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How to get creative

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Amy Morin, LCSW, is the Editor-in-Chief of Verywell Mind. She’s also a psychotherapist, international bestselling author and host of the The Verywell Mind Podcast.

Having a creative mind allows us to do new and exciting things and engage ourselves in a way that takes us one step closer to reaching our full potential. Are some people born being creative, or is it a skill that you can develop much like a muscle?

In his 1996 book “Creativity: The Work and Lives of 91 Eminent People,” psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi suggested that, “of all human activities, creativity comes closest to providing the fulfillment we all hope to get in our lives.” Csikszentmihalyi proposes that creative people possess 10 antithetical traits that interact with each other in a complex manner and impact one’s overall creativity. Incorporating these creative practices into your daily life may help you increase your creative potential.

Energetic and Focused

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Paul Bradbury / OJO Images / Getty Images

Creative people tend to have a lot of energy, both physical and mental. They can spend hours working on a single task that holds their attention, yet seem to remain enthusiastic all the while.

Having a creative mind doesn’t mean always engaging in a focused creative or artistic task. Creative and artistic people are imaginative, curious, and spend a great deal of time at rest, quietly reflecting on the topics that hold their interest and allowing their minds to wander.

Smart and Naive

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Betsie Van der Meer / Stone / Getty Images

Creative people tend to be smart, but research has shown that having a very high IQ is not necessarily correlated with higher levels of creative achievement—personality traits are important, too.

In Lewis Terman’s longitudinal study of gifted children, children with high IQs were shown to do better in life overall, but those with very high IQ weren’t necessarily creative geniuses. Very few of those involved in the study demonstrated high levels of artistic achievement later in life.

Csikszentmihalyi notes that studies suggest that there seems to be a cutoff point at around 120. Having higher-than-average intelligence might contribute to creativity, but having an IQ over 120 does not necessarily lead to greater creativity.

Balancing creativity with practical knowledge means knowing which ideas to pursue and which to rework or abandon. This skill set is an important aspect of being a creative person.

Creative people are smart and they are able to maintain their sense of wonder, curiosity, and ability to look at the world with fresh eyes.

Last Updated: January 8, 2021 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Joui Turandot. Joui Turandot is a Personal and Creative Branding Consultant and the Founder of JTM Consulting, a business that specializes in public persona branding, business branding, creative leadership coaching, and speaking workshops. Joui has more than 10 years of experience as a fashion designer, filmmaker, photographer, costume designer, stylist, and personal development coach. She guides creative leaders and entrepreneurs through a journey of self-discovery and embodied personal expression. Joui holds a BA in Media Studies from Mills College and holds credentials in the Somatica Core Training Method by the Somatica Institute and in the Art of Circling Training by The Circling Institute.

There are 21 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

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Creativity is a skill that you can work on with time, training, and effort. [1] X Expert Source

Joui Turandot
Branding Consultant Expert Interview. 4 June 2020. There are many areas you can focus on to improve your overall creativity. Engage in creative exercises like reading, writing, and listening to music to sharpen your creativity. Learn as much as possible and open yourself up to new ideas and experiences. Make lifestyle changes like walking more, exercising regularly, and getting more sleep to give your brain the boost it needs to increase your creative skills.

  • Monday, August 15, 2016
  • Creativity

Every day is different, and everyone’s mental agility can change from minute to minute. Sometimes a person’s brain is very open, and the ideas and creativity seem to just flow.

Other times, this same person seems to be stuck in a mindset that gets them nowhere. This article is for those people who need to get those creative juices flowing again.

How to get creative

A creative designer needs to maintain an optimistic feeling to be able to focus on their inspiration. Fear can be a downfall in this scenario and will diminish this focus. Mental flexibility is demonstrated when a person can change their mindset and move away from the fears. A designer is a creator and what they create is considered magic. They take an idea and design something that is a visual stunner that offers a solution to a challenge.

Many people struggle with sustaining a particular intensity of creativity. So, it’s important to try and maintain a positive mindset to overcome this conflict. Aspirations and goals are the foundation of mental flexibility along with stability between self-control and impulse. These 17 tips allow the brain to adapt and release more creative ideas.

1. Set No Expectations

Always create with no expectations as to the outcome. By just creating a passion, the final result will be something spectacular.

