% of human ringworm infections are triggered by an organism that commonly causes ringworm in cats. And in as many as 70% of households, where a cat has ringworm, at least one person will probably catch the infection. Children and elderly people tend to be most susceptible due to weaker or compromised immune systems.
  • Itchy skin is a first symptom. Once you get infected it often takes from 4-14 days to start itching.
  • Ringworm spores can survive in the environment for up to 18 months – so you’ll need to clean everything thoroughly if you get a case in your home.

How To Identify Cat Ringworm

While ringworm usually causes raised, circular areas that are crusted over and hairless, or simply, round hairless areas, quite often infected cats (especially long-haired cats) don’t reveal any such symptoms. That makes it harder to detect.

But look for scaly dandruff, darkened or red, irritated skin, poor hair coat or hair loss, and itchiness. You may also see raised or rounded lesions or boils that can ooze. And there may also be inflammation of the folds of skin around the nail, or a whitish, opaque appearance of the claw.

Cat Ringworm Treatment Options

The fungus infection sometimes goes away on its own – but, who wants to take the chance of spreading it?

If you suspect your cat or ANYONE in your household has ringworm, get it properly diagnosed by a vet (for your animals) or a doctor (for your family members). The medical professional will provide recommendations for treatment, which is normally done with anti-fungal cream or pills.

How To Deal With Ringworm

  • Clean up the environment as thoroughly as you can. Wash all surfaces, linens, cat toys; disinfect grooming brushes/combs and bedding, etc. Use bleach as much as possible but for areas such as carpet or furniture, a solution of apple cider vinegar does a fine job.
  • Keep her isolated in a room if possible until the infection is gone.

Banixx Pet Care has tremendous anti-fungal properties and has been used successfully in treating ringworm in cats and kittens. It creates an environment that kills the ringworm fungus, while providing soothing relief for any itchiness or secondary infections caused by excessive scratching, and it does not stain or discolor fur, fabric or skin.

How To Use Banixx To Treat Cat Ringworm

  • Use disposable gloves while you’re applying Banixx so that you don’t get infected.
  • Using very light pressure, gently pat Banixx on the affected area of your kitten or cat’s ringworm. A cotton ball soaked (but not dripping) in Banixx is generally a good approach. This may be done two to three times daily for the duration of the infection.
  • To prevent the spread of this infection, immediately dispose of the gloves.

Banixx Pet Care Remedy

Banixx is an effective remedy for dog ear infections, hotspots, ringworm, yeast infections, wounds and itchy skin.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

By Natalie Riggs on November 30, 2018
Tagged with: health issues

​​ In theory, a guinea pig’s sneeze should be cute. Let’s be honest. All things they do are pretty cute. But too many sneezes can signify something more sinister. When accompanied by nose goop, crusty eyes, and labored breathing, it’s definitely cause for concern.

​An upper respiratory infection (URI) is a common illness for guinea pigs. When caught early, antibiotics can usually knock it out. However, because guinea pigs are so skilled at hiding illness, sometimes we don’t notice until things have gone downhill. Once the respiratory infection is well set in, treatment becomes more challenging. A URI can turn into pneumonia between the time your trusted exotic vet closes at 5 p.m. on Friday and reopens at 8 a.m. on Monday. Don’t beat yourself up. A 14-day course of Baytril is far from the only option for treating stubborn respiratory infections.

What Causes Respiratory Infections in Guinea Pigs?

Guinea pigs can catch respiratory infections from species other than guinea pigs. Even healthy dogs and rabbits carry this risk. According to vet Julia Whittington, “causative agents include bordetella bronchiseptica and streptococcus pneumoniae. Rabbits and dogs are carriers of bordetella and many species can serve as asymptomatic carriers of streptococcus.” To be on the safe side, it is always best to avoid interactions between guinea pigs and rabbits or dogs.

