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How to get virtual desktops on windows xp

How to Get Virtual Desktops on Windows XP

A lot of people prefer multitasking. The best tool for that purpose is virtual desktops. Virtual desktops provide the opportunity to run many desktops at the same time from a desktop computer or laptop. It is very easy to switch among the desktops by just using a button. Every virtual desktop can possess its unique applications as well as a different background. The feature of virtual desktops is not included in Windows XP by default. However, you can easily get virtual desktops on Windows XP. The means to get virtual desktops on Windows XP is very safe for the computer. All you have to do to get virtual desktops on Windows XP is to use software. This software provides four desktops to use.

In order to get virtual desktops on Windows XP, you have to use the Microsoft PowerToys download page.

Follow these simple steps to get the virtual desktops:

Go to the “Microsoft PowerToys download page”.

Choose DeskMan.exe from the list on the right hand side of the window.

It will allow you to download the file named DeskmanPowertoySetup.exe. Double-click on the file.

Choose the option “Complete” for installing.

It will be installed in a very little time. Right click on the taskbar at the bottom of your screen.

Point to Toolbars. You will now see the new option called Desktop Manager.

Click on Desktop Manager.

Every blue button represents a unique desktop. The green button can be used to preview the four virtual desktops.

Right-click on one of the buttons to see the options for configuration.

Success! This is the preview of the virtual desktops.

You just have to click on any of the desktops in the preview screen in order to get that desktop in the front. Virtual desktops can prove to be very useful if you want to divide your recreational applications and your work applications.

  • Virtual desktop software helps you declutter and organize your desktop. Instead of squeezing applications and shortcuts on a single desktop, create and navigate multiple virtual desktops.
  • Windows 10 has built-in virtual desktop functionality called TaskView. However, it’s pretty limited. So we handpicked the 5 best virtual desktop tools you can use on your Windows 10 PC.
  • You might also be interested in software to split your PC screen, ideal for window management.
  • Visit our Productivity hub for more awesome guides!

How to get virtual desktops on windows xp

  • Marvel
  • Starwars
  • National Geographic
  • Pixar

Virtual desktop software enables users to open programs on multiple desktops.

Instead of opening and squeezing all your applications in the taskbar, you can create virtual desktops and place them there instead. As a result, you can reduce organize your desktop better by eliminating clutter.

Microsoft integrated virtual desktop functionality into Windows 10. To access it, press the Task View button on the taskbar. You might think that Windows 10 users don’t really need extra third-party virtual desktop software.

However, the built-in Task View is fairly basic and has limited options. For example, you can’t add individual wallpapers to virtual desktops or customize their hotkeys. In this case, you can turn to third-party solutions.

Here’s the best virtual desktop software for Windows 10

  1. Dexpot
  2. VirtuaWin
  3. Virtual Dimension
  4. DeskSpace
  5. BetterDesktopTool

Let’s take a closer look.

Top 5 virtual desktop software for Windows PC

1. Dexpot

How to get virtual desktops on windows xp

Dexpot is the best among virtual desktop software programs for Windows. It’s available for personal use for free. However, you have to buy a license for commercial usage.

Dexpot enables users to set up 20 virtual desktops within Windows. The best thing about this software is that you can customize those desktops by giving them their own separate wallpapers, screensavers, hotkeys and custom resolutions.

You can even distribute icons so that each desktop has its own unique software and file shortcuts. The amount of customization is well beyond what you can do in Windows 10’s Task View.

Dexpot also includes numerous extra plug-ins, such as MouseEvents, Taskbar Pager, Dexcube, and Wallpaper Clock. My favorite is Dexcube that activates a 3D-rotating cube effect when switching virtual desktops.

The Desktop Slideshow plug-in automatically switches between the virtual desktops much the same as a slideshow. There are also a few experimental plug-ins you can add to Dexpot, which include Gadgets that adds sidebar gadgets to the virtual desktops.