How to get creative

Modern culture often labels creativity as natural gift. Artists get showered with praise and proclamations of “you’re so talented,” but truthfully, talent has little to do with it.

Creativity is a skill to be learned, practiced, and developed, just like any other. Juggling takes practice, as does surfing, coding, and driving a car. Creativity is no different. The more you make creativity part of your daily life, the more it will grow.

So how do you make creativity part of your daily life? Here are 9 suggestions-and guess what? You can get started on them all in the next 10 minutes.

1. Doodle Something

Although we may have been reprimanded in school to “stop doodling and pay attention,” it’s time to bring back the doodle. Doodling, contrary to popular opinion, does not demonstrate a lack of focus. In fact, doodling can help you stay present and engaged during an activity in which you might otherwise find your mind drifting.

Suni Brown, author of The Doodle Revolution, notes that some of the greatest thinkers-from Henry Ford to Steve Jobs-used doodling to jump-start creativity. Doodling can enhance recall and activate unique neurological pathways, leading to new insights and cognitive breakthroughs. Some companies even encourage doodling during meetings!

2. Sign Up for a Class in Something You’ve Never Done Before

Creativity flourishes when you push yourself outside of your comfort zone and learn something new. Many communities offer evening adult education classes. These classes are often very casual, with plenty of beginner offerings. Try painting, pottery, or woodworking. How about learning a new language, picking up a new instrument, or taking a cooking class?

3. Create the Right Environment

The truth is that every single individual (yes, even you) can be creative. You simply require the right environment, stimulus, and support. Kids are awash with creative energy in part because they have not yet learned to fear the criticism of their peers or experienced embarrassment from failure. This is now why failure is lauded in adults-it reflects creative, risk-taking endeavors. Though not all creative ventures will work out, ultimately some will (and be very, very successful).

This is why Google goes to great lengths to provide employees with fun perks such as beach volleyball courts and free beer, a setup almost resembling an adult playground. The goal is to create an environment that lets employees feel relaxed and comfortable with vocalizing creative, even wacky, ideas. Businesses that value creativity need to do their best to foster a creative, safe space where unusual ideas are celebrated and where creativity is nurtured.

4. Pause the Brainstorming and Move Your Body

Though old-school business practice dictates group brainstorming as a powerful way to generate creativity, modern research has found that the group collective isn’t always all it’s cracked up to be.

Instead, try new approaches to creative problem solving. Go for a walk. Physically move your body and consider your project problem from different locations. Physical movement has been shown to have a positive affect on creative thinking, just as theater pros suggest practicing lines in different poses and positions to generate new character approaches.

5. Start a Sketchbook

Sketching is a great way to preserve memories and make constructive use of time that might otherwise be spent fiddling on a phone. Buy a small, lightweight sketchbook that can easily fit in your bag. Start sketching whenever you have even a few spare minutes-draw the salt and pepper shaker on your table while waiting for your coffee, or the crumpled pile of newspaper on the subway.

Though you may be disappointed in your sketches at first, the more you draw, the better you’ll get. Don’t overanalyze your results-simply draw for the enjoyment of the process, not the end piece. Creativity seeps across activities, so sketching just a few minutes a day can result in a major boost of workplace creativity.

6. Keep Toys on Your Desk

Many creative design companies encourage employees to keep toys on their desks-from Legos and Lincoln Logs to Play-Doh and origami paper. Building something physically with your hands, as opposed to typing on a keyboard, can be just the creative jolt you need.

7. Engage in Flash Fiction

Flash fiction is a form of writing consisting of extremely short pieces. There are many flash fiction writing groups online in which members write 100-word stories based on a provided prompt. That’s right, just 100 words. No one can say that’s out of their league.

Have your own try at flash fiction writing. Join a community online, or start your own at work. No pressure, no need to share; it’s just a chance to get those creative juices flowing!

8. Try the 30 Circles Test

This great creative exercise comes from researcher Bob McKim, and is featured in Tim Brown’s TED talk Creativity and Play.

Take a piece of paper and draw 30 circles on the paper. Now, in one minute, adapt as many circles as you can into objects. For example, one circle could become a sun. Another could become a globe. How many can you do in a minute? (Take quantity over quality into consideration.)

The result: Most people have a hard time getting to 30, largely because we have a tendency as adults to self-edit. Kids are great at simply exploring possibilities without being self-critical, whereas adults have a harder time. Sometimes, even the desire to be original can be a form of self-editing. Don’t forget-good artists copy, great artists steal.

