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How to deal with egomaniacs

A Different Kind of Motivation

This is very interesting subject to express in the blog. The reason is I took weeks to go through the lessons too. Dealing with ego mind can drained the energy and cause us emotionally and mentally tired. I have been through that for weeks and then I realise this; all of us took years to just understand ‘Why we have these people in our lives?’. Although we know that everyone is a teacher and if they didn’t teach us beautiful experiences, they teach us the ugly ones. But that’s not the salvation. We didn’t stop experiencing ugly moments in life even after we knew the answer. And it keeps coming back to us, isn’t it? So answering the question is not the solution here.

Egomaniac people (the term is just for the article only) are people who unconsciously run their lives through their ego minds. They (the people) are the passenger and the driver is the ego mind. They go where the ego mind takes them, which against their free spirit. You can see there are many people still stuck in their ego minds, and that including me and you. We have been generalized into ego being. Although the consciousness is rising and there are many people are now practise to be present and allow the ego minds to lose its control, there are also people who still hasn’t aware. And these are the people who appear in our presence for many reasons and one of it is to get touch with the light of consciousness that we bring into this world.

The ultimate way to face the egomaniac people is to be present, be in the state of love. That also the easiest way but not many people understand the concept of Just It. So I’m going to share with you the practical ways to face the egomaniac people so you didn’t get caught in the dramas and hopefully in the same time shed some light into their beings with love.

Here’s the ugly truth. When we are dealing with war between egos, nobody wins. The energy of the war itself is use to feed the egos and we end up in emotional pain. But in moments like this (the war), we are so tempted to be heard, we are so eager to explain the ‘truth’ of ourselves but war means no explanation needed.

So the best way to deal with it is just give short respond to the person. And from my experiences, I just responded “okay” or “alright”. Then I leave before my ego mind takes the driver seat.

Avoid their games.

The ego always wanted to be feed. It creates situations so it can be feed and rises. Take a moment to observe egomaniac people; you will notice that they always find ways to create situations that can feed their egos. They complaints and give reasons that others created the situations (mostly problems) and they are the solutions. Take note how the wars in this world started. If you notice their game, avoid playing it. Walk away if you can but if that’s not the choice, just observe it without judgement. That way you wouldn’t fall into the unconscious ego game they created.

Why Play Game That You Will Lose?

This is the gate to the ultimate way; being present. Breathe as if the only way to stay alive is to stay aware that you are breathing. No thinking by doing that. Just breathe. Go inward with the miracle healing of air and oxygen. And then in between you and the other person is a space for transformation to take place. There was a time when I did this; I noticed the breathing of the said person become aligned with mine, in same beat and harmony. Then the person no longer feel trapped in his own unconscious mind. That’s how we can help ourselves and let the transformation and the light of consciousness help the other person.

Be Transparent.

If you read the book The Power of Now, you would familiar with ‘Be Transparent’. But it takes lots of practise to be transparent. Transparent in this context is not related to honesty. It’s something like soul, transparent. It’s something like clear water where you can see what’s inside it. If you can see aura, you only see the transparent colour(s). Do notice that you can also see whatever things behind the aura, the visible things. That’s what it means by being transparent. This method, whatever is coming onto you will not hit you because there is no wall to hit. It then will go through you; just like your sight go through the aura, the soul (that’s including spirits) and water.

Most important point here is not to fall into the unconscious ego mind that you have in you. That’s the whole point of this article. It’s not about changing the egomaniac people and forces them to surrender their ego mind. That’s not our job. This practical ways is about saving ourselves so that we do not stop rising our consciousness from day to day. The rest will be taken care just the way it is.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Just become you like to take selfies doesn’t make you an egomaniac – a true egomaniac has a psychological disorder that makes him believe he is the greatest, most important person in the world. – vocabulary.com

The remaining part of the definition is too good to pass up, so we won’t.

You can also use the word to describe someone you know who’s a self-centered jerk, though. Egomaniac, coined in the early 19 th century, combines ego, “the self,” and maniac, from the Greek mania, “madness or frenzy.”

The phrase “You can also use the word to describe someone you know who’s a self-centered jerk” likely isn’t groundbreaking to people who has called someone an egomaniac. (The informality of the quotation, followed by a history of the word’s origin caused this writer to do a double take, however.)

Ahem, getting back to the article’s premise.

Egomania is closely related to another abnormal personality type we’ve discussed before: Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD). There are, however, some significant differences between egotism (also called egomania), NPD, and other conditions. Why is this important to mention? Because mislabeling someone can cause serious harm, especially to individuals already in pain.

For example, an individual experiencing clinical depression may appear overly self-involved, but this behavior is rooted in a different neurobiological cause (they can’t escape hopeless thoughts, speaking out in desperation hoping someone will help.) Depression, in any form, is a serious condition that demands treatment.

Egotism, on the other hand, often entails unabashedly vocal self-centeredness; NPD often fits this description, as well. Furthermore, it’s incredibly rare for this type of person to seek help.

With that in mind, we present ten common behaviors of egomania:

1. Extreme self-centeredness

Unsurprisingly, egomaniacs are highly self-absorbed individuals. They care for no one else’s wants or needs – the notion simply never crosses their mind.

Most people are “selfish” to a degree, in that they seek to first take care of themselves, but this is a natural way of thinking. An inability to look after oneself – or at least meet one’s basic needs – makes it tough to help anyone else.

Egotists never seek to help anyone, regardless of their circumstances.

2. Intense cruelty

The history books are full of megalomaniacal egotists who exhibited extreme cruelty: Hitler, Stalin, Hussein, and so on. Granted, few if any egotists will ever reach such extreme levels of inhumanity.

That said, egotists aren’t particularly concerned with the welfare (much less the feelings) of others. As such, it’s quite commonplace for them to exhibit irrational malice.

3. Naive self-confidence

Charles Darwin, who infamously discovered the evolutionary theory, once said: “Ignorance frequently begets more confidence than does knowledge.”

Self-confidence is a wonderful attribute to have, lest such confidence originates from some misplaced sense of superiority rather than earned – which is often the case with egomaniacs.

4. Lack of empathy

As mentioned, egotists aren’t known for being considerate towards the feelings of others. Likewise, egotists do not contemplate other’s thoughts or opinions at odds with theirs. An egotist will demonstrate this absence of empathy in conversation; where they’ll disengage at the slightest notion of opposition and without explanation.

5. Sense of entitlement

An egomaniacs sense of entitlement falls in line with that of a narcissist’s. Egomaniacal narcissists misguidedly believe that their needs and wants require “favorable treatment;” any other reaction – or in some cases, non-reaction – from those involved are met with scorn and rage.

6. Lack of maturity

Sigmund Freud, in addition to a majority of psychologists and psychiatrists, believes that humans are born in a state of egomania. One expert states “Infants are primarily concerned with having their own needs met, and very young babies may not be aware of others (i.e. omnipotence) …(young) children eventually develop empathy and interest in others gradually over time.”

Egotists do not appear to undergo these (and other) psychological developments, which seems to correlate with their immature mindset.

7. Calculating and cold

Most egomaniacs possess traits similar to those with NPD. One particular attribute stands out: deliberate and calculated manipulation. Egomaniacs that fit his description perceive others as nothing more than a means to an end. They’ll utilize whatever is at their disposal to get what they “deserve” before quickly discarding the person without remorse.

8. Ill temperament

Because of the egomaniac’s immature mindset, they generally possess undeveloped emotional intelligence. Their impulsivity, in conjunction with a limited capability to manage or adjust their emotions, oftentimes manifests into verbal fits and tirades. Egotists may become very aggressive, even physically.

9. Always alone

Egotists have such a high sense of self-importance that they perceive others to be a waste of time. If one were to browse the Facebook page of a suspected egomaniac, it’s highly likely there’d be very few (if any) photos with other people. At the workplace, it’s common to see these folks distance themselves using whatever means necessary.

10. A lust for extravagance

Not everyone who basks in luxury is an egomaniac – but a good number are. The strange thing about an egotists affinity for the extravagant is that they get less thrill from the actual item than from the attention it garners.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Grow Your Business, Not Your Inbox

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

There are major differences between self-confidence and egomania, often built around the presence of humility. Yet there is a rather large space between the two, where some people that you currently employ or manage might reside.

Let’s look at this in terms of value: those that are confident tend to perceive their value in accordance with reality. In other words, their perception of self-worth to the organization, based on value and productivity, is most likely aligned with your views. Those with unhealthy egos believe that their value is beyond that of reality.

The unhealthy ego represents a significant problem for your business, as these types will often feel they’re underpaid, regardless of what value they bring or revenue they generate, regularly take on more or bigger tasks than they can handle without asking for help and have the unique ability to turn off co-workers and clients.

Whether those that have unhealthy egos can be saved depends on one very important question — are they coachable?

1. Learn their personality. It’s important that you learn during the interview process if they are coachable, but if you don’t, you need to find out quickly once they’re hired. Pay extremely close attention in the first two weeks and see how they respond to constructive criticism and direction from you.

If they take the suggestions and improve, they are coachable. If they get offended or don’t make adjustments, they’re probably not. If they can’t be coached, you either need to find a position that better fits their true capabilities or make the swift decision to move them out of the company before they do any serious damage.

2. Open their eyes. As a leader, it is your responsibility to understand where employees’ heads are and what aspect of their ego is in need of adjustment. It’s you that needs to help shift their understanding of their current value and abilities back into alignment.

There is a way to get that ego back into check within a relatively short period of time — there must be a shock to their system, and it’s your job to provide that shock. Now, you’re not going to be able to provide a shock such as the one Steve Jobs received when he was thrown out of his own company many years ago — think his ego was realigned after that? — but you do need to create a situation and interaction that will open their eyes and mind that they won’t quickly forget.