Unsafe bedding, like cedar, can set guinea pigs up for a weakened respiratory system. A draft from a forgotten open window or damp hair after a bath can set things off. Other times, respiratory infections pop up and we just don’t know why. Harmful bacteria can hide out undercover and chose to wreak havoc at unexpected times. ​

Recognize the Symptoms Early

Because respiratory infections are so common, it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the symptoms. According to Guinea Lynx, symptoms of an upper respiratory infection in guinea pigs include:

  • Refusal to eat or drink
  • No feces (as a result of not eating)
  • Labored breathing, wheezing
  • Sneezing, coughing
  • Crusty eyes, eyes that are almost sealed shut
  • Discharge from eyes or nose ​
  • Dull and/or receding eyes
  • Rough or puffed-up coat
  • Lethargy, hunched posture

If you notice symptoms when your normal vet is closed, assuming it’s not yet an emergency, isolate your guinea pig from her pals so the whole crew doesn’t get sick. Putting your guinea pig in the bathroom while you take a steamy shower can help her breathe a little easier. If she’s starting to lose her appetite, start syringe feeding sooner rather than later to avoid complications with GI stasis. If there was ever a time for tempting treats to keep her alert and eating, this is it. Go ahead, break out the dill.

Need Tempting Treats?

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Antibiotics = Key

Guinea pigs don’t get “colds” like we do. A vet visit is absolutely necessary. An upper respiratory infection won’t get better without antibiotics. Baytril is commonly prescribed as a first means of defense. Because it is used so often, some bugs that cause URIs have become resistant to it. If your guinea pig doesn’t show signs of improvement or gets worse after two or three days, a different medication might be needed. Luckily, other antibiotics can be used “off label” for guinea pigs if Baytril isn’t working.​

​If your guinea pig isn’t responding to the first antibiotic tried, your vet may want to take a culture of some nasal discharge. This is the best way to identify what bacteria is at play. From there, they can identify what medicine will be most effective. Culture results can take a few days, but sick piggies don’t have much time to waste. It won’t hurt to take a shot in the dark on treatment while waiting on the report.

Baytril and doxycycline is one combination that seems to work well for stubborn respiratory infections. Be sure to give a probiotic an hour or two after each dose, as the double whammy can be tough on the gut. Azithromycin is another that has generated a fan base in recent years for respiratory infections that just won’t give up.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Dose can be as important as the proper medication. Your vet may have started with a low dose of Baytril, probably around 2.5 mg/kg. Guinea pigs can tolerate up to 10 mg/kg every 12 hours for those hard-to-treat infections. ​The doxycycline dose that works best for guinea pigs is the same that’s often used for rats, 5 mg/kg twice daily. Note that this concentration is higher than what’s usually given to rabbits, but lower than what dogs and cats need.

Giving too high of a dose can cause serious consequences to the GI tract, so always follow your vet’s advice and monitor your guinea pig closely. Some guinea pigs tolerate antibiotics better than others. Not all antibiotics will produce the same reaction in every guinea pig.

Whatever medication is prescribed, always triple check it’s not an antibiotic that is on the list of dangerous medicines for guinea pigs. Antibiotics in the penicillin family are potentially fatal to guinea pigs. Rabbits are more tolerant of penicillin if it is injected to bypass the digestive system. In guinea pigs, though, it is sti​ll toxic and can make a bad situation much, much worse.

Pull Out All the Stops

Antibiotics are crucial for treating respiratory infections in guinea pigs. Experimenting with different types, combinations, and dosages with your vet can make all the difference. Some respiratory infections, though, are sneaky. When they ​progress into pneumonia, antibiotics alone might not do the job. Guinea pigs with advanced respiratory infections sometimes start to accumulate fluid in the lungs. Not only does this make it hard to breathe, but it makes the infection harder to treat. Ask your vet about the diuretic furosemide.

A nebulizer can be a lifesaver, literally. You can use a solution of sterile saline mixed with an antibiotic like Baytril to deliver it deeper into the lungs. Even if Baytril isn’t working orally, a nebulizer will send the medicine straight to the source of the problem. Antibiotics that aren’t safe to give orally, like gentamycin, can be used in a nebulizer in addition to oral antibiotics to pack a triple punch. Bronchiodilator Albuterol or a steroid might be added to the mix, too.

In addition to calling in the troops with medications, don’t underestimate the importance of supportive care. A guinea pig that is kept calm and warm, is force fed around the clock, and given extra vitamin C and fluids (if necessary) has an improved chance of recovery.

Ringworm is a common skin disorder otherwise known as tinea that can affect the skin on the body (tinea corporis), the scalp (tinea capitis), the feet (tinea pedis, or athlete’s foot), or the groin (tinea cruris, or “jock itch”). Ringworm is not, as its name suggests, caused by a worm. It is caused by a fungal infection of the skin, and the fungi responsible for the infection are known as dermatophytes.

