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How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

There was a time when the Print Screen key was the only way to take screenshots in Windows. But Microsoft’s operating system has evolved, and we now have more built-in options to take screenshots. In Windows 7 and beyond, we have the Snipping Tool. In Windows 10, there are two built-in apps to take screenshots.

Microsoft also launched a built-in screenshot tool for Office apps in 2013. Do you know that you can take a screenshot from a built-in feature of your MS Word (2013 and after)? If you haven’t used this feature so far and don’t know how to use it, continue reading this article.

We are going to discuss how you can take a screenshot through the Word’s built-in tool.

Table of Contents

Using Microsoft Word’s Built-in Tool to Take Screenshots

Open MS Word, navigate to its ribbon and click on the Insert tab.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

You will get a drop-down menu. Here you will find the Screenshot among the regular options of Pictures, Shapes, 3D Models, SmartArt, and Charts.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Click on the Screenshot button.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

As you click on Screenshot, it opens another drop-down menu called Available Windows. This menu will give you the thumbnail preview of all the windows opened on your device at the moment.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

In the above example, only a blank MS Word window is open on the device. When you select a thumbnail from this menu, it swiftly copies it to the Word file. It will be inserted like any other image, and hence you can position (aligning, text wrapping, etc.) it in the same manner.

Using MS Word to Take Screen Snippets

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Microsoft has kept the built-in screen-capturing feature of MS word more functional than the Print Screen key. In many cases, you don’t need the screen-capture of an entire window but just its particular section. For all such requirements, MS Word’s Screenshot function has another feature called Screen Clipping.

This option allows you to take snippets of any part of the screen outside of the Word window.

The Screen Clipping feature works pretty similarly to the Snipping Tool. When you click on it, the Word window disappears, the screen goes dim, and a rectangular-drawing cursor appears on the screen. Select the area that you want to snip and remove your hand from the mouse button. The selected area will directly copy in the open Word document.

Why There Is a Need for Built-in Screenshot Feature in MS Word?

Many people ask that when we have multiple built-in screen-capturing options in Windows, why MS Word needs one of its own? MS Word’s built-in screenshot tool has an edge over the Print Screen Key or the Snipping Tool for various reasons. Let’s see.

You don’t need to switch between mouse and keys: This built-in tool allows you to take and use a screenshot of any open, active, or inactive window in one go without resorting to keyboard shortcuts that either take a full screen or active window screenshot.

It can streamline your work: If you are working on a document where you need to use a lot of screenshots, a built-in tool ensures quick and convenient working as compared to any external app.

It is handy for taking snippets: Usually, you have to open the Snipping Tool to take screen snippets and then paste it from there in your document. With a built-in tool, you can take and use a snippet then and there without opening the app and using paste function.

But if you are using earlier Word versions, you still have to use the Windows’ built-in screenshot tools.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

There was a time when the Print Screen key was the only way to take screenshots in Windows. But Microsoft’s operating system has evolved, and we now have more built-in options to take screenshots. In Windows 7 and beyond, we have the Snipping Tool. In Windows 10, there are two built-in apps to take screenshots.

Microsoft also launched a built-in screenshot tool for Office apps in 2013. Do you know that you can take a screenshot from a built-in feature of your MS Word (2013 and after)? If you haven’t used this feature so far and don’t know how to use it, continue reading this article.

We are going to discuss how you can take a screenshot through the Word’s built-in tool.

Table of Contents

Using Microsoft Word’s Built-in Tool to Take Screenshots

Open MS Word, navigate to its ribbon and click on the Insert tab.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

You will get a drop-down menu. Here you will find the Screenshot among the regular options of Pictures, Shapes, 3D Models, SmartArt, and Charts.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Click on the Screenshot button.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

As you click on Screenshot, it opens another drop-down menu called Available Windows. This menu will give you the thumbnail preview of all the windows opened on your device at the moment.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

In the above example, only a blank MS Word window is open on the device. When you select a thumbnail from this menu, it swiftly copies it to the Word file. It will be inserted like any other image, and hence you can position (aligning, text wrapping, etc.) it in the same manner.

Using MS Word to Take Screen Snippets

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Microsoft has kept the built-in screen-capturing feature of MS word more functional than the Print Screen key. In many cases, you don’t need the screen-capture of an entire window but just its particular section. For all such requirements, MS Word’s Screenshot function has another feature called Screen Clipping.