2. VirtuaWin

How to get virtual desktops on windows xp

VirtuaWin is virtual desktop software that hogs minimal system resources and has a good number of configuration options. The program works with all Windows platforms from Windows ME up, and there’s also a portable version of the program. This is open-source software you can add to your desktop.

VirtuaWin is primarily a system tray app with which you can switch between virtual desktops and select other options from its menu. However, its setup window still includes a diverse range of configuration options with which you can customize the virtual desktop titles, layouts, hotkeys, mouse actions, and more besides.

One of the best things about VirtuaWin is that it supports up to 20 virtual desktops with minimal resource usage. You can enhance its functionality with modules, which are similar to plug-ins. The software’s website includes a variety of extra modules you can add to the VirtuaWin modules directory.

For example, VMPreview provides a preview of the virtual desktops in window or full-screen mode; and KvasdoPager adds a virtual desktop pager to the taskbar similar to the Gnome pager in Linux.

Editor’s Note: This article continues on the next page. If you’re interested in other desktop tools, check out our wide collection of guides.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the purpose of a virtual desktop?

A virtual desktop improves your productivity and declutters your desktop. You can organize your tasks better by creating personalized virtual desktops, where you can quickly launch applications and toggle windows.

How do I create a virtual desktop?

You can create a virtual desktop using the Windows 10 Task View. But an easier way is to download one of the virtual desktop tools we mentioned on this list.

What is the best virtual desktop?

Amazon WorkSpaces is the best virtual desktop software for business. However, Dexpot is ideal for personal use.

By [email protected] – April 11, 2018

Your employees need access to their work in any situation. Whether it’s a last minute change to a presentation, taking a sick day and working from home, or conducting a meeting with company members around the world, virtual technology is a business reality. And a virtual desktop allows you to work from anywhere, anytime.

But is it safe? Is it optimal? Which software is best for virtual business?

Here are 6 reasons why your business needs to use virtual desktops.

1. Heightened Cybersecurity

With increased cybersecurity incidents on SaaS, there has been a shift to virtual desktops. Ransomware and malware, as well as other local security risks, have proven to be too much for anti-virus software and firewalls on the devices themselves. This has become more of an issue since most businesses are online.

To curtail this problem, go virtual with your company’s online work. Create an extra layer of cybersecurity and don’t rely 100% on the device itself. By using IT as a Service, you can consolidate security measures and centralize your cybersecurity.

2. Cloud Computing Connects Your Company

When you save your data in the cloud, it can be accessed and worked on by others within your company. In simpler terms, having a virtual desktop allows your company’s documents to be reachable by remote and traveling employees.

3. Lower IT Costs by Eliminating Infrastructure

Having virtual desktops at the core of your company lowers infrastructure costs. Servers, complex switching, and other hardware is eliminated. This saves on hardware cost, software licensing cost, and long-term maintenance and replacement costs.

IT can manage virtual infrastructure more efficiently making the cost-per-device more cost-friendly.

4. Employee Versatility

You can hire any qualified candidate, anywhere in the world. You are no longer restricted to your local geographic location. Employees can take travel and still be connected to the business.

From assistants to business owners, a virtual presence allows for versatility in the workplace. In fact, everybody could be out of the office and tasks can still be accomplished with speed and efficiency.

5. Multiple Ways to Set Up

The best way to run virtual desktops for your company is through Desktops as a Service (DaaS), which are hosted desktops. You can use cheaper hardware like netbooks to access cloud-based virtual desktops. This means you can use your favorite device, even a Chromebook, to work on your Line of Business applications.

6. Keeps Everything in the Back End

As a monthly service, DaaS is set up with back-end infrastructure and maintenance. Centralizing your VDI allows IT to administer support easily. This also allows additional IT oversight and faster incident responses due to stolen laptops, security patches, or malware.

When you use a VDI, you leave the important data within the secure software, instead of leaving it vulnerable to be easily manipulated on local hardware.

VDI is the Future of Business

Virtual Desktops have been a part of businesses for decades with Citrix Metaframe and now with Citrix XenApp. The increased Internet speeds, more powerful servers, and need for additional security makes this the right time to migrate your IT infrastructure into a virtual desktop environment.

