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How to crochet a circle with increases

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

The Spruce / Mollie Johanson

  • Total Time: 30 mins
  • Skill Level: Beginner

There are lots of ways to crochet a circle, but making one that is not wavy or wonky can be a challenge. Fortunately, there is a basic formula that will keep your crocheted circle flat. This crocheted circle uses the method of joining with a slip stitch at the end of each round. The alternative would be to create continuous rounds that lead to a spiral pattern rather than a circle. It’s a fairly quick and easy method, depending on how large of a circle you plan to make. You can use flat crocheted circles to make a variety of items, including doilies, placemats, coasters, and rugs.

Watch Now: How to Crochet a Simple Circle

What You’ll Need

Equipment / Tools

  • Crochet hook

Materials

  • Yarn

Instructions

Round 1: Work Single Crochet Stitches to Form a Circle

Begin with a slip knot and then two chain stitches. Then, make six single crochet stitches into the second chain from the hook. Slip stitch to join the end of the round.

This circle begins with six single crochet stitches, but you can adjust that depending on the type of stitch you use. Use these general guidelines for the starting round:

  • Use six to 10 stitches in round one for single crochet.
  • Use eight to 12 stitches in round one for half double crochet.
  • Use 10 to 14 stitches in round one for double crochet.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Round 2: Work 2 Single Crochet Stitches in Each Stitch

For the second round of the circle, use two single crochet stitches per each stitch you already made. This will give you a total of 12 single crochet stitches for round two. (If you started with a different number of stitches, you should have twice as many stitches as round one.) Slip stitch to the first stitch to join.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Round 3: Work a Pattern of Single Crochet Stitches

For the third round, use two single crochet stitches for the next stitch, and then alternate between using one and two stitches. For a crochet circle that started with six single crochet stitches, you will end this round with 18 single crochet stitches. (For circles that started with other numbers of stitches, this round should have three times the number of stitches as the first round.) Slip stitch to the first stitch.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Round 4: Work Another Single Crochet Stitch Pattern

For the fourth round, use a single crochet stitch for the next stitch, then another single crochet stitch in the following stitch, and then two single crochet stitches in the next stitch. Repeat that pattern around the circle, and slip stitch to join to the first stitch.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Continue Growing the Circle

If you want to continue growing the circle, continue growing the pattern. For each round, add one more single crochet stitch before doing two single crochet stitches. For instance, to create the fifth round you would do a single crochet stitch in each of the first three stitches, followed by two single crochet stitches in the next stitch. And in round six, you would do a single crochet stitch in each of the first four stitches, followed by two single crochet stitches in the next stitch.

You can end your crochet circle as soon as it’s large enough for you. If you want a circle that has a more finished edge, then you can slip stitch in each stitch all the way around. You can also add a scalloped border or other edging.

October 4, 2015 By Kathryn Senior & filed under Crocheting Blog.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Crocheting a flat circle seems pretty straightforward: crochet in rounds, throw in some increases and — bam! — you’ve got a circle. Except, you might have something that’s a little misshapen and not actually a circle.

The good news is this problem is totally fixable. All you need are a few rules to help guarantee you get perfect circles every time.

1. Start With the Right Number

Your first round really sets the stage for success, so make sure you have the right number of stitches from the get-go. Too many stitches and you make waves; too few and you have a bowl.

Generally, the taller the stitch, the more stitches you need in your first round. A few guidelines to keep in mind:

  • Single crochet: Use 6-8 stitches in round 1
  • Half double crochet: Use 10 stitches in round 1
  • Double crochet: Use 12-14 stitches in round 1

Get my FREE guide »

2. Nail the Magic Increase Formula

To make your circle grow just enough without getting too big around the edge, you need to know how many times to increase and where to increase each round. Luckily, this is the same whether you’re making a crochet circle using sc, hdc or dc stitches.

Pro Tip: You must start with the recommended number of stitches laid out above if you want this formula to work its magic.

  • Round 1: Start with the recommended number of stitches listed above.
  • Round 2: Make 2 stitches into each stitch of Round 1 (you’re increasing in every stitch).
  • Round 3: Make 2 stitches into the first stitch of the previous round, 1 stitch into the next. Repeat this pattern around (you’re increasing every other stitch).
  • Round 4: Make 2 stitches into the first stitch of the previous round, then 1 stitch into each of the next 2 stitches. Repeat this pattern around (you’re increasing every third stitch).
  • Round 5: Make 2 stitches into the first stitch, then 1 stitch into each of the next 3 stitches. Repeat this pattern around (you’re increasing every fourth stitch).

With every round, you work one more regular stitch between your increase stitches. By Round 10, for example, you’d make 8 single stitches between each increase.

Now, what does this actually look like? See below how to work a flat circle in double crochet.

Rounds 1 and 2

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Start with a magic ring. Make 3 chains and 12 dc into the ring, which will give you 13 stitches in Round 1, shown on the left in the photo above.

For Round 2, make a dc into one of the dc stitches in Round 1. Work a second dc into the same stitch and complete the round making 2 dc into every stitch.

By working 2 stitches into every stitch, you’ve doubled your stitches in Round 2. You now have 26 stitches.

Rounds 3 and 4

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

In the photos above, the increase stitches are highlighted with green Vs and the single stitches are shown in bright pink lines. In Round 3, shown on the left, there is an increase every other stitch. In Round 4, shown on the right, there are two single stitches between each increase.

Keep Counting

An easy way to make sure you’re on track in each round is to count your stitches. Remember, you’re increasing by the same number of stitches you started with in Round 1. So, because our example started with 13 dc, each subsequent round increases by 13 stitches.

  • Round 2: 26 (13 sts from previous round + 13 sts increased)
  • Round 3: 39 (26 + 13)
  • Round 4: 52 (39 + 13)
  • Round 5: 65 (52 + 13)
  • Round 6: 78 (65 + 13)

Give Spirals a Go

There’s another method for crocheting flat circles, used primarily in amigurumi: instead of joining each round and making a complete ring, you work in an ever-growing spiral pattern. The same formula for increasing applies.

How to Fix Mistakes

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Although the above tips will give you perfect, flat circles 95 percent of the time, there’s still a chance things can go wrong. After all, your tension could be off, or you could accidentally repeat a row or forget a few increases. When that happens, you may find yourself with a wonky-looking circle. Here’s what to do in each situation.

The Potato Chip

Compared to the flat circle in the center, the one at the top right looks super ruffled — that’s the potato chip effect. This is what happens if there are too many stitches around the outside of your growing circle. In this example, rounds 1 and 2 are correct, but the others have too many increases.

If your circle shows signs of ruffling, try pulling back a couple of rounds and skip a round. For instance, you could pull back to round 4, then crochet round 6 instead of round 5 before carrying on. Because you’re skipping a set of increases, you’ll have fewer stitches and hopefully a flatter edge.

The Bowl

The example on the top left shows what happens if you complete rounds 1 and 2 correctly, but then continue without increasing at all. The sides curl up, beginning the formation of a bowl or basket. When this happens, try repeating the round you’ve just finished. So if you’re on round 5, work another round 5 before going on to round 6. Problem solved!

December 5, 2019 by Ashleigh

Learn how to crochet a flat circle with my free pattern and video tutorial!

Scroll down for the free written instructions and video tutorial or read more below about how to crochet flat circles.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

You got skills!

Skills, they’re the building blocks of knowledge. Right? Learning how to crochet a flat circle is one tool that every crocheter should have in their toolbox.

Crocheting a flat circle can come in handy when crocheting just about anything – often you’ll need to know how to crochet a flat circle to begin a crochet hat, to crochet amigurumi toys, to make baskets and other items. This technique is a very useful one to know as a beginner crocheter or for perfecting your skills to work on designing your own pieces.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Increasing the number of techniques you can utilize when crocheting makes following creative patterns more fun! Sometimes when reading a pattern or watching a video tutorial, the teacher may rush through how to crochet a flat circle as part of the project. So it’s really helpful to be able to understand how that shape is made and do it on your own!

Learning how to crochet a flat circle is just one of many techniques every crocheter should know, others include how to keep straight edges in crochet and how to change color in crochet.

What to make with flat circles

Once you’ve mastered how to crochet a flat circle you can put those skills to good use to make all sorts of projects.