This option allows you to take snippets of any part of the screen outside of the Word window.

The Screen Clipping feature works pretty similarly to the Snipping Tool. When you click on it, the Word window disappears, the screen goes dim, and a rectangular-drawing cursor appears on the screen. Select the area that you want to snip and remove your hand from the mouse button. The selected area will directly copy in the open Word document.

Why There Is a Need for Built-in Screenshot Feature in MS Word?

Many people ask that when we have multiple built-in screen-capturing options in Windows, why MS Word needs one of its own? MS Word’s built-in screenshot tool has an edge over the Print Screen Key or the Snipping Tool for various reasons. Let’s see.

You don’t need to switch between mouse and keys: This built-in tool allows you to take and use a screenshot of any open, active, or inactive window in one go without resorting to keyboard shortcuts that either take a full screen or active window screenshot.

It can streamline your work: If you are working on a document where you need to use a lot of screenshots, a built-in tool ensures quick and convenient working as compared to any external app.

It is handy for taking snippets: Usually, you have to open the Snipping Tool to take screen snippets and then paste it from there in your document. With a built-in tool, you can take and use a snippet then and there without opening the app and using paste function.

But if you are using earlier Word versions, you still have to use the Windows’ built-in screenshot tools.

You can quickly and easily add a screenshot to your Office file to enhance readability or capture information without leaving the program that you are working in. This feature is available in Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Word.

Screenshots are useful for capturing snapshots of programs or windows that you have open on your computer. When you click the Screenshot button, open program windows are displayed as thumbnails in the Available Windows gallery. You can insert the whole program window, or use the Screen Clipping tool to select part of a window. Only windows that have not been minimized to the taskbar can be captured.

When you choose Screen Clipping, your entire window will temporarily become opaque or “frosted over.” After you select the part of the window that you want, your selection will show through this opaqueness.

Note: Only one screenshot at a time can be added. To add multiple screenshots, repeat steps 2 and 3 below.

Click in the document at the location where you want to add the screenshot.

In Excel, Outlook, and Word: On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Screenshot.

In PowerPoint: On the Insert tab, in the Images group, click Screenshot.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

The Available Windows gallery appears, showing you all the windows that you currently have open. Do one of the following:

To insert a screenshot of an entire window into your document, click the thumbnail image of that window.

To add a selected portion of the first window shown in the Available Windows gallery, click Screen Clipping; when the screen turns white and the pointer becomes a cross, press and hold the left mouse button and drag to select the part of the screen that you want to capture.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Tip: If you have multiple windows open, you’ll first need to click the window you want to capture before starting the screenshot process. This will move that window to the first position in the Available Windows gallery. For example, if you want to take a screen clipping from a web page and insert it into a Word document, first click the screen with the website, and then go directly to your Word document and click Screenshot. The screen with the web page will be in the first position in the Available Windows gallery, and you can click Screen Clipping to select a portion of that screen.

The window or portion of the screen you selected is automatically added to your document. You can use the tools on the Picture Tools tab to edit and enhance the screenshot.

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To replicate the issue, we would like to have a screenshot of the Screenshot option in Office 365.

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Which option are you choosing from the Insert | Screenshot drop down?

In particular, note that the previews of available windows do not include the window that is currently active in Word. You’d have to open another window.

Please note that I do not work for Microsoft
MVP program info: https://mvp.microsoft.com/

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You are reading far too much into my reply. I was asking for clarification; that’s all. What exactly isn’t working?

A screen shot (ironic as it may seem) might actually help. You can always use the Snipping Tool which is built into Windows (I used it for the screen shot in my previous post). The Snipping Tool can be used as a replacement for the screen shot function in Office, of course.

Please note that I do not work for Microsoft
MVP program info: https://mvp.microsoft.com/

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A ScreenShot would be nothing more than a static picture of the Word page. The tool exists, it just does not function.

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Can I clarify the issue here?

When you Choose from the “AVAILABLE WINDOWS” it does not insert/paste the screen shot of that window on the office app where you are doing the INSERT SCREENSHOT? Does it insert/paste the SCREENSHOOT when you use the “screen clipping” option or does the same, no image/screenshot inserted on office app?

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No one is suggesting you don’t know what you are doing, but in order to troubleshoot we have to be to understand the problem and to be able to recreate it, or at least recreate the steps you use to create it. The video is great.

After doing the capture, try doing a paste into the doc. Maybe the capture happened but something blocked the paste.