How to get virtual desktops on windows xp

Using multiple virtual desktops is a helpful way to stay organized when carrying out multiple tasks. It can also serve as a cheap alternative to having multiple monitors connected to one computer.

Virtual desktops are very common in Unix/Linux distributions, letting you divide up your work and switch between multiple desktops — serving as a cheap alternative to having multiple monitors. They are also popular with use on Windows systems.

Windows 10 is the first edition of the operating system to integrate virtual desktop functionality. However, the capabilities are limited to only creating and switching between virtual desktops. This is still a valuable tool but there are third-party software options that provide more features and customization managing virtual desktops.

In this article, we’ll cover how to create virtual desktops in Windows 10 natively, as well as virtual desktop software that offers more helpful features and customization.

How to Make More Desktops on Windows

Windows allows you to create an unlimited number of virtual desktops. Creating a virtual desktop on Windows 10 without third-party software only requires a few steps:

  1. First, select the Task View icon directly next to the Windows Search Box in the lower-left corner.
  2. Then click the + New Desktop button that appears in the top-left corner of your screen to create the new virtual desktop.

How to Switch Desktops on Windows

Switching between desktops also only requires a few steps:

  1. Clicking on the Task View icon next to the Windows Search Box again will show you all of the existing virtual desktops in thumbnails.
  2. Clicking on any one of the thumbnails will switch your view to that desktop.

Best Virtual Desktop Software

Third-party virtual desktop software offers customization beyond what Windows alone allows, such as setting individual wallpapers and assigning functionality to hotkeys. They also often allow for plugins that offer additional features.

Here is our list of the best virtual desktop software:

Dexpot

Dexpot is a feature-rich virtual desktop manager that offers up to 20 virtual desktops. It’s provided free for private use and is approximately $32 (or lower with multi-license discounts) for commercial use after a 30-day trial. It supports Windows OSes up to Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 with 64-bit support. Additional plug-ins can add enhancements, and it’s also available as a portable application.

Dexpot offers some neat features, like live thumbnail previews of the virtual desktops on the taskbar of Windows 7 and later. Additionally, you have the ability to right-click windows to move and copy them between virtual desktops and configure other settings for that particular window/program.

VirtuaWin

VirtuaWin is a free, open source project, distributed under the GNU General Public License. The base software program provides relatively simple functionality with up to four virtual desktops, but many modules allow you to add additional features. In addition to a regular Windows install, a portable version and support are also provided.

nSpaces

nSpaces is a fairly advanced virtual desktop manager offered for free for non-commercial users. It offers some of the same features as the previous solutions but also has a focus on security. nSpaces allows you to password-protect the virtual desktops, which can be useful if you share a Windows account with other users.

DeskSpace

DeskSpace was the first virtual desktop software that came with 3D cube transition effects. At this time it was known as Yod’m 3D. This tool is available on 32 and 64-bit Windows platforms and offers customizable wallpapers, icons and titles of virtual desktops that can be accessed through the system tray menu.

DeskSpace may not be the most impressive option as far as features go but where it shines is its entertaining and aesthetically pleasing 3D transitions. Users can arrange six virtual desktops that are shown on each side of a 3D cube. Switching between desktops triggers an interesting transition of the cube moving position.

BetterDesktopTool

BetterDesktopTool is a highly-rated virtual desktop solution that allows for more than 20 virtual desktops. This tool uses a tiled window previews function where users can view all virtual desktops through the Windows & Desktop Overview tab.

A helpful feature for this software tool is Hot Edges. Moving the mouse cursor to the edge of the monitor screen allows you to seamlessly switch between desktops. Open browser and application windows can also be moved to other desktops by dragging them to the edge of the screen.

Three free virtual-desktop programs work better and give you more options than Microsoft’s Virtual Desktop Manager, which is as buggy as an anthill and has no Vista version.

It took all of about 20 minutes to get accustomed to Linux’s virtual desktops , which let you switch between work environments with a single click. The problem is, I still spend most of my computing time on Windows machines that lack this handy productivity-boosting feature.