The fungi that cause ringworm tend to grow in warm, moist areas of the body, such as areas of frequent sweating. Most commonly, ringworm results in itchy, scaly, and reddened skin and bald patches if the scalp or beard areas are involved. The infection is highly contagious and is passed from person to person through direct skin contact or via contact with contaminated items such as toilet articles, clothing, and even by contaminated shower or pool surfaces.

Animals can also be affected by ringworm and may transmit the condition to humans. In this case, ringworm is an example of a zoonotic disease, or a disease transmitted from animals to humans. Although cats are affected by ringworm more than dogs, dogs are also commonly affected. In animals, ringworm causes raised, circular areas that frequently are crusted over and associated with hair loss. However, some infected cats may also carry the fungus without showing any symptoms. On the other hand, infected dogs almost always show the typical skin symptoms of ringworm.

Studies have shown that up to 13% of human ringworm infections (tinea capitis) are caused by an organism that commonly causes ringworm in cats. Other studies have shown that in 30%-70% of households in which a cat develops ringworm, at least one person will develop the condition. Young children, the elderly, and people whose immune function is compromised for any reason are most susceptible to the infection.

Other animals that can develop ringworm (and can transmit the infection to humans) include dogs, cows, goats, pigs, guinea pigs, and horses. As with transmission among humans, direct contact or contact with objects the infected animal has touched (such as bedding, grooming articles, saddles, furniture, carpeting, etc.) is responsible for spreading the infection.

Ringworm is a treatable condition in both animals and humans. Topical (applied to the affected area) medication is the usual treatment for ringworm. In severe or resistant (not responding well to topical medications) infections, oral antifungal medications (taken by mouth) may be prescribed. If a pet has been infected with ringworm, it is important to thoroughly disinfect the home to rid the environment of any remaining fungal spores after treatment.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

By Natalie Riggs on June 21, 2020
Tagged with: health issues

Hair loss in guinea pigs can be scary. Luckily, whether you’ve noticed excessive shedding or obvious bald spots, the top causes of hair loss in guinea pigs are actually pretty easy to diagnose and treat. But first, let’s bust a few myths. Guinea pigs do not lose hair with old age. And those bald spots behind the ears? Totally normal. All pigs have them. Ok, let’s carry on.

Mites

Parasites are gross, annoying, and inconvenient, but don’t worry. they won’t spread to you or other types of animals. These species-specific uninvited guests usually come from direct contact with another guinea pig that already has mites. They can also be spread through indirect contact, such as from bedding or clothing that has been tainted by the insects or eggs from an already-infested guinea pig.

Parasites are gross, annoying, and inconvenient, but don’t worry. they won’t spread to you or other types of animals. These species-specific uninvited guests usually come from direct contact with another guinea pig that already has mites. They can also be spread through indirect contact, such as from bedding or clothing that has been tainted by the insects or eggs from an already-infested guinea pig.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

Mites can’t be seen with the naked eye, but their symptoms are fairly obvious. They can cause extreme itching, dandruff, skin irritation and scabs, and even seizures. Microscopic mites can be hard to spot, even through skin scrapings. The vet will likely diagnose the guinea pig based on symptoms alone (itching, hair loss, skin irritation, etc.)​

Bathing won’t cure mites, and can even make irritation worse and treatment more difficult. The most common medicine for both mites and lice is ivermectin, which is super safe. Ivermectin does NOT kill the eggs of lice or mites, so the treatment must be repeated at least once about a week later. For severe cases, the vet may even recommend a third treatment 7-10 days after that. Revolution is a chemically similar prescription product that can be given as an alternative. Revolution doesn’t need to be repeated as frequently as ivermectin, and may provide protection for a full month.

Ringworm

Parasites aren’t the only cause of dry, itchy skin and hair loss in guinea pigs. If treating for parasites doesn’t resolve your guinea pig’s discomfort, there may be other issues at play. Guinea pigs can suffer from fungus, like ringworm. Fungus can cause bald patches, scaly skin, and hair loss. Ringworm commonly starts around the head area, unlike mites, which often presents as a “V” shape on the back. A vet will be able to tell the difference, and will likely recommend an anti-fungal cream or shampoo, or give oral medication for severe ringworm outbreaks. Clotrimazole and miconazole creams are safe for guinea pigs.