I’ve rounded up some of my own favorite patterns using flat circles in the construction for you to peruse. Some of these projects have very obvious flat circle components but others are more hidden!

Just click the links to see the free patterns.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

The Yarn

In this video tutorial I use Lion Brand Wool Ease Thick & Quick – one of my all-time favorite yarns! It’s great for myriad projects but also for learning new stitches and techniques, like how to crochet a flat circle!

Wool Ease Thick & Quick comes in a ton of beautiful colors and my favorite is the color I used called Fisherman. It’s a stunning off-white that’s not too yellow. It’s a beautiful cream color that fits just about everyone’s taste!

Shop the Wool Ease Thick & Quick yarn here.

How to Crochet a Flat Circle PATTERN

MATERIALS

-Any yarn and corresponding hook size

I used Lion Brand Wool Ease Thick & Quick yarn in the color Fisherman and a K 6.5mm crochet hook

-Stitch marker (a bobbi pin or spare piece of yarn in another color works fine for this)

NOTES

-See abbreviations below the written instructions.
-Place a stitch marker in the first stitch of each round. Be sure to move it up when you begin each round.
-Numbers within indicate the number of final stitches in that round. Be sure to double check your stitch counts so that you make sure you are on track to make a perfect flat circle.
-This pattern creates a circle working in continuous rounds without a seam. If you wish to join your rounds simply slip stitch at the end of each round and chain 1 stitch.
-When the pattern reads “inc, sec 2; rep around” that means: increase (two single crochets in the same stitch) once, single crochet in each of the following two stitches, repeat this entire sequence over and over until you’ve finished the round.
-Save this page to your Pinterest board if you need to watch it often to remember how to make a flat circle.

Video Tutorial:

Written instructions:

Make a magic ring

Round 1: Ch 1, 6 sc into magic ring

Round 2: Inc around

Round 3: Inc, sc; rep around

Round 4: Inc, sc 2; rep around

Round 5: Inc, sc 3; rep around

Continue on in this method by adding one extra sc after the increases and make the flat circle as large as you like – it could keep going forever! I’ll take you through Round 10 here in the written instructions so you can get the hang of it.

Round 6: Inc, sc 4; rep around

Round 7: Inc, sc 5; rep around

Round 8: Inc, sc 6; rep around

Round 9: Inc, sc 7; rep around

Round 10: Inc, sc 8; rep around

Abbreviations (US Terms):

inc – increase (2 single crochets in the same stitch)

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Crocheting a circle is very similar to crocheting a hexagon. Unlike the hexagon, the increases for a crochet circle are offset each even round so that the final crochet piece has a more round appearance.

The crochet circle has many applications in all areas. For Amigurumi the circle is used as ears, eyes, faces, noses and is the base for the most important 3-dimensional shapes like spheres and tubes used as arms, bodys, heads and more.

The circle is also perfect to crochet easy and simple potholders and coasters. Crocheted with a bigger yarn and/or crochet hook you can crochet ponchos, hats, round blankets and more.

The depicted circle has been crocheted with the “Schachenmayr Catania” yarn with a 2.5 mm crochet hook.

Circle Crochet Pattern

Needed Techniques

  • Magic Ring
  • Single Crochet Stitch (sc)
  • Increase

Needed Materials and Tools

  • 2.5 mm Crochet Hook
  • Stitch Marker
  • Colors: purple
  • This pattern was crocheted using the „Schachenmayr Catania“ yarn (100% Cotton, Meterage: 125 m, Yarn Ball Weight: 50 g, Yarn Weight: Sport – 5ply / Fine (2)) in the following colors:
  • Fuchsia (128)

All materials used are available on Amazon (Affiliate Link):

Crochet Circle

Crochet the Circle in Fuchsia in spiral rounds with single crochet stitches.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Use the check boxes to mark your finished rounds, rows and steps.

  • Crochet the circle in spiral rounds in Fuchsia.
  • Round 1: 6 sc into the Magic Ring (6 stitches).
  • Round 2: [1 increase] repeat till end of the round (12 stitches).
  • Round 3: [1 sc, 1 increase] repeat till end of the round (18 stitches).
  • Round 4: 1 sc, 1 increase, [2 sc, 1 increase] repeat 5 times, 1 sc (24 stitches).
  • Round 5: [3 sc, 1 increase] repeat till end of the round (30 stitches).
  • Round 6: 2 sc, 1 increase, [4 sc, 1 increase] repeat 5 times, 2 sc (36 stitches).
  • Round 7: [5 sc, 1 decrease] repeat till end of the round (42 stitches).

Done is the crocheted circle. If you want to crochet a larger circle, continue with the pattern below.

If you want to crochet an even bigger circle, offset the increases each even round starting with the 4th round.

Crochet the next rounds for a larger circle:

  • Round 8: 3 sc, 1 increase, [6 sc, 1 increase] repeat till 5 times (48 stitches).
  • Round 9: [7 sc, 1 increase] repeat till end of the round (54 stitches).
  • Round 10: 4 sc, 1 increase, [8 sc, 1 increase] repeat 5 times, 4 sc (60 stitches).
  • Round 11: [9 sc, 1 increase] repeat till end of the round (66 stitches).
  • Round 12: 5 sc, 1 increase, [10 sc, 1 increase] repeat 5 times, 5 sc (72 stitches).
  • Round 13: [11 sc, 1 decrease] repeat till end of the round (78 stitches).
  • Round 14: 6 sc, 1 decrease, [12 sc, 1 decrease] repeat 5 times, 6 sc (84 stitches).
  • Round 15: [13 sc, 1 decrease] repeat till end of the round (90 stitches).
  • Round 16: 7 sc, 1 increase, [14 sc, 1 increase] repeat 5 times, 7 sc (96 stitches).
  • Round 17: [15 sc, 1 decrease] repeat till end of the round (102 stitches).

2. Single crochet (sc) 6 times into the second chain from the hook, slip stitch (sl st) into the first stitch to close the circle. Now you have your first round, a tiny circle with 6 stitches.

3. For your second round, chain 1, sc 2 times into each single crochet, and sl st into the beginning of the round. Now you have a circle with 12 stitches. For each consecutive round, the number of single crochets increases by one.

4. For your third round, chain 1, *sc 2 times into the first sc, then sc 1 time into the next sc, repeat from * to the end of the round. Sl st int the first stitch. Now you have a circle with 18 stitches.

5. For the next round, chain 1, *sc 2 times into the first sc, then sc 1 time into the next 2 sc, repeat from * to the end of the round. Sl st int the first stitch.

6. This next round chain 1, *sc 2 times into the first sc, then sc 1 time into the next 3 sc, repeat from * to the end of the round. Sl st int the first stitch.

7. For each consecutive round, the number of single crochets in bold above increases by one. (So the next round will be sc 1 time into the next 4 sc, then the next 5 sc, etc.) Continue in this pattern until you have the number of stitches you have in your round.

8. Fasten off and weave in ends.

About the shop

Lion Brand® Yarn Company is a fifth generation, family-owned business. We are passionate about helping people enjoy the pleasures of working with yarn. Lion Brand® yarns are sold online, at craft chains, discount chains and independent shops across the United States.

Learn how to crochet a perfect circle with this photo & video tutorial!

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

If you crochet a lot of circles – especially if you crochet amigurumi, baskets or bags – you may have found that when you work a standard circle increase, your circle doesn’t look like a perfect circle. Instead you can see little “points” where your increases are located throughout the circle. This causes your circle to look a little bit like a hexagon than a circle.

There is a great way to change up how you are crocheting your circle so it will be perfectly round without those points! I just recently learned this tip and want to share it with you.

I am constantly learning new things in crochet – techniques, stitches and tips that help my crochet projects look the best they possibly can. I always want to be open to these new techniques and I want to learn all the things – as I am sure you do, too!

When you crochet in the round you need to make increases every round so that your circle will remain flat. If you have trouble keeping your circle flat I will have another tutorial coming up that will show you how to keep your circle from forming a bowl or being too wavy – stay tuned for that! However, when you place those increases in the same place going up each round it creates these unsightly “points” which keeps your circle from being perfectly round.

Once you know how to do this you will be able to translate any pattern with a circle shape to this technique to eliminate this problem!