3. Provide the shock. Let’s use an example: You have a salesperson that demands more money because they feel they deserve it, despite the fact that they’ve been only scraping by from a productivity standpoint. To start, I suggest that you put together a detailed and overwhelming visual report outlining their performance over time in relation to their goals — graphs will be really helpful. Then schedule a meeting with the individual at least an hour before the office typically opens, but don’t tell them about the meeting until very late in the previous day or provide any details. You must provide the shock.

At the point of meeting, present your information in a direct, forward and honest manner. I’m not at all suggesting that you be overly aggressive in an attempt to make them cry, but that you be firm and to the point with the goal of helping them to understand where they truly are, realigning their reality. When they attempt to defend themselves, which they will, use factual information to help them understand the inadequacies — facts don’t lie. It might take some time to reel them in, but remain firm. It’s only when their understanding is aligned with reality will you be able to take them to the next level.

It’s critical that you put a plan in place with them moving forward and close the meeting on a positive note. Build them back up and be passionate when you explain that you believe in them and that it’s your new goal in life to help them be as successful as possible — then live up to your word.

How to Deal With EgomaniacsI don’t know about you, but egomaniacs scare the ‘b’jesus out of me’. I am terrified of them, but still I find myself sucked into their web of soul destroying destruction.

As much as they are charming, good at ‘selling a story’ and surrounded by people, they are manipulative, obsessive and bullies.

By definition (Wikipedia), egomania is an obsessive preoccupation with one’s self and applies to someone who follows their own ungoverned impulses and is possessed by delusions of personal greatness and feels a lack of appreciation.

More likened to the clinical narcissistic personality disorder, there are egomaniacs in all walks of life, but its important to be aware of who they are in yours and know which way is the best way to deal with them.

In my profession as a marketing consultant, I am surrounded by egomaniacs. In life, many of my friends also have a healthy sense of ego, but the true egomaniacs are best to keep ‘on side’ but do try to steer away from them. Here’s why:

1. If you are not on their side , they will stomp on you and make sure no-one else is either. Given that egomaniacs are also charming, be aware, they can charm the pants of someone – literally.
2. They won’t accept rejection. Rejection in any form, comes with a pay-back clause.
3. They are always right and if you dare to not think they are right, they are good ‘campaigners’.
4. They have to be liked, so their passive aggressive behaviour may stomp on you and belittle you to others with untruths. But don’t be surprised if in no time, they come back to you with something they think you cannot refuse. Like earlier this year, I cut ties with an egomaniac, and after being a bully and horrible, a week later he sent me an email saying that he has a “billionaire to invest in my business”. This is typical egomaniac behaviour. Never fall for this bait as its their way of trying to be ‘liked’ and feeds their passive aggressive behaviours.
5. They will do absolutely anything to get their own way and to get people on-side, if you have fallen off-side. Anything includes using whatever means they have to woo people.

It’s not all doom and gloom. Egomaniacs exist in the world. I have just finished reading Simon Cowells book and he is out there and proud to be an ‘egomaniac’. He’s successful, so many egomaniacs believe that it is ok to be ‘who they are’ because that is what ‘stars are made of’.

Why is being an egomaniac bad for your personal brand?

1. Most people don’t like the drama associated with being around an egomaniac, so while they may not say anything, they are thinking it. To them, you are plain ‘weird’ and mostly they see through your passive aggressive behaviours and ‘feel sorry for you’.
2. While people may let you think you have won, you have gone down in their estimation – big time. Don’t be fooled. You will never be in their top handful of friends.
3. Other egomaniacs won’t like you and many of the world’s top business people and superstars fall into this category. Your pool just gets smaller and smaller.
4. You won’t learn, because you are not open to learning. You will never be a better person, because you are not open to be a better person – you already think you are.
5. Ultimately, people don’t want to be close to an egomaniac. When an egomaniac burns someone, people are smart and they see it. They may not say anything, but they know and its another strike against you.
6. People will be scared of you and they will have seen your bullying and never wrong attitude. They may appear on the surface as friends just to pacify you but your friends will be less and less as years go by.

Here’s how I have learned to deal with egomaniacs.

1. Check your own ego at the door: We all have egos, but hopefully its just a healthy amount. When you come face to face with an egomaniac, know that they are not worth your time and energy. Think about how you can reduce your interaction with them. If they have a point of view, don’t challenge it, excuse yourself and go to the restroom. By challenging it, they will feel the need to win and you will lose or face the fate of their behaviours.
2. Get perspective: Life is short and we will always come across people with quirky personality types. Why its important to understand elements of an egomaniac is because they may go through stages of influence on how you view the world or certain people. Egomaniacs are self-serving so their opinions quite frankly don’t count. They are communicating only what they want for you to buy-into.
3. If you are on the receiving end of an egomaniacs tantrum of need for control over a situation, be assertive. Don’t let bullies win.
4. Understand where they are coming from. Most egomaniacs didn’t have enough love growing up, or their fathers left their mothers early on. No-one paid attention to them. They just want to be loved and appreciated and to be liked. They don’t know how else to act because no-one has taught them right from wrong and that you don’t need to win a fight to win. No-one has taught them compassion and kindness. They are after all, just big babies looking for approval.
5. Distance yourself. It’s a great psychological trick. If they are past 40 years of age, they won’t change. Keep them in small doses and when they get under your skin, just walk away. you don’t need to see them for another six months.

Why is a marketing blog on egomania important? I am writing this as it is a conversation I hear a lot about. Egomaniacs live in everyone’s life. We have to deal with them and the fact of the matter is that they often are in roles of authority. Knowing how to deal with them, will assist you in not being bullied by their antics, or seduced by their charm. It will make your life much happier – trust me. Talking from experience. As marketers, we do need to understand our audience.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

2015-11-06 James Cox

Egomaniacs are the kind of people who always have to be right. They can’t accept other people’s opinions. All they do is talk about themselves. They are critical and quick to anger, and they.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Dealing with Difficult People Working with An Ego Maniac Sandra Crowe

2012-03-30 Sandra Crowe

Sandra Crowe Working with An Ego Maniac http://www.sandracrowe.com Dealing With Difficult People Sandra Crowe Author “I Didn’t Sign Up For This!” She is the author of Since Strangling Isn’t.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to deal with people who are full of themselves; egomaniacs

2014-08-31 Marie Dubuque

We all know them, and you can decide whether you want to buy into their bravado, or simply put up with them. Most of the time, these types are also selfish and really don’t care about anyone.

Top Documentary Films: Understanding Egomaniacs

2015-07-24 Documentary Films

Top Documentary Films: Understanding Egomaniacs Maybe it’s just me, or the people I communicate with, or the fact that I live in L.A. — but isn’t it starting to seem as though a sweeping.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How To Handle An Egomaniac

2010-12-09 Jamie Greene

Listen to the dangers of the egomaniac and how to spot them a mile away!

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Episode 3! Egomaniacs and how to deal with them.

2017-03-25 Dragonrend Inn

How to deal with egomaniacs! (not) DnD style — Watch live at https://www.twitch.tv/dragonrendinn.

These 4 Zodiac Signs Are TOTAL Egomaniacs

These 4 Zodiac Signs Are TOTAL Egomaniacs most egotistical sign zodiac – The signs and ego problems The zodiac: Twelve stages of personality which star sign has the biggest ego What Are the.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to deal with two-faced people

2013-01-08 Marie Dubuque

You know the type, who are really nice to you to your face, and then talk behind your back. Just be super professional towards them. Save your warm and friendly self for the people who really.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to deal with condescending people

2012-12-15 Marie Dubuque

I would not appear to show a whole lot of interest in what they are saying. Smile and nod, and be polite, but not your warm and friendly self. Save that side of you for the people who really.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Ryan Holiday – Ego is the Enemy – How to Deal with Big Egos -Book Review

2016-07-13 Sleeping Elephant

Learn how do deal with the egomaniacs you encounter in life – Whether it be big EGOs, inflated pride, or blind commitment. Ego is the Enemy is the sequel to The Obstacle is the Way. I go.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to deal with pretentious people

2013-03-29 Marie Dubuque

You know the types. They try to dominate every conversation. They try to put you down to elevate themselves. Just remember, on the inside, they are extremely insecure. the really confident.

How to Deal with Big Ego Identities

2008-08-18 Jeanine Austin

Dr. Jeanine, coach for people worldwide, discusses big ego posturing. I coach women towards their ultimate purpose, full of spiritual meaning, connection, compassion and humor. Website: .

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to deal with narcissistic attack on sane person’s ego

2017-10-14 Narcissistic Recovery Healing for Empaths

How to deal with narcissistic attack on sane person’s ego : 1. When you go gray-rock or nc with the narc and fm – it is very probable that they will say that it is because you have a great.

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How do you deal with someone’s out of control EGO?

2017-01-03 Justin Prince

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Personality Types – Alpha/Beta/Narcissist/Egomaniacs

Talk about what defines a person as a Alpha or Beta and the difference between a Narcissist and a Egomaniac.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to deal with someone who plays head games and disrespects you

2014-08-30 Marie Dubuque

You have to ask yourself how much you will put up with. I would say don’t put up with any signs of disrespect. If they call you at the last minute, don’t go out. Believe me, this person is.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Dealing with favoritism among friends and family

2014-12-14 Marie Dubuque

When you think of favoritism, you think of families with children. But what about groups of friends and grandparents? That type of favoritism can be hurtful too.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to deal with conceited arrogant people you see everyday

2014-05-11 Marie Dubuque

Don’t let them know that they have gotten to you. I mean no reaction. Because if you look down or in any way allow them to see you look upset at all, they will continue their rants. And remember.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Dealing with people who act like you owe them something; sense of entitlement

2014-11-12 Marie Dubuque

These types are the most frustrating. You have to make sure you don’t become a door mat.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Narcissistic Entitlement 101: What It Is, Why It Happens and How to Deal (c)

2017-08-26 Angie Atkinson

Why do narcissists always act like the world owes them something? One word: entitlement. Dealing with someone with NPD or another cluster b personality disorder is exhausting. Between the trauma.

