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How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

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How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

Your smartphone already does an amazing variety of stuff. It’s your camera, navigation guide, compass, it can even serve as an impromptu level so all your pictures hang straight. You may not know that it can also function as a barometer or altimeter, too.

How Barometers Work

Many of us have that amateur meteorologist inside of us, so while we can always pull up the weather forecast using an app or a website, it’s a lot more fun to track atmospheric pressure trends on your own using a barometer.

Barometers measure air pressure. There are several kinds of barometers. Torricellian and aneroid are the traditional mechanical barometers you might have seen in the past, and there are the digital barometers as found in your smartphone and high-end outdoorsy watches.

If you use a smartphone, it probably already has a built-in barometer. Phone manufacturers include barometers to improve GPS elevation results, because they can be adversely affected by atmospheric pressure. While you may never have any need or desire to know your current altitude or atmospheric pressure, aspiring meteorologists, hikers, or simply curious folks might really like to know.

Barometers measure atmospheric pressure, so you can get a general sense of what’s going to happen by whether a barometer rises or falls. If the barometer goes up, then that means the weather is going to be fair. If it goes down, then it’s probably going to rain, snow, or indicate some other type of inclement weather.

Today we’ll show you the basics of how to use a barometer app on a smartphone. You can find and download barometer apps for both iPhone and Android, which you can use to do your own weather predictions.

Using Your Smartphone Barometer

On your smartphone, you can use a barometer to get an idea of how the weather is trending.

For example, when we use the Barometer and Altimeter app on our iPhone (you can use whatever one you prefer however, they all function in pretty much the same way), we tap “Set” to calibrate the red needle so it lines up with the black one.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

As time passes, the black needle will move, either up or down, which will indicate how your local weather is trending. In the following screenshot, we see that the needle has moved up, which means the weather will be fair. If it were to move down, then we would probably need to bring an umbrella!

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

Using the simply-titled Barometer app on Android, we calibrate the needle to zero so we know how it moves over time.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

In addition to being able to predict the weather, you can check your current altitude. It’s important here to keep in mind the difference between altitude and elevation. Elevation is the height at which the land mass you’re standing upon extends above sea level. Altitude is how high you are above that land mass.

So, while your phone might be able to tell you how high you are, such as in a plane or when climbing a hill, if you don’t already know your elevation, it won’t tell you how far you are above sea level.

Know also, barometric pressure is going to differ with your current weather and position, therefore you will have to set the reference altitude and pressure to get an accurate reading.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

Your barometric pressure needs to be set to your local pressure in order for the altitude reading to be correct. If your atmospheric pressure changes, so too will your altitude even if you don’t move or change position.

Similarly, the relative altitude value needs to be set to your current local altitude for the atmospheric pressure to read correctly. If you don’t change altitudes, the barometric reading will remain accurate. In order to obtain your station pressure, you can set the reference altitude to zero.

Using the Android app, you can view altitude reading right on the barometer’s face.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

And obviously you can calibrate both sensors just as you can on the iPhone equivalent.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

Basically, the idea here is to get a small reading (zero or one) on the altimeter so that as you change positions and elevations, you will know how high or low you are.

Most people like to get altitude readings for when they’re hiking, or simply out of curiosity, such as when going from place to place. The barometric pressure reading on the other hand, will typically appeal to anyone into DIY weather-forecasting.

There are quite a few barometer apps available through iTunes and Android Play, so if you do a simple search for the keyword “barometer” you can easily find one that suits you.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

We all have our ups and downs, but some of us like to measure our vertical measurement above the Earth. This can tell reveal much about the weather and living conditions wherever you are. While you may often use your phone’s location for 2D street-level navigation, those same satellites can also help you find your distance above sea level (altitude, not to be confused with elevation, which is the earth’s distance above sea level). Paired with a barometric pressure sensor and a data connection (if there’s one available), your phone can provide surprisingly accurate altitude readings.

Difference Between Altitude and Elevation

The terms “Altitude” and “Elevation” are usually used interchangeably, but there’s a major difference between the two. An “altitude” is the vertical measurement measured from a specific datum or plane, which is mostly sea level. Hence, an altitude is your height from mean sea level (also known as 0 feet.) On the other hand, “elevation” is generally used to specify the height to which something rises, such as ground level, or a building, etc. Any height is measured above a specific ground elevation, and is usually published on specific maps or charts.