I tried using Microsoft’s Virtual Desktop Manager, a PowerToy for Windows XP that lets you create as many as four separate desktops, but it’s as buggy as an anthill, and offers no version for Vista. However, I did find three free virtual-desktop programs that work better and give you more options: VirtuaWin, an open-source program that supports up to 20 separate desktops; Virtual Dimension, another open-source app that offers more features than VirtuaWin; and Z-Systems’ Vista/XP Virtual Desktop Manager, which takes advantage of Vista’s Aero interface.

VirtuaWin’s simple approach
At only 385KB, this lightweight utility keeps things simple but lets you add features via downloadable add-on modules that let you start applications automatically when you enter a desktop, give each desktop a name that shows on its taskbar icon (a feature built into Virtual Dimension), and cycle through your desktops automatically, among other functions. VirtuaWin’s support for as many as 20 separate desktops seems like plenty until you consider that Virtual Dimension and Vista/XP Virtual Desktop Manager let you create as many desktops as your system’s memory can accommodate.

How to get virtual desktops on windows xpConfigure your virtual desktops in VirtuaWin’s Setup dialog box. VirtuaWin

You switch between VirtuaWin desktops by clicking one of the four corners of the program’s system-tray icon, or by pressing the keyboard shortcut assigned to it. If you create more than four desktops, the icon displays the active desktop’s number; click the icon once to view your open apps, or double-click it to open the Setup dialog box. Beyond that there’s not much to the program, which is just fine if you’re “cultivating a minimalist vibe,” as they say in the movies. (Bonus points if you know which one I’m quoting.)

Customize with Virtual Dimension
There are many more similarities than differences between VirtuaWin and Virtual Dimension, but the differences are noteworthy.

Virtual Dimension lets you give each virtual desktop its own wallpaper, which makes it much easier to distinguish between desktops. The program is also much easier to configure via its Settings dialog box: you can assign various operations their own keyboard shortcuts for moving between windows, adjust the transparency of open windows, and tweak the utility’s appearance in other ways.

Give each of your Virtual Dimension desktops its own wallpaper via the program’s Settings dialog box. Virtual Dimension

Click the program’s system-tray icon to open a small preview window that includes the names you’ve assigned to each desktop. Choose one of the previews to open that desktop, or click the system-tray icon again to close the preview. In addition to using keyboard shortcuts, you can jump between desktops by right-clicking the icon and choosing one from the pop-up menu that appears.

Get Vista’s Aero effect with Vista/XP Virtual Desktop
This program’s main claim to fame is its full-screen desktop previews in Vista, which take the guess work out of identifying the desktop you’re looking for. You can create a separate system-tray icon for each active desktop, and assign each desktop its own background. The program also lets you adjust the size of the preview windows, but not their transparency as you can with Virtual Dimension. You get fewer keyboard-shortcut options with this program than with Virtual Dimension, though both let you designate programs that will appear on all desktops.

Customize the keyboard shortcuts for switching between virtual desktops in Vista/XP Virtual Desktop Manager’s Options dialog box. Z-Systems

Two virtual winners
The Aero support and full-screen previews in Vista/XP Virtual Desktop Manager make it a good choice for that OS, but Virtual Dimension’s easy customization and inclusion of the desktop names in its preview window give it an edge on XP systems.

Whichever program you choose, you’ll find the ability to jump between workspaces makes Windows much easier to work with.

Tomorrow: fixes for applications that don’t know when to quit.

Windows XP used to be the most used Windows Operating System version. The OS version existed and was widely used by users around the world for 14 long years until the 8 th of April, 2014. April month 2014 put an end to the usage of Windows XP Operating System by officially announcing and implementing end of support for the same. However, despite the release of newer and better versions of the Windows Operating System, a number of users still wished to continue working on XP OS. Along with Windows XP, the Windows XP Mode also saw an ending on the 8 th of April 2014. Therefore, the next alternative was to make it possible with the help of virtual PC service. This segment helps you understand how to run Windows XP Mode in Virtual PC.