In guinea pigs, most ringworm infections are caused by Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Ringworm can be caused by a few different species of fungi; Microsporum canis is more common in dogs and cats, for example. Regardless, it’s a good idea to practice good hygiene when treating a guinea pig with ringworm, as it can spread to other animals and humans in the household. Kids can be especially susceptible. Cleaning and sanitizing the guinea pig’s cage, accessories, and environment is essential to prevent ringworm from spreading.

Ovarian Cysts

Ovarian cysts plague more unspayed female guinea pigs than not after three years of age. Not all girlies will show signs or have problems. For the unlucky ones, symptoms include bilateral hair loss on the flanks, crusty nipples, and moody behavior (like mounting cagemates or acting irritable). The hair loss is caused by hormones out of wack, so these guinea pigs might act like they are in heat 24/7, rather than the normal day or two every two weeks.

Normally, spaying a guinea pig is the recommended course of action. However, not all seniors are ideal surgical patients – and, of course, seniors are usually the ones with this issue. Talk to your exotic vet about alternative treatments and how to monitor your ladypig if surgery isn’t a good option for her. Draining cysts or using hormonal treatments can also provide relief from bothersome symptoms in some instances.

Barbering

Hair loss that isn’t falling out at the root may be self-inflicted. Your guinea pig may “barber” himself as a result of pain or stress. Check the bald areas for lumps, swelling, or signs of tenderness below. Older pigs may barber themselves as a reaction to pain from arthritis or tooth problems.

Your guinea pig’s pals may barber him too as a display of dominance or even bullying. If one guinea pig seems to be pestering other more than usual, you’ll want to keep an eye out for the picked-on pig becoming distressed, hiding more than normal to get away from his roomie, or being discouraged from his share of food and water.

While these are the most common causes of hair loss in guinea pigs, other potentially serious diseases can produce similar symptoms. Always pay a visit to your exotic vet if hair loss persists or you can’t identify the root cause.’

So i noticed one of my piggies has a bald spot above his leg about the size of a 10pence peice and has crusty blood round the outsides with tiny spots in the middle,

one of his ears has really dry skin with crusty blood on the rim of ear.What do you think it could be?any advice etc much appreciated

The other piggy seems fine although she has a lot of dark fur so is hard to tell.

The pet store said to take them in,if its ringworm they’ll treat it BUT its mites I’ll have to go to vets & fork out(HOW MUCH WILL THIS COST & WHAT DOES IT ENTAIL?)

p.s its supposed to say IF its mites I’ll have to fork out. im not saying it is mites I dont know it could be either which is why im asking what you think.

Im skint so what do you call not expensive? £10?£20?

11 Answers

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

I don’t think I’ve ever heard of a guinea pig getting ringworm. This sounds like mites. All of my guinea pigs have had it at one time or the another. The hair loss is typical of mites and the blood spots in the center of the ring sounds like bite marks. The other blood is probably being drawn from the scratching your pig is doing.

The easiest home treatment for mites(if this is a available in the U.K.) is ivermectin. First thoroughly clean your guinea pigs cage. A 5% bleach solution is a vet approved method. Then treat your guinea pigs topically with ivermectin at recommended doses (0.5mg/kg). Place 1/3 of the dose behind each ear and 1/3 in the rump area.

Also another home method that I swear works is dabbing just a bit of Lysol right on the pigs neck between the ears. The guinea pigs can’t groom themselves there and won’t ingest it. I’ve used it on 3 occasions and has always worked.

If you can’t find ivermectin or don’t want to attempt home treatment then a vet trip is required. I don’t know how to convert into pounds but vet treatment is usually 10-15 American dollars per pig. I hope I helped.

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea Pigs

None of my guineas have ever had ringworm, its always mites. The symptoms are usually hair loss & slightly irritated looking skin. Sometimes if you look closely, you can see the mites.

You can get mite treatment in pet shops, e.g. shampoos, sprays, but if you don’t know what it is, I would recommend you see a vet. Also, if its ringworm, then I believe it can affect humans. Plus, the pet shop treatments aren’t that great.