An example: the elevation of a specific landmark can be 700 feet above mean sea level. If you were at the exact location at a a height of 2000 feet, your altitude would be 2000 feet above mean sea level (MSL), but your height would be 1300 feet above ground level (AGL) (2000-700 = 1300 feet).

How do phones measure altitude?

Phones are able to measure altitude, and if you know the elevation of the ground below, you can calculate your exact height above ground. The most important altitude measurement tool in your phone’s arsenal is the GNSS/GPS receiver. If your phone can find at least four satellites, with one directly overhead, you can usually get an altitude reading accurate to within 10 to 20 meters (35 to 70 feet). Having good satellite reception isn’t always guaranteed, though, and while GPS-based altitude works most of the time, it can still be subject to fairly large errors.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

That’s why many modern phones are also equipped with barometric pressure sensors (barometers). Because gravity pulls everything down towards the Earth, including the atmosphere, pressure gets lower as your altitude increases. Measuring this change helps your phone figure out how far up or down you’ve gone.

Shifting weather can also affect atmospheric pressure, though, so most altimeter apps will try to get the most current pressure data from a nearby meteorological station. This gives the app something to compare the pressure changes to. Barometer-based altitude measurements can still work without a data connection, but you may have to calibrate it manually.

1. Altitude Using the Compass App (iOS)

The quickest way to get the altitude measurement on an iPhone is using the built-in Compass app. If your phone is able to connect to a satellite and get a good connection, the Compass app will show your exact location coordinates and altitude.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

Unfortunately, there’s no such app present in Android by default. Fortunately, there are multiple third-party apps to view your altitude. Usually their accuracy doesn’t vary much since they use the same method to calculate altitude, so you can use them as well:

2. My Altitude (iOS/Android)

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

My Altitude is a complete solution for most of your altitude needs. You’ll get to see the altitude, coordinates, barometric pressure, water boiling point, weather – even NOAA data you can download to use the app offline. It doesn’t come with any tracking or graphing features, but it does have a tool that lets you take a photo with attached coordinates, altitude, and other details. My Altitude is available to download on both iOS and Android.

3. Altimeter & Altitude Widget (Android)

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

This app from DS Software (only on Android) uses location, barometer, and geospatial survey data to help you get accurate elevation and altitude readings, plus it comes with an array of maps and a feature that allows you to record and graph your altitude trends. Being able to switch easily between elevation (the SRTM and USGS settings are both for elevation) and altitude (GPS and Bar) is a great feature, since comparing the two readings can help you get a sense for how accurate your altitude is.

If you have an onboard barometer, the app also provides an array of calibration options, allowing you to get the data from the nearest airport or set it manually. Its level of detail, variety of elevation/altitude settings, and tracking features make it an excellent choice as a workhorse altimeter.

4. Altimeter GPS – Hike & Trek (iOS)

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

This iOS app comes with the standard altimeter, barometer, and compass, plus a pedometer and journey tracker so you can visualize your distance and altitude changes. There’s even an SOS feature that can automatically send someone your location in an emergency. It’s the trip tracking that sets this app apart, though, as many iOS altimeters don’t come with that feature.

5. Altimeter Ler (Android)

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

This app’s design makes you feel like you’re in an airplane cockpit, but you can’t argue with the rich data you get out of it. Altimeter Ler (available on Android) gives you a full readout of your location and environmental conditions plus a variety of maps and good tracking features. It can calculate altitude based on both GPS and barometer readings and even tells you the estimated error of the GPS data you’re getting. It doesn’t have visualization tools to track your altitude changes or elevation data, but it comes with enough other features to make up for those shortfalls.

6. Altimeter (Android)

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

EXA Tools’ altimeter for Android doesn’t provide a lot of extra data, but its interface is easy to read, and its tracking feature might actually be one of the best on this list thanks to its nicely-presented altitude-change graph. It comes with many ads (you can get rid of them by going premium), but they’re not unmanageable, and the app itself works well.

Should I just get a real altimeter?

If “ain’t no mountain high enough” is less of a song lyric and more of a life motto for you, you might have your eye on a non-phone altimeter. The good news is that this probably isn’t necessary if your phone has a decent GNSS chipset and a barometer, as tests have shown smartphones and altimeters to have roughly similar accuracy. What you probably need, though, is a good GPS app and maybe one that can be used offline.

Related:

Shujaa Imran is MakeTechEasier’s resident Mac tutorial writer. He’s currently training to follow his other passion become a commercial pilot. You can check his content out on Youtube

iPhone is the best mobile for any kind of users because of its distinguishing benefits. iPhones come with various built-in technologies and facilities which allow the users to remain update with surrounding factors conveniently. Among many other useful features, iPhone has barometer functionality. You can use its barometer feature for measuring the pressure, forecasting the weather, tracking physical activities ratio, and altitude elevation. These all facilities can be used on the daily basis as they help us to know the useful facts about our living. To use the built-in barometer functionality of iPhone, you have to use an app. Here are the best barometer apps for iPhone that are available in the market and you can select anyone according to your needs.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

5 Best Barometer Apps for IOS Devices

If you are looking for the best barometer apps for iPhone, have a look at our list below.

1. Barometer and Altimeter

This is the app created and launched by AFS software company. This is free and widely used worldwide. It can help its user to calculate the air pressure and elevation estimation precisely. It is also used for weather forecasting purposes. It uses the pressure sensor of iPhone to calculate and display pressure figures.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

It is the right app to install on iPhone 6, 6 Plus and above versions. It is also suitable for iPad Air2 and iOS 8 including above versions.

2. Simple Barometer

Simple Barometer is an app that only works with on devices with a barometer like iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPad Air 2, and newer. You don’t need to use network connection because the current pressure is detected by the barometer sensor inside the iPhone. You can get the current pressure on your display, anywhere your iPhone can go.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

Simple Barometer app measure air pressure in a number of different units: inches mercury (inHg), millimeters of mercury (mmHg), atmospheres, kilopascals (kPa), hectopascals (hPa), or pounds per square inch (PSI).

3. Bar-o-meter

It is a fantastic app which is developed by Nettuno which is used to inform you of your altitude with help of pressure measurement using the mobile sensor. Its best feature is that it can display the pressure units in different units. It is also used for weather forecasting.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

Using your location, with the help of barometric formula you can quickly measure you’re the charts of pressure and altitude. It is the free app which allows excellent animations and graphics display of pressure and altitude in your iPhone or iPad.

4. Barometer plus Altimeter

It can also be a good choice when you are looking for any iPhone barometer app. It can tell you everything about weather and elevation. It does not come with any widget support. Therefore, it can only be used for iPhones. Anyone who is not iPhone user can depend on GPS based altimeters.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

You can download this app for free from App Store and it is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

5. Barometer & Altimeter Pro

This is another iPhone barometer app which is by Steffen Bauereiss which use your iPhone sensor. It is incredible altimeter and barometer app which can easily use anywhere without any issue. It also comes with Notification Center Widget and barometric Trend. It is basically a free app with various features. You can also purchase this app which will give you Pro features.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

This app can be used on iPhone 6, 6S, 7, 8 and the latest iPhone X. It will also work on Plus versions of other iPhone models. Any of your iPad or iOS devices which has barometric pressure sensor can use this app without any doubt.

We hope that you liked our list of the best barometer apps for iPhone, iPad and iPod. Feel free to leave your comments in the section below.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

Joe Levi
  • Android,
  • Editorial,
  • Galaxy Nexus,
  • Google,
  • Ice Cream Sandwich

At last night’s Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich announcement we were told that the new flagship phone, the Galaxy Nexus, would include a barometer, and that the Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich SDK included all the bits needed for developers to tie into the new sensor.

What’s a barometer?

Wikipedia describes a barometer as “a scientific instrument used in meteorology to measure atmospheric pressure.” It measures the pressure exerted by the atmosphere above it. This measurement of pressure can be used to forecast short term changes in the weather and can be used to estimate altitude.

Smartphone Application: Weather Forecasting

HTC’s Sense UI includes an iconic “clock and weather” widget prominently featured on the homescreen. Other app developers have created similar widgets, such as Beautiful Widgets, pictured below.

These widgets use your smartphone’s geo-location information and your Internet connection to retrieve local weather information (current, high, and low temperatures; and current conditions) for various weather data providers. Using the same information you can get the weather forecast for the next several days.

Augmenting those with real-time, local, barometric pressure readings may allow these types of apps to be even more reactive to changes in the weather.

Currently, I have Beautiful Widgets set to check on the weather every four hours. Checking more frequently can drain your battery and chew up your data. No, it’s not much of either, but when added up, over time your data usage could go up (a problem for those not on “unlimited” plans) and your battery life could go down (a problem for all of us).

Imagine this scenario: you’re sitting at your desk, perfectly content in your short-sleeved shirt, and want to run to lunch. You check your smartphone and the forecast says you’ll have a storm front roll in sometime in the early evening, so you don’t worry taking your coat or umbrella. You head out to lunch. Unfortunately, like me, you set your smartphone to update the weather forecast every four hours; it’s been three hours since the last update. Since then, that cold-weather front has moved in faster than anticipated. You find yourself caught in a heavy rainstorm with blowing winds that wasn’t supposed to arrive until your commute home.

With a barometer built into your phone, and an app which can read its data, your smartphone could have noticed the drop in barometric pressure and alerted you to the change. It could also have triggered a request to update forecast data, saving your battery and data usage by only updating when the weather changed.

If your phone had a barometer in it, and your weather app was programmed to use changed in barometric pressure to trigger an update, perhaps you could have avoided getting caught out in the rain.

Additionally, since a barometer isn’t dependent upon a data connection, you could still get “weather change alerts” even when you weren’t under a data umbrella. Such as…

Smartphone Application: Altitude

… when you’re hiking.

My family and I like to go hiking in the foothills and mountains around us. Last week my son and I hiked several miles each day in unfamiliar territory. We were in a very remote area which was outside not only data coverage, but cellular voice coverage as well.

We used Google’s My Tracks to chart our progress while hiking, and so we could see where we were in relation to where we started (in case we got lost). We didn’t have any digital maps of the area (again, we had no data coverage), we could only see the line of where we’d walked, but that was useful enough.

On one of our hikes we were approaching 10,000-feet above sea level. The temperature drops pretty quickly when you’re up that high, and weather can change quickly — very quickly. We didn’t know we were that high, at the time we thought we were only about 8,800-feet up… 1,200-feet makes a lot of difference.

Since we had the GPS on and recording our track, a quick glance at the data during one of our breaks showed us our true altitude, so we were a little more cautious and aware of the weather, but if we hadn’t been recording our tracks we wouldn’t have known, and we could have gotten caught in a bad situation.

Since many people turn off the GPS on their phone to conserve battery life (especially when they’re not actively using it), someone in a similar situation might not have known, and that bad situation could have become a major problem!

A barometer is a passive sensor (rather than an “active” sensor, like GPS). An app could alert you to your altitude when you approach certain thresholds — without sucking down your battery like GPS does. Perhaps apps like My Tracks could be updated to include an “altitude trigger” option, which could turn on the GPS to record your location at 50-foot increments of elevation change, saving your batter, but still recording a relatively accurate track.

Since you’re wondering…

That day’s hike could have gotten bad. We were only around three-miles from the trail-head, but we had climbed over a thousand-feet in elevation, and were still headed up the mountain. We didn’t know at the time, but a storm-front was moving in, and the pressure was dropping — fast. Since there was a mountain in the way, we couldn’t see the impending storm-front closing in on us, and at that altitude, we were a lot more exposed than we thought we were.

If we’d have been at the top of the trail when the storm rolled in (or if there had been rain or snow with it), we could have been in trouble.

If one of us had had the Galaxy Nexus with an app running and set to sound an alert when the barometric pressure dropped, we’d have gotten off the mountain a lot faster than we did — and all without needing any data coverage.

As luck would have it, we got to the bottom of the trail just as the leading edge of the storm was upon us. It brought wind and clouds and sent the temperature down ten-degrees Fahrenheit in a matter of minutes. With clouds blocking the sun and the wind picking up we started to get cold — but we were safe.

What else can you think of that a barometer could be used for on a smartphone? Let your imagination run wild and let us know what you think in the comments!

Joe Levi

Joe graduated from Weber State University with two degrees in Information Systems and Technologies. He has carried mobile devices with him for more than a decade, including Apple’s Newton, Microsoft’s Handheld and Palm Sized PCs, and is Pocketnow’s “Android Guy”.

By day you’ll find Joe coding web pages, tweaking for SEO, and leveraging social media to spread the word. By night you’ll probably find him writing technology and “prepping” articles, as well as shooting video. Read more about Joe Levi here.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

Joe Levi
  • Android,
  • Editorial,
  • Galaxy Nexus,
  • Google,
  • Ice Cream Sandwich

At last night’s Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich announcement we were told that the new flagship phone, the Galaxy Nexus, would include a barometer, and that the Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich SDK included all the bits needed for developers to tie into the new sensor.

What’s a barometer?

Wikipedia describes a barometer as “a scientific instrument used in meteorology to measure atmospheric pressure.” It measures the pressure exerted by the atmosphere above it. This measurement of pressure can be used to forecast short term changes in the weather and can be used to estimate altitude.

Smartphone Application: Weather Forecasting

HTC’s Sense UI includes an iconic “clock and weather” widget prominently featured on the homescreen. Other app developers have created similar widgets, such as Beautiful Widgets, pictured below.

These widgets use your smartphone’s geo-location information and your Internet connection to retrieve local weather information (current, high, and low temperatures; and current conditions) for various weather data providers. Using the same information you can get the weather forecast for the next several days.

Augmenting those with real-time, local, barometric pressure readings may allow these types of apps to be even more reactive to changes in the weather.

Currently, I have Beautiful Widgets set to check on the weather every four hours. Checking more frequently can drain your battery and chew up your data. No, it’s not much of either, but when added up, over time your data usage could go up (a problem for those not on “unlimited” plans) and your battery life could go down (a problem for all of us).

Imagine this scenario: you’re sitting at your desk, perfectly content in your short-sleeved shirt, and want to run to lunch. You check your smartphone and the forecast says you’ll have a storm front roll in sometime in the early evening, so you don’t worry taking your coat or umbrella. You head out to lunch. Unfortunately, like me, you set your smartphone to update the weather forecast every four hours; it’s been three hours since the last update. Since then, that cold-weather front has moved in faster than anticipated. You find yourself caught in a heavy rainstorm with blowing winds that wasn’t supposed to arrive until your commute home.

With a barometer built into your phone, and an app which can read its data, your smartphone could have noticed the drop in barometric pressure and alerted you to the change. It could also have triggered a request to update forecast data, saving your battery and data usage by only updating when the weather changed.

If your phone had a barometer in it, and your weather app was programmed to use changed in barometric pressure to trigger an update, perhaps you could have avoided getting caught out in the rain.

Additionally, since a barometer isn’t dependent upon a data connection, you could still get “weather change alerts” even when you weren’t under a data umbrella. Such as…

Smartphone Application: Altitude

… when you’re hiking.

My family and I like to go hiking in the foothills and mountains around us. Last week my son and I hiked several miles each day in unfamiliar territory. We were in a very remote area which was outside not only data coverage, but cellular voice coverage as well.

We used Google’s My Tracks to chart our progress while hiking, and so we could see where we were in relation to where we started (in case we got lost). We didn’t have any digital maps of the area (again, we had no data coverage), we could only see the line of where we’d walked, but that was useful enough.

On one of our hikes we were approaching 10,000-feet above sea level. The temperature drops pretty quickly when you’re up that high, and weather can change quickly — very quickly. We didn’t know we were that high, at the time we thought we were only about 8,800-feet up… 1,200-feet makes a lot of difference.

Since we had the GPS on and recording our track, a quick glance at the data during one of our breaks showed us our true altitude, so we were a little more cautious and aware of the weather, but if we hadn’t been recording our tracks we wouldn’t have known, and we could have gotten caught in a bad situation.

Since many people turn off the GPS on their phone to conserve battery life (especially when they’re not actively using it), someone in a similar situation might not have known, and that bad situation could have become a major problem!

A barometer is a passive sensor (rather than an “active” sensor, like GPS). An app could alert you to your altitude when you approach certain thresholds — without sucking down your battery like GPS does. Perhaps apps like My Tracks could be updated to include an “altitude trigger” option, which could turn on the GPS to record your location at 50-foot increments of elevation change, saving your batter, but still recording a relatively accurate track.

Since you’re wondering…

That day’s hike could have gotten bad. We were only around three-miles from the trail-head, but we had climbed over a thousand-feet in elevation, and were still headed up the mountain. We didn’t know at the time, but a storm-front was moving in, and the pressure was dropping — fast. Since there was a mountain in the way, we couldn’t see the impending storm-front closing in on us, and at that altitude, we were a lot more exposed than we thought we were.

If we’d have been at the top of the trail when the storm rolled in (or if there had been rain or snow with it), we could have been in trouble.

If one of us had had the Galaxy Nexus with an app running and set to sound an alert when the barometric pressure dropped, we’d have gotten off the mountain a lot faster than we did — and all without needing any data coverage.

As luck would have it, we got to the bottom of the trail just as the leading edge of the storm was upon us. It brought wind and clouds and sent the temperature down ten-degrees Fahrenheit in a matter of minutes. With clouds blocking the sun and the wind picking up we started to get cold — but we were safe.

What else can you think of that a barometer could be used for on a smartphone? Let your imagination run wild and let us know what you think in the comments!

Joe Levi

Joe graduated from Weber State University with two degrees in Information Systems and Technologies. He has carried mobile devices with him for more than a decade, including Apple’s Newton, Microsoft’s Handheld and Palm Sized PCs, and is Pocketnow’s “Android Guy”.

By day you’ll find Joe coding web pages, tweaking for SEO, and leveraging social media to spread the word. By night you’ll probably find him writing technology and “prepping” articles, as well as shooting video. Read more about Joe Levi here.

Today we have numerous apps that inform us of the weather you will do in the next hours and days with extraordinary precision. But for a long time the only device that was needed to know if it was going to do better or worse was a barometer, which measures the pressures of our atmosphere.

It is a more basic way of knowing the weather, but of course it is a method used for centuries to know what the evolution of time will be in the following hours of the day, and even in the following days.

Use your mobile as a barometer

Nowadays it is not necessary that our mobile has an integrated barometer, that there are, because these apps are responsible for giving us all the information in real time about these pressures thanks to the data that is collected in real time in thousands of weather stations of all the world. It is true that these barometer applications should make little sense with the weather forecasts, but it is still a good method for many people to anticipate the time it will do .

The barometer measures atmospheric pressure , which is the weight per unit area of surface exerted by the atmosphere. When there are high pressures, it is normal for the weather to change for the better , without precipitation or with a more peaceful time. When the low pressures begin to appear, they advance a more unstable time , probably with precipitation and a rising storm. Therefore with this data we can anticipate time. We have different apps in stores with which we can emulate atmospheric pressure. One of the most interesting in the case of Android is Barometer and Altimeter and Thermometer.

As you can see, it is an app that offers several uses, not only the barometer, but we will focus on this. The barometer mode has the appearance of a classic one, with a meter in the hectopascal unit . Low pressures on the left and high pressures on the right. In such a way that the more to the right the needle points the better time it will hold . When it is the other way around and the needle points to the left, the weather will get worse as there are low pressures. We will also have the current reading in hectopascals in quite large numbers. In the case of iOS we also have numerous barometer apps, such as Barometer Plus, which also has a more colorful and visual interface. This also shows us with icons what to expect from the weather according to atmospheric pressures.

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  • This topic has 5 replies, 3 voices, and was last updated 4 years, 1 month ago by Gunnar H .

Benefits of various use of iphone 7 have been discussed. It also have a better pressure sensor than prevous models, actually quite good. Pick your choice of app and it is a good Altimeter/Barometer if you can live with battery life etc. And if you bring the phone anyway, it weights nothing.

My iphone 7 have for months constantly showed 1 mbar less than my Kestrel 5500 weather station. I bought the 5500 less than a year ago so it should even OK with calibration.

Locale: North Woods. Far North.

That’s good to know. That, the better camera and the greater water resistance might get me to change phones before I kill the current one (my usual MO).

Is there an app you like that fires up each hour or so, grabs pressure data and goes back to sleep? So one could look at air pressure trends overnight, while in camp, to help predict the weather? My mnemonic: “Gaining elevation without working for it is cheating. Cheating is bad. Bad weather is bad”. (i.e. if you’re “higher” the next morning without actually having moved, the air pressure dropped and low pressure systems typically generate more wind and precipitation).

I know it was just a typo, but the subject made me smile. In 2012 my in-laws were in China over my father-in-law’s birthday and, since he’s a huge Apple fan, my mother-in-law requested (in advance) an iPhone cake for him. Here was the result:

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

I had a bit time now to look at apps for data logging. This is the one i use mostly:

It has an old fashion interface that works well as barometer/altimeter. It doesn’t seem to be to tough on the battery. It also has data logging but this function is useless since it only collects data when active on the screen, and I haven’t found any settings to change that. It has not really been a problem though since I normally use my Kestrel for data logging. More battery efficient, whether resistant and I can get temperature, humidity, wind etc.

Looking now at data logging apps, this one can log barometer values but that is (almost) the only thing it can do, love it or hate it:

It works. I have no idea of battery drainage.

Barometer plus seems to have a working graph and settings where you can control data logging interval, set reference altitude, and even fine-tune calibration if have a good reference instrument. I have only used it a few minutes now but it seems to be a good (free) app

Being able to control data logging interval should hopefully help to mitigate battery drainage.

There apps that combines temperature, pressure and even humidity. Sounds great but I doubt it works well, Iphones have what I understand no humidity sensor and I have never managed to get good temperature reading out of a phone, it tends to generate its own microclimate. There are also loads of weather predicting apps that can show pressure, I think most of them require access to internet to work well but I haven’t looked into them. Many of them get good user ratings.

Btw if you have an Iphone 6 it could be worth testing, it should have a pressure sensor as well, but I don’t know about the quality.

Locale: North Woods. Far North.

Thanks for the reference on the apps. Something I’ve done for years with my analog Thommen altimeter is put it in a clear-topped water-proofed case and a tubing adaptor so I can use it as a wide-ranging pressure/vacuum gauge. So now my phone can serve that purpose as well as job-site camera, video, voice recorder, calculator, and contain the work plan, schematics, P&I D, etc.

You can even have a message delivered with a sad jingle when the barometer falls. Just fill your backpack with power banks and you’re good to go!

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Benefits of various use of iphone 7 have been discussed. It also have a better pressure sensor than prevous models, actually quite good. Pick your choice of app and it is a good Altimeter/Barometer if you can live with battery life etc. And if you bring the phone anyway, it weights nothing.

My iphone 7 have for months constantly showed 1 mbar less than my Kestrel 5500 weather station. I bought the 5500 less than a year ago so it should even OK with calibration.

Locale: North Woods. Far North.

That’s good to know. That, the better camera and the greater water resistance might get me to change phones before I kill the current one (my usual MO).

Is there an app you like that fires up each hour or so, grabs pressure data and goes back to sleep? So one could look at air pressure trends overnight, while in camp, to help predict the weather? My mnemonic: “Gaining elevation without working for it is cheating. Cheating is bad. Bad weather is bad”. (i.e. if you’re “higher” the next morning without actually having moved, the air pressure dropped and low pressure systems typically generate more wind and precipitation).

I know it was just a typo, but the subject made me smile. In 2012 my in-laws were in China over my father-in-law’s birthday and, since he’s a huge Apple fan, my mother-in-law requested (in advance) an iPhone cake for him. Here was the result:

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

I had a bit time now to look at apps for data logging. This is the one i use mostly:

It has an old fashion interface that works well as barometer/altimeter. It doesn’t seem to be to tough on the battery. It also has data logging but this function is useless since it only collects data when active on the screen, and I haven’t found any settings to change that. It has not really been a problem though since I normally use my Kestrel for data logging. More battery efficient, whether resistant and I can get temperature, humidity, wind etc.

Looking now at data logging apps, this one can log barometer values but that is (almost) the only thing it can do, love it or hate it:

It works. I have no idea of battery drainage.

Barometer plus seems to have a working graph and settings where you can control data logging interval, set reference altitude, and even fine-tune calibration if have a good reference instrument. I have only used it a few minutes now but it seems to be a good (free) app

Being able to control data logging interval should hopefully help to mitigate battery drainage.

There apps that combines temperature, pressure and even humidity. Sounds great but I doubt it works well, Iphones have what I understand no humidity sensor and I have never managed to get good temperature reading out of a phone, it tends to generate its own microclimate. There are also loads of weather predicting apps that can show pressure, I think most of them require access to internet to work well but I haven’t looked into them. Many of them get good user ratings.

Btw if you have an Iphone 6 it could be worth testing, it should have a pressure sensor as well, but I don’t know about the quality.

Locale: North Woods. Far North.

Thanks for the reference on the apps. Something I’ve done for years with my analog Thommen altimeter is put it in a clear-topped water-proofed case and a tubing adaptor so I can use it as a wide-ranging pressure/vacuum gauge. So now my phone can serve that purpose as well as job-site camera, video, voice recorder, calculator, and contain the work plan, schematics, P&I D, etc.

You can even have a message delivered with a sad jingle when the barometer falls. Just fill your backpack with power banks and you’re good to go!

by shyami | Jul 1, 2021 | Apps

Do you love hiking, skiing, mountain biking, and many more outdoor activities? You must feel the need for an altimeter to measure your elevation point. Here we discuss the Best altimeter apps Android/ iPhone 2021, which will measure elevation for you.

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

1. Accurate Altimeter Android / iphone

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

This is the best altimeter app, Android 2021, and it was created by AR Labs. This app will turn your mobile into a great altimeter. After installing this app on your device, you will get elevation measurements even when you are offline. It is the most downloaded altimeter app, and it regularly updates, and it is now with a great interface and great features. This app will estimate altitude with three different methods to get a reliable measure without an internet connection. This app will examine your historical chart to get your excursion elevation gain. This app will map your elevation and contour line and pick the elevation from any point on the map. Another method is by pictures with impressed place altitude and name. In this app, altitude can be estimated by satellite triangulation. This app is quite slow and less accurate, but it will work well with no internet. This app will take the ground elevation at your current position with the help of an internet web service. It will also measure altitude with the help of the pressure sensor of your device.

2. Travel Altimeter and elevation iPhone

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

This app is one of the best altimeter apps iPhone 2021, and with this app, you can check the altitude of any area where you are. It is a smart tracking app that is used to measure altitude. This is the perfect app for people who love hiking, skiing, mountain biking, and many more outdoor activities.

3 Terrain Radar Altimeter 2 iPhone

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

With this app, you can measure the elevation of each location with in the radius of 500m. With this app, you can discover the height of hills in front of you and can take a look a further away mountain. This app calculate in real time.

4. Altimeter Free Android

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

FFZ Sri presents you with another good altimeter app, and it is a professional-style altimeter app. This app will share photos of your excursion and walks. This app will detect the position and high altitude very accurately. With this altimeter app, you will be able to know that you are at what height. This app will also memorize the maximum height reached and is a very useful app for mountain hiking. You will also notice quality and precision at any time. This app uses both GPS and barometric sensors to detect elevation levels. This app will also allow you to see the altitude in feet and meters. This app also allows you to record the altitude trend over time, and you can see the realistic graph by tracking the weather forecast n the basis of barometric pressure. You can also take customized pictures and share them on Facebook, whatsapp, email, and many more social sites.

5. My Elevation by RDH Software Android

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

This app will tell you the exact elevation for your location and all location worldwide, and it has many more features. This app will follow your current location in real-time, and you can watch your movement on the map, and you can also see your elevation and coordinate updating as you move. Here you can also search for any location and the elevation of that area. This app will also tell you the weather in that area. You can also search the attraction point nearby the location. You will also get the option to bookmark places that you want to remember. With this app, you can also share your location with social sites app.

6. Altimeter and altitude widget Android

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

This is a great altimeter app by DS Software, and this app measures elevation based on barometric pressure and GPS; it is a great altitude tracker and widget and can be used in photography. With this altimeter app, you will be able to know that you are at what height. This app uses both GPS and barometric sensors to detect elevation levels. This app will also allow you to see the altitude in feet and meters. You can also take customized pictures and share them on Facebook, whatsapp, email, and many more social sites. This app will also memorize the maximum height reached and is a very useful app for mountain hiking. You will also notice quality and precision at any time.

7. GPS Altimeter – Get Altitude Android

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

EXA Tools created this great altimeter app, and with this app, you can check the altitude of any area where you are. It is a smart tracking app that is used to measure altitude. This is the perfect app for people who love hiking, skiing, mountain biking, and many more outdoor activities. This app will tell you elevation with high precision.

8. Altimeter Offline by Egea App Design Android

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

After installing this app in your device, you will be able you get elevation measurement even when you are offline. it is with great interface and great features. You can also share your location on facebook, whatsapp, email and many more social sites.

9.. Altimeter Plus by Plain Tap Android

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

This app will provide you better assurance and it will be fully functional even offline. This app also allows you to record the altitude trend over time and you can also take customized pictures and can share them on facebook, whatsapp, email and many more social sites.

10. Altimeter Android

How to use your phone as a barometer or altimeter

With this app, you can check altitude of any area where you are. It is smart tracking app which is used to measure altitude. This is perfect app for the people who love hiking, sking, mountain biking and many more outdoor activities.

So these are the Best altimeter apps Android/ iPhone 2021, which will measure elevation for you. Please like, share, and also comment us your altitude measuring experience.
Thank you