Egomaniacs are the kind of people who cannot accept other people’s opinions and always have to be right. They are quick to anger and critical, and all they do is talk about themselves. Egomaniacs tend to hog the spotlight and they can make you miserable, but with a few tricks, you will be better able to deal with them at school, work or anywhere.

When the egomaniac is your colleague, you can stay active and reasonable by remaining diplomatic and calm. When you feel an outburst of self- praise coming, stop the conversation subtly by acting disinterested or bored and avoiding eye contact.

It will be easier for you to deal with their self-appraisal by reminding yourself that you are successful and capable. If your boss is egoist, look elsewhere for a mentor because he/ she probably will have a hard time giving you encouragement and support.

Actually, the egomaniac craves attention and affirmation; do not be the person they rely on for proof of their worth and avoid feeding their ego with validation and compliments. Your pride or insecurities may get the best of you when confronted with an egoist’s constant assertion of self- worth, so do not be lured into a long conversation about their latest deeds.

Assuming that you are the boss and one of your employees is egomaniac, their need for assertion or challenging you might be mitigated by offering your subordinate options. Take in mind that a narcissistic employee can be well motivated by a strategic use of compliments and praise.

Many people are drawn, at least initially, to egomaniacs thinking they are exciting. If your friend never gives you a chance to talk and is not really interested in you, it is time to recognize toxic friendships.

How to Effectively Manage Difficult Employees: The Egomaniac

A few weeks ago, I introduced you to an employee you may have encountered in your lifetime, called The AWOL. You know, the one that just never seems to be around when a project is due? The AWOL is just one of many personality types that Jezra Kaye and I help managers address with our book, Managing the Unmanageable: How to Motivate Even the Most Unruly Employee.

Today, I’m bringing another unmanageable employee (UE) to the table. This one is called “The Egomaniac.” Perhaps you’ve met?

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

If you have, you may have heard the words me me me me me me me. This UE takes the phrase “not a team player” to new heights. A healthy ego can be a good thing; but the same ego that drives an Egomaniac to succeed can drive her colleagues to distraction. And worse, the Egomaniac doesn’t just think about herself all the time; she seems to be out for herself all the time, too.

How are you supposed to deal with this person? Jezra and I came up with a tool kit of sorts, which we call the “5C’s.” They are easy to remember and just might help you wrangle The Egomaniac.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

  1. First, you need to Commit or Quit. Do you want to retain this employee? If you are going to take on that challenge, rather than the challenge of finding and hiring someone new, you really need to commit. Yes, you may be committing to the future of someone you may not even like.
  2. Then, it’s time to Communicate. Managers may not love the idea, but having a completely straight forward and honest conversation with the UE is imperative. This might be easier with The Egomaniac who is more than willing to discuss themselves that it would be with the AWOL, for example. But what kind of conversation? That leads us to the next “C.”
  3. While talking to your UE and attempting a UE salvage, managers need to clarify goals and roles. Though employees typically think they know what is expected of them at work, what they “know” might not be correct. It’s amazing what you might discover when discussing an employee’s behavior, framed within the context of goals and roles.
  4. After having a frank conversation with The Egomaniac and clarifying their goals and roles, some will self-correct. However, what really needs work here is their attitude. That’s where coaching comes in. Coaching is a great management tool and can be quickly learned. You can coach your UE to help shift their inner-attitudes and make a huge impact on both your relationship with your UE and your UE’s career.
  5. The above four steps will help make positive changes in The Egomaniac’s behavior. However, we all know that habits are hard to break, and that rings true even more when it comes to changing habitual attitudes. To mitigate that, create accountabilitywith your UE. Take some time to create a system wherein your employee can deliver the changes you’ve discussed. This will keep The Egomaniac on track as well as keep you on track with your management efforts.

Managers, I want to hear from you! Tell me about your experience with egomaniac employees. What has worked and not worked for you in managing them? Leave a comment below, send me an email, or tweet me.

There are many more difficult employee types that seem unmanageable. I love to speak about those unmanageables too! Stay tuned.

How to spot, deal with, and avoid them

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

The ego is a tragic thing.

It’s shatters faster than it can be built. It’s an institution for which there is no proper schooling, and a place where delusions thrive like mold on wet garbage. They can become bigger than an elephant in an outhouse.

People give in to their egos the same way an abandoned building on the haughty side of town gives way to a bulldozer tearing it down to make way for the next five diamond hotel. One they can regale themselves in on the lavish rooftop while looking down on the pathetic passersby who shan’t be let in.

Egos need a huge boost when the going gets tough.

Egoists can’t accept being snubbed because they’re an overblown asshole, or a persistently perverse dickhead. The world would stop if their bubble burst. They desperately need to bleed out that painful, festering wound with some humility.

Harsh words to an egoist sting like pouring rubbing alcohol on a stab wound. Silence results in an explosion of bitterness that culminates in, “I can’t believe they don’t want me. How could anyone resist me? I’m so great I can’t live down the fact I’m being tossed aside for someone better, because there is no one better.”

There’s a certain kind of man who thinks he doesn’t have to do much when it comes to dating. He feels women should come to him and when they do, he doesn’t need to give anything in return but empty smiles, disregard, and a few bone shaped, generic treats when things start turning away from his intended direction.

Dating is a dance that both parties must equally partake in. If one side gets more attention, the other can feel they’re being taken for granted. No one wants to feel like they need a step stool to be on equal terms.

Here are some egotistical jerkwads you may encounter and how to deal with them.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

He feigns interest long enough to get you twisted, then disappears into next week without a trace. He texts threes days later, never emails back, and says he didn’t have a charger when his battery died, so of course he couldn’t have called you.

PROBLEM: He’s thinks throwing you a bone or two in the form of excuses and pseudo-interest every now and then is good enough.

WHY IS THIS A PROBLEM? Because he can count on you to be sitting around waiting for him like the faithful little doggie you’ve always been.

SOLUTION: STOP WAITING FOR HIM. This guy doesn’t want you. If he did, he wouldn’t pretend, stall, or frequently disappear. Procrastination isn’t a sign of endearment, it’s a sign of inflamed, cystic bullshit.

Keep dating others. If you’re free when he shows up three months from now wanting to take you out and you feel like letting him, go for it. Pay attention to those paying attention to you.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

He only engages with you when you do all the work. Otherwise you don’t hear from him. His logic is, “I can count on her to do it all, so I don’t have to.”

You get to call, stop by, make all the plans, make all the moves, while he sits backs and enjoys the free entertainment.

PROBLEM: He’s indifferent to your entire existence. You could be anyone, and he doesn’t care who. He’s taking what he can get because you’re giving.

WHY IS THIS A PROBLEM? You’re allowing yourself to become a forgettable woman of convenience. You’re his Uber/Postmates/Molly Maids/Tinder match.

You think giving him everything and doing everything for him is going to get you the relationship you want. It won’t. He’ll gladly take everything you freely hand over to him… all while he’s getting off his ass and pursuing the women he actually wants to date.

SOLUTION: Stop getting played and catering to some insecure man’s every whim. Get some self-respect and let the man earn your attention for once. And always.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Dating is an ego trip for him. He’s going to play dumb to your advances. He’ll ask why you’re interested in him in particular and want every specific reason. He’s going to play the oblivious beau in an attempt to make you prove yourself again and again until he feels satisfied the deck is stacked generously in his favor.

PROBLEM: He can’t let you have the satisfaction of knowing he wants you, too.

WHY IS THIS A PROBLEM? He wants you to stew shamefully in his shadow while he basks in the glory of having you dangling from his dick.

SOLUTION: Don’t tell him squat. Don’t stroke his ego and don’t play along. A guy who really likes you isn’t going to make you jump through hoops like a well trained animal. A guy who really likes you believes you when you tell him you like him.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

This guy is in awe of your presence, your boundless self-love, and is enamored with your resolve to take charge. He knows you’re full of life and feels he must be the one to bring you crashing back down to earth.

PROBLEM: He’s going to spend all his time finding out what gets under your skin and use it to try and put you in check.

WHY IS THIS A PROBLEM? He’s going to insult you, look down his nose at you, and do his best to try and bring you down to the level which he feels you are and should remain. He wants you feeling insecure so you’ll prove yourself to him. He wants the power of controlling you.

SOLUTION: Ditch him. And don’t take anything he says the slightest bit seriously. Recognize that he’s so insecure he doesn’t feel you’d give him the time of day any other way.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Egotistic people shit on others to preserve their own fragile self-image.

When someone has to resort to being an egomaniacal ass to gain the respect of those they want to enslave and control, we need to recognize them for what they are, and show them we’re better and smarter than they believe us to be.

We can do that by throwing them out the window and kicking them in the nads with some good old fashioned blatant disregard and staunch intolerance.

Let them find an ego boost elsewhere. We’re too kind, considerate, empathetic, and too damn busy.

How to manage egomaniacs in your office

    Written by Mellissah SmithManagement7 comments

I don’t know about you, but egomaniacs scare the ‘b’jesus out of me’. I am terrified of them, but still I find myself sucked into their web of soul destroying destruction.

As much as they are charming, good at ‘selling a story’ and surrounded by people, they are manipulative, obsessive and bullies.

By definition ( Wikipedia ), egomania is an obsessive preoccupation with one’s self and applies to someone who follows their own ungoverned impulses and is possessed by delusions of personal greatness and feels a lack of appreciation.