9. Role-play Away

Role-playing isn’t just for the geeks at Comic-Con (no judgment; we love you guys). Role-playing can help you develop new solutions to existing problems by putting yourself in the shoes of a client or customer.

Even if you’ve already made efforts to enter the client’s mindset, physically role-playing situations with co-workers can generate powerful revelations and project solutions. As children, role-playing is how our imaginations thrived, from baking mud pies and playing house to fighting off baddies and exploring the jungles in our own backyards. It’s time to bring back the power of play.

When it comes to creativity, one of our biggest concerns is usually how we can be more creative, or how to come up with better ideas. Research in this area is all over the place, but I’ve gathered some of the most practical studies out there to help you utilize specific techniques that can boost your creativity.

All of these studies are useful for everyday creativity in daily life, so try a few out for yourself and see which ones work best for you.

Restrict Yourself

The research shows an insidious problem that many people have is that they will often take the path of “least mental resistance,” building on ideas they already have or trying to use every resource at hand. The thing is, the research also suggests that placing self-imposed limitations can boost creativity because it forces even creative people to work outside of their comfort zones (which they still have, even if they are a bit “weirder” than most).

One of the most famous examples is when Dr. Seuss produced Green Eggs & Ham after a bet where he was challenged by his editor to produce an entire book in under 50 different words. I’m no Dr. Seuss, but I’ve found (and I’m sure other writers can relate) that when I’m suddenly restricted to writing something in 500 words when I had planned to write it in 800 words, it can lead to some pretty creative workarounds.

Try limiting your work in some way and you may see the benefits of your brain coming up with creative solutions to finish a project around the parameters you’ve set.

Re-Conceptualize the Problem

One thing that researchers have noticed with especially creative people is that they tend to re-conceptualize the problem more often than their less creative counterparts. That means, instead of thinking of a cut-and-dry end goal to certain situations, they sit back and examine the problem in different ways before beginning to work.

Here’s a candid example—as a writer who handles content strategy for startups, my “cookie cutter” end goal is something like “write popular articles.” The problem is, if I approach an article with the mindset of, “What can I write that will get a lot of tweets?”, I won’t come up with something very good. However, if I step back and examine the problem from another angle, such as: “What sort of articles really resonate with people and capture their interest?”, I’m focusing on a far better fundamental part of the problem, and I’ll achieve my other goals by coming up with something more original.

So, if you find yourself stagnating by focusing on generic problems (“What would be something cool to paint?”), try to re-conceptualize the problem by focusing on a more meaningful angle (“What sort of painting evokes the feeling of loneliness that we all encounter after a break-up?”).

Create Psychological Distance

While it’s long been known that abstaining from a task is useful for breaking through a creative block, it also seems that creating “psychological” distance may also be useful. Subjects in this study were able to solve twice as many insight problems when asked to think about the source of the task as distant, rather than it being close in proximity.

Try to imagine your creative task as being disconnected and distant from your current position/location. According to this research, this may make the problem more accessible and can encourage higher level thinking.

Daydream… and Then Get Back to Work!

Although study after study confirms that daydreaming and napping can help with the creative thought process, there is one piece of research that everybody seems to leave out.

One study in particular shows that the less work you’ve done on a problem, the less daydreaming will help you. That is, daydreaming and incubation are most effective on a project you’ve already invested a lot of creative effort into. So before you try to use naps and daydreams as an excuse for not working, be honest with yourself and don’t forget to hustle first!

Embrace Something Absurd

Research suggests that reading/experiencing something absurd or surreal can help boost pattern recognition and creative thinking. (Subjects in the study read Franz Kafka, but even stories like Alice in Wonderland have been suggested by psychologists.)

The conclusion was that the mind is always seeking to make sense of the things that it sees, and surreal/absurd art puts the mind in “overdrive” for a short period while it tries to work out just exactly what it is looking at or reading. I like reading interesting short stories like The Last Question or browsing absurdist art at places like r/HeavyMind when I’m looking for some inspiration.

Separate Work from Consumption

Also known as the “absorb state,” this technique has been shown to help with the incubation process and is far more effective than trying to combine work with creative thinking. It makes sense too—we are often in two very different states of mind when absorbing an activity and when we are trying to create something.