Regardless of what happens with the paste, the first troubleshooting step to try is starting Word in Safe Mode. This suppresses all addins in Word. Addins are often a cause of this sort of problem.

If that doesn’t help, try starting Windows in Safe Mode and Word in Safe mode.

The next link is a wiki with a list of addins that have caused problems in the past. I doubt any of those old ones are causing this problem, I just include the list as an example of the havoc that an addin problem can cause in Office.

This is a collection of generic trouble shooting fixes for Office (2013)

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How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Geoffrey_Carr

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Neseniai parodėme, kad galite naudoti “Microsoft Word” kaip tinklaraščio įrašo redaktorių ir ši funkcija buvo tikrai gera. Mes grįžome prie šio baitu dydžio patarimo, kuris parodys, kaip galite greitai pridėti ekrano kopijas prie savo įrašų.

Naudokite “Microsoft Word”, kad fotografuotumėte

“Word” ekrano kopija yra tikrai neskausminga patirtis. Tiesiog perjunkite skirtuką “Įterpti” ir spustelėkite mygtuką “Ekrano kopija”. Jūs būsite pasveikinti su kiekvieno atidaryto lango miniatiūra. Galite tiesiog spustelėti vieną iš miniatiūros ir jis bus įterptas į dabartinį dokumentą.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Tinkamo konkretaus lango ekrano kopija niekada nebuvo lengvesnis.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Jei norite užfiksuoti tam tikrą zoną ekrane, galite pasirinkti, ar norite tiksliau parinkti ekrano nuėmimą, o ne spustelėti miniatiūrą.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Pasirinkę ekraną, kurį norite užfiksuoti, jis bus automatiškai pridėtas prie jūsų dokumento.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Tai viskas priklauso nuo to. Žodis išlaiko geresnius ir geresnius vaizdus, ​​kol eina dienoraščio įrašo redaktorius. Leiskite mums žinoti, ką galvojate į komentarus.

Aug 7, 2017
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You can add images, videos, tables, graphs, and screenshots in an MS Word file. It isn’t one of the world’s most popular word processors for nothing. If you’re willing to invest the time, you can use it to create stunning documents. For anyone unfamiliar with professional document designing apps, MS Word is heaven sent. The images you insert in an MS Word document are added in reduced quality. This is to keep the size of the file somewhat reasonable. A single image can add substantially to a document’s size. Imagine if it were added in its original size, your document might become too big to be emailed. Of course, the reduced quality doesn’t always look good in which case, you should sharpen an image in MS Word to make it look better.

MS Word isn’t an image editor by any stretch of the imagination. It has a few tools with limited options for editing an image. These include crop tools, color filters, shapes, borders, and more. If an image you’ve added to your document looks off, you can sharpen it. There’s a built-in tool that lets you do just that.

Sharpen An Image In MS Word

MS Word has a sharpen image feature as far back as Office 2007. Perhaps older versions of the productivity suite have this feature too. It is accessed the same way but the actual controls will be different based on which version of MS Office you’re using. This post details how you can sharpen an image in MS Word in Office 2016.

First, insert a picture via the Insert tab on the ribbon. Next, right-click the image and select ‘Format picture’ from the context menu.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

A panel will open on the side with several tabs. Select the Format Picture tab; it’s the one on the far right.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Expand the ‘Picture Corrections’ option. Here you will see a dropdown and a Sharpness slider. The dropdown has preset values for sharpness. They can sharpen or soften the image. You can set a custom sharpness level via the Sharpness slider.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Other Picture Corrections

The Picture Correction section also lets you change the brightness and contrast in an image. Like with Sharpness, you can either increase or decrease the brightness and the contrast. There are presets that change both elements in a picture at once. If you want to change one element but not the other, make use of the sliders instead of the preset dropdown. If anything goes wrong and your picture looks worse than it did before, click the ‘Reset’ button to fix it.

You can choose to edit an image in a proper image editing app before you add it to MS Word but it will be compressed once it is added. Your edits might not look as good as they did before the image was inserted in MS Word. If you want to use a better quality image but keep the file size small, try inserting an image via an online source. The image will be in better quality and you will be able to update it by replacing the online file.

Word’s usability doesn’t stop at writing and editing text. You can add tables, charts, images, and simple graphics to embellish your writing and make it more reader-friendly. If you think outside the box a little, why not use Word to design photo collages?