More likened to the clinical narcissistic personality disorder, there are egomaniacs in all walks of life, but its important to be aware of who they are in yours and know which way is the best way to deal with them.

In my profession as a marketing consultant, I am surrounded by egomaniacs. In life, many of my friends also have a healthy sense of ego, but the true egomaniacs are best to keep ‘on side’ but do try to steer away from them. Here’s why:

1. If you are not on their side, they will stomp on you and make sure no-one else is either. Given that egomaniacs are also charming, be aware, they can charm the pants of someone – literally.
2. They won’t accept rejection. Rejection in any form, comes with a pay-back clause.
3. They are always right and if you dare to not think they are right, they are good ‘campaigners’.
4. They have to be liked , so their passive aggressive behaviour may stomp on you and belittle you to others with untruths. But don’t be surprised if in no time, they come back to you with something they think you cannot refuse. Like earlier this year, I cut ties with an egomaniac, and after being a bully and horrible, a week later he sent me an email saying that he has a “billionaire to invest in my business”. This is typical egomaniac behaviour. Never fall for this bait as its their way of trying to be ‘liked’ and feeds their passive aggressive behaviours.
5. They will do absolutely anything to get their own way and to get people on-side, if you have fallen off-side. Anything includes using whatever means they have to woo people.

It’s not all doom and gloom. Egomaniacs exist in the world. I have just finished reading Simon Cowells book and he is out there and proud to be an ‘egomaniac’. He’s successful, so many egomaniacs believe that it is ok to be ‘who they are’ because that is what ‘stars are made of’.

Why is being an egomaniac bad for your personal brand?

Here’s how I have learned to deal with egomaniacs.

1. Check your own ego at the door: We all have egos, but hopefully its just a healthy amount. When you come face to face with an egomaniac, know that they are not worth your time and energy. Think about how you can reduce your interaction with them. If they have a point of view, don’t challenge it, excuse yourself and go to the restroom. By challenging it, they will feel the need to win and you will lose or face the fate of their behaviours.
2. Get perspective: Life is short and we will always come across people with quirky personality types. Why its important to understand elements of an egomaniac is because they may go through stages of influence on how you view the world or certain people. Egomaniacs are self-serving so their opinions quite frankly don’t count. They are communicating only what they want for you to buy-into.
3. If you are on the receiving end of an egomaniacs tantrum of need for control over a situation, be assertive. Don’t let bullies win.
4. Understand where they are coming from. Most egomaniacs didn’t have enough love growing up, or their fathers left their mothers early on. No-one paid attention to them. They just want to be loved and appreciated and to be liked. They don’t know how else to act because no-one has taught them right from wrong and that you don’t need to win a fight to win. No-one has taught them compassion and kindness. They are after all, just big babies looking for approval.
5. Distance yourself. It’s a great psychological trick. If they are past 40 years of age, they won’t change. Keep them in small doses and when they get under your skin, just walk away. you don’t need to see them for another six months.

Why is a marketing blog on egomania important? I am writing this as it is a conversation I hear a lot about. Egomaniacs live in everyone’s life. We have to deal with them and the fact of the matter is that they often are in roles of authority. Knowing how to deal with them, will assist you in not being bullied by their antics, or seduced by their charm. It will make your life much happier – trust me. Talking from experience. As marketers, we do need to understand our audience.

Mellissah Smith

Mellissah Smith is a marketing expert, author, writer, public speaker and technology innovator. Having worked with more than 300 companies across technology, health and medical, professional services, manufacturing, transport and logistics, finance and sustainability industries, Mellissah has a well-established reputation as an experienced marketing professional with more than 20 years experience. As the founder and managing director of Marketing Eye, she has taken the company from startup to a multi-million dollar enterprise with offices in Australia and the US. Mellissah is also the Editor in Chief of Marketing Eye Magazine, a quarterly magazine that cover marketing, entrepreneurship, travel, health and wellbeing. #mellissah #marketingeye

“What is an egomaniac and egocentric behaviour” – understanding and handling egotistical people

We all know someone who has an ego problem, someone with an over-blown ego. These are the people who think everyone is looking up to them, or worse – wants to be them because they are just so smart – so smarter than the rest of us. We all know that everyone is a gift from God, but egomaniacs think they are the only gift. They regard themselves as talented in every sphere of life,even more so than the experts.

While they appear to be super-confident, any criticism destroys the egomaniacs. They’d rather be doing the criticism. Because they over-emphasise every little achievement on their part, they also tend to take lack of achievement/criticism very, very badly.

What is an egomaniac and egocentric behaviour: what we should understand about egomaniacs

What is an egomaniac and egocentric behaviour:how to deal with an egotistical people why everyone should sympathise with egomaniacs

When people feel insecure about themselves, they inflate their egos so they appear superior. Egomaniacs inflate their egos by deflating yours – they shoot you down to their level – they do what is termed ‘levelling’.

They go around shouting “look at me, I’m so wonderful” and “hey, I’ve done this and that, I am so smart!” Insecurity and low self esteem are the root of this behaviour. Most people can ignore the inflated egos, but the problem arises when they do that at somebody else’s expense – by shooting somebody down.

These people have normally been picked on or bullied and have now grown to protect themselves by taking on a certain demeanor. Least do they realise that their overinflated egos are driving their loved ones crazy and sometimes away. There is a thin line between confidence, arrogance and egotistical behaviour.

If a person is confident, there’s a relaxed air about them. If you are sexy, smart or talented, you don’t need to go around telling people you are, people will see it if it is there.

What is an egomaniac and egocentric behaviour: quotes for egomaniacs

What is an egomaniac and egocentric behaviour: quotes for egomaniacs

“Do not believe that it is very much of an advance to do the unnecessary three times as fast.” – Peter Drucker

“No trumpets sound when the important decisions of our life are made. Destiny is made known silently.” – Agnes De Miller, Dancer

“I am an agnostic; I do not pretend to know what many ignorant men are sure of.” – An Economist

“No matter what accomplishments you achieve, somebody helped you.”- Althea Gibson

How to Deal With EgomaniacsMike: My hunting buddy is a pretty good guy and a great hunter; he’s into conservation and getting kids involved and all that. But he’s obsessed with killing more deer and bigger deer than anyone else. Every year he gets hung up on being the number one deer killer in our parts. Is there anything you would suggest for me to do? I haven’t known him all that long, and he’s shown me some good hunting spots. But damn, sometimes I can’t stand to be around him and his ego.

BTW, I don’t care about numbers. I simply want to put some doe meat in the freezer and wait for a buck that is mature, like I have seen you do many times on TV. Thanks (name withheld so as not to PO my buddy).

Anonymous: I’ve been in all kinds of deer camps/clubs/lodges across America for more than 30 years and have run across a good many egomaniacs like you describe. While a few of them have turned out to be decent guys like you say your buddy is, most have been a——- with a capital A that I have no time or use for. Our lives and hunting time are too short; I want to hang and hunt with people I like and respect.

I’ve tried all sorts of approaches with egomaniacs–complete avoidance…cold shoulder when I’m in the same room listening to them brag about how great a hunter they are…politely confronting them and saying man, it doesn’t matter how many deer you kill or if yours is bigger than mine… No matter, I usually still never like these guys and never have a good time around them, so I avoid them.

Your case is a different though because you like this fellow some, and he has found you some good hunting spots. I suggest you bite your tongue and put up with his BS as best as you can for now. When he gets on your nerves too much, get up and leave–go hunting, go home, whatever. The next time you see him things ought to be better.

I don’t know how old this fellow is, but at some point in every hunter’s life the hunting becomes more important than the killing, though it takes longer for some people to get there. Hopefully soon your friend will start to realize that it’s not all about rack score and numbers of deer whacked and stacked, far from it. By then you’ll know him better and you might be able to talk this thing out man to man without blowing up your friendship.

Good luck, dealing with rude and arrogant people is never fun and never easy.

Home » Addiction Articles » Explaining the Egomaniac with an Inferiority Complex

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Article Contents

What Is an Egomaniac?

An egomaniac is someone who has an obsession with him or herself. The person has uncontrolled impulses and has self-delusions about his or her own greatness. This person often feels unappreciated by others and will take great strides to make him or herself happy over the happiness of others.

What Is an Inferiority Complex?

An inferiority complex is a feeling of inadequacy that is both unrealistic and prevalent throughout the person’s life. This can be caused by actual or assumed inferiority in some aspect of a person’s life. For instance, someone with an inferiority complex at work may feel he isn’t as educated as another person due to actually being uneducated or being uncertain about his own education.

To compensate for the inferiority complex, these individuals may become aggressive.

What Are the Signs of an Egomaniac with an Inferiority Complex?

There are several major signs that someone struggles with being an egomaniac and has an inferiority complex. These signs include:

  1. Exaggeration
  2. Ridicule
  3. Hyper sensitivity
  4. Hating losing
  5. Fishing for compliments
  6. Trouble paying attention to others

Exaggeration

Exaggerating may be something you do when you tell a story or want to make a joke, but in most situations, exaggerating isn’t a good idea. The people who tend to over-exaggerate details of an event tend to struggle with egomania and inferiority complexes because they want to overemphasize their worth to others.

Ridicule

Egomaniacs and those with an inferiority complex often ridicule others and put them down. This makes them feel better about themselves, but the judgment is more a case of trying to draw judgment away from themselves and placing it onto others. Whatever the personal defect they believe they have will be a point of sensitivity, so they will often draw attention to that defect in others.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Hyper Sensitivity

We’ve all had days where we feel emotionally sensitive to criticism or other things, but an egomaniac is far too sensitive to others’ opinions. People who struggle with this condition will take everything said about them too seriously and obsess over those comments. For instance, if someone points out a flaw you have, do you find yourself obsessing to change it or defending yourself unnecessarily? That can be a sign of an inferiority complex or egomania because you want to appear better to others.