I’ve found that my writing breaks down when I try to handle research + writing at the same time, and I’m much better off when I just turn off my “work mode” and consume more inspiration in the form of reading, watching, and observing.

Create During a Powerful Mood

For a long time, the research has pointed to happiness as being the ideal state to create in. Recently though, a relatively new study (2007) on creativity in the workplace made this bold conclusion: Creativity increased when both positive and negative emotions were running high.

The implication seems to be that while certain negative moods can be creativity killers, they aren’t as universal as positive moods (joy, being excited, love, etc) in that sometimes they may spur creative thinking rather than hinder it. I don’t want you to put yourself in a bad mood to create something, but next time you’re in a strong emotional state, try to sit down and focus that energy on creating something, the end result could be worthwhile.

Get Moving

Is there any wonder that ‘exercising more” is one of the most desired good habits in the entire world? Some research even suggests that exercise can actually boost creative thinking as well, due to it’s ability to get the heart pumping and put people in a positive mood. It’s similar to how other research shows that thinking about love can produce more creative thoughts; it’s not necessarily the act, it’s the change in mood.

If you’re stuck in a creative rut and want to take a break, try including exercise while your brain is subconsciously at work, it may help to speed up your “Aha!” moment.

Ask, “What Might Have Been?”

According to the research surrounding the process of counterfactual thinking , looking at a situation that has already occurred and asking yourself, “What could have happened?” can boost creativity for short periods of time.

According to an analysis by Jeremy Dean :

  • Analytical problems are best tackled with a subtractive mind-set: thinking about what could have been taken away from the situation.
  • Expansive problems benefited most from an additive counterfactual mind-set: thinking about what could have been added to the situation.

Gregory Ciotti is the founder of Sparring Mind , the blog that takes psychology and persuasive marketing and makes them play nice together. Download his free e-book on ‘Conversion Psychology’ for more research or follow Greg on Twitter .

How to get creative

Are you sitting at your desk trying to make brilliant, novel ideas appear from thin air, only to find yourself coming up with jack squat? It’s probably time to get that creative blood pumping.

Looking for some fast ways to ignite that spark of creativity? We scoured the web to find some of our favorite ideas to get you working.

  1. A walk does a lot of good for the soul, so take a stroll around the office (or around the block). (Brain Pickings)
  2. You may just need a small change of workspace to get the creativity going. (Entrepreneur)
  3. Next time you take on a project, try setting some “weirder” rules for yourself. (Lifehacker)
  4. Need to write something amazing in a short period of time and aren’t sure where to get started? Here are 11 exercises to try. (Writers Marketing)
  5. Adding side projects to your life can actually fuel your creativity for main projects. (Accidental Creative)
  6. Check out these awesome creative quotes to get pumped up and ready to work. (BuzzFeed)
  7. Try the SimpleMind app, a tool that helps you turn your abstract brainstorms into seriously cool idea webs. (Boston Globe)
  8. Here are several tools every careerist needs to get creative quickly. (Spoiler: One of them involves a super comfy chair). (Fast Company)

Need some more help getting creative? Check out our suggestions!

How to get creative

Late last year, Epic Games introduced one of the most exciting multiplayer modes in Fortnite yet: Creative mode. Unlike Fortnite: Battle Royale, Creative mode focuses on building, tweaking, and messing around in an open-ended sandbox. Players can design their own deathmatch levels, kart races, and training sessions — or just goof around with their friends via the game’s vehicles and weapons.

For many Fortnite players, Creative mode is the game’s equivalent to Minecraft. Similar to the latter game, Epic even has a simple system for sharing levels. They’re called Island Codes and they let players exchange levels, as well as visit each others’ maps. You can check out their creations as soon as they boot up Creative mode.

If you’re interested in sharing a code with your online friends, here’s how to go about getting one.

What Is an Island Code?

Instead of forcing players to browse through a workshop system or download custom mods, the Fortnite Creative mode streamlines sharing through Island Codes. These keys are 12-digit numbers that can be used in the Creative hub’s rift portals. Copying and pasting an Island Code will immediately download another player’s island and add it into a “favorites” list that can be revisited any time.

In short, if you want to share any of your creations with other Fortnite players, you need to publish an Island Code. Unfortunately, you also need to find Island Codes separate from the game online, but you can check out some starting recommendations here.