This technique works for all crochet stitches but is especially helpful with single crochet stitches.

I have created a video tutorial so you can see this technique in action! See the complete video tutorial below. Subscribe to my YouTube Channel to get notified whenever I post a new video.

To get free crochet patterns and get notified of future giveaways, sign up for my newsletter. I never share or sell your information to third parties — it stays private!

If you would like daily crochet inspiration be sure to follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, Twitter and Tumblr.

If you make any of my designs and share on Social media be sure to add #nanascraftyhome so I can see your amazing creations!

You may also like the following tutorials at Nana’s Crafty Home:

  • How to Crochet a Circle With Increases1. How to choose self-striping yarn cakes
  • How to Crochet a Circle With Increases2. Tapestry Crochet Tips & Tricks
  • How to Crochet a Circle With Increases3. How to add a border in C2C
  1. How to Choose Self-striping yarn cakes for a multi-cake project
  2. Tapestry Crochet Tips & Tricks
  3. How to add a border in C2C

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Learn how to crochet a Perfect Circle Tutorial Written Instructions

When you follow the basic pattern below you will find that your circle will end up looking like a hexagon

Rnd 1: MC, ch 1, 6 sc in MC (6)
Rnd 2: 2 sc in each st. (12)
Rnd 3: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next st,* repeat between * * to end. (18)
Rnd 4: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next 2 st,* repeat between * * to end. (24)
Rnd 5: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next 3 st,* repeat between * * to end. (30)
Rnd 6: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next 4 st,* repeat between * * to end. (36)
Rnd 7: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next 5 st,* repeat between * * to end. (42)
Rnd 8: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next 6 st,* repeat between * * to end. (48)
Rnd 9: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next 7 st,* repeat between * * to end. (54)

Instead of working your increase in the first st of every round, you will shift those increases every other round.

So your pattern will look like the following:

Rnd 1: MC, ch 1, 6 sc in MC. (6)
Rnd 2: 2 sc in each st. (12)
Rnd 3: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next st,* repeat between * * to end. (18)
Rnd 4: 1 sc in next st, 2 sc in next st, *1 sc in next 2 st, 2 sc in next st* repeat between * * to last st, 1 sc in last st. (24)
Rnd 5: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next 3 st,* repeat between * * to end. (30)
Rnd 6: 1 sc in next 2 st, 2 sc in next st, *1 sc in next 4 st, 2 sc in next st,* repeat between * * to last 2 st, 1 sc in last 2 st. (36)
Rnd 7: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next 5 st,* repeat between * * to end. (42)
Rnd 8: 1 sc in next 3 st, 2 sc in next st, *1 sc in next 6 st, 2 sc in next st,* repeat between * * to last 3 st, 1 sc in last 3 st. (48)
Rnd 9: *2 sc in next st, 1 sc in next 7 st,* repeat between * * to end. (54)

You will want to shift the increases on even rounds as it is easier to divide even numbers. For example, for round 6 you are working 4 sc st between each increase so to shift those increases for this round you would divide in half – 2 stitches worked at the beginning of your round and 2 stitches worked at the end of your round.

Really easy once you understand the logic of it – and you have a finished circle you can be proud of!

Use this same technique on any pattern and you will always have a perfect circle!

I hope you found this tutorial helpful – and let me know if there are other crochet tutorials you are looking for!

To begin a design that you work in rounds, you first have to create a center ring. The center ring is the foundation for all crocheted designs that are worked in rounds — just like the foundation chain you use when working in rows. The center ring is the circle created by several chain stitches joined together to form a circle, or it can be just a single chain stitch. This article shows you the two most common methods for creating the center ring, when you want to use each, and how to end a round and be in the proper position to start the next round. The two most frequently used methods are making a ring of chain stitches or working a round of stitches into one chain stitch.

Working stitches in the hole

The most common method for creating a center ring is to make a chain and close it into a ring with a slip stitch. You would use this method when your first round is made up of a fairly large number of stitches and you need the room in which to fit them, or if the design calls for an obvious hole in the center. The following steps show you how to create a simple center ring of 6 chain stitches:

2. Insert your hook into the first chain stitch you made, forming a ring (see Figure 1).

Figure 1: Making the center-ring chain.

3. Yarn over your hook (yo).

4. Draw the yarn through the stitch and through the loop on your hook, as Figure 2a shows.

Your center ring is now complete (see Figure 2b).

Figure 2: Completing the center ring.

The number of stitches in the beginning chain determines the size of the hole that the center ring creates as well as how many stitches you can work into the center ring. Make sure the ring is large enough to accommodate the number of stitches that you’ll be working in it. On the other hand, make sure it’s not so long that you have a big loose hole in the center. When you’re working a pattern, it tells you how many chain stitches you need for the proper size center ring.

After you make the center ring, you’re ready for the first round. Just as when you’re beginning a new row, you first have to determine the number of turning chain stitches that you need in order to bring your hook up to the proper level for the next round of stitches. (The number of turning chain stitches you need depends on the stitch you’re about to work.) Now here’s the really easy part about working with a center ring: Instead of inserting your hook into the actual stitches of the center ring, you just go through the center hole. The following steps show how to work single crochet stitches into the center ring:

1. Chain (ch) 1 to make the turning chain for single crochet (sc).

2. Insert your hook into the center ring (see Figure 3a).

Figure 3: Working a single crochet in the center ring.

3. Yarn over your hook (yo).

4. Draw the yarn through the center ring (refer to Figure 3b).

5. Yarn over your hook.

6. Draw the yarn through the 2 loops on your hook.

One single crochet stitch is complete (see Figure 4a).

Figure 4: Working a round of single crochet.

Continue to work single crochet stitches into the ring until you can’t fit anymore (refer to Figure 4b). The center ring will stretch somewhat, and you’ll probably be surprised at how many stitches you can fit in.

Working stitches in the chain stitch

The second most common method for creating a center ring is to work all the stitches for the first round in one chain stitch. You generally use this method when the design calls for a small hole in the center of the pattern or almost no hole at all. To start a center ring this way, you always chain 1 (this is what you work the stitches in) plus the number of stitches required for the turning chain, depending on which particular stitch you work in the first round. Follow these steps to work your first round of double crochet stitches into a chain stitch:

2. Chain 3 more for the double crochet (dc) stitch’s turning chain.

3. Yarn over your hook (yo).

4. Insert your hook in the fourth chain from the hook (see Figure 5).

This is the first chain stitch you made and becomes your center ring chain stitch.

Figure 5: Insert hook into first chain stitch made.

5. Work 1 complete double crochet stitch in the center ring chain stitch.

Continue to work double crochet stitches in the same chain stitch until you’re comfortable with the process. Figure 6a shows you how to begin the second stitch, and Figure 6b shows several completed stitches and growing.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Figure 6: Making first round of double crochet in center-ring chain stitch.

In this post today, I would like to share with you my go-to pattern to crochet a Simple Circle Granny Square.

This round afghan block is very easy and beginner-friendly. Moreover, it is really versatile, and I have been modifying it in many different ways to create animals, flowers, and fun Halloween Granny Squares.

The final size of my simple circle granny square is 5.5” (14 cm), which I find a great size for crocheting baby blankets, pillows, and many other projects that use granny squares.

I will be sharing some of these projects soon.

But for now, let’s dive into the free crochet pattern of the Simple Circle Granny Square!

Note: this post contains affiliate links. This means that if you purchase something through the links on my blog, I might earn a commission. This will not have any effects on the price you pay. For more info, please, see my Privacy Policy.

Download the pattern of the simple circle granny square as a print-friendly PDF file on Ravelry or LoveCrafts!

Materials

  • 4-mm (G/6 USA, 8 UK) Hook
  • DK Yarn in two different colors. For this tutorial, I used Paintbox Yarns Baby DK.
  • Tapestry Needle

Abbreviations (US Terms)

Ch – Chain
Dc – Double Crochet
Hdc – Half Double Crochet
Inc – Increase
MC – Magic Circle
Sc – Single Crochet
Sl St – Slip Stitch
St – Stitch
Yo – Yarn over

Special Stitches

Increase (Inc)
One increase consists of 2 sts crocheted into the same indicated st.