Hating Losing

It’s not uncommon for people to hate losing at a game or event, but those struggling with inferiority complexes already feel they are losers; losing simply exposes greater faults in their personalities. If you have this condition, you’ll hate losing because you think it reflects on your personal reputation and makes people think less of you. It hurts you to lose because you think of it as a failure even though you must fail sometimes in order to learn.

Fishing for Compliments

Everyone fishes for compliments sometimes; a new love interest may fish for a compliment to see how much you like them, or vice-versa. Fishing for compliments reaches a new level when egomaniacs are involved. They love receiving compliments and if they struggle with an inferiority complex, then they need those compliments to feel secure in a relationship or situation. It’s easy for these individuals to talk down about themselves just to get others to say positive things about them.

Problems Paying Attention

Someone who focuses on themselves all the time won’t be very good at listening to others, and this is a sign of an egomaniac. They can have a hard time listening to you (or you may have a hard time listening to others). They may seem uninterested in what you have to say or may be lost in their own thoughts, making it nearly impossible to hold a conversation. They may be obsessing about how to respond, what they look like, or how what they say will reflect on them.

It’s often the case that those struggling with addiction also have aspects of this personality. The combination of negative behaviors can influence a person to begin using drugs or to abuse alcohol to relax or stop thinking as much about troublesome situations. During recovery, this attitude must be resolved to help you overcome addiction and dependency on substances.

How Can I Learn More About Recovery Services Near Me?

If you struggle with addiction and feel you may also struggle with egomania and an inferiority complex, there is help available. We are waiting at 1-855-211-7837 to take your call. Whether you’re interested in a mental-health program near you or want to find out more about addiction services that can help, we can help you get involved with the right program as soon as possible. Visit us online to learn more about the treatments available for your condition at www.yourfirststep.org .

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How to spot, deal with, and avoid them

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

The ego is a tragic thing.

It’s shatters faster than it can be built. It’s an institution for which there is no proper schooling, and a place where delusions thrive like mold on wet garbage. They can become bigger than an elephant in an outhouse.

People give in to their egos the same way an abandoned building on the haughty side of town gives way to a bulldozer tearing it down to make way for the next five diamond hotel. One they can regale themselves in on the lavish rooftop while looking down on the pathetic passersby who shan’t be let in.

Egos need a huge boost when the going gets tough.

Egoists can’t accept being snubbed because they’re an overblown asshole, or a persistently perverse dickhead. The world would stop if their bubble burst. They desperately need to bleed out that painful, festering wound with some humility.

Harsh words to an egoist sting like pouring rubbing alcohol on a stab wound. Silence results in an explosion of bitterness that culminates in, “I can’t believe they don’t want me. How could anyone resist me? I’m so great I can’t live down the fact I’m being tossed aside for someone better, because there is no one better.”

There’s a certain kind of man who thinks he doesn’t have to do much when it comes to dating. He feels women should come to him and when they do, he doesn’t need to give anything in return but empty smiles, disregard, and a few bone shaped, generic treats when things start turning away from his intended direction.

Dating is a dance that both parties must equally partake in. If one side gets more attention, the other can feel they’re being taken for granted. No one wants to feel like they need a step stool to be on equal terms.

Here are some egotistical jerkwads you may encounter and how to deal with them.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

He feigns interest long enough to get you twisted, then disappears into next week without a trace. He texts threes days later, never emails back, and says he didn’t have a charger when his battery died, so of course he couldn’t have called you.

PROBLEM: He’s thinks throwing you a bone or two in the form of excuses and pseudo-interest every now and then is good enough.

WHY IS THIS A PROBLEM? Because he can count on you to be sitting around waiting for him like the faithful little doggie you’ve always been.

SOLUTION: STOP WAITING FOR HIM. This guy doesn’t want you. If he did, he wouldn’t pretend, stall, or frequently disappear. Procrastination isn’t a sign of endearment, it’s a sign of inflamed, cystic bullshit.

Keep dating others. If you’re free when he shows up three months from now wanting to take you out and you feel like letting him, go for it. Pay attention to those paying attention to you.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

He only engages with you when you do all the work. Otherwise you don’t hear from him. His logic is, “I can count on her to do it all, so I don’t have to.”

You get to call, stop by, make all the plans, make all the moves, while he sits backs and enjoys the free entertainment.

PROBLEM: He’s indifferent to your entire existence. You could be anyone, and he doesn’t care who. He’s taking what he can get because you’re giving.

WHY IS THIS A PROBLEM? You’re allowing yourself to become a forgettable woman of convenience. You’re his Uber/Postmates/Molly Maids/Tinder match.

You think giving him everything and doing everything for him is going to get you the relationship you want. It won’t. He’ll gladly take everything you freely hand over to him… all while he’s getting off his ass and pursuing the women he actually wants to date.

SOLUTION: Stop getting played and catering to some insecure man’s every whim. Get some self-respect and let the man earn your attention for once. And always.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Dating is an ego trip for him. He’s going to play dumb to your advances. He’ll ask why you’re interested in him in particular and want every specific reason. He’s going to play the oblivious beau in an attempt to make you prove yourself again and again until he feels satisfied the deck is stacked generously in his favor.

PROBLEM: He can’t let you have the satisfaction of knowing he wants you, too.

WHY IS THIS A PROBLEM? He wants you to stew shamefully in his shadow while he basks in the glory of having you dangling from his dick.

SOLUTION: Don’t tell him squat. Don’t stroke his ego and don’t play along. A guy who really likes you isn’t going to make you jump through hoops like a well trained animal. A guy who really likes you believes you when you tell him you like him.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

This guy is in awe of your presence, your boundless self-love, and is enamored with your resolve to take charge. He knows you’re full of life and feels he must be the one to bring you crashing back down to earth.

PROBLEM: He’s going to spend all his time finding out what gets under your skin and use it to try and put you in check.

WHY IS THIS A PROBLEM? He’s going to insult you, look down his nose at you, and do his best to try and bring you down to the level which he feels you are and should remain. He wants you feeling insecure so you’ll prove yourself to him. He wants the power of controlling you.

SOLUTION: Ditch him. And don’t take anything he says the slightest bit seriously. Recognize that he’s so insecure he doesn’t feel you’d give him the time of day any other way.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Egotistic people shit on others to preserve their own fragile self-image.

When someone has to resort to being an egomaniacal ass to gain the respect of those they want to enslave and control, we need to recognize them for what they are, and show them we’re better and smarter than they believe us to be.

We can do that by throwing them out the window and kicking them in the nads with some good old fashioned blatant disregard and staunch intolerance.

Let them find an ego boost elsewhere. We’re too kind, considerate, empathetic, and too damn busy.

It would be possible to describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense; it would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure.

How to Deal with Egomaniacs

“Everyone wants to be right, but no one stops to consider if their idea of right is right.”
Frederick Matthias Alexander

This is a post on how to deal with egomaniacs Kay’s style.

Egomaniacs, in my own personal definition, are people who think highly of themselves.

They think they are superior than the rest.

Their ways are always right to them and if anyone goes the opposite direction, those people are wrong to them.

They wanted to be right despite knowing that they might be wrong.

Despite owning a little attributes of a narcissist (yes, I can never love anyone as much as I love myself (ღ˘⌣˘ღ), wtf), I am myself a “victim” to a few egomaniacs.

Egomaniacs are, in my opinion, in a way narcissists, but the problem with them is that they never seem to be able to mind their own business.

Allow me to present some better definitions of egomaniacs from some more reliable sources.

egomania – an intense and irresistible love for yourself and concern for your own needs

egomaniac – an abnormally egotistical person

A person obsessed with their own (supposed) importance.

someone who behaves in an unreasonable or crazy way because they think that they and their ideas are extremely important

These people can be annoyingly annoying and they can sometimes make you feel like a failure, so it is very important to know how to deal with this people especially if you are destined to be around with these people.

1. Ignore them!

These people crave for attention!

They believe that their existence are so important that if they are not around the world will be in a mess.

I’m not asking you to stop talking to them or pretend not to see them when they are actually in front of you.

No! That would be ridiculous and childish.

Show lack of interest when they talk (especially when it comes to insulting you).

Pretend you mind is somewhere else.

Make them repeat what they have just said.

2. Have fun dealing with them.

Honestly, egomaniacs are not all that bad (humans are not perfect remember?).

They can be fun too.

Dealing with them (ONCE IN A WHILE) can add excitement to a dull life.

Seriously, it gets your mind working.

Instead of thinking of it this way,

Oh Lord, why do I have to deal with this egomaniac?!

with tonnes of frustration, let’s think this way,

How do I deal with this egomaniac and how do I ease his ego a little?

View it as a puzzle game.

Alright, you might think I am twisted but hey, dealing with egomaniacs almost every single day in my life, how can I not be twisted?

3. Stay away from them.

Last option if none of the above works.

It can be REALLY tough dealing with these people.

Well, we are humans, we lose patience once in a while.

The best way to do when you are at your limit is to stay away from them for a while.

You can’t stay away from them forever, especially when they are relatives or colleagues at work, but when you are at your limit, avoid talking to them, because talking to an egomaniac requires loads of patience!

Here’s a picture of a cute tatty teddy (totally unrelated) for this boring post.

How to manage egomaniacs in your office

I don’t know about you, but egomaniacs scare the ‘b’jesus out of me’. I am terrified of them, but still I find myself sucked into their web of soul destroying destruction.

As much as they are charming, good at ‘selling a story’ and surrounded by people, they are manipulative, obsessive and bullies.

By definition ( Wikipedia ), egomania is an obsessive preoccupation with one’s self and applies to someone who follows their own ungoverned impulses and is possessed by delusions of personal greatness and feels a lack of appreciation.