How to get creative

How to Earn an Island Code

For the time being, Fortnite Creative mode players cannot simply publish any island and share it online. According to Reddit user ZooKeeperZak, an Epic Games designer, the studio is “testing the publish system out” for Island Codes at the moment. In the near future, Fortnite Creative mode players can expect an in-game Island Code system to publish any level they want. But for the time being, you actually need Epic’s approval to share your code first.

Epic is currently giving out Island Code permissions online to select players. If you’d like to create an island for other players to check out, you need to create something impressive enough to gain the studio’s attention. ZooKeeperZak recommends posting directly on r/FortniteCreative, where Epic Games regularly browses through users’ creations. YouTube and Twitter are also great choices if you already have a sizable online following. Of course, if your level is cool enough, it’s always possible a video of the creation will gain some viral attention. You never know!

If Epic likes your hard work and wants to contact you, you can most likely expect an employee to reach out to you over private message. “Block Party” winner inspectorkhan can attest to that. In that user’s case, Epic contacted the creator and worked closely with them to publish and share their Island Code. Inspectorkhan noted that there should be a “publish your island” option under the “Island Settings” menu in-game once the developer gives you the right to publish an Island Code.

Until then, you’ll have to share images and videos of your island online. Hopefully that it’s impressive enough (and you get lucky enough) to gain Epic’s approval! In the meantime, you can always have fun with your creations on your own.

Tip #1: think like a kid.

Ed. note: This post was originally published in April, 2019 but we wanted to bring it back out the archives in hopes that it inspires you to make the most of this time quarantined at home.

One of my favorite things about watching my kids play is that it reminds me how much creativity lies within each one — we were born as creative people, whether we’ve cultivated that into adulthood or not. At 5, Phoebe becomes totally immersed in drawing, building and creating stories, and Henry (2) continually surprises me with the connections he makes between ideas that would never have occurred to my adult mind. Their natural free play is in stark contrast to the productivity-focused mindset I’m usually in; even my leisure time is often spent socializing or being connected to electronics, rarely activities that require much imagination.

It’s got me thinking about how amazing it would be if this creative spark were brought into our adult lives. Do we all have an inner artist longing to get out? I’ve been diving into the research and learning that reclaiming our creativity could actually be a big factor in discovering our passion, finding out what makes us feel most alive, and even being better at our work. Read on for 6 ways you can be more creative every day, and prepare to be majorly re-inspired.

How to get creative

1. Draw, paint, doodle, watercolor.

Growing up, my favorite thing to do when I was bored was to grab my notebook and some markers, and just draw with no end goal in sight. I’d create rainbows, mermaids, solar systems — and I don’t remember feeling any pressure to make them worthy of hanging on the fridge, I just did it for the sheer joy of creating. Later on, I took up collaging with a stack of magazines each evening, and in high school, I fought the boredom of band class by secretly sketching dresses in my quest to become a fashion designer.

The sheer act of engaging in making art of any kind fires up all kinds of connections in the brain, so don’t fight the urge to doodle while you’re on your next conference call. I’ve been taking time each weekend to dust off my sketchbook and spend some time watercoloring with Phoebe, and it’s been so refreshing for my mind and my soul to make art just for the fun of it.

How to get creative

2. Do something physical.

Research has shown that physical exercise helps to force you out of left brain dominant thinking and instead adopt a more creative mindset. Exercise also increases blood flow and oxygen to the brain, which sharpen mental clarity. Here’s a fascinating article that claims aerobic workouts may help stimulate imagination and new ideas.

How to get creative

3. Embrace boredom.

I recently did a 48-hour detox from all my devices, and one of my biggest goals for the experiment was to learn how to embrace boredom. Why, you may ask? Because research shows that being bored actually propels us towards deeper thinking and creativity. The theory goes that a bored mind searches for stimulation, which moves it into the daydreaming state, which leads to new ideas. Read more about the studies here.

Instead of filling every extra minute with productivity or scrolling through your phone, give your mind some breathing room. Let your mind wander, and who knows? You just might have the “aha moment” you were working so hard to achieve.
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How to get creative

4. Watch a TED talk or listen to a podcast.

I often find that tuning into a powerful TED talk or listening to an interview with someone fascinating is a great way to shift my perspective, quickly and without a lot of effort. There are so many inspiring people out there, and nothing makes me more excited about creative thinking than learning from someone who is out there truly innovating in their field.