Magic Circle (MC)
To learn how to crochet the magic circle, please, check out this step-by-step tutorial.

Pattern Notes

  • If the pattern says “hdc 2”, it means that you have to crochet 1 hdc into each of the next 2 sts.
  • (…) – Repeat the instruction within brackets for the indicated number of times.
  • The stitch count is indicated within brackets at the end of each round’s instructions.
  • Join each round with a sl st between the last and first st of the round.

How to Change Color

When changing yarn color, my preference is to do it in the middle of a stitch.

  • Yo, insert your hook into the next st, yo, and pull up a loop.
  • Drop your currently used yarn (CA in the case of Round 4), and hold the new color yarn (CB) behind your work. CB is now your working yarn.
  • Yo with CB and pull yarn through all the loops on your hook.

The Crochet Simple Circle Granny Square measures 5.5” (14 cm).

Gauge

Using your 4-mm crochet hook, make a MC.

Round 1. Ch 2, hdc 11 in the MC. Join the round with a sl st into the first hdc. (11 sts)
Round 2. Ch 1, hdc inc 11. Sl st to join. (22 sts)
Round 3. Ch 1, (hdc inc 1, hdc 1) 11 times. Sl st to join. (33 sts)

You three rounds should measure 2.25″ (5.5. cm).

Simple Circle Granny Square – Pattern

With CA, make a MC.
Round 1. Ch 2, hdc 11 in the MC. Join the round with a sl st into the first hdc. (11 sts)

Round 2. [CA] Ch 1, hdc inc 11. Sl st to join. (22 sts)

Round 3. [CA] Ch 1, (hdc inc 1, hdc 1) 11 times. Sl st to join. (33 sts)

Round 4. [CA] Ch 1, hdc 1, hdc inc 1, (hdc 2, hdc inc 1) 10 times, 1 hdc. Close the last st with CC. Sl st to join. (44 sts)

Squaring the Circle

Round 5. [CB] Ch 1, sc 2, hdc 2, dc 1, dc inc 1, ch 2, dc inc 1. (dc 1, hdc 2, sc 3, hdc 2, dc 1, dc inc 1, ch 2, dc inc 1) three times. Dc 1, hdc 2, sc 1. Sl st to join. (13 sts on each side and ch-2 at the corners)

Round 6. [CB] Ch 2, dc 7. (In the ch-2 corner, [dc 1, ch 2, dc 1]. On the next side, dc 13) three times. [dc 1, ch 2, dc 1] into the last corner, dc 6. (15 sts on each side and ch-2 at the corners)

Round 7. [CB] Ch 2, dc 8. (In the ch-2 corner, [dc 2, ch 1, dc 2]. On the next side, 15 dc) three times. [Dc 2, ch 1, dc 2] into the last corner, dc 7. (19 sts on each side and ch-1 at the corners)

Round 8. [CB] Ch 1, sc 10. (In the ch-1 corner, [sc 1, ch 1, sc 1]*. On the next side, sc 19) three times. [Sc 1, ch 1, sc 1] into the last corner, sc 9. (21 sts on each side and ch-1 at the corners).

*When working the corners, make sure not to skip the first dc of the next side, which might hide behind your last sc.

Fasten off and weave in all your ends.

Your crochet Simple Circle Granny Square is ready!

I hope you liked this pattern and I’d love to see your version of it! Please, share it on Facebook or Instagram using the hashtag #raffamusadesigns

A crochet and knit blog

Are you a beginner crocheter? I believe you have seen all those round crochet stuff like coasters, mandala, and rugs. Did you ever wonder how to make a flat crochet circle?

The method to make a crochet circle that lays flat is really easy and once you understand it you can make anything you like, from a small coaster to a big area rug in any stitch you want!

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

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As I said, this method works with any stitch because it is just math! You have to make the correct number of increases in every round and your crochet circle will lay fat every single time.

Common flat crochet circle mistakes

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

If your circle usually looks like a potato chip, you have made too many increases.

If your circle usually looks like a bowl, you have made too few increases.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

The math

Don’t get scared on me, right now. This will be fairly simple.

Let’s make a circle with double crochet stitches. You preferably begin with a magic ring and make 12 dc in the ring.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

On the second round, double the stitches. Which means you will make 2 stitches in every stitch.

On the third round, make 1 dc in the first stitch and increase (make 2 dc) in the next stitch. Continue like this until you reach the end of the round and join with a slip stitch.

On the fourth round, make 1 dc in the next 2 stitches and then increase (make 2 dc in the same stitch). Continue like this until you reach the end of the round and join with a slip stitch.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

On the fifth round, make 1 dc in the next 3 stitches and then increase (make 2 dc in the same stitch). Continue like this until you reach the end of the round and join with a slip stitch.

On the sixth round, make 1 dc in the next 4 stitches and then increase (make 2 dc in the same stitch). Continue like this until you reach the end of the round and join with a slip stitch.

You see where I am going with this? In my mind, it looks like I am pushing the increases further on the round on every new round I am making. First, it was just one stitch, then two, then three and so on. You can continue in this manner for as many rounds as you like. If you count right and keep your tension even you will always get a flat crochet circle!

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

That also means that I am adding 12 stitches in every round. That is the original number of stitches I had in the first round. Easy way to remember, right?

I mentioned tension above, because on some occasions if your counting is correct your tension might not be, thus resulting in minor changes in the progress.

So, if your counting is correct (double-check, please) but your circle still looks a potato chip, it just means that at some point your stitches became too loose or you got confused and changed your crochet hook -with a bigger one- in the middle of your project.

And on the other occasion, if your counting is correct but your circle still looks like a bowl, it means that at some point your stitches became too tight or you got confused and changed your crochet hook -with a smaller one- in the middle of your project.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

There is an easy fix for both occasions. Rip it out and start again!

When you get comfortable with this method go and read my other article on how to make a perfect crochet circle. This mostly applies to single crochet circles but I have seen results on half double and double crochet stitches and I am always using it. It again involves some math but it really is just about rearranging some stitches in the space. Think it as home décor! You are just going to move some chairs around and your living room will look better! Easy…

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

That was it for today! What did you think of it? Did I explained it well or confused you even more? Ask away in the comments…

How to Crochet a Circle With IncreasesLearning how to increase and decrease stitches in crochet will enable you to make shaped pieces–if you want to make amigurumi, crochet in a circle or make garments, you will need to know how to increase and decrease. First up: How to Increase in Crochet!

Working a basic increase in crochet is super easy because you just do 2 stitches in the same stitch! If you are reading a pattern, it may call an increase “inc”. Other times, the designer will simply just tell you to 2sc (or 2 dc, etc) in the next stitch. Both mean the same thing: work 2 stitches in the same stitch.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

When an increase is worked at the beginning of a row, the work will slant to the right. This is a single crochet increase. Single crochet in the first stitch and then single crochet in the exact same stitch.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Want to know how to increase in crochet at the end of the row?! You guessed it… simply crochet 2 stitches in the same stitch. This will make the work slant to the left.

How to Crochet a Circle With IncreasesDouble crochet increases work the same way. You might remember that a new row of double crochet starts with a turning chain. This chain counts as the first stitch.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

So to increase in double crochet at the beginning of a row, the turning chain counts as the 1st stitch, then a double crochet is stitched in the first double crochet from the row below. If working an increase in the middle of the row, 2 double crochet would be worked in 1 stitch.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Similarly, a double crochet increase at the end of a row simply has 2 double crochet in the last stitch. Increases in other stitch lengths work the same way.

Easy peasy! You now know how to increase in crochet!

Circles are one of the key parts of amigurumi. You find them everywhere! Luckily, they’re very simple to make. Check out this formula and you’ll understand how to crochet a circle in no time.

As always, I’m using US terminology. A single crochet (sc) is equivalent to a UK double crochet – but this formula works with any stitch!

How to crochet a circle:

  • Starting the circle: Sc 6 stitches into a magic ring. Pull tight, and sl to first stitch to join. Mark the first stitch with a locking stitch marker. 6 stitches.
  • Round 1: Sc twice into every stitch. 12 stitches.
  • Round 2: *Sc, sc twice into next stitch.* Repeat from * around. 18 stitches.
  • Round 3: *Sc x 2, sc twice into next stitch.* Repeat from * around. 24 stitches.
  • Round 4: *Sc x 3, sc twice into next stitch.* Repeat from * around. 30 stitches.
  • Round 5: *Sc x 4, sc twice into next stitch.* Repeat from * around. 36 stitches.
  • Round 6: Sc in every stitch, until piece for five rows, or until piece measures desired size. Set aside.