More likened to the clinical narcissistic personality disorder, there are egomaniacs in all walks of life, but its important to be aware of who they are in yours and know which way is the best way to deal with them.

In my profession as a marketing consultant, I am surrounded by egomaniacs. In life, many of my friends also have a healthy sense of ego, but the true egomaniacs are best to keep ‘on side’ but do try to steer away from them. Here’s why:

1. If you are not on their side, they will stomp on you and make sure no-one else is either. Given that egomaniacs are also charming, be aware, they can charm the pants of someone – literally.
2. They won’t accept rejection. Rejection in any form, comes with a pay-back clause.
3. They are always right and if you dare to not think they are right, they are good ‘campaigners’.
4. They have to be liked , so their passive aggressive behaviour may stomp on you and belittle you to others with untruths. But don’t be surprised if in no time, they come back to you with something they think you cannot refuse. Like earlier this year, I cut ties with an egomaniac, and after being a bully and horrible, a week later he sent me an email saying that he has a “billionaire to invest in my business”. This is typical egomaniac behaviour. Never fall for this bait as its their way of trying to be ‘liked’ and feeds their passive aggressive behaviours.
5. They will do absolutely anything to get their own way and to get people on-side, if you have fallen off-side. Anything includes using whatever means they have to woo people.

It’s not all doom and gloom. Egomaniacs exist in the world. I have just finished reading Simon Cowells book and he is out there and proud to be an ‘egomaniac’. He’s successful, so many egomaniacs believe that it is ok to be ‘who they are’ because that is what ‘stars are made of’.

Why is being an egomaniac bad for your personal brand?

Here’s how I have learned to deal with egomaniacs.

1. Check your own ego at the door: We all have egos, but hopefully its just a healthy amount. When you come face to face with an egomaniac, know that they are not worth your time and energy. Think about how you can reduce your interaction with them. If they have a point of view, don’t challenge it, excuse yourself and go to the restroom. By challenging it, they will feel the need to win and you will lose or face the fate of their behaviours.
2. Get perspective: Life is short and we will always come across people with quirky personality types. Why its important to understand elements of an egomaniac is because they may go through stages of influence on how you view the world or certain people. Egomaniacs are self-serving so their opinions quite frankly don’t count. They are communicating only what they want for you to buy-into.
3. If you are on the receiving end of an egomaniacs tantrum of need for control over a situation, be assertive. Don’t let bullies win.
4. Understand where they are coming from. Most egomaniacs didn’t have enough love growing up, or their fathers left their mothers early on. No-one paid attention to them. They just want to be loved and appreciated and to be liked. They don’t know how else to act because no-one has taught them right from wrong and that you don’t need to win a fight to win. No-one has taught them compassion and kindness. They are after all, just big babies looking for approval.
5. Distance yourself. It’s a great psychological trick. If they are past 40 years of age, they won’t change. Keep them in small doses and when they get under your skin, just walk away. you don’t need to see them for another six months.

Why is a marketing blog on egomania important? I am writing this as it is a conversation I hear a lot about. Egomaniacs live in everyone’s life. We have to deal with them and the fact of the matter is that they often are in roles of authority. Knowing how to deal with them, will assist you in not being bullied by their antics, or seduced by their charm. It will make your life much happier – trust me. Talking from experience. As marketers, we do need to understand our audience.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

As a psychiatrist and psychotherapist, many clients seek my help handling difficult relationships. Although the old saying “it takes two to tango” is almost always true, often I am convinced that my client is not the one with the enduring problem. Instead, he or she is having a tough time dealing with a more difficult personality. Whether it be a spouse, friend, coworker, or boss, it is clear that there are some folks who are just hard to navigate. Often these individuals have what is clinically called a personality disorder. Personality disorders are marked by a longstanding pattern of beliefs and behaviors that are inflexible, maladaptive, and cause distress to the affected individual and those around him or her.

We all have our ways of dealing with conflict in our relationships. However, in a workplace setting, these methods often fail us. We cannot simply avoid a hostile boss. It would be inappropriate to motivate an unproductive employee with an ice cream cone. When confronted with personality quirks in the office, we need to maintain composure and act according to best practices. In a difficult dyad, it is very helpful to first define what kind of individual you are dealing with, then tailor your response to his or her limitations. Below are some common forms of personality disorders and suggestions for how to handle them.

Narcissistic personality disorder. The term “narcissistic” is often thrown around in casual conversation. Most of us can have some narcissistic traits, but an individual with this type of personality disorder continually seeks fame, fortune, and power. They view themselves as special, and believe they deserve to socialize with other special people. They need excessive admiration and will exploit others to achieve their own goals. When confronted with a narcissist, it is helpful to recognize that although he or she appears arrogant and impervious to criticism, underneath there is a very fragile sense of self, fear of failure, anxiety, and shame. It is therefore important to constantly acknowledge any positive contributions. Whether it is a boss or a coworker, publicly and personally commend them whenever possible. When giving negative feedback, make sure you couch criticism in a “complement sandwich.” In other words, try to identify and state something positive that the individual has accomplished before and after you discuss what needs improvement.

Dependent Personality Disorder. Those suffering from this type of disorder tend to be overly clingy, need others to assume responsibility for major areas of living, and are fearful of being alone. They have a tough time making decisions, are reluctant to disagree with others, and engage in activities to receive approval and support, even when they are unpleasant. Those with dependent personalities are rarely in leadership roles, but are rather stuck in junior positions despite having certain strengths. If you are managing someone with dependent personality disorder, your job is to make he or she feel empowered. Start by introducing responsibilities just beyond their comfort zone. Acknowledge their success, or gently give one on one constructive feedback. Once your employee has had some successes, set firm boundaries. Clearly articulate expectations and your confidence in them to handle whatever emerges. Maintain a once weekly meeting or email conversation where they can consult or trouble shoot with you, but encourage independence in the interim.

Histrionic Personality Disorder. These are individuals who need to be the center of attention, are flirtatious and seductive, and use their physical appearance to gain popularity. He or she is highly suggestible, and frequently blurs the boundaries between personal and professional relationships. The most important rule in dealing with a histrionic employee is to set firm boundaries. Clearly state that certain behaviors and dress are not appropriate for the workplace, and professionalism is required for any member of your company to succeed. Do not respond to the flirtations, no matter how alluring or seductive. Be very specific and unemotional with requests and feedback. Calmly but firmly resist any gesture to extend the relationship beyond the workplace.

Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder. This is a very different syndrome than obsessive compulsive disorder, in which individuals engage in repetitive thoughts and behaviors to eliminate an underlying anxious condition. Those with obsessive compulsive personality disorder are overly preoccupied with rules, orderliness, neatness, and a need for perfection. They are controlling, intolerant, and inflexible. Their intense rigidity leads to preoccupation with lists, details, and rules, making them inefficient and indecisive. Encourage these individuals that they do not need to be perfect in order to be successful. Reiterate that “perfection is often the enemy of the good,” and that it is more realistic to learn from experience than to foresee the ideal solution. Since these individuals are commonly overly committed to work at the expense of leisure activity and relationships, encourage them to take vacations and breaks to avoid burnout and preserve their skills.

Thankfully, most people we work with do not have full blown personality disorders, although inevitably there are a few. By targeting your coping strategies to the particular individual, you will be in a much better position to manage up or down, and succeed regardless of the difficult patterns in the relationship.

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I recently just finished filming my first feature length film. It was a nightmare due to one guy there.

It started out ok. For about the first 30 minutes, that is. On the first filming day, he started yelling at me (the director and writer) because he said that, “My head doesn’t have to be in every shot!” It only got worse.

We have been friends for a while now, and it’s strange that he would let artistic differences get in the way. Sure, he gave me ideas for the film. He was essential to the filmmaking process. But he just got SO annoying and mean. If he couldn’t get the line right (as the main actor) he would insult my script. He would constantly yell at everyone else for messing up. I never yelled at anyone for messing up. I just knew that it was an accident and we can just do it over. He let the f-words fly.

After a while, he got paranoid. He thought that I wouldn’t credit him like he needed to be credited, and he talked to the cinematographer about this, and told the cinematographer that “both of us deserve director spots just like him.” The cinematographer talked to me about him saying that, and then the egomaniac approached me later, saying that only he himself deserved a directing spot and the cinematographer doesn’t. I didn’t mind giving them those spots, but it always seems like he’s in it for him and only him.

Later, it was time to go downtown and get one shot for the film. The both of them wanted to take all of the equipment, such as the microphone and cords and the stand, and I told them that we didn’t need to, seeing as this shot was going to have no sound in it. They took it anyway, because they wanted to look professional in front of all the passerbys. When we were getting the stuff all set up, the lead actor (and now co-director) starts yelling at me from across the road to turn the camera on and start filming, and I said, “We haven’t got these cords hooked up yet.” Finally, when we did, we turned it on and filmed.

When he came back, he was ticked off because I didn’t turn the camera on, and I again told him we didn’t have all of those “professional” cords hooked up, and he said, “Well I figured you’d do it anyway.” I told him he didn’t have to get so mad about it, and he said, “Well the thing is, yeah, I am mad.” And I went off on him in the middle of downtown, with people walking all around, because I had been pushed to my limits. We are in this yelling match, and finally he calls me a dumba**. After all we’d been through as friends, he would call me a dumba**.

When we got in the car, he called my a hypocrite for yelling at him when I didn’t like that he yelled. I didn’t like that he yelled because it was over stupid stuff like someone messing up a line or not getting his way or something. This is also coming from the guy that threatened to quit because he didn’t like the sound of the wind we were thinking about using for one shot. He told me he was debating between calling me a dumba** or a f***er, and decided on the lighter one. What am I supposed to say? Thanks?