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Admittedly, Word might not have all the features and tools of a design/graphics app, but this doesn’t stop you from making a great collection of your favorite photos. With some creativity and a few tips and tricks from this article, you will be able to do it in no time.

In addition, you can save your design as a template/layout and just change the images in the collage. But first things first, let’s see what the steps to create a collage in Word are.

Making a Collage in Microsoft Word

As hinted, Word doesn’t offer a ready-made collage layout or template, unless you download a third-party one from the internet. This means you’ll need to make everything from scratch. Initially, it might take a bit more time but you will get a fully customized final result.

Using Developer Option

Step 1

Open a new Word document, click on File, and select Option from the blue menu on the right. Choose Customize Ribbon in the pop-up window and make sure to check the Developer option under “Customizing the Ribbon” section. Click OK to confirm when you finish.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Note: This step applies to those who use Microsoft Word 2013 or 2016. If you are on a different version the first step might not be necessary. Mac users will need to click on the ‘Word’ option in the upper left-hand corner, then click ‘Preferences,’ and ‘View’ to turn on the developer options.

Step 2

With the Developer option on, go to the Developer tab and select “Picture Content Control.” Click on the icon and add as many image slots as you want, then click the center of the image to add pictures from a file.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Step 3

Once the image is inside the slot, you can drag the sides to resize it and match the layout. There is also an option to tilt the images a little to make for a more interesting design. Just grab the image and move it left or right to get the desired angle.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Using Word Tables

This method can be used in any Word version and it applies even if you use the cloud/app-based free version. Here are the necessary steps.

Step 1

With a new Word document on, select the Insert tab and click on the Table drop-down menu.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Based on the number of images you want to insert, choose the table layout. You can fit the table to the page if necessary.

Step 2

You’ll get a relatively small text box at the top of your screen. It’s advisable to extend it to cover the entire page. This way you get extra room to insert the images.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Also, feel free to use the Table Design tab to change the color of the layout and select a background fill. Check out all the available styles by clicking on the arrows in the toolbar. There is also an option to get a different border style.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

If you choose a border style, use the pen tool, and click on each border to apply the style. This is where you can get creative since there is no need to apply the style to all borders.

Step 3

With the basic layout in place, it’s time to insert the images into your Word collage template. Select the collage panel/slot where you want to insert the image, click Insert, and choose “Picture from File.”

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Unless you resize the image prior to import, it won’t fit to collage slot. If it turns out too big, select the image and resize it to fit the image to the collage.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Image Manipulation Tips and Tricks

Word offers a surprising amount of image manipulation tools and effects to make the images stand out. You can make brightness and color corrections, add artistic effects, or change the image transparency.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

What’s more, there are close to thirty image effects and borders you can apply. You can fine-tune each of the applied effects from the Format Picture menu on the right. Click on the Effect tab and select the arrow to reveal the adjustment sliders.

Step 4

When you finish the design, click the small floppy disc icon to save the collage. Give the document a name, add some tags, and choose the destination and file format.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

You should know that file formats are one of the downsides of making a collage in Microsoft Word. To be precise, the documents are saved in different text formats (.doc, .docx, .dot, etc). That said, you can export the collage to PDF, which might be a better option if you want to print it. However, you won’t be able to upload the collage to certain social media.

Using SmartArt

The built-in SmartArt feature is another way to add photos in various layouts in Microsft Word. To use SmartArt follow these steps:

Step 1

With a Word Document open, click on the ‘Insert’ tap in the ribbon and click on ‘SmartArt.’

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Step 2

A dropdown will appear, click ‘Picture.’ Choose the layout you’d like to use. It will appear in the document once selected.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Step 3

Add your photos to the template.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Your photos will automatically size to fit within the template making a picture collage.

Collage Made of Words

During our testing, it took about ten minutes to make a Word collage but you can spend much more time perfecting the design. And there’s a neat hack to work around Word’s inability to export JPEGs or PNGs.

Instead of exporting the document, you can take a screenshot and get the collage in JPG or PNG. Depending on the specs of your computer you could end up with an HD collage ready for social networks.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

While Microsoft Word isn’t the best drawing tool, you can create basic drawings or scribbles in Word directly. Here’s how.

Microsoft Word isn’t essential software for graphics designers, and for a good reason. It’s true—Microsoft Word isn’t best suited for drawing, but it does have some built-in drawing tools you can use, should you need to.