Do you see a pattern?? I think you probably do. You increase ONCE every X stitches, where X is the round number. So, in round one, you increase in every stitch. In round four, you increase every fourth stitch. This creates a lovely flat circle, which can be as big as you need to make it. You can keep going and make big enough to cover your whole house!

But it’s more of a crochet octagon than a crochet circle?

Okay, you got me, Giotto. This formula does create increase lines which are visible in some yarns. To solve this, you can stagger the increases.

The key is to keep the correct number of increases every round. For example, in the fourth round, we increase one stitch in four. This usually looks like this:

sc sc sc increase sc sc sc increase sc sc sc increase

staggered increases might look like this:

sc sc increase sc sc sc increase sc sc sc sc increase

Note there are the same amount of stitches and increases, but instead of lining up neatly, they’re staggered throughout the work. This will prevent the little ‘lines’ you find so loathsome – but I usually don’t bother.

What can you do with a crochet circle?

Crochet circles are amigurumi essentials (which is probably why you’re on this website!). As well as that, you could:

  • Add spots in the centre of two crochet circles for yarny “googly eyes”.
  • Whip up a set of quick coasters for a friend in her favourite colours.
  • Size the yarn and hook way, way up and make a circular lap-blanket, or use cotton yarn to make a rug.
  • Sew two large circles together for a cushion.
  • Create a set of custom hot pans to match your dining room.

What have I missed? Tell me in the comments!

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How to crochet a round/ circle afghan. free pattern

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From when I posted the video on how to crochet a circle, a lot of viewers have been asking for the circle blanket pattern.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Although till now I didn’t manage to finish one ( I started one and never finished, then forgot about it and started another one and realised I have 2 incomplete round blankets).

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

So again I have decided to sit and write the pattern based on my latest work using circles in crochet, so it is a reference for me too when I want to start a real one again .

I hope you find the pattern easy to follow as I tried my best to keep it simple.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

As usual the yarn I use , my all-time favorite red heart soft yarn , their colors are just so unique, another brand which I also use at times is loops and threads or lion brand , not so much for the last one.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

I also usually use a hook half size or one size bigger than the recommended one, just to get the blanket as light as possible.

This post has no pictures for now but I’m putting the links to the videos to follow easily with the pattern.

Written pattern

make a slip knot.

ch 3, 11 dc in the circle, join (12).

ch3, 2 dc in the next st, 2dc in every st across, 1dc in the initial ch3 point, join (24)

ch3, 2dc in the next st, 1 dc in the following st, repeat from*till # 2dc in the last st, join (36)

ch3, 2dc in the next st, *1 dc in the next 2st, 2dc in the next st#, repeat, 1dc in the last st, join (48)

ch3, 2dc in the next st, 1dc in the next 3 st, 2dc in the next st, repeat, 1 dc in the last 2st, join

ch3, 2dc in the next st, 1dc in the next 4st, 2dc in the next st, repeat,1dc in the last 3st, join

ch3, 2dc in the next st, 1dc in the next 5 st, 2dc in the next st, repeat, 1 dc in the last 4 st, join

ch3, 2dc in the next st, 1dc in the next 6 st, 2dc in the next st, repeat, 1 dc in the last 5 st, join

ch3, 2dc in the next st, 1dc in the next 7 st, 2dc in the next st, repeat, 1 dc in the last 6 st, join

ch3, 2dc in the next st, 1dc in the next 8 st, 2dc in the next st, repeat, 1 dc in the last 7 st, join

ch3, 2dc in the next st, 1dc in the next 9 st, 2dc in the next st, repeat, 1 dc in the last 8 st, join

ch3, 2dc in the next st, 1dc in the next 10 st, 2dc in the next st, repeat, 1 dc in the last 9 st, join

repeat the same and keep increasing the dc st by one in every row till row/round 60 or till desired size achieved.

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Comments

Thank you,I have appreciated with getting lot of good and reliable information with your post.Thank You for sharing wonderful Blog.

Thank you for your interest in my post.

Why does it curl? Why am I doing incorrectly. Thank you

Check if your work is too tight or the number of double crochet in one round are correct.

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How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

How to crochet half circle, written pattern

So I had to adjust this post as some of you did not like how it was, now you’ll find the pattern all together below and here are the pictures explaining how to make the half circle.

You can always make a shawl out of this pattern or half circles blanket, even better, fruit slices like watermelon blanket, I’m giving you ideas ! right 🙂

The choice of yarn will be yours and of course the crochet hook is whichever recommended in the yarn ball label, of course you can always use half size or one size up if you want your project to be lighter in weight, faster to finish 🙂

one more thing, find the video tutorial now at the end of this post, for left handed people and also right handed.

How to crochet an easy head scarf

So few days ago, in the middle of some projects, it came to my mind what an easy project I do which is wearable and quick and fun to do, being stuck at home for this epidemy, I thank god that i have this hobby and creativity to make things rather than getting board and cursing everything around me 🙂

So this headscarf is easy and achievable within one hour, one of the few projects I’m posting under “1 hour crochet projects”.

So if you follow me for a while whether here or on youtube, you would know that I do the granny triangle differently when I do shawls or any similar project, so you see that you have straight lines forming a triangle shape instead of all the lines forming triangles.

Maybe some of you like it or may be not, depends on your preferences.

So without further due, scroll down to the written pattern if you didn’t skip the intro yet 🙂
The video .

crochet hook: 4MM

WRITTEN PATTERN

Ch4
Row 1 : 2dc in the 4th ch.

Row 2 : ch3, turn, 2 dc in the same st, 3dc in…

The granny square is a classic crochet motif that can be used to create all kinds of fun projects. In fact, it is often one of the first patterns a beginner learns to make when starting to crochet.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

The basic granny square is a classic crochet design for many reasons. It’s an easy-to-learn pattern that’s straightforward and repetitive. Granny squares are simple to make, and quick, too!

Granny squares can be worked using one solid color, or a different color for each round — which is a great way to use up smaller scraps of yarn. It’s easy to transform the look of a granny square by playing with color.

You can use granny squares to make crochet blankets, scarves, bags, tops, cardigans and a variety of other easy crochet patterns.

How to Crochet a Classic Granny Square

In this tutorial, I’ll show you my favorite way to make a granny square. The squares stay square and flat, and the corners stay nice and open.

This basic granny square can be worked using a solid color, or a different color for each round. You can make it with any weight yarn, and a corresponding crochet hook.

What you’ll need:

  • Yarn – I’m using worsted weight
  • Crochet hook – I’m using a size H or 5.0mm

Stitch Abbreviations:

This tutorial is written in US terms.

ch – Chain stitch

dc – Double Crochet

sl st – Slip stitch

Granny Cluster, or shell: A granny cluster is a special stitch that consists of a set of 3 double crochets, all worked into one stitch or space. The clusters are separated from one another with chain stitches.

Different Ways to Start a Granny Square

There’s more than one way to start a granny square. You can start with a crochet ring, or, for a tighter center, use a magic ring.

Start in a single chain.

Chain 3, and make the next stitches into the first chain stitch. All of the clusters in the first round will be made into the first chain stitch.

This technique is simple and fast, but it can be a little tricky to fit all of the stitches into one chain stitch.

Chain Stitch Foundation Ring

Chain 4 stitches, and use a slip stitch to join your chain into a circle. Then work your first round into the circle. This method is quick and easy, but will give you a more pronounced hole in the center of your square.

Magic Ring (aka Magic Circle)

If you want a tight center to your square with no holes, use the magic circle technique to start your granny square.

We’ll be using the chain stitch foundation ring for this tutorial, but feel free to use your favorite!

Basic Granny Square Pattern

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Foundation Ring:

Begin by making 4 chain stitches (ch). Make a slip stitch (ss) in the 4th ch from hook to join into a circle.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Round 1:

  1. Chain 3. (This counts as a dc.)
  2. In the foundation ring, work: 2 dc, 3 ch.
  3. Into the ring, work: (3 dc, 3 ch) three times.
  4. Join with sl st into the 3rd chain of the beginning chain stitches. (This completes the first granny cluster of the first round.)