How to get creative

5. Generate way more ideas than you think you actually need.

Throughout my research, THIS is the single most common thread among super creative thinkers. People who are able to generate a lot of ideas (good and not-so-good) are much more likely to have a couple of brilliant ideas hidden in the mix than those who only come up with a couple of ideas to begin with. Block out time for free writing and come up with as many ideas around a problem as your brain can generate, even if they seem silly. Since creative people are prolific idea-generators, remember that they typically have more misses than hits. As Thomas Edison said, “Genius is one percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.”

How to get creative

6. Make time for play.

Studies show that when we fully immerse ourself in just doing what we enjoy — in other words, getting out of our own heads — it stimulates outside-the-box thinking and silences our inner critic. Tinker with toys, build something, get outside… and most importantly, think like a kid!

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Amy Morin, LCSW, is the Editor-in-Chief of Verywell Mind. She’s also a psychotherapist, the author of the bestselling book “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do,” and the host of The Verywell Mind Podcast.

Creativity is all about finding new ways of solving problems and approaching situations. This isn’t a skill restricted to artists, musicians or writers; it is a useful skill for people from all walks of life. If you’ve ever wanted to boost your creativity, these tips can help.

Commit Yourself to Creativity

How to get creative

The first step is to fully devote yourself to developing your creative abilities. Do not put off your efforts. Set goals, enlist the help of others, and put time aside each day to develop your skills.

Become an Expert

One of the best ways to develop creativity is to become an expert in that area. By having a rich understanding of the topic, you will be better able to think of a novel or innovative solutions to problems.

Reward Your Curiosity

One common roadblock to developing creativity is the sense that curiosity is an indulgence. Rather than reprimanding yourself, reward yourself when you are curious about something. Give yourself the opportunity to explore new topics.

While rewarding yourself is important, it is also important to develop intrinsic motivation. Sometimes, the true reward of creativity is the process itself, not the product.

Take Risks

When it comes to building your creative skills, you need to be willing to take risks in order to advance your abilities. While your efforts may not lead to success every time, you will still be boosting your creative talents and building skills that will serve you well in the future.

Build Your Confidence

Insecurity in your abilities can suppress creativity, which is why it is important to build confidence. Make note of the progress you have made, commend your efforts, and always be on the lookout for ways to reward your creativity.

Make Time for Creativity

You won’t be able to develop your creative talents if you don’t make time for them. Schedule some time each week to concentrate on some type of creative project.

Overcome a Negative Attitude

Focus on eliminating negative thoughts or self-criticisms that may impair your ability to develop strong creative skills.

Fight Fear of Failure

The fear that you might make a mistake or fail in your efforts can paralyze your progress. Whenever you find yourself harboring such feelings, remind yourself that mistakes are simply part of the process. While you may occasionally stumble on your path to creativity, you will eventually reach your goals.

Brainstorm New Ideas

Brainstorming is a common technique in both academic and professional settings, but it can also be a powerful tool for developing your creativity.

Start by suspending your judgment and self-criticism, then start writing down related ideas and possible solutions. The goal is to generate as many ideas as possible in a relatively short span of time. Next, focus on clarifying and refining your ideas in order to arrive at the best possible choice.

Explore Multiple Solutions

The next time you approach a problem, try looking for a variety of solutions. Instead of simply going with the first idea you have, take the time to think of other possible ways to approach the situation. This simple activity is a great way to build both your problem-solving and creative thinking skills.

Keep a Creativity Journal

Start keeping a journal to follow your creative process and track the ideas you produce. A journal is a great way to reflect back on what you have accomplished and look for other possible solutions. This journal can be used to save ideas that can later serve as future inspiration.

Use Mind Maps and Flow Charts

A mind map is a great way to connect ideas and look for innovative answers to questions. Create a mind map by writing down a central topic or word. Next, link related terms or ideas around the central word. While similar to brainstorming, this technique allows for branching ideas and offers a very visual way of seeing how these ideas are linked.  

As you start to develop a new project, create a flow chart to track the presentation of the project from start to finish. Look for various paths or sequences of events that might occur. A flow chart can help you visualize the final product, eliminate potential problems and create unique solutions.