For simple drawings, you can draw in Word directly using shapes, lines, or pen tools. If you want to draw in Microsoft Word, here’s what you’ll need to do.

These instructions have been designed with Microsoft Office 2019 in mind. Note that Microsoft 365 (formerly O365) is the Office suite with 1 TB of OneDrive per user. While the steps may work for older versions of Word, there may be some variations or missing features.

Using Microsoft Word Drawing Tools

There are two sets of drawing tools available to Microsoft Word users. If you want to draw basic, block-like images, you can insert shapes or lines into your Word document and group them together. You might want to do this if you’re creating a diagram or flow chart, for instance.

Alternatively, you can turn Word into your own personal canvas using pen drawing tools. If you have a touchscreen device or a graphics tablet, you can create freehand drawings.

To insert shapes, you’ll need to press the Insert tab on the ribbon bar. For freehand drawings, press the Draw tab instead.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Inserting Shapes into Microsoft Word

If you’re not confident of your freehand drawing ability, or you want to create diagrams in Word, you can insert shapes.

There are hundreds of pre-set shapes available. You can draw typical shapes like squares or circles or insert arrows, stars, speech bubbles, and more. To insert a shape, press the Insert tab on the ribbon bar, then press the Shapes button.

This will list the various shape options in a drop-down menu for you to choose from.

Press on one of the pre-set shapes or line options to select it—your cursor will change at this point.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Once this happens, draw onto your Word document directly to insert the shape or line you selected. This allows you to select the appropriate size for your shape.

With the shape inserted and selected, Word will switch to the Format tab on the ribbon bar. From here, you can format your shape.

For instance, add text to your shape and begin typing with the shape selected–the text will be inserted inside the shape.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

You can also change the color and style of your shape, as well as the position and alignment of any inserted text, using the options listed in the Format tab.

Creating Freehand Drawings in Word

If you want to create more original Word drawings, you can use various pen drawing tools to draw onto a Word document. You can do this using a mouse or trackpad, or more precisely, using a touchscreen device or graphics tablet.

To start, press the Draw tab on the ribbon bar. This will display the pen drawing tool options for you to use.

Three drawing options are available under the Tools section. Press Draw with Touch to begin drawing with one of the pen tools, Eraser to switch to the eraser tool, or Select to select your drawings as objects to move, copy, or delete them.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

A list of available pens to draw with is shown under the Pens category. There are three drawing pens available—Pencil, Pen, and Highlighter.

As you’d expect, using the Pencil tool inserts a finer, less precise drawing line to your document. The Pen tool is the opposite—lines are clearer, thicker, and more defined. The Highlighter tool can be used for emphasis, adding color to your drawings.

Several pre-set colors and designs are available already in the Pens category—select one of these to begin drawing. Alternatively, you can create your own by pressing the Add Pen button and selecting one of the tools listed in the drop-down menu.

This will add a new pen design to the Pens category, with a settings drop-down menu. From here, you can set the thickness and color of the pen tool, with a preview of the pen design at the top.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

You can edit these in the future by hovering over a pen design and press the arrow icon in the bottom-left corner.

With your drawing pen tool selected and configured, you can begin drawing onto your Word document directly.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Creating a Drawing Canvas in Word

Word allows you to draw onto a Word document without constraints. If you’d prefer to draw onto a much smaller area of your Word document, however, you can insert a drawing canvas.

A drawing canvas groups your drawing into a single object which can then be moved, resized, or copied elsewhere. To do this, press the Drawing Canvas button in the Insert section of the Draw tab.

This will insert the canvas into your Word document. You will only be able to draw inside the canvas object’s borders– anything drawn outside of this will be ignored.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

Designing Microsoft Word Documents

While it hasn’t been designed with drawing in mind, you can still use shapes, lines, and freehand pen drawings to create simplistic images in Microsoft Word. You can use shapes to create a flow chart or diagram or use free-hand drawings to show your artistic drawing skills.

You can insert and edit images in Microsoft Word too, but don’t forget Word’s main purpose. If you’re designing new documents, you may prefer to use building blocks to help you create them more quickly.

Why is understanding how to use Microsoft Word for real-time document collaboration important?

Well, in the days before cloud-based collaboration tools, working as part of a team on a Microsoft Word document was challenging. Everyone would create their content, make their changes, and then someone would be tasked with trying to manually keep track of all the edits.