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Round 2:

  1. Chain 4. (This counts as 1 dc plus 1 ch.)
  2. In the next 3-chain space (aka the corner space), work: 3 dc, 3 ch, 3 dc, 1 ch. Repeat two more times for a total of three times.
  3. In the last 3-chain space, work: 3 dc, 3 ch, 2 dc.
  4. Join with a sl st to the 3rd chain of the beginning chain stitches. (This completes the first granny cluster of the second round.)

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Round 3:

  1. Chain 3. (This counts as 1 dc.)
  2. Then into the same space, work: 2 dc, 1 ch (This makes the first granny cluster of this round.)
  3. Into the next 3-chain corner space, work: 3 dc, 3 ch, 3 dc, 1 ch.
  4. Into the next 1-chain space, work: 2 dc, 1 ch.
  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 around to the beginning chain. Join with a sl st to the 3rd chain of the beginning chain stitches.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Round 4:

  1. Chain 4. (This counts as 1 dc plus 1 ch.)
  2. Into the next 1-chain space, work: 3 dc, 1 ch.
  3. Into the next 3-chain (corner) space, work: 3 dc, 3 ch, 3dc, 1 ch.
  4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 in each of the remaining 1 chain and 3-chain spaces. (Stop at the last 1-chain space.)
  5. In the last 1-chain space, work: 2 Dc.
  6. Join with a sl st to the 3rd chain of the beginning chain. (This completes the last granny cluster of the round.)

Now that you know the pattern, you can keep adding rows to make the granny square as large as you like.

Repeat rounds 3 and 4 to add more rounds to your granny square, until you reach the desired size. You can finish off at any time.

Finishing the Granny Square

Once you have completed your last round, cut your working yarn, leaving a six-inch tail. Pull the yarn through the last stitch.

Use a tapestry needle to sew in the loose ends.

Have questions? Join the Facebook Group!

I hope this tutorial was useful for you! If you have any additional questions, feel free to join my Facebook Group. I created this group for you to share your pictures, WIPs, ask questions, and help each other out.

Learn how to crochet a flat circle using these simple rules!

All you need to do is follow this simple rules:

1. Start with the right number of stitches

If you start with too many stitches your work will become wavy, and if you start with too few your work will bunch up into a cup.

The taller the stitch you’re using the more stitches you need to start with:

– If you’re crocheting with single crochet start with 6 to 8 stitches.

– If you’re crocheting with half double crochet start with 8 to 10 stitches.

– If you’re crocheting with double crochet start with 12 to 14 stitches.

The number of stitches you start with may vary depending on your tension and the yarn you’re using.

2. Increase evenly on all rounds

Increase the same amount of times as the number of stitches in your first round.

Have the same number of stitches between the increases throughout the round.

For example, if you’re working with single crochet and started with 6 stitches your work will look like this:

Round 1: 6 single crochets into the Magic Ring (6st)

Round 2: increase on all stitches (12st)

Round 3: (1 single crochet, 1 increase) x 6 (18st)

Round 4: (2 single crochet, 1 increase) x 6 (24st)

Notice how on every round there’s one more stitch between the increases, and how the total number of stitches at the end of each round keeps increasing in multiples of 6.

And that’s all you need to know to crochet a flat circle with single crochet, half double crochet and double crochet! Use this technique when you want to make crochet flowers, bags, bowls, mandalas and even some amigurumi pieces where you want the finished project to stand upright!

A Law of a Circle for Crocheting in Rounds

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To learn to crochet in rounds doesn’t necessarily mean that we are going to study how to make a circle.

Crocheting in rounds means that you don’t need to turn the work at the end of the row in order to position your hook at the beginning of a new row.

Each round is a row worked until it meets itself. Once you get there you have to join the end of the row to its beginning. How? You have to use a slip stitch.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Learn to Crochet a Slip Stitch

Step 1: To join the end of the row to its beginning, insert the hook into the first stitch of the row from front to back. Wrap the yarn over the hook from back to front (see illustration).

Step 2: In one motion draw the yarn through the stitch and through the loop on the hook. Slip stitch is made.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Once you have an idea about crocheting in a round, you can crochet a triangle, square, hexagon, or octagon by varying the points of increases on each round. Why and how do we need to make all those increases?

It is just a matter of pure geometry. A chart shows four rounds (1st and 3rd – in black, 2nd and 4th – in red) total. You can see that each next round has a diameter greater than a previous one.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

To increase a diameter of a new round, we have to add stitches to each new round. It will keep a circle flat. A detailed explanation about reading charts, while crocheting in rounds can be found at the Crochet in Rounds page.

How many increases should we make in each row? As usually, there are a few RIGHT solutions for the same problem. Choose the one you like the best. Let’s learn to crochet a circle first.

Learn to crochet a flat circle. Variant # 1.

Below is a table, which presents a simple Law of a Circle data, to follow. It will keep your circle flat. A project begins with a ring of chain stitches. How many of them should be made? Pattern usually tells you. If you don’t have any pattern description, just follow the table data.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Round 1. Make a chain for height to start the next round (Column #3). Count that as first stitch. Crochet as many stitches in a ring as many of them are shown in the last column. (To add in each round). Slip stitch to join.

Round 2. Make a chain for height to start the round. Count that as first stitch. Total number of stitches which has to be added depends upon the type of stitch you crochet. For any type of stitches, their number has to be doubled to compare to the first circle: work two stitches in every stitch of the first round. Slip stitch to join.

Round 3 and every next round. Make a chain for height to start the round. Number of stitches to be added in a round is shown in the last column. Increases have to be evenly distributed among the stitches of the previous round. For example, for the third row: *work two stitches in the first stitch, than work one stitch in each of the next two stitches *, repeat from * to * to the end of the row. Slip stitch to join.

Learn to crochet a flat circle. Variant #2.

Here is a slightly different approach to crocheting a circle. There are no too many differences between both variants. Which one to choose is only a matter of your preferences. This method works for single, double, and treble crochet. Let’s learn to crochet a circle, using a single crochet stitch.

Make a ring using 3 or more chain stitches, slip stitch to join.

Round 1. Make 1 chain for height to start the next round. Count that as first stitch. Make, for example, 8 single crochets total over the ring. Slip stitch to join.

Round 2. Make 1 chain for height. Count that as first stitch. Work two stitches in every stitch in the round. Slip stitch to join. There will be 16 stitches total in the round.

Round 3. Make 1 chain for height. Count that as first stitch. *Work two stitches in the first stitch, one in the second stitch”, repeat from * to * to the end of the row. Slip stitch to join. There will be 24 stitches in the 3rd round.

Round 4. Make 1 chain for height. Count that as first stitch. *Work two stitches in the first stitch, than work one stitch in each of the next two stitches *, repeat from * to * to the end of the row. Slip stitch to join. There will be 32 stitches in the 4th round.

Round 5. Make 1 chain for height. Count that as first stitch. *Work two stitches in the first stitch, than work one stitch in each of the next three stitches *, repeat from * to * to the end of the row. Slip stitch to join. There will be 40 stitches in the 3rd round.

Round 5. Make 1 chain for height. Count that as first stitch. *Work two stitches in the first stitch, than work one stitch in each of the next four stitches *, repeat from * to * to the end of the row. Slip stitch to join. There will be 48 stitches in the 3rd round.

Additional Rounds: Here is a trick: each increase is done by making 2 single stitches in one stitch. Round 3 has 1 single stitch between increases. Round 4 has 2 single stitches between increases. Round 5 has 3 single stitches between increases. To keep your circle flat, each new round has to have 1 extra single stitch between increases.

The best way to learn to crochet your first circle is the practice, of course. Here, is a video and additional explanation which show you how to crochet a round using double crochet stitches.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Are you stuck on a crochet increase? Have you hit a spot in a pattern where it tells you to increase a certain number of stitches, but you can’t figure out how to do it?

Well – I’m here to help! Many times you will increase without even thinking about it. In fact you increase in every row of a granny square when it’s worked in the round. Every row contains more stitches as you are increasing at each corner.