About Windows XP Mode Virtual Usage

Support services for Windows XP Mode also ended, making the host machine vulnerable to malware threats. Therefore, before starting with the process, it is highly recommended that the mode be used without connection to the internet. Internet connection should not be enabled while the mode is being used in order to prevent entrance of malware into the system via web connectivity.

NOTE: Shut down all modes of internet connectivity to the system and Bluetooth connection if any enabled.

How To Run Windows XP Mode in Virtual PC

Windows 7 featured support for Windows XP Mode via its Professional edition. However, not all machine configurations are able to support operating the provision. To make it possible, the usage of VMware is done as a medium to do so without having to perform the virtualization of the system hardware.

To Start: Without hardware virtualization too, one can run the Windows XP Mode. Install VMware Player which is a freeware enabling users to create and operate a virtual system without virtualization of system hardware.

NOTE: XP Mode can directly be imported; therefore, the copy of it can be used free. Except for a few differences, the virtually use XP Mode is a great replacement for such necessities.

Important: Note that Windows XP mode is not supported on the Windows 7 Home Version and VMware Player 3.0 is required.

Stage 1

Download the setup file for XP Mode and get it installed on your machine. For XP Mode installation, just follow the default prompts displayed and continue until the end.

Stage 2

Once you are done with XP Mode installation, start working on the installation of VMware. Downloading the setup is free of cost however; you will need to do a registration.

NOTE: A few prompt may appear asking you to install certain drivers; approve them. They have appeared in the past, though not in the latest, therefore, keep in mind what to do if it does appear.

Step 1: Reboot the machine once you are done with the installation.

Step 2: Once rebooted, run the VMware player. Import XP Mode:

  1. Go to File menu
  2. Click on Import Windows XP Mode VM

This might take a couple of minutes as the XP Mode is being converted to VMware format. However, the time taken depends on your machine’s hardware configuration.

Step 3: When done, a new virtual machine will appear on the player – XP Mode. To run the XP mode, click on ‘Play Virtual Machine’.

Step 4: Click on Update/Install Tools when prompted to. This is generally required to integrate XP Mode on the computer.

Step 5: Just approve a prompt for UAC and rest the tools will install on their own.

Step 6: Accept the license agreement and proceed operating your Windows XP Setup.

Step 7: choose the regional, keyboard settings for your XP setup, and proceed with setting up other options for your XP configuration like; date and time, automatic system updates, and more.

NOTE: if you are asked for drivers to be searched, do not proceed and instead click on cancel. This is owing to the fact that the previously installed VMware Tools have everything that is needed including the drivers.

Final Words

Explained above are the basics to learn how to run Windows XP Mode in Virtual PC and start working with it. Customizations can further be performed for specifying the default folder for XP storage. For a seamless usage of the XP Mode on Windows 7, Enter Unity mode can be enabled on the machine. This was how without involving hardware virtualization, users can achieve XP Mode in a Virtual Environment. For users not having access to XP Mode due to the lack of compatibility on their machine, this is a great method of continue working on the XP that too without involving hardware virtualization.

#1 luciusad2004

Hello all. I was wondering if anyone else knew about this. Its pretty common in linux distrobutions, and its supposed to be makeing its way in to the newest version of mac OS X.

Heres a link if anyone wants to check it out. I can try to get some screen shots if anyone wants to see.
Its called “Virtual Desktop Manager” and you have to scroll down a bit to find it.
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloa. ppowertoys.mspx

It lets you control up to four desktops at one time, and has an option to “zoom out” and view all of the desktops at once and select wich one you want to return to. You can also have different applications open in the different windows. I imagine it would be great for the mulittaskers out there. There are two ways that i noticed so far to move between these different views.

The first option is to have the desktop manager toolbar opened. This just sits in the taskbar and it has five round buttons. Four of them are numbered and move directly between the desktops. The fifth button is green and has four squares inside of it; it lets you view all of the desktops at once. If you dont want this on your taskbar you can rip it off of the taskbar and view it in a window or pull it to a side of the screen to have it snap to the edge as a seperate toolbar.