The filming was near end, and the last day he didn’t yell but was just in that attitude. He told me, “Just because you’re the editor doesn’t mean you get to decide what goes into the movie.” Yeah, well I’m the writer and director as well.

It was so much better after we finished filming. But lately he’s been talking to me about some of the stuff I’ve been editing and is always like “you didn’t do this did you?” or “don’t put that in” and the like, when it’s my final decision.

My question is, HOW ON EARTH DO YOU DEAL WITH THESE KINDS OF PEOPLE. I mean, I’m sure the logical thing to say would be like, “Don’t work with them.” But what about when you already are and you have no choice? I don’t think he could ever understand anyone else’s point of view but his own.

egomania

e·go·ma·ni·a

egomania

e·go·ma·ni·a

egomania

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How to work for an egomaniac leader

A while ago, my colleague Vince Molinaro wrote a great rant about the 10 worst types of leaders. You can read the full post here. When I came across it again, I had the inspiration to write a monthly series on how you and your team can survive under a terrible leader. This is the seventh post in that series.

The seventh type of terrible leader Vince describes is the egomaniac leader. These are the leaders who think they are the center of the universe. As Vince says, they think “everything revolves around them and their ideas are the only good ones.” If this is true of your boss, he clearly needs to get a grip, but you’re not in a position to disabuse your egotistical team leader of his delusions of grandeur.

If you have an egomaniac leader, you’re probably annoyed and exasperated a lot. But unlike if you have an insecure leader or incompetent leader, your egomaniac leader probably doesn’t threaten the ability of you and your entire team to be successful. Because all of an egomaniac’s energy is going into propping up her ego, there’s not much time to make life miserable for you. So take a deep breath, and use these techniques to deal with your egomaniac boss.

Don’t Believe the Hype

It might be easy to get sucked into the vortex of your boss’ giant ego, but that would be a mistake. Keep a firm grip on reality and make sure you know where your boss really is strong and capable and where his confidence far out strips his competence. One risk of the egomaniacal boss is that his boasting makes people think your team can deliver more than is possible. You need to manage expectations and provide the voice of reason to other stakeholders in the organization. Another important reason not to believe the hype is that you might start losing your self and your own contribution in the giant shadow cast by his ego. Try to stay tuned in to who really is making things happen.

Don’t Show Them the Love

Egomaniacs want love and adoration and to find others who think they’re as swell as they do. It’s best not to feed the beast, even though that might be the easiest way to create a connection with her. If you start out trying to ingratiate yourself by heaping on the praise, you’ll probably just raise expectations to the point that the things you’ll have to come out with will make you want to gag. Instead, when your boss starts making it all about herself, just shut down: withdraw eye contact, stop nodding or reinforcing her comments, just be disinterested. Instead, smile and engage when she mentions others or takes a more balanced approach to the situation. This is basic psychology and will slowly but surely motivate your boss to stop obsessing about her own fabulousness.

Find Other Sources of Recognition

Your egomaniac boss is probably not spending much time lavishing you with praise. That’s because the egomaniac thinks that praise is a zero-sum game and that if he says something nice about you, that must mean his awesomeness is diminished. So, don’t wait for the boss who thinks he’s the universe’s gift to your organization to give you a pat on the back. Document and keep track of your contributions and accomplishments and when you find an appropriate opportunity, share those successes with other leaders .

Working for an egomaniac leader will probably leave you craving a little respect, but it’s not the worst thing that can possibly happen. If you can laugh to yourself about the marvel that is your team leader, the miraculous good fortune you had in getting to work for the most stupendously talented leader in the history of mankind, you’ll come out no worse for the wear. (If that fails, go with the tried and true approach of drawing mustaches on the boss’ picture!)

  • How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Having the last word for some people means winning the argument. Whilst this clearly isn’t always true, it is a frustrating trait that applies to more than just Wikipedia!

It is worth remembering that the person who wins the debate is not necessarily the person who shouts the loudest, or gets in the last word.

Often a person with this personality is likely to be an egomaniac or bordering on being one. An egomaniac can be defined as a person who is obsessively self-centred or egotistical.

Why do egomaniacs feel the need to have the last word?

There are many reasons people behave as they do. Trying to understand the psyche behind aggressive behaviours can help to plan your course of action if you regularly deal with people who insist on always having the last word.

Insecurity:

Somebody who lacks confidence or self-esteem may try to assert themselves in other ways, by expressing himself or herself in a forceful way. This is a familiar scenario in bullying, where often the aggressor is a victim in another way.

Should this be the possible reason for their insistence on having the last word, trying to discuss your differences with sensitivity might help to reach a peaceful outcome. They probably need to be heard more strongly than they need to feel validated.

Arrogance:

A person with extreme arrogance may genuinely not be able to accept that they might be incorrect, or that another person’s opinion is equally as valid as their own. This is an unfortunate trait to have, and it may be that an extremely arrogant person simply isn’t worth arguing within any circumstance.

Egocentricity:

Some people simply need to be the centre of attention, and will argue black is white in order to keep the spotlight. This can occur for lots of reasons; they might feel ignored in their home life, or feel impotent in other areas of their social or professional relationships.

If a person is unreasonable simply for attention, it isn’t wise to stroke their ego. You will only find yourself drawn into their appeals for attention, and may be supporting their egocentricity by doing so.

Power:

Having the last word can be perceived as powerful, often by people who lack assertiveness in other areas of their lives. This is a difficult scenario to deal with, as you are the unwitting recipient of their onslaught that is enforcing their own feelings of control and power.

Try not to be drawn into a debate with this person; they will do their utmost to drive you down for their own self-esteem.

Anger:

Refusal to debate calmly can be a reaction to feelings of anger, and shouting down an opponent is a way to express their feelings. In this situation, it may be best to revisit the discussion when the other person has had time to calm down. Otherwise, debating with an angry opponent could quickly turn into a volatile situation.

Dominance:

As with power, a person who feels the innate need to dominate others or to establish their seniority may do so by insisting they have the final word in any conversation. A scenario most likely to exist in the workplace, people can try to demonstrate their dominance over peers or colleagues by forcing them to concede an argument.

In this situation, you need to reinforce your own self-esteem, and perhaps have a third party step in. Don’t be crushed by another person’s drive to control your actions; make sure your voice is heard even when you are speaking quietly.

How should you deal with an egomaniac, and is there any way to have a productive debate?

When you are having a discussion with somebody who refuses to listen, it is wise to choose not to continue the conversation. This might sound counterproductive, but channelling energy and time into a scenario that is never going to have a mutually agreeable outcome is not a worthwhile investment.

If an opponent makes the decision to step away from the debate, this can entirely diffuse the situation. You are not obliged to continue a dialogue that makes you feel uncomfortable. Nor is it your sole responsibility to change the mind of a person who refuses to listen to reason.

Take a step back. There is a better chance that your arguments will mature over time and that any valid points you have made will remain in their thought process and perhaps inform behaviour in time.

Keep your own poise

Feeling frustrated is understandable. If you are trying to reach an agreement in a fruitless discussion, you might feel embattled and try ever more strenuously to communicate your perspective.

If a debate is continuing to escalate, at some point this needs to end before it turns into a heated exchange which is a negative experience for all involved.

In order to de-escalate a tense situation, you might do well to agree to disagree. You don’t ever have to agree with something which you feel is wrong or incorrect, but you can express your acceptance of another person’s point of view without having to concede that you are not right.

Silence speaks volumes

Don’t feel drawn or forced into an impossible discussion. If you know that you are dealing with an egomaniac that has no intention of considering another perspective, you can decide not to engage in the conversation.

Being the bigger person isn’t always the easiest course of action, but may save your headspace from becoming bogged down with an argument that you were never going to win.

Particularly in contentious circumstances (politics springs straight to mind!) it might be wiser to say nothing at all and keep your peace.

References:

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

  • Feeling Annoyed with Everything and Everyone? 5 Unexpected Causes – August 7, 2020
  • 4 Things to Do When Someone Is Mean to You for No Reason – July 27, 2020
  • How to Express Your Feelings as an Emotionally Distant Person – July 22, 2020

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Synonyms for egomania

concern only for oneself

Synonyms

Words related to egomania

an intense and irresistible love for yourself and concern for your own needs

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How to Deal With EgomaniacsEgomaniacs are around every corner of the recruiting world. They’re in every industry; every department. While that doesn’t sound very appealing, there are things to consider before writing them off completely when it comes to hiring. Egomaniacs are often some of the best employees available. With an already competitive industry, it’s hard to weed out top talent that will do more harm than good while working for your company. Egoists are negative emotion catchers that thrive on making others feel bad about themselves. Most of the time, they’re more capable of doing their job than average workers. In fact, their skill set is unmatched in many cases.

Unfortunately, there are some individualists that tend to offer only negative effects in the workplace. These people suck the life out of a department and never hold themselves accountable for their mistakes or actions.

These are the ones that must be weeded out during the recruiting process. Otherwise, you’ll spend more time and money than needed on a problem-employee. Below, you’ll find several tips that will help you not only identify egomaniacs that are more arrogant than confident, but also deal with the ones that will eventually be an asset to your company as well.

If you missed our last blog post, be sure to visit back with it before moving on. You’ll find more information about egomaniacs and how they interact with individuals. If your firm or HR department needs help organizing resumes and sorting your talent pool, our free applicant tracking system for small business hiring can make life easier. Keep reading to see how Recruiteze saves you time and money.

Recruiting Egomaniacs

How to Deal With EgomaniacsBe unbiased. Staying neutral while dealing with an egomaniac is key. If they feel like they’re making you feel one way or another, they’ll demand even more of your feelings. You’ll be left insecure and without confidence. Instead, remain calm, read their body language and consider what they’re saying verbally rather than reacting emotionally.