You work crochet increases in corners of ponchos, around hats, when you make toy animals, ripple afghans and sometimes in scarves too. Increases are everywhere and you can make all kinds of shapes just by increasing and decreasing.

Usually a pattern will tell you to work several stitches into the same stitch of the previous row. This is increasing the easy way as the designer tells you exactly what to do.

The ‘corner’ piture you see here is a good example – at the center of the row I worked 5 double crochets into the same center stitch in each row. If you work less stitches in the same space, your crochet increase ‘point’ will be shallower and wider, more stitches in the same stitch and your ‘point’ will be sharper and narrower.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

If you work only 2 stitches into one stitch of the previous row, you get a more subtle effect. This circle shows how when the number of stitches is doubled in each of 3 rows the circle grows larger and stays flat. If you work no crochet increase, then the circle would end up as a tube.

If you continued to work 2 stitches into each stitch of the previous round, after a few rounds the circle would begin to ripple due to too many stitches.

A good example of working 2 stitches into every stitch is shown in the picture at the top of this page. This is a straight chain, but I worked 2 double crochets into each chain, then the same in each stitch every row for a total of 3 rows. This doubles the stitch count every row – so you can clearly see what happens.

This technique has been used for some scarf patterns. It’s easy and effective to use a repetitive crochet increase to form these attractive ripples. If you make a scarf from this method you can either leave it in random ripples or twist it so that it curls around itself like a big spiral.

For a scarf, just chain to the length you want, then work 2 double crochets into each stitch every row until you either run out of yarn, or reach the width you like. Then break your yarn & finish off ends.

Those are the easier ways to crochet increase. The other time you might come across increasing is when making mittens or a sweater, etc. You may work sideways for a rib effect, then the pattern tells you to increase a certain number of stitches evenly across the next row.

You know. that’s a pet-hate of mine. When I see that in a pattern it really puts me off, not because I don’t like math, but if someone writes a pattern, then I think they should give you ALL of the information you need instead of you having to drag out a calculator.

Anyway – to work out how often you should increase if you find yourself in this situation, this is how I do it.

    Take the number of stitches you have (eg. 30) and divide them by the number of stitches you need to increase (eg. 12). Answer = 30/12 = 2 plus an extra 6. So you know you’ll need to crochet increase in every 2nd stitch, BUT. you have 6 leftover stitches. What do you do with them?

Divide the spare number into 3 (as close as possible), stick one third at the front of the row and the other 2 thirds on the end of the row. Eg. 2/2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-/4. This means that you would work the first 2 stitches, then increase in every 2nd stitch AFTER THAT where the -‘s are. This gives you the 12 increases evenly across the row and the spare stitches also are divided equally at either end of the row.

Of course the stitches don’t always work out evenly, but if you remember to always put the smaller third (sounds funny I know, but you know what I mean, right?) of the spare stitches at the front of the row, and don’t start your crochet increase until the right spot, you’ll do just fine!

I think that method is easier than alternating. what I mean is, that you could work the increases every 2nd, then every 3rd stitch, but that might be complicating things further.

So – now that I’ve probably thoroughly confused you, I think I need to take a nap!

Good luck with your crochet increases – I’m sure you’ll manage them just fine with a little practice!

Gooi Ah Eng

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These app will teach you everything you need to know about crochet.

Everything a beginner crocheter needs to know to crochet basic stitches

How to Crochet Right Handed: 9 Steps
How to Invent a Crochet Pattern: 12 Steps
How to Single Crochet
How to Quickly Crochet a Simple Flower
How to Crochet a Chain: 13 Steps
How to Crochet a Circle
2 Easy Ways to Turn in Crochet
How to Crochet a Granny Square
How to Crochet in the Round: 15 Steps
How to Crochet a Hat for Beginners
3 Ways to Crochet a Heart
4 Ways to Crochet a Magic Ring
How to Do Double Crochet: 11 Steps
How to Treble Crochet
5 Ways to Crochet an Amigurumi Toy
3 Ways to Crochet a Ball
How to Crochet a Hat: 10 Steps
How to Crochet Leg Warmers
4 Ways to Crochet a Blanket
How to Crochet a Bag Easily
How to Crochet a Chevron Scarf
How to Crochet a Sweater
How to Crochet Roses
4 Ways to Crochet a Star
6 Ways to Crochet a Baby Blanket
How to Make a Crocheted Rag Rug: 11 Steps
3 Ways to Crochet an Infinity Scarf
How to Crochet a Skull Cap
3 Ways to Change Colors when Crocheting
3 Ways to Crochet a Baby Hat
How to Crochet a Skirt
3 Ways to Crochet a Triangle
How to Tapestry Crochet: 11 Steps
4 Ways to Crochet a Headband
3 Ways to Crochet Shawls
How to Crochet a Bobble
How to Bavarian Crochet
3 Ways to Crochet Popcorn Stitch
How to Crochet a Toy Hammock
3 Ways to Crochet a Hooded Scarf
3 Ways to Crochet a Box
How to Crochet a Baby Sweater for Beginners
4 Ways to Crochet Slippers
4 Ways to Crochet Mittens
How to Crochet Lace
How to Bind Off (Crocheting)
4 Ways to Tunisian Crochet
5 Ways to Crochet Baby Sandals
How to Crochet Fitted Hand Warmers
3 Easy Ways to Crochet a Shell Stitch
How to Crochet Cable Stitch
How to Crochet Baby Booties: 12 Steps
How to Crochet a Circle With Increases: 11 Steps
3 Ways to Crochet Boot Cuffs
3 Ways to Crochet a Bow
3 Ways to Crochet a Leaf
How to Crochet a Stuffed Animal
How to Crochet Butterflies
How to Crochet a Zig Zag Afghan: 11 Steps
How to Crochet Doilies

Learn How to Crochet with the videos below:

How to Do a Single Crochet Stitch
How to Do a Double Crochet Stitch
How to Crochet in the Round
How to Do Half Double Crochet
How to Add and Drop Crochet Stitches
How to Do a Crochet Slip Stitch
How to Do a Triple or Treble Crochet Stitch
How to Fasten Off Yarn
How to Count Crochet Stitches
How to Join Motifs or Make Seams in Crocheting
How to Tie a Crochet Slip Knot
How to Broomstick Lace Crochet
How to Butterfly Stitch
How to Hold a Crochet Hook
How to Tunisian Crochet
How to Tapestry Crochet
How to Crochet the V Stitch
How to Crochet Moss Stitch
How to Spike Stitches
How to Shell Stitches

I need a crochet pattern for a large circle that increases & lays flat or almost flat. and I need the pattern to be an open stitch, not tight like single or double crochet. more like a V stitch, or something that’s pretty, but very open & airy..if that makes sense?

5 Answers

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

These might help. Even if you just use the middle parts–use heavier thread and it will be bigger at the beginning. There are tons of sites online on doilies. You just have to take a few minutes to go through and find the good ones. Good luck!

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

1st suggestion: This sounds like a hat pattern but without the final shaping. I would look for a pattern of a hat and continue with the increases. The increases are easy to figure out because they are done logically for example: 2 sts in every 2nd st in one row, then 2 sts in every 3rd st on the next row, etc. I would continue the increase model when the pattern stops increasing.

2nd suggestion: Check out www.youtube.com and do a search for Theresa Richardson’s double crochet hat. You can also substitute with treble crochet. She also has it written out in her blog. Experiment with her basics and you might end up getting the final look you want.

3rd suggestion: Another very airy stitch is the Solomon’s Knot but it is not an easy stitch to master. Theresa (same as above) has a child’s dress she makes using that stitch–it is fabulous.

Melissa taught herself crochet stitches & pattern reading in 1999. Today she creates her own patterns and teaches others the art of crochet.

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

Photo by Melissa Flagg

Increases and decreases can be one of the most confusing parts of any crochet (or knitting) pattern. But increases and decreases can also make the most beautiful and intricate patterns for a variety of projects including shawls, blankets, gloves and hats.

Increases

Increases are quite simple. You simply crochet twice in one stitch. The trick to increases is learning to make them evenly spaced.

If you add too many increases in a row, the piece will not light flat, it will have a bit of a wave too it. If you don’t add enough increases, the piece will start to curl. This isn’t so much of a problem when working on a project such as a blanket.