It used to be if you had a four-person team — Alan, Brenda, Carol and David — all working on a report, the best-case process would have gone something like this:

  • Alan would write the initial draft (let’s call that version 1) and send it to his three colleagues.
  • Brenda makes her additions and corrections, and that becomes version 2. She sends version 2 off to the others.
  • Carol makes her own changes to Brenda’s version, and then creates version 3.
  • David makes changes to Carol’s (version 4), and that copy goes back to Alan for final edits and polishing.

But here’s what really happened.

Alan sent version 1 out to everyone via email. Brenda, Carol and David all made changes, and shared their updates with the rest of the group (version 2b, version 2c and version 2d).

Now, there were three version 2s, and all four team members updated each and every copy, sending out their own revisions to each revision and, after an inbox-filling email thread, they would reach the logical conclusion of version 2019JAN28, Mark VII/potato.

Document collaboration has gotten better since then

Things have changed. Now, everyone can work with each other in a single document, rather than checking out the previous copy or sitting down in a room or on a conference call and going through the document line by line.

With Microsoft 365 from GoDaddy, there is a solution for small businesses who want to collaborate on a Microsoft Word document with colleagues.

Also, if an organization needs extra security for things like HIPAA compliance for their emails or document archiving, it can cover those bases as well.

Now, instead of the old “send around the document” dance, there is a single live version of the document available to all team members.

Every time someone views the document, they get the latest version, and they don’t have to actually deal with any older versions.

If someone does want to review a previous version, the document revisions are stored online.

Whenever a team member logs on and looks at the document, they’re seeing the latest copy with all its revisions, updates and comments.

How to use microsoft word 2013’s built-in screenshot tool

What you need for document collaboration with Microsoft Word

If you want to use Microsoft Word to collaborate on a document, you’ll need a few things.

First, you’ll need a document that can actually be co-authored. Basically, if it ends in x, you can co-author it: .docx (Word), .xlsx (Excel), and .pptx (PowerPoint). We’re only talking about Microsoft Word for real-time document collaboration in this article. However, the principles are the same for the other programs.

1. Create a new Word document

First, create a new document in Microsoft Word.

2. Store your Word document in Microsoft OneDrive

Then, you’ll need a place to store your documents, like Microsoft OneDrive. You’ll store your files here whenever you share them.

You’ll also need the OneDrive for Business app, which syncs files from OneDrive to your Mac or PC. OneDrive for Business comes with Office 2013, Office 2016 and the Office 365 subscription — which means Microsoft 365 from GoDaddy users can still collaborate with non-365 users.

3. Share your Word document

Next, you need to share your document with your collaborators. But it’s not enough to just share the document, you also need to grant Edit permissions for your co-authors. You can’t just email a link to your colleagues, they need to actually be made Editors.

By design, you won’t be able to overwrite each other’s work, because two things will happen.

First, a little colored flag will show the other authors’ names in the paragraph or sentence they’re working on — and you can see their changes happening in real time. Second, that paragraph will be uneditable to everyone else. So if you don’t like what they’re doing, you can’t make any changes until they move on to a new paragraph.

Additionally, if you want to see who has made additional changes to the document, that’s not a problem. Here are a few things you should know.

  • You won’t be able to see changes in Word Online, like you can with the regular Track Changes function. You’ll have to download the document and open it in Word.
  • You can’t turn Track Changes on or off in Word Online; you have to do that on your own computer. Download the document, turn it on or off, and make the changes. I recommend turning it ON when you upload it so you can all keep track of all the changes.
  • But you don’t need to re-upload the revised version of the document. When you’re done and you save the document, it will continue to be stored where you opened it in Word Online. Tracked changes will be preserved and — if you turned on Track Changes before you opened the document in Word Online — any changes you make in Word Online will also be tracked.
  • You can drop in comments by highlighting text and select Review –> New Comment, or just right-clicking and selecting New Comment from the menu. Collaborators can then respond to the comment in the Reply box.

All in all, it’s fairly easy.

If you can use Microsoft Word already, then you can easily use Microsoft Word for real-time document collaboration. It’s just a matter of following a few steps and remembering to Share the document with each new revision.

Let them know what they should change and what they shouldn’t.

Choose someone to serve as the coordinator and leader of the project. This person will get the final say on the edits and changes. Establish a process and an order to actually making changes, and set deadlines for when everything needs to be finished.

If you can follow these steps, this is going to be easy, and you’ll have an easier time working together for a group to create your different documents. Good luck!