Ignore negativity. People are sometimes rude and inconsiderate for seemingly no reason. This is how an egoist operates. They’ll take someone who’s in a happy mood down in no time if allowed. That means ignoring their negativity and rudeness is important. Don’t let your emotions fall from positive. They feel better about themselves when negativity is the frontrunner in emotions. They prey on making life harder for others.

Be considerate. Learning to empathize with someone else’s life situation can go a long way in changing the way we view their actions and intentions. If someone is searching for a new job, it’s possible they may be extremely unhappy in their current role, or be feeling significant financial pressure in their personal lives. Regardless, it can be helpful to attempt to get to know what motivates them, and what they are looking for.

Be patient. Egoists require a big more energy and work than typical candidates. That means the overall process of hiring will not only take longer, but also be more taxing on you. At this point, you may feel like you’re losing patience. Instead, make time for the inconvenience. Plan ahead to leave yourself some room to breathe. This will help you keep your patience. It’ll also allow you extra time so that you’re not getting behind on other candidates or work that should be getting done.

Be personable. You might find yourself wanting to ignore egomaniacs altogether. Instead, be kind and considerate to them. Ask about their hobbies, passions and life outside work. Talk about yourself in the same capacity. Interacting with them should be more soulful than transactional.

Stay positive. When all else fails, just smile and keep going. Turning to a negative mindset is the worst thing you could do. It’s only natural to get angry. It’s also normal to feel yourself starting to lose patience. Instead, stay positive. Don’t let them lower you down. You’re in charge of your emotional state. Don’t let them have the upper hand. Stay positive and happy, no matter what comes your way.

Recruiting is a competitive world that can prove to be difficult. Making sure your hiring strategies are on point and able to handle even the biggest egos, you’ll be more than happy with the end results. Stay positive, hold them accountable for their actions and behavior. Don’t lose patience and continue interacting with egomaniacs, even when you’re at the end of your rope!

Recruiteze Is the Best Applicant Tracking System for Small Business Hiring Needs

How to Deal With EgomaniacsLooking for help with recruiting new employees? If so, you can access our free recruiting solutions for free! We offer free basic memberships without obligation for all of our recruiting products. Recruiteze is a free applicant tracking system for small business hiring projects. It allows your candidates to apply to your available job postings and have their resume added to your database immediately.

Already using a ATS for small business recruiting to help you track job candidates? iReformat makes the perfect addition. iReformat allows you to format resumes with ease for free! In addition, we are proud to offer you a free 15 day trial of any of our other memberships. Other packages start at $10 per month and offer unlimited support, users, and more!

Let us help you take the boring work out of your recruiting projects. Don’t hesitate to use Recruiteze and iReformat to help reduce the time consuming process of hiring new employees and filtering through resumes and applications. If you have any questions or are interested in our enterprise package that offers unlimited access to all our services contact us today!

Use These Ideas to Know How to Deal With Your Difficult Boss

Nothing is more destructive in the workplace than difficult bosses. Every employee has a series of bosses over their working career. Hopefully, most of your bosses are competent, kind, and even, worthy of your trust and respect.

This is the type of boss that employees love. A boss who selects a proper management style for each workplace situation and a boss who understands the difference between Theory X and Theory Y management styles.

Unfortunately, too often, employees have difficult bosses who impact their ​desire to engage and contribute to work. It is no surprise that employees who quit their job are most frequently leaving their bosses, not necessarily the company or their job.

As the single most disruptive or contributing relationship in the workplace, getting along with the boss is critical for employee retention. Find out more about how to deal with difficult bosses. Someday, you may find yourself reporting to a very difficult and maybe even a downright bad boss. Here’s how you can best deal with this trying situation.

Bad to the Bone: Dealing With a Bad Boss or Bad Managers

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

You’re weary. You’re frustrated. You’re unhappy. You’re demotivated. Your interaction with your boss leaves you cold. He’s a bully, intrusive, controlling, picky and petty. He takes credit for your work, never provides positive feedback and misses each meeting he schedules with you.

He’s a bad boss, he’s bad to the bone. Dealing with a less than competent manager or just plain bad managers and bad bosses is a challenge too many employees face. These ideas will help you deal with your bad boss.

How to Fire Your Bad Boss

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Is your bad boss more difficult than the average bad boss who is just not very good with recognition and clear direction? Your bad boss, in contrast, is a nasty, demeaning, motivation-destroying, screaming bully. This is the type of bad boss you may want to invest the time to fire.

But, you need to proceed carefully and in an informed manner so that you don’t take yourself and your career down in the process. Find out how.

What Makes a Bad Boss – Bad?

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Nothing sparks more commentary than asking about what makes managers bad bosses. With the lengthy comments received from readers, some common themes in site visitor responses about bosses are found.

Want to avoid becoming a bad boss? Afraid that you may already be considered a bad boss? Just want to commiserate with other people who have bad bosses?

Are You the Victim of a Bad Boss?

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

How many times have you witnessed an employee working in a supervisory position who doesn’t have the knowledge or skills needed to do the job? Have you asked why some bosses get the management roles that they do?

Because these issues exist in the workplace, It is predictable that at least once in your work life, you will do your job at the mercy of a bad boss.

How to Tick Off Your Boss

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Face it. There are probably things that you do that drive your manager up against a wall. And, as a result, you think of her as a bad boss. You need to identify the actions you take and the things that you do that drive her crazy. Until you do, you won’t get along with your boss.

If you want to get back at your boss and destroy your own career possibilities in the process (because even a bad boss is still your boss), try doing these ten things and see how fast you can make your boss angry.

Tips to Help You Get Along With Your Boss

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Face it, whether you want to admit it or not, you’re the person who is in charge of your relationship with your boss. No one will ever be as concerned and involved as you—including your boss—that the quality of your relationship helps you achieve your career goals.

Your boss shares a critical interdependence with you since he has information that you need to succeed. But, he also can’t do his job or accomplish his goals without your help.

5 Tips to Improve Your Relationship With Your Micromanaging Boss

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Most micro-managing bosses are not bad people–although it may feel that way as they peer over your shoulder and question you at length about everything that you’re working on. If you’re a smart employee, you’ll recognize that it’s not usually you who has the problem.

As crazy as it makes you feel, you can manage your micro-managing boss.

6 Tips for Working With a Younger Boss

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

We all expect that boss positions are assigned because the employee has years of experience, supervisory and management skills, and the capability to lead other employees. If you believe this, think again. You may one day find yourself working for a boss who is much younger than you and who lacks the expected skills and experience.

How do you handle working for a boss who is not only much younger than you but may also have a lot less experience on the job?

A difficult co-worker can ruin what is otherwise a perfectly good job.

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

© Daniel Hurst Photogrpahy

A difficult co-worker can ruin what is otherwise a perfectly good job. Dealing with an untrustworthy backstabber, a bullying loudmouth or a deceptively quiet schemer can deplete the energy of you and your employees.

We have strategies that will defuse the threat they pose to the workplace and free up time you can spend with others — including your family. Be prepared to experiment with a range of motivational tactics — a mix of carrots and sticks.

The Egomaniac

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

© Daniel Hurst Photogrpahy

High-ego employees resist direction. They think they know best, so they shrug off even the most gently worded advice. They do not think they need to improve — and consider you lucky to have them.

If your employees deliver consistently excellent results, you may want to expend the effort to keep them on track rather than cutting them loose.

How to deal with them:

1. Don’t poke fun — it only makes matters worse.

2. Ration your public praise to exceptional results.

3. Be prepared to do some coddling.

It may be galling, but once you’ve granted egomaniacs the importance they crave, you’re well positioned to change their mind and improve their work.

The Glory Hound

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Egomaniacs drive managers crazy, but glory hounds drive everyone crazy. They not only want the spotlight — they want to take it away from their peers.

Some telltale signs: Defensiveness, competitiveness to the point of treating peers as enemies and shameless self-promotion.

How to deal with them:

Take a less-is-more approach: Make them earn your approval by creating specific, easy-to-understand metrics and only rewarding them when their performance exceeds those key measures.

The Gossiper

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Managing gossip is difficult because as a general rule you can’t forbid employees from chatting about employment-related topics. At the same time, gossipers can rupture relationships and sow seeds of distrust.

How to deal with them:

Make sure you’re setting a good example. When an employee comes to you with a juicy tidbit, don’t bite.

If your workers view you as a reliable source who will not withhold relevant information, you will forestall rumors. In times of uncertainty (when rumors tend to thrive), they will look to you for the latest news rather than speculate at the water cooler — or via instant messaging.

The Silent Clam

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Quiet employees are fine — until they become too quiet. Taking a laissez-faire approach with them can backfire: If you don’t find out what makes them tick, they may start slacking off or refusing to follow directions.

How to deal with them:

Because timid types often speak slowly and seem to choose their words deliberately, a harried manager may try to prod the discussion along by jumping in. Don’t! If the clam won’t elaborate, it’s your turn. Before adding any commentary, sum up what he or she said, using phrases like “To make sure that I understand, you think that. “

Paraphrasing shows you’re paying attention and that you care what your employee has to say.

The Constant Complainer

How to Deal With Egomaniacs

Everyone grumbles sometimes. Problem personalities never seem to stop. Not only can they crush morale, but outsiders may conclude you don’t treat your employees well — or that you tolerate malcontents.

How to deal with them:

1. Turn complaints into constructive proposals with phrases, such as: “In order to deal with [what you’re grumbling about], let’s solve that by. ” And let them provide the specifics.

2. Confront them. Public scolding rarely works, but in a private meeting, describe their problem behavior. They may not realize how often they grouse. In a supportive tone, explain that you’re not necessarily claiming their grumbling is unjustified, but that you want them to use more constructive language.