It will cost you up to £25 at the vets, which will usually include an anti-parasitic injection & some oral or topical treatment to administer at home. They will probably ask to see the guinea again, a week or so later. I don’t always take mine back, as I can tell whether further prescription is necessary, but I would advise you to do as the vet recommends, just to be on the safe side. Some vets don’t charge for this checkup.

Finally, don’t be tempted to leave it to see whether it gets better on its own, as you could end up with a bald, itchy guinea pig. And once they’re bald, sometimes the fur doesn’t grow back.

Promoting Safe Pet Ownership

How to Treat Ringworm in Guinea PigsA Kitchener, Ontario family is dealing with a household outbreak of ringworm, likely contracted from a new pet guinea pig. Ringworm is a fungal infection cause by a few different types of fungi. Some ringworm fungi are able to infect both people and animals, and those can be spread in households from direct contact with an infected person or pet. In this case, the Gross family purchased a new guinea pig from a local pet store, and unfortunately, ended up bringing ringworm home as a bonus.

As is common, the new pet was the centre of attention when it got home, and the Gross’ three children, ages 8, 5, and 2, had very close and frequent contact with it. The next day, the family noticed an area of hair loss on the guinea pig, at which point they took it back to the store. Ringworm was subsequently diagnosed, though there’s no mention of how this was done, nor is there any mention of what actually happened to the little critter afterward.

The big problems started a week later, when a red lesion was seen on their youngest child’s back. This was also diagnosed as ringworm, though again there’s no mention of how, or whether it was definitively confirmed as ringworm. The newspaper report goes on to say “More spots kept appearing on Matthew’s skin as Gross was given different steroid creams to try and contain the infection.” You always need to take media descriptions of medical issues with a grain of salt. Hopefully, the child was treated with anti-fungal cream, not steroid cream, as the latter not only won’t treat ringworm, they may make it worse if used alone. Steroid creams are often prescribed for non-specific skin issues (particularly if the skin is very itchy, which can certainly happen with ringworm), but in a case like this where there was known contact with an animal with ringworm, I have to hope that the physician was treating with an antifungal cream instead of, or in addition to, a steroid cream.

Anyway, whether despite or because of the treatment, more skin lesions kept appearing on the child. Then skin lesions were found on the family dog, and both the dog and cat ended up being treated for ringworm. The treatment for dogs and cats is relatively straightforward, but it’s still a hassle and can be somewhat expensive, and often takes several weeks.

The family has contacted the pet store about paying for cleaning supplies, air purifiers and veterinary bills, but the company did not respond to the newspaper reporter’s inquiries, citing an ongoing investigation. It’s hard to say whether the company should be held responsible. It largely depends on the measures they take to reduce the risk that they are selling pets at increased risk of transmitting infectious diseases. There’s always a chance of picking up something from a pet, so an infection does not necessarily indicate incompetence or liability. If a store had reasonable practices in place, it’s probably the purchaser’s responsibility to take proper precautions when they take the pet home, and it’s an example of why prompt veterinary examination of new pets is always a good idea. It’s rarely done, particularly for species that cost less than the price of a veterinary exam, and you never know whether it would have helped prevent anything in this case, but in many instances it can help identify potential issues and address them before problems occur.

Preventing outbreaks like this can be difficult. Ringworm can be found on animals in the absence of any skin disease, so you can’t always tell an animal is infected by looking at it. (However, in this case if a large patch of hair loss was noticed by the owners the day after the guinea pig came home, it’s likely that something was evident the day before). Ringworm is spread by direct contact, which is common between pets and kids, especially new pets that often get smothered with attention in the first few days. Good hygiene practices, particularly attention to handwashing, can certainly help, but some degree of risk will remain.

Overall, guinea pigs are relatively low risk for zoonotic diseases, but this report shows that even “low risk” pets can be sources of infection. Fortunately, while controlling ringworm outbreaks can take time and be frustrating, it’s not a serious disease and it is controllable.

More information about ringworm can be found on the Worms & Germs Resources page.

Some skin conditions in pigs can lead to loss of production or even death, and need rapid treatment.

Skin conditions in pigs can be divided into five groups according to their symptoms: Sores, lumps, a change in skin colour, thickening of the skin, or hair loss. This week, we’ll look at conditions that cause sores.

Types of skin conditions in pigs

Wounds

These often result from pigs biting each other or from piglets injuring their mother’s teats when suckling. Sharp objects and biting flies can also cause wounds. Such injuries can become infected with bacteria and produce abscesses – painful swollen areas filled with pus – or fly strike (see below).

To treat, wash the wounds with water and disinfectant and use an insect spray to keep the flies away. Cutting the eye teeth of piglets is the only sure way to prevent teat injuries (ask your local vet to help with this).

Fly strike

This condition can kill your pigs if not treated in time. It occurs when flies lay eggs in wounds or in skin soiled by urine or droppings. The eggs hatch into maggots, which feed on the wounds and cause further damage. To treat, remove the maggots and clean the wounds using an insecticidal cream or powder. You may also need to inject the pig with antibiotics.

To prevent fly strike, keep your animals and their surroundings as clean as possible. Treat wounds promptly and thoroughly, and control flies with fly traps, fly papers and sprays. Be careful, though, not to spray the pigs’ food.

Mange

Mange is caused by mites (small parasites) that live in the skin and often occurs in small pig herds. The skin becomes itchy and the pig rubs itself against pen walls and other objects. Other symptoms are bare patches, heavy crusts, and lines on the body that look like ribs.

Initially, mange affects the ears, but it can spread to other parts of the body. To treat mange, use spray-on or pour-on medication, or an injection that also treats worms. If you have only a few pigs, club together with your neighbours to buy the medicine and treat everyone’s pigs at the same time. Sows infect their piglets.

If you treat the adult pigs regularly, it’s unnecessary to treat the piglets. Boars are often more severely infected than sows, and need careful attention.

Lice

Pig lice are large and easy to see. Look for them around the head and neck, and between the legs. They cause skin irritation and scratching, and can be treated with insecticidal sprays.

Greasy pig disease

This affects young piglets, and can result in death. Yellowish crusts form on the snout, around the mouth and behind the ears, making the animal appear “greasy”. The crusts can spread all over the body. The disease is caused by bacteria and can be treated with antibiotic injections.

Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD)

Typical symptoms are blisters – mainly around the mouth, snout and feet – which burst and cause sores. A sow may also get sores on her teats, preventing the piglets from suckling. In some cases, the pig’s claws can drop off. Unfortunately, there is no treatment for FMD. If you suspect your herd has it, speak to your animal health technician or vet as soon as possible.

Ringworm

This is caused by a fungus spread by contact, particularly in overcrowded conditions. The name comes from the ring-shaped sores on the back and sides of the infected animal. Despite the name “ringworm”, there is no worm involved.

These sores often get better with time, but may need to be treated with iodine or other antifungal medicine. It does not harm the pig, but can spread to people, where it can cause severe itching and other problems. If in doubt about any of these conditions, get advice immediately from your animal health technician or vet.

Source: Skin Conditions In Pigs, by Jenny Turton, produced by the Directorate Communication, Department of Agriculture, in co-operation with the ARC-Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute.

If you’re new to cats, you might think this condition involves worms, but actually, nothing could be farther from the truth – it’s a common skin infection caused by a fungus that lives on the dead tissues of skin and hair. This dead tissue is completely normal and happens all the time in animals as well as humans.

Ringworm is highly contagious and can be passed from animals to humans. You can catch it by touching an infected person or animal. You can also catch it by touching objects or surfaces that had contact with the infected animal such as towels, blankets, carpets and grooming supplies. So the answer to the question, “Can I get ringworm from my cat?” is a resounding “YES!

Ringworm in cats is usually seen on the skin around the face, ears, chest, forelegs and along the ridge of the back. It results in itchy, scaly and reddened skin, as well as bald spots, and often looks like a red, hairless patch in the form of a ring (hence the name).

Cat Ringworm Facts

  • Ringworm can affect all kind of animals, including dogs, cats, cows, goats, pigs, rabbits, birds, guinea pigs and horses. But cats tend to get ringworm more often than dogs do, possibly because cats carry the spores for a longer time than dogs do and that enables the infection to take hold.
  • Studies have shown that up to 13% of human ringworm infections are triggered by an organism that commonly causes ringworm in cats. And in as many as 70% of households, where a cat has ringworm, at least one person will probably catch the infection. Children and elderly people tend to be most susceptible due to weaker or compromised immune systems.
  • Itchy skin is a first symptom. Once you get infected it often takes from 4-14 days to start itching.
  • Ringworm spores can survive in the environment for up to 18 months – so you’ll need to clean everything thoroughly if you get a case in your home.