Challenge Yourself and Create Opportunities

Once you have developed some basic creative skills, it is important to continually challenge yourself in order to further advance your abilities. Look for more difficult approaches, try out new things and avoid always using the same solutions you have used in the past.

In addition to challenging yourself, you also need to create your own opportunities for creativity. This might involve tackling a new project or finding new tools to use in your current projects.

Try the Six Hats Technique

The “six hats” technique involves looking at a problem from six differing perspectives.   By doing this, you can produce more ideas than you might have had you only looked at the situation from one or two points of view.

  • Black Hat: Use a negative perspective. Which elements of the solution won’t work?
  • Blue Hat: Think broadly. What is the best overall solution?
  • Green Hat: Think creatively. What are some alternative ideas?
  • Red Hat: Look at the situation emotionally. What do your feelings tell you?
  • White Hat: Look at the situation objectively. What are the facts?
  • Yellow Hat: Use a positive perspective. Which elements of the solution will work?

Look for Inspiration

Never expect creativity to just happen. Look for new sources of inspiration that will give you fresh ideas and motivate you to generate unique answers to questions. Read a book, visit a museum, listen to your favorite music or engage in a lively debate with a friend. Utilize whatever strategy or technique works best for you.

Consider Alternative Scenarios

When approaching a problem, utilize “what if. ” questions to consider each possible scenario. If you take a specific approach, what will the outcome be?

By looking at these alternatives beforehand, you’ll be better able to develop creative solutions to problems.

Try the Snowball Technique

Have you ever noticed how one great idea often leads directly to another? You can take advantage of this by utilizing a “snowball technique” when you are generating ideas for your project.   If the idea isn’t appropriate for your current work, set it aside to work on later, or implement it in a future project.

How to get creative

Late last year, Epic Games introduced one of the most exciting multiplayer modes in Fortnite yet: Creative mode. Unlike Fortnite: Battle Royale, Creative mode focuses on building, tweaking, and messing around in an open-ended sandbox. Players can design their own deathmatch levels, kart races, and training sessions — or just goof around with their friends via the game’s vehicles and weapons.

For many Fortnite players, Creative mode is the game’s equivalent to Minecraft. Similar to the latter game, Epic even has a simple system for sharing levels. They’re called Island Codes and they let players exchange levels, as well as visit each others’ maps. You can check out their creations as soon as they boot up Creative mode.

If you’re interested in sharing a code with your online friends, here’s how to go about getting one.

What Is an Island Code?

Instead of forcing players to browse through a workshop system or download custom mods, the Fortnite Creative mode streamlines sharing through Island Codes. These keys are 12-digit numbers that can be used in the Creative hub’s rift portals. Copying and pasting an Island Code will immediately download another player’s island and add it into a “favorites” list that can be revisited any time.

In short, if you want to share any of your creations with other Fortnite players, you need to publish an Island Code. Unfortunately, you also need to find Island Codes separate from the game online, but you can check out some starting recommendations here.

How to get creative

How to Earn an Island Code

For the time being, Fortnite Creative mode players cannot simply publish any island and share it online. According to Reddit user ZooKeeperZak, an Epic Games designer, the studio is “testing the publish system out” for Island Codes at the moment. In the near future, Fortnite Creative mode players can expect an in-game Island Code system to publish any level they want. But for the time being, you actually need Epic’s approval to share your code first.

Epic is currently giving out Island Code permissions online to select players. If you’d like to create an island for other players to check out, you need to create something impressive enough to gain the studio’s attention. ZooKeeperZak recommends posting directly on r/FortniteCreative, where Epic Games regularly browses through users’ creations. YouTube and Twitter are also great choices if you already have a sizable online following. Of course, if your level is cool enough, it’s always possible a video of the creation will gain some viral attention. You never know!

If Epic likes your hard work and wants to contact you, you can most likely expect an employee to reach out to you over private message. “Block Party” winner inspectorkhan can attest to that. In that user’s case, Epic contacted the creator and worked closely with them to publish and share their Island Code. Inspectorkhan noted that there should be a “publish your island” option under the “Island Settings” menu in-game once the developer gives you the right to publish an Island Code.

Until then, you’ll have to share images and videos of your island online. Hopefully that it’s impressive enough (and you get lucky enough) to gain Epic’s approval! In the meantime, you can always have fun with your creations on your own.