But when you are working on a project that is worked in the round (in a circle), this becomes more of a concern. If you add too many increases in a project such as a hat, the end product won’t fit right, and may not even form the bowl that creates that hat.

Unfortunately, this is one of those things you may not figure out until you are halfway done with the project, which means you’ll have to rip the whole thing out and start over again.

A good rule of thumb for increases: For every row you crochet, add just as many stitches after the increase. So if you are on row three, add three single stitches after each increase.

For example: If using single crochets, single crochet twice in one stitch, then make one single crochet in each of the next three stitches, single crochet twice in the next stitch, then make one single crochet in each of the next three stitches, etc. This will keep your work flat and prevent curling.

Step by Step – Working an Increase

Decreases

Decreases are often used to make projects curl, such as in a hat or bag so worrying about spacing isn’t as much of an issue.

However, if your decreases are not evenly spaced, the piece just won’t look right. It will look sloppy, and if you are thinking about selling your project, or giving it as a gift, you want it to look professional.

There are a couple of ways to work a decrease:

  • Simply skip a stitch
  • Turn two stitches into one, typically abbreviated in a pattern as 2tog (for example, a single crochet decrease would be written as sc2tog).

The easiest of these is, obviously, to skip a stitch. This works better in some patterns than in others. For example, if you are crocheting a lace pattern, this type of decrease would work quite well since it leaves a small gap.

However, if you are crocheting something such as a bag, a gap may allow things to fall through and that wouldn’t make the bag very effective. In this case, you’d want to use the decrease that turns two stitches into one.

How to Work a Decrease

Decreases that make one stitch out of two are worked slightly differently for each stitch. This doesn’t become a problem until you need the decrease for a single or treble crochet. Then you have to worry about how many times to yarn over. But once you get the hang of it, it becomes second nature.

The single crochet is by far the most straight-forward of the decreases. There are no extra yarn overs to contend with, unlike the half double and double crochet decreases.

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How to Crochet a Basic Beanie

How to Crochet a Circle With IncreasesMy approach to most of my knitting and crocheting projects is to design it myself and to play it by ear — I like knowing the gist of how to make something, so that I can make my own version, customized to my needs. Earlier this month, I wrote about how to knit a basic hat. In today’s post, I’m going to give you directions for crochet a basic beanie. Of course, as with all things, there is more than one way to do it, but I think that these directions will give you a good basis.

You will need:

  • 1 skein of your favorite yarn (Jiffy, Vanna’s Choice, Wool-Ease Thick & Quick, and Fishermen’s Wool are all great choices)
  • Crochet hook in your preferred size (see step 2 below for more details)

Here’s how to do it:

  1. Measure around the head, above the ears, of the person who the hat is for and write down how many inches around their head your hat will need to be. (If you can’t measure their head–it’s for a gift or they’re not available–estimate based on your own head size.)
  2. Crochet a gauge swatch in single crochet to find out how many stitches per inch you get with the hook and yarn you are using. (If you’re not sure what size hook to use, start with the size recommended on your yarn’s ball-band, and adjust up or down a size if you want a tighter or looser fabric.)
  3. Multiply the number of stitches per inch you found in step #2 by the circumference of the head (from step #1); then multiply this number by 2/3 (or 0.66) and round to the nearest number. (You do this so that your hat will fit snugly against the head and not be too loose.) Save this final number for later.
  4. To start the hat, you’ll need to crochet a circle, using joined rounds. If you’ve never done this before, don’t worry. A little practice and you’ll be a pro. To do this, chain 2. Single crochet (sc) 6 times into the second chain from the hook, slip stitch (sl st) into the first stitch to close the circle. Now you have your first round, a tiny circle with 6 stitches.
  5. For your second round, chain 1, sc 2 times into each single crochet, and sl st into the beginning of the round. Now you have a circle with 12 stitches.
  6. For your third round, chain 1, *sc 2 times into the first sc, then sc 1 time into the next sc, repeat from * to the end of the round. Sl st int the first stitch. Now you have a circle with 18 stitches.
  7. For the next round, chain 1, *sc 2 times into the first sc, then sc 1 time into the next 2 sc, repeat from * to the end of the round. Sl st int the first stitch.
  8. This next round chain 1, *sc 2 times into the first sc, then sc 1 time into the next 3 sc, repeat from * to the end of the round. Sl st int the first stitch.
  9. Are you starting to see the pattern? For each consecutive round, the number of single crochets in bold above increases by one. (So the next round will be sc 1 time into the next 4 sc, then the next 5 sc, etc.)
  10. Continue in this pattern until the number of stitches you have in your round is equal to (or very close to) the number you wrote down in step #3.
  11. Now, for each of the following rounds, you will chain 1, sc in every sc to the end of the round, sl st to join. Do this until your hat is deep enough for you/your recipient’s hat.
  12. Then fasten off and weave in your ends.

Following these steps, you get a solid hat, similar to the one above. A hat like this is also good for practicing working in the round, which is useful for many of our amigurumi animals.

The great thing about a basic pattern like this is that you can do so much with it. Make stripes instead of only using one color. Switch out the single crochets for half-double crochets or double-crochets. Alternate stitch patterns. Add a pom-pom on top. Add earflaps. Cross-stitch a design on top of your basic hat. You could even use these steps to create a beret by making the base circle larger than the circumference of your head , then decreasing until you get to the circumference of your head (that you wrote down in step #3), and then working a band in a contrasting stitch pattern for the brim.

Now that you have the basic tools, get creative and make the hat that you’ve always wanted!

There are so many inspiring crochet circle patterns out there. But what if you want to make a blanket or other item that has straight edges? You will need square crochet motifs. While there are also plenty of great square crochet patterns out there,there may be times that you want to adapt a circle into a square to create the exact pattern you desire. This guide shows you how to turn a crochet circle into a square. It includes a simple crochet circle-in-a-square pattern along with additional information to help you learn how to adapt any circle to a square.

Choosing Your Crochet Circle

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

You can turn any crochet circle into a square. However, it will be a lot easier on you if the final round of your crochet circle has a number of stitches that is divisible by the number 4. Each square is, of course, going to have four corners and you want those corners equidistant apart, which is why you want to begin with the right number of stitches that will easily allow you to divide by 4.

Choosing Your Crochet Circle

For our pattern, we will crochet three rounds of a double crochet circle as follows:

Step 1

Ch 3. 7 dc into 3rd ch from hook. Slip st to close round. (8 dc)

Step 2

Ch 3 (counts as first dc). Dc in same st. 2 dc in each st around. Slip st to close round. (16 dc)

Step 3

Ch 3 (counts as first dc). 2 dc in next st. *1 dc, 2 dc around.Slip st to closeround. (24 dc)

This final round has 24 double crochet stitches, a number divisible by 4.

Preparing the Crochet Circle

How to Crochet a Circle With Increases

The stitch markers are placed equidistant around the circle; this is where the four corners of the square will be.

Crochet the circle to the point where it is ready to become a square then end off. Place a stitch marker in any of the stitches on the outside round. Place three additional stitch markers equal spaces apart (dividing the final number of stitches on the outside round by 4 tells you how many stitches should be in between each stitch marker). These will be your corners.

Practice Circle in Square Pattern, Part 2

In our practice example, attach a stitch marker to any double crochet. Attach stitch markers at every 6th stitch after that (because 24 stitches divided by 4 corners is 6 stitches.)

Combining Stitches of Different Heights

The easiest way to turn a crochet circle into a square is to use stitches of varying heights across the round. Notice that if you draw a circle around the square, thewidest part of the circle is in the center of each round. Because of this, you want the shortest stitches in the middle of each round and the tallest stitches near the corners; this brings the height of the corners up to the height of the center and is what makes a circle become a square shape. It is common to use single crochet stitches in the center, followed by half double crochet on either side, double crochet on either side of that and taller stitches on the outsides if needed.

To find the center, you want to count the number of stitches across the round and divide this number by 2. So, count the number of stitches that are in between two stitch markers in your circle. Divide that number by 2 and this gives you your center stitch, which will be your shortest stitch (likely your single crochet). Working from there out you’ll increase the height of the stitches. So, here’s an example, if you have a circle that has five stitches between stitch markers: