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What really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively

There are a wide variety of natural remedies to soothe your back, which can help reduce the intake of medications or provide an added benefit to your existing medical treatment.

Take a look at these natural pain-relieving strategies and find out what works best for you:

Read on to learn more about effective pain-relieving strategies for chronic back pain from natural methods.

Heat therapy can provide both pain relief and healing benefits for many types of lower back pain
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Benefits of Heat Therapy for Lower Back Pain

1. Enjoy an anti-inflammatory drink every day

When you consume anti-inflammatory foods regularly, several antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and even anti-cancer agents can build up in your blood. Over a period of time, these potent agents can play a significant role in reducing and/or eliminating inflammatory reactions in the body.

Consuming these healthy drinks on a regular basis may help reduce your back pain.

Turmeric milk

Turmeric, an Asian spice, contains antioxidant, anti-arthritic, and anti-inflammatory properties. 1 , 2

An easy method to consume turmeric is to mix a small quantity (1/2 teaspoon) of turmeric powder in a glass of warm milk. You can add honey or stevia to the milk if you prefer a sweet taste. Consume this drink, preferably just before bedtime to allow the anti-inflammatory process to work while you sleep.

Consuming dairy products may increase inflammation in some people. In such cases, trying plant-based milk, such as almond milk can be helpful.

Tart cherry juice

Cherries are rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents. 3 , 4 Cherry juice can help relieve muscle pain, which may be chronic or exercise-induced. 4 Cherry juice is easily available to buy at grocery stores and commonly contains the tart cherry extract. Try drinking a glass of cherry juice on a daily basis and see if it has positive effects in relieving your back pain.

Ginger-green tea

You can also try infused-herbal drinks, such as ginger-green tea, which contains the pain-relieving benefits of both green tea 5 and ginger. 6 Ginger-green tea bags can be purchased from grocery stores and you can easily enjoy a cup either at work or at home.

Over a period of time, these anti-inflammatory agents can build up in your bloodstream, so including these drinks in your daily diet will help reduce overall inflammation and prevent new inflammatory pain.

2. Fall asleep faster and sleep longer

When you have a restful night’s sleep, your back will feel less sore during the day. 7 A night of restorative sleep can have healing benefits and make you feel refreshed, rejuvenated, and less stressed.

Try these natural sleep aids, one at a time, to see which one works best for you:

  • Vitamins C and B6. The natural steroids in your body control your metabolism and promote good sleep. 8 , 9 Supplements of vitamins C 10 and B6 11 are known to help the body produce and regulate natural steroid hormones.
  • Melatonin. Your natural sleep hormone, melatonin can be taken as a supplement to improve your sleep cycle.
  • L-theanine. An amino acid found in tea leaves, L-theanine may help some people feel relaxed and get better sleep.
  • Valerian. Supplements made from the root of the valerian plant may help you sleep faster and stay asleep longer.

Another option is cherry juice or cherry extracts—cherries contain certain enzymes that help promote better sleep. 4

3. Avoid prolonged static posture

It is important to pay attention to the joints and muscles of your spine and hip. Prevent fatigue and stresses on these joints by following simple tips, such as:

    Avoid excessive sitting or consider using a standing desk while you work. When you sit for a long duration, the pressure on your spinal discs increase. Aim to get up every hour and walk a short distance to take the load off your discs.

Check your posture and adjust your neck, shoulder, and back alignment to prevent stresses on your spine. Poor, unsupported posture can lead to several problems in your back, causing or increasing the pain.

Rotate activities in order to avoid the same set of muscles and joints from getting over-fatigued. For example, if you have been standing and working for some time, consider changing to a different activity where you can sit down. You can go back to standing once the muscles and joints have had a chance to relax.

When you have a flare-up of symptoms, consider less exertive activities, such as reading a book, listening to music, or crafting. These activities can help divert your mind from the pain and let your back rest at the same time.

4. Gently stretch your joints and soft tissues through yoga

Yoga is an effective way to stretch your back, improve the health of muscles and joints, enhance distribution of healing nutrients through blood circulation, and increase the flexibility of the spine. 12

When you start, perform the stretches slowly and advance only if you feel comfortable without pain. Gradually, you will be able to add more stretches to your routine. An ideal time for yoga is early morning—to help loosen your spine and also reduce stiffness and aches in your back.

5. Try mindful meditation

Meditation is a great way to improve concentration, release feel-good hormones (endorphins), and decrease anxiety and stress. Through mindful meditation, you can control the way your body perceives pain. 13

Find a quiet, dark room and meditate for 5 to 10 minutes in the morning. You can also try meditating before bedtime or while you take a break at work. If you don’t like to meditate, try simple breathing exercises—take 10 deep, slow breaths in a row.

6. Support your body in a warm pool

The buoyancy of the water lets you enjoy the benefits of exercise with less pain. Exercising in water also helps regulate the functioning of nerves and muscles, relieving pain. 14

If you prefer warmer pools, look into water exercise classes and hydrotherapy pools. Water therapy exercises are often done in water that is about 83 degrees to 88 degrees. Hydrotherapy pool temperatures are often more than 90 degrees.

7. Keep a self-activating heat patch handy

Heat patches that activate when in contact with the body are a great tool to carry during long drives or keep in your office desk/bedside table drawer. These heat patches activate quickly, can be worn inside your clothing, and provide a continuous supply of heat to relieve your back pain. Follow the package instructions and avoid wearing the patch for long durations to prevent skin damage. Some heat patches are also infused with medications for more effective pain relief.

Bonus tip: Consider taking a vitamin D3 supplement

If your doctor agrees, consider taking a vitamin D3 supplement. Vitamin D is essential for bone, neuromuscular, and immune system function. Taking a vitamin D3 supplement can help reduce back pain by increasing the absorption of calcium in your body and improving bone strength. 15

Finding the perfect pain relief technique is usually a process of trial and error, making it worth exploring various approaches. Try these natural pain-relieving strategies for your back pain and see what works best for you. Severe pain that is not relieved by self-care must be evaluated by a health professional for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan.

Chiropractic is a health care profession dedicated to the non-surgical treatment of disorders of the nervous system and/or musculoskeletal system. Generally, chiropractors maintain a unique focus on spinal manipulation and treatment of surrounding structures.

Many studies have concluded that manual therapies commonly used by chiropractors are generally effective for the treatment of lower back pain 1 , 2 , as well as for treatment of lumbar herniated disc for radiculopathy 3 , 4 and neck pain, among other conditions. 5

When patients with non-specific chronic low back pain are treated by chiropractors, the long-term outcome is enhanced by obtaining maintenance spinal manipulation after the initial intensive manipulative therapy. 6

Core Chiropractic Treatment

The core of chiropractic usually involves treatment of common lower back pain conditions through manual therapy:

  • Spinal manipulation and manual manipulation. 7 This type of manual manipulation refers to a high-velocity, short lever arm thrust that is applied to abnormal vertebra with the goal of improving functionality, reducing nerve irritability and restoring range of motion in the back. It is also commonly known as “chiropractic adjustment”.
    There is firm literature support for chiropractic treatment of lower back pain. Many of the published guidelines recommend chiropractic manipulation to be included in the treatment plan early in the care of lower back pain. 8 – 16
  • Mobilization. 7Chiropractic mobilization refers to low velocity manipulation, movement and stretching of the muscles and joints, with the goal of increasing the range of motion within those areas.

Chiropractic Treatment Plan

Goal setting for the chiropractic treatment plan is driven by the patient’s pain and disability issues and activity intolerance.

Consistent among all guidelines of low back pain treatment is the prevention of chronicity. The use of active care (care that is patient-driven such as exercise, activity modification, ergonomic modifications, etc.) is emphasized to accomplish this goal.

What really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively

Usually, the aging population complains of having aches and pains in their legs or neck, or lower back. Shockingly, today, the younger and middle-aged population complains of having unbearable neck or lower back pain that affects their normal healthy life.

Among youngsters, low back pain has become one of the main common reasons for visiting physicians. According to a recent study, about 4 million Australians, 16% of the adult population suffered from low back pain that occurred chronically.

The overall prevalence of back pain, after considering the age difference, in males was 16% and in females, it was 15%. Getting relief from back pain must help us to get back to work and be normal.

Maintaining good posture

Maintaining the correct posture throughout the day will prevent back pain from occurring again and again. Even standing, sitting, stooping, bending, and lying down demands good posture so that body movements require little effort.

Failure to maintain good posture adds strain on muscles and this leads to stress on the spine. Without your knowledge, poor posture can trigger problems with nerves, blood vessels, discs, joints, and muscles.

Consulting a physical therapist can help you to follow exercises that strengthen your muscles and understand the importance of healthy movements even while sitting or standing. Sometimes, the sleeping position also affects the spinal alignment. Good posture is important while lying down to sleep also.

Treating with ice and heat

Choosing between cold and heat therapy for getting relief from lower back pain depends on how quickly you feel relieved from pain.

For cold therapy, you can use a frozen towel or an ice pack as it prevents nerves from conducting pain signals. It also reduces the flow of blood to the spot where you feel the pain and helps to slow down the swelling. The cold therapy must be applied only for 20 minutes but it is safe to apply up to ten times in 24 hours.

Once the swelling subsides, change to moist heat therapy that brings in extra oxygen, increases blood circulation, loosens tight muscles, and facilitates healing. It prevents pain signals from traveling to your brain, decreases muscle stiffness, and penetrates your muscles better to ease the pain.

Sleeping adequatelyWhat really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively

Everyone needs adequate sleep between seven and nine hours to be mentally and physically fit. Quality sleeping hours are important when we are getting back to our normal health after a period of pain or illness.

Getting sufficient healthy, restorative sleep will help us to manage back pain effectively. It is only during restorative sleep, the healing process happens in our body, and it is the right time for the spine to undergo self-repair.

With consistent low back pain, getting good sleep is impossible. But, still, there are ways to progress into restorative sleep. The best sleeping position is to lie down on your side with your knees bent partially. With a little pillow between your bent knees, it will reduce the pressure on the spine and let you have a good sleep.

Avoiding static posture

To be in a prolonged static posture can induce back pain. Avoid placing stress on hip and spine joints and muscles. Sitting in the same place for long hours may increase the pressure on the spinal discs. Spare some minutes to get up and walk a while to relax your spinal discs.

At the same time, if you have been standing and working continuously, take time to sit and relax for a while. Allow your joints and muscles to relax and be without stress.

Getting relief in water pool

Water therapy exercise is another easy way to get relief from chronic low back pain. These exercises, specifically designed, based on the condition of the individuals, strengthen muscles and avoid recurrence of back pain in the future. Water acts as the pain reliever as the pressure from the water makes exercises easy without pain.

Floating or standing pool exercises and swimming are some of the low-impact therapy that will strengthen your muscles and provide support to your spine. Water exercise improves the quality of life, relieves pain, and handles back pain with ease. It also regulates the functions of muscles and nerves and relieves pain. Water therapy exercises are done in a water pool with the temperature ranging from 28 to 31 degree Celsius.

Following medical prescriptionsWhat really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively

Non-specific back pain goes away usually after a while on its own. If low back pain keeps on returning or lasts for a long time, medicines can help you to get relief from back pain. It is better to get an appointment with your doctor and be examined properly. After examination, the doctor may request you to have imaging tests like an MRI or X-ray and also prescribe medication for your low back pain.

The doctor may prescribe muscle relaxants, topical pain medications, and injections. Muscle relaxants help to relieve painful back pain. Applied directly to the area that hurts you, creams and ointments may help to get instant relief. Pain killers are also prescribed in addition to physical therapy that involves exercises or massage.

Meeting physical therapist/osteopath

Usually, your doctor may recommend you for an appointment with a physical therapist, who may help you to get relief from low back pain through simple exercises, in addition to medicines.

Some people prefer to get an appointment with an osteopath. They use manual techniques such as massage and manipulation to reduce back pain and prevent them from occurring again.

It is worth having in mind, manual therapies and exercises are only a part of treatment for back pain. You will manage back pain better if you include both medical treatment and other therapies in your treatment regime.

Conclusion

Finding out the best pain relief technique for your back pain may be the main concern. Along with your exercises from the physical therapist, intake of medicines is also important.

Non-specific low back pain is common in industrialized countries among young adults. Though low back pain is lower in adolescents and children, it slowly increases between the age group from 35 to 55. As this population gets older, the prevalence of low back pain may also increase.

What really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively

Liam Neeson is a content marketing strategist at One Path Osteopathy, helping businesses to maximize their lead generation opportunities.

What really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively

Hanging upside down works for Batman. But does it have health benefits for non-superheroes?

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Inversion tables — which suspend a person upside down — are said to relieve back pain by taking pressure off the spine. Whether or not they work is another question.

Pain management specialist Haren Bodepudi, MD, explains what the science says and what you should know before you fall heels-over-head in the name of pain relief.

Inversion table benefits

Inversion therapy is also known as spinal traction. Inversion tables allow you to strap yourself in and tilt backward at an angle or completely upside down.

The theory behind it is simple: Hanging upside down can take the pressure off the nerves of the spine and give the squishy disks between the vertebrae room to relax. Fans of inversion therapy say it can relieve problems including:

  • Low back pain.
  • Muscle spasms.
  • Sciatica.

But inversion tables aren’t a slam-dunk for back pain. “The research is mixed,” Dr. Bodepudi says. “Some studies have found it can provide relief for some patients, but others haven’t found any benefit.”

And some people should definitely not try it. Hanging upside down can increase your blood pressure, so steer clear if you’re pregnant, have high blood pressure, heart disease or eye diseases such as glaucoma. And if you have acid reflux, tilting backward could make symptoms worse.

How to use an inversion table

If you think it’s worth a try, consider these pointers to stay safe:

  • Talk to your doctor: “Since inversion therapy isn’t safe for everyone, talk to your physician to make sure you can use it safely,” Dr. Bodepudi says.
  • Try it out in therapy: Physical therapists sometimes use inversion therapy in their practice. You might want to try it out in PT before you invest in a table for home.
  • Have a spotter: Make sure someone else is around the first time you try it, in case you need help getting right side up again. You don’t want to get stuck with your feet in the air.
  • Go small: To begin, spend just 30-to-45 seconds tilted backward, Dr. Bodepudi recommends. “It takes time to adjust to inversion therapy, so start with shorter increments,” he says. “If you don’t experience any dizziness or worsening pain, you can work your way up to longer stretches, as much as five minutes at a time.”
  • Don’t overdo it: You don’t need to go fully vertical or spend lots of time to get benefits. Though studies found mixed results, research suggests that three minutes at a 60-degree tilt is the sweet spot for inversion therapy, Dr. Bodepudi notes.
  • Don’t expect instant results: Some people find quick short-term relief from pain. But longer-term benefits could take as long as eight weeks to appear, so be patient, he says.

Other back pain relief options

Not everyone has the money or space in their home for an inversion table. But you can achieve similar spinal traction with stretches and yoga poses that ease pressure on the spine, Dr. Bodepudi says.

Consider inversion therapy one of many tools in your toolkit. “I wouldn’t recommend inversion therapy by itself for treating back pain,” he says. “But it’s something you might try in combination with other therapies, such as over-the-counter pain medications, physical therapy, yoga, and at-home stretching and core-strengthening exercises.”

In other words, inversion isn’t likely to be a silver bullet for your back woes. But as part of a multipronged strategy to treat back pain, it might just help.

Back muscle knots, also known as myofascial trigger points, are small, “bumpy” muscle areas that occur when muscle fibers or the bands of tissue called fascia underneath them – tighten up, contract, but do not release.

What really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively

These trigger points can irritate the nerves around them and cause referred pain anywhere horizontally or vertically in your lower body.

Can you speed up the healing of muscle knots – naturally?

YES. Here you’ll quickly find out the best ways to do that.

What Does a Muscle Knot Look and Feel Like?

Muscle knots (hypertonicity) can usually be felt under the skin.

When you press them, the pain gets worse. Muscle knots are often a bit swollen and feel hard when you touch them.

If you have an active trigger point, the area causes pain even when you don’t touch it.

If you have a latent trigger point, it is only painful when you press on it.

👉 The most common area of muscle knots is the trapezius muscle, which starts in the neck and goes to the middle of the back and shoulders, forming a trapezium shape.

Here’s a video showing how a muscle knot looks like:

What Causes Back Muscle Knots?

Common causes of muscle knots include:

  • Poor posture (caused by sitting most of the day)
  • Stress and tension
  • Injuries (Lime improper weight lifting, or repetitive moves)
  • Muscle spasms
  • Too much bed rest or sitting without stretching

The 3 Best Home Treatments for Back Muscle Knots

I know the pain from a trigger point can be awful, but please consider letting go of the pain killer and try these natural and quick natural home treatments to quickly loosen a muscle knot:

1. Trigger Point Self-Massage Tools

Using a self-massage took for myofascial trigger points is scientifically proven to effectively relieve muscle knots – without any side effects.

Self-massage tools are easy to use, are low cost, and can be used at home whenever you need them.

The most popular ones are the Body Back Body and the Theracane , both of them are recommended by physical therapists, massage therapists, and chiropractors.

👉 Both of them have about 10 knobs on them, which you use to apply pressure to your trigger points, relax the muscle knots, and boost blood circulation to promote healing.

Both of them are lightweight and easy to use.

What really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively The Theracane massager – check today’s price

How to Use Self Massage Tools to Release Trigger Points?

You simply hook the Body Back Buddy or the Theracane over your shoulder or around your side and hold it by the handles so that the knob touched your trigger point.

Then you push away from your body with your lower or outside hand while guiding the knob with the upper or inside hand.

Stick with a comfortable pressure for 10 to 30 seconds and return to the treated area 3 to 4 times each session.

You may be shocked to see how fast you’ll feel better, and after a few sessions, you’ll be able to move better, use your muscles, and even drive pain-free.

2. Trigger Point Foam Roller

Unlike a regular foam roller, t rigger point foam rollers are compact, heavy-duty foam rollers with different patterns on the surface for a variety of manipulations and applications.

They really put the regular foam rollers to shame. They won’t crumble apart after a few weeks of use and they can really be helpful for your sore muscles.

Simply lie down on the roller and move around until you feel the pressure on your muscle knot. Roll over the painful area for about 30 seconds and repeat 3 times.

The Grid Foam Roller (my personal favorite) comes with a great guide on how to use it on different parts of the body, which is very helpful.

3. Infrared Heating Pad

An infrared heating pad is probably the least known muscle knots reliever, yet the most effective one in my experience.

First, it’s highly effective. For me, it works every time, and you’ll have trouble finding even one person claiming that an infrared heat pad hasn’t helped relieve their pain – any kind of pain – without medication.

Second, it requires you to do…absolutely nothing.

All you have to do is take a 30-minute nap while you’re on it. Or read a book. Or watch television.

My Infrared heating pad (I also have a full-body mat) has made my home much more popular in the last few years.

(And now may be the time to get a little message through to my relatives – get your own!)

It can be used to relieve any type of pain, anywhere in your body, safely and naturally.

And, it has many other amazing uses (detox, weight loss, heart health, circulation problems, chronic illness, and more) which I’ve written about many times.

What Are Muscle Knots That Crunch With Massage?

According to a massage therapist I spoke to, a muscle knot that feels like it “crunches” when you massage it is the muscle fascia “slipping” past the skin with enough friction to catch and release repeatedly.

How about you? what’s the most effective muscle knots reliever you ever tried?

To your health and happiness,

What really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively

Lower back pain is the absolute worst. The throbbing pain can be dull enough just to let you know that it is there and will continue to annoy you. Or, it can be sharp, intense pains that will have you not being able to walk for an uncertain amount of time.

There are a lot of individuals that suffer from back pain on a daily basis. When trying to treat this condition, there is not a one-size-fits-all cure. There are several different tricks that you will probably have to use in order to help heal your lower back pain. Here are eight of the easiest methods around to try to relieve your lower back pain.

1. COLD COMPRESSES AND HEATING PADS

As soon as you feel the lower back pain beginning, it is important to grab a cold compress immediately and begin icing the area. Most people will actually grab a heating pad instead but this is a mistake. The cold compress will begin to stimulate a numbing effect and this will prevent the muscles in your lower back to swell any further.

What really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively

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Back pain is considered chronic if it lasts three months or longer. It can come and go, often bringing temporary relief, followed by frustration. Dealing with chronic back pain can be especially trying if you don’t know the cause.

Back pain rehabilitation specialist Andrew Nava, M.D. , offers insights into common chronic back pain causes and nonsurgical treatment options—and advises not to give up hope.

Common Causes of Chronic Back Pain

Chronic back pain is usually age-related, but can also result from a prior injury. The most common causes include:

  • Arthritis of the spine —the gradual thinning of the cartilage inside the spine
  • Spinal stenosis —narrowing of the spinal canal that may lead to nerve pain
  • Disc problems, such as a herniated or bulging disc
  • Myofascial pain syndrome—unexplained muscle pain and tenderness

In some cases, it’s difficult to pinpoint the cause of chronic back pain. “If your doctor has exhausted all diagnostic options, it’s time to seek a second opinion from a back pain specialist,” recommends Nava. It’s important not to make rushed decisions or undergo extensive medical procedures until the origin of the pain is found. Not only may they not help; they could make the pain worse, warns Nava.

If the source of the pain is not known or can’t be treated, your best option may be to work with your doctor on reducing the flare-ups and making the pain manageable with nonsurgical treatments.

Nonsurgical Treatments for Chronic Back Pain

Physical Therapy

Exercise is the foundation of chronic back pain treatment. It’s one of the first treatments you should try under the guidance of your physician and spine physical therapist. However, the same set of exercises doesn’t work for everyone, says Nava. The exercises have to be tailored to your specific symptoms and condition. Maintaining the exercise routine at home is also a big part of success.

Physical therapy for chronic back pain may include:

  • Retraining your posture
  • Testing the limits of pain tolerance
  • Stretching and flexibility exercises
  • Aerobic exercises
  • Core strengthening

Mindfulness and Meditation

Chronic back pain is straining both physically and emotionally. To manage the frustration, irritability, depression and other psychological aspects of dealing with chronic pain, you may get referred to a rehabilitation psychologist. This specialist may recommend meditation, yoga, tai chi and othercognitive and relaxation strategies to keep your mind from focusing on pain

Some diets are highly inflammatory, especially those high in trans fats, refined sugars and processed foods. Consult with your doctor to see if your diet could be contributing to your chronic back pain and how you could change it. Maintaining a healthy weight could also help lessen your back pain by reducing the pressure on your spine.

Lifestyle Modifications

When you have chronic pain, it’s important to accept your limitations and adapt. “Listen to your body and learn to pace yourself,” suggests Nava. Take a break when mowing the lawn, or make several trips when carrying groceries. Take note of the activities that worsen your pain and avoid them if possible. Not only could this help your back feel better, it could also prevent the underlying condition from advancing. Another important lifestyle change to try is giving up smoking. Nicotine is scientifically known to accentuate pain and delay healing.

Injection-based Treatments

Nerve blocks, epidural steroid injections, nerve ablations and other types of injection-based procedures are available for chronic back pain. They are used when the source of the pain is known and can sometimes help rule out certain causes if the treatment doesn’t work. Injections may stop or lessen pain for a certain period of time, but are not intended as long-term solutions and shouldn’t be used in isolation.

Alternative Treatments

Acupuncture, massage, biofeedback therapy, laser therapy, electrical nerve stimulation and other nonsurgical spine treatments can also make a difference for chronic back pain. Talk to your spine specialist about alternative treatments that could benefit you.

Pharmacologic Treatments

Analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants and other medications can be used to help control chronic back pain. However, most come with unwanted side effects and are not intended for prolonged use.

“Opioid medications generally shouldn’t be used as the first, the only or the long-term line of treatment for chronic back pain,” recommends Nava. Many of them are addictive and don’t address the underlying cause of your pain. Opioids should be prescribed only after a thorough exam by a specialist and if other drugs have failed to provide relief. If you find yourself relying on opioids to get through the day, it may be time to seek a second opinion.

When is Surgery a Good Idea for Back Pain?

These red flags can be indicators for surgery, if they’re found to be related to your spine condition:

  • New or progressing bowel/bladder issues
  • Weakness in limbs
  • Gait and balance problems
  • Evidence of increased (brisk) reflexes

Surgery can also be an option for chronic back pain if there is a known cause confirmed by imaging and if other treatments didn’t help. “Get opinions from at least two surgeons,” suggests Nava, “as pain can still come back after the surgery.”

Back muscle knots, also known as myofascial trigger points, are small, “bumpy” muscle areas that occur when muscle fibers or the bands of tissue called fascia underneath them – tighten up, contract, but do not release.

What really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively

These trigger points can irritate the nerves around them and cause referred pain anywhere horizontally or vertically in your lower body.

Can you speed up the healing of muscle knots – naturally?

YES. Here you’ll quickly find out the best ways to do that.

What Does a Muscle Knot Look and Feel Like?

Muscle knots (hypertonicity) can usually be felt under the skin.

When you press them, the pain gets worse. Muscle knots are often a bit swollen and feel hard when you touch them.

If you have an active trigger point, the area causes pain even when you don’t touch it.

If you have a latent trigger point, it is only painful when you press on it.

👉 The most common area of muscle knots is the trapezius muscle, which starts in the neck and goes to the middle of the back and shoulders, forming a trapezium shape.

Here’s a video showing how a muscle knot looks like:

What Causes Back Muscle Knots?

Common causes of muscle knots include:

  • Poor posture (caused by sitting most of the day)
  • Stress and tension
  • Injuries (Lime improper weight lifting, or repetitive moves)
  • Muscle spasms
  • Too much bed rest or sitting without stretching

The 3 Best Home Treatments for Back Muscle Knots

I know the pain from a trigger point can be awful, but please consider letting go of the pain killer and try these natural and quick natural home treatments to quickly loosen a muscle knot:

1. Trigger Point Self-Massage Tools

Using a self-massage took for myofascial trigger points is scientifically proven to effectively relieve muscle knots – without any side effects.

Self-massage tools are easy to use, are low cost, and can be used at home whenever you need them.

The most popular ones are the Body Back Body and the Theracane , both of them are recommended by physical therapists, massage therapists, and chiropractors.

👉 Both of them have about 10 knobs on them, which you use to apply pressure to your trigger points, relax the muscle knots, and boost blood circulation to promote healing.

Both of them are lightweight and easy to use.

What really works how to relieve lower back pain effectively The Theracane massager – check today’s price

How to Use Self Massage Tools to Release Trigger Points?

You simply hook the Body Back Buddy or the Theracane over your shoulder or around your side and hold it by the handles so that the knob touched your trigger point.

Then you push away from your body with your lower or outside hand while guiding the knob with the upper or inside hand.

Stick with a comfortable pressure for 10 to 30 seconds and return to the treated area 3 to 4 times each session.

You may be shocked to see how fast you’ll feel better, and after a few sessions, you’ll be able to move better, use your muscles, and even drive pain-free.

2. Trigger Point Foam Roller

Unlike a regular foam roller, t rigger point foam rollers are compact, heavy-duty foam rollers with different patterns on the surface for a variety of manipulations and applications.

They really put the regular foam rollers to shame. They won’t crumble apart after a few weeks of use and they can really be helpful for your sore muscles.

Simply lie down on the roller and move around until you feel the pressure on your muscle knot. Roll over the painful area for about 30 seconds and repeat 3 times.

The Grid Foam Roller (my personal favorite) comes with a great guide on how to use it on different parts of the body, which is very helpful.

3. Infrared Heating Pad

An infrared heating pad is probably the least known muscle knots reliever, yet the most effective one in my experience.

First, it’s highly effective. For me, it works every time, and you’ll have trouble finding even one person claiming that an infrared heat pad hasn’t helped relieve their pain – any kind of pain – without medication.

Second, it requires you to do…absolutely nothing.

All you have to do is take a 30-minute nap while you’re on it. Or read a book. Or watch television.

My Infrared heating pad (I also have a full-body mat) has made my home much more popular in the last few years.

(And now may be the time to get a little message through to my relatives – get your own!)

It can be used to relieve any type of pain, anywhere in your body, safely and naturally.

And, it has many other amazing uses (detox, weight loss, heart health, circulation problems, chronic illness, and more) which I’ve written about many times.

What Are Muscle Knots That Crunch With Massage?

According to a massage therapist I spoke to, a muscle knot that feels like it “crunches” when you massage it is the muscle fascia “slipping” past the skin with enough friction to catch and release repeatedly.

How about you? what’s the most effective muscle knots reliever you ever tried?

To your health and happiness,

Do you have lower back pain? You are not alone. Anyone can experience lower back pain at any time, even if you don’t have a prior injury or any of the risk factors. It is not always serious and can often get better on its own. But in some cases pain is your body’s way of telling you that something isn’t right.

Learn more about lower back pain and what causes it from rehabilitation physician Akhil Chhatre, M.D., who specializes in back pain in the Johns Hopkins Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

Why is lower back pain such a common problem?

The bottom part of your back typically has just five vertebrae — fewer than your neck and mid-back. And these vertebrae do a lot of heavy lifting! Your lower back is where your spine connects to your pelvis, bearing the weight of your upper body. This area experiences a lot of movement and stress, which may lead to wear, tear and injuries.

What are some common causes of lower back pain?

Arthritis of the Spine

Arthritis of the spine — the slow degeneration of the spinal joints — is the most frequent cause of lower back pain. All of us experience wear and tear as we age, and it is normal for your lower back to start acting up as you get older. As the cartilage breaks down between the spinal joints, surrounding tissues may become inflamed. The inflammation and the thinning of cartilage increase friction in the joints, which may cause pain in the lower back.

Back Injuries

A bad fall or a car accident can cause a lower back injury. But so can carrying a laundry basket up the stairs. Some back injuries can be sudden and traumatic, and some happen slowly over time. You may think that athletes and active people get injured the most due to their active lifestyle. “But this is not always the case,” Chhatre says. You are just as likely to tweak your back while bending over to pick up a sock from under the bed. It’s the everyday tasks, like holding a child, that may lead to back injuries when done improperly.

Herniated Discs

A herniated, or bulging, disc is a disc that has “spilled out” of its lining. This happens most frequently in the lower back. The injured disc may not always hurt. But even if it’s painless, its contents can press on or irritate nearby nerves, causing pain in the lower back and other areas.

Which lifestyle factors contribute to lower back pain?

There are three major lifestyle factors that may affect your chances of developing lower back pain:

  • Multiple studies have established a link between smoking and lower back pain. Smoking raises inflammation inside the body and hinders the body from healing itself.
  • Obesity is also associated with several types of chronic pain, including lower back pain. In people with high body mass index (BMI), the stress on the spine increases, contributing to even more wear and tear.
  • Your level of physical activity can also play a role in your lower back health. While a sedentary lifestyle could increase your risk of developing lower back pain, so can excessive or strenuous physical activity. Check with your doctor if you are unsure about your ideal level of physical activity.

Can lower back pain be related to weather?

If you feel like your lower back pain worsens on days when it’s cold or the weather is changing, you are not imagining things. Back pain can indeed be related to barometric pressure and outdoor temperature. Changes in pressure can sometimes cause pain in arthritic joints, including the spine. Muscles and joints in general react to the environment, which can make them stiffer and more likely to suffer an injury.

Could lower back pain be kidney pain?

It absolutely can. Kidneys are located on the back side of your body and kidney pain can sometimes feel like back pain. The only true way to tell the difference is to visit a doctor who can conduct a thorough examination.

What does it mean if lower back pain is shooting into legs?

Lower back pain can radiate to other parts of the body: up or down from its place of origin. Sometimes lower back pain can be on one side of the back, which is also normal.

If the pain is shooting from the lower back into one or both legs, it could be sciatica (nerve pain), but it’s not always the case. There are many parts in the lower back that may cause the pain to radiate into the legs, such as facet joints, sacroiliac joints, muscles or inflammation of the bursa.

Can lower back pain be a sign of something serious like cancer?

Lower back pain can be related to cancer. In fact, it is one of the first symptoms of prostate cancer when it metastasizes and creates lesions. Almost any cancer can spread to the back and some, like sarcoma, can originate in the back. Be cautious, especially if you are experiencing other symptoms besides lower back pain. Talk to your doctor if you have additional symptoms or concerns.

What can I do for low back pain at home?

If your lower back pain has just started, the best thing you can do is start a log. Record your symptoms, times, dates and which activities trigger the pain or make it worse or better. Take this information to your family physician if the pain doesn’t resolve on its own. It will make diagnosing the cause much easier.

Once you know which motion or position causes your lower back pain, try to avoid it and see if you get better. Icing the painful spot can also help. And so can over-the-counter pain relievers that help reduce inflammation. Just remember that pain killers treat only the symptom — pain — and not its cause.

When should I see a doctor if I have lower back pain?

In many cases lower back pain stops on its own. But if it doesn’t, here are some guidelines on when you may want to start seeking professional help:

  • If the pain lasts four weeks or longer
  • If the pain keeps getting worse as time goes by
  • If you are experiencing other symptoms, such as fever, major weight loss or weight gain, loss of function or weakness in extremities, bladder problems, etc.

Who should I see for lower back pain?

Your primary care physician knows you best and should be your first contact for lower back pain. If he or she is unable to diagnose or treat the issue, you may get referred to a specialist, such as a rehabilitation physician (physiatrist). These specialists practice a comprehensive approach to lower back pain, and can diagnose and treat a variety of conditions that have lower back pain as a symptom.

Later, you may get referred to a physical therapist, a chiropractor or another practitioner depending on the nature of your back pain. The good news is that surgery is rarely needed for lower back pain. “Only about one in ten patients needs lower back surgery,” Chhatre says.