The other method of doing this is by using the shortcut keys. By defaut these are “windowskey + ‘the number of the desktop you want'”, and “windowskey + v” to view all windows. These can be changed to your likeing however.

I always admired the feature in many of the linux distrobutions and am rather suprised microsoft had a program to do it in xp.

How to get virtual desktops on windows xp

Using multiple virtual desktops is a helpful way to stay organized when carrying out multiple tasks. It can also serve as a cheap alternative to having multiple monitors connected to one computer.

Virtual desktops are very common in Unix/Linux distributions, letting you divide up your work and switch between multiple desktops — serving as a cheap alternative to having multiple monitors. They are also popular with use on Windows systems.

Windows 10 is the first edition of the operating system to integrate virtual desktop functionality. However, the capabilities are limited to only creating and switching between virtual desktops. This is still a valuable tool but there are third-party software options that provide more features and customization managing virtual desktops.

In this article, we’ll cover how to create virtual desktops in Windows 10 natively, as well as virtual desktop software that offers more helpful features and customization.

How to Make More Desktops on Windows

Windows allows you to create an unlimited number of virtual desktops. Creating a virtual desktop on Windows 10 without third-party software only requires a few steps:

  1. First, select the Task View icon directly next to the Windows Search Box in the lower-left corner.
  2. Then click the + New Desktop button that appears in the top-left corner of your screen to create the new virtual desktop.

How to Switch Desktops on Windows

Switching between desktops also only requires a few steps:

  1. Clicking on the Task View icon next to the Windows Search Box again will show you all of the existing virtual desktops in thumbnails.
  2. Clicking on any one of the thumbnails will switch your view to that desktop.

Best Virtual Desktop Software

Third-party virtual desktop software offers customization beyond what Windows alone allows, such as setting individual wallpapers and assigning functionality to hotkeys. They also often allow for plugins that offer additional features.

Here is our list of the best virtual desktop software:

Dexpot

Dexpot is a feature-rich virtual desktop manager that offers up to 20 virtual desktops. It’s provided free for private use and is approximately $32 (or lower with multi-license discounts) for commercial use after a 30-day trial. It supports Windows OSes up to Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 with 64-bit support. Additional plug-ins can add enhancements, and it’s also available as a portable application.

Dexpot offers some neat features, like live thumbnail previews of the virtual desktops on the taskbar of Windows 7 and later. Additionally, you have the ability to right-click windows to move and copy them between virtual desktops and configure other settings for that particular window/program.

VirtuaWin

VirtuaWin is a free, open source project, distributed under the GNU General Public License. The base software program provides relatively simple functionality with up to four virtual desktops, but many modules allow you to add additional features. In addition to a regular Windows install, a portable version and support are also provided.

nSpaces

nSpaces is a fairly advanced virtual desktop manager offered for free for non-commercial users. It offers some of the same features as the previous solutions but also has a focus on security. nSpaces allows you to password-protect the virtual desktops, which can be useful if you share a Windows account with other users.

DeskSpace

DeskSpace was the first virtual desktop software that came with 3D cube transition effects. At this time it was known as Yod’m 3D. This tool is available on 32 and 64-bit Windows platforms and offers customizable wallpapers, icons and titles of virtual desktops that can be accessed through the system tray menu.

DeskSpace may not be the most impressive option as far as features go but where it shines is its entertaining and aesthetically pleasing 3D transitions. Users can arrange six virtual desktops that are shown on each side of a 3D cube. Switching between desktops triggers an interesting transition of the cube moving position.

BetterDesktopTool

BetterDesktopTool is a highly-rated virtual desktop solution that allows for more than 20 virtual desktops. This tool uses a tiled window previews function where users can view all virtual desktops through the Windows & Desktop Overview tab.

A helpful feature for this software tool is Hot Edges. Moving the mouse cursor to the edge of the monitor screen allows you to seamlessly switch between desktops. Open browser and application windows can also be moved to other desktops by dragging them to the edge of the screen.