How To Identify Cat Ringworm

While ringworm usually causes raised, circular areas that are crusted over and hairless, or simply, round hairless areas, quite often infected cats (especially long-haired cats) don’t reveal any such symptoms. That makes it harder to detect.

But look for scaly dandruff, darkened or red, irritated skin, poor hair coat or hair loss, and itchiness. You may also see raised or rounded lesions or boils that can ooze. And there may also be inflammation of the folds of skin around the nail, or a whitish, opaque appearance of the claw.

Cat Ringworm Treatment Options

The fungus infection sometimes goes away on its own – but, who wants to take the chance of spreading it?

If you suspect your cat or ANYONE in your household has ringworm, get it properly diagnosed by a vet (for your animals) or a doctor (for your family members). The medical professional will provide recommendations for treatment, which is normally done with anti-fungal cream or pills.

How To Deal With Ringworm

  • Clean up the environment as thoroughly as you can. Wash all surfaces, linens, cat toys; disinfect grooming brushes/combs and bedding, etc. Use bleach as much as possible but for areas such as carpet or furniture, a solution of apple cider vinegar does a fine job.
  • Keep her isolated in a room if possible until the infection is gone.

Banixx Pet Care has tremendous anti-fungal properties and has been used successfully in treating ringworm in cats and kittens. It creates an environment that kills the ringworm fungus, while providing soothing relief for any itchiness or secondary infections caused by excessive scratching, and it does not stain or discolor fur, fabric or skin.

How To Use Banixx To Treat Cat Ringworm

  • Use disposable gloves while you’re applying Banixx so that you don’t get infected.
  • Using very light pressure, gently pat Banixx on the affected area of your kitten or cat’s ringworm. A cotton ball soaked (but not dripping) in Banixx is generally a good approach. This may be done two to three times daily for the duration of the infection.
  • To prevent the spread of this infection, immediately dispose of the gloves.

Banixx Pet Care Remedy

Banixx is an effective remedy for dog ear infections, hotspots, ringworm, yeast infections, wounds and itchy skin.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jane Meggitt

Two different categories of mites infest guinea pigs — fur mites and mange mites. Guinea pigs usually have a small number of fur mites on their bodies. One type, Chirodiscoides caviae, seldom causes a problem other than mild itching, even in relatively large numbers. While Chirodiscoides caviae is specific to guinea pigs, a fur mite that also infests rabbits can cause far more harm. Cheyletiella parasitivorax, the rabbit fur mite, causes the condition known as “walking dandruff” in its victims, in which tiny skin flakes appear to move on the animal. Symptoms of Cheyletiella parasitivorax include hair loss, scratching and lesions.

Mange Mites

Mange mites — trixacarus caviae, also known as the Sellnick mite — can kill a guinea pig if not treated. Initial symptoms include hair loss and lesions, generally starting on the animal’s back and moving forward onto the shoulders. Secondary bacterial infections often occur in the open sores. A mange mite infestation causes such terrible itching that the affected guinea pig may experience seizures. He stops eating, loses weight, becomes weak and may die.

While any guinea pig can develop mange once exposed to these mites, old, young and pregnant animals, or those living in stressful situations, are the most vulnerable.

Mite Treatment

  • The dewormer ivermectin can kill mange mites on guinea pigs, as can the topical flea and tick preventive selamectin, marketed under the brand name Revolution and available only by prescription. These products eradicate both fur and manage mites. Your vet will determine the correct dosage for your pet, as overdosing can result in severe side effects or kill the animal.
  • Your vet will prescribe antibiotics if a skin infection is present, and may provide you with topical ointment to aid in healing the lesions. If your guinea pig is seriously ill from mange mites, he might require hospitalization and intravenous fluid therapy until he recovers sufficiently to go home.
  • It’s important to treat every guinea pig in your household, not just those with obvious symptoms.
  • You must thoroughly clean all of your pet’s living quarters, and either disinfect or throw out brushes, toys, bowls and similar items.

For best results, find a veterinarian specializing in treating small animals or exotics.