Information

This article describes Citrix VDI-in-a-Box desktop and peripheral connections.

Protocols Supported by VDI-in-a-Box

VDI-in-a-Box supports Citrix HDX protocol out-of-the box. Users can choose to connect to the desktops using RDP, if required.

Three Methods to Connect to a VDI-in-a-Box Virtual Desktop

To connect to a VDI-in-a-Box virtual desktop, log on using any of the following methods. Regardless of what connection method you choose, a Citrix Receiver is required on the user device. Downoad Citrix Receiver for free from the Citrix VDI-in-a-Box downloads page.

Web Browser: VDI-in-a-Box supports connections from a browser. You can launch the connection by pointing your browser to any one of the vdiManager addresses in the grid. Example: http://[vdiManager address]

Citrix Receiver: Citrix Receiver provides connections to virtual desktops from iPad, iPhone, Android tablets, Android phones, and many other mobile devices and thin clients. Citrix Receiver can be downloaded from the respective AppStore of the mobile devices. A typical connection to vdiManager would require you to supply the following parameters.

Connection to the vdiManager address: Example, http://[vdiManager address]/dt/PNAgent/config.xml

User credentials: Example, username and user password

Domain information: Example, sampledomain.com

VDI-in-a-Box Java Client: The Java Client requires the Java Runtime Environment (JRE 1.5 or greater) on the user device. When the Java client is launched from the end-point, it self-updates. It checks for updates from vdiManager and automatically updates to the latest version. There is no need to install any additional software on the end-point. The Java Client uses the Java Webstart technology to pull the latest version of the client software from vdiManager.

Supported User Devices

Laptops and Desktops

Citrix VDI-in-Box virtual desktops run on PCs, MACs and many Linux computers. Supported operating systems are listed below. Note that you can lock down these desktops by using software such as VDIBlaster to expose only the Java Desktop Client, browser, or Citrix Receiver.

32-bit or 64-bit Windows XP SP2/SP3, Windows Vista, or Windows 7 desktops and laptops

32-bit RedHat 5.x, CentOS 5.x, Ubuntu 10.x Linux desktops and laptops

Mac OS X 10.5 and 10.6

Thin clients

Citrix VDI-in-a-Box virtual desktops are certified to run on a variety of Wyse and 10Zig thin clients. In general, a thin client that can support a RDP or HDX client can log on to a VDI-in-a-Box virtual desktop. Some of the Wyse and 10Zig clients supported include:

Wyse Xenith Pro

10Zig 56xx Linux

10zig 56xx Windows XP Embedded

Mobile Devices

Citrix VDI-in-Box virtual desktops run on mobile devices through a Citrix Receiver connection. The certified devices include the following. Ensure to test with specific models to verify that the virtual desktop works. Citrix appreciates sharing your experiences so that information can be shared with others.

Choosing a User Device

Choosing the right user device depends on your use case, goals, and budget. Following are suggestions to help you choose a user device.

Desktops: Repurposing old desktops is a low cost solution that provides great performance. Most old desktops are more powerful than many high-end thin clients. You can use an old desktop with 256 Megabytes of RAM to run a virtual Windows 7 desktop. However, old desktops consume much more power than other devices and you have the overhead of managing them. You can use software such as vdiBlaster to lock down the desktops and reduce management overhead. Many users start with old desktops and replace them with thin clients over time.

Thin clients: Thin clients significantly consume lower power than desktops and many provide a zero-maintenance option whereby their firmware can be automatically upgraded from the VDI-in-a-Box server. Wyse ThinOS7 thin clients are one such example. 10Zig provides thin clients with the VDI-in-a-Box Java Desktop Client built-in and configuration-free support for the kiosk mode. However, note that low-end thin clients do not handle media streaming and Flash as well as the higher-end thin clients. Also, the embedded operating system makes a difference. Both RDP and HDX perform better on Windows-based thin clients. Use the lower-end thin clients for task workers and the higher-end thin clients for users who need access to media, such as to watch training videos.

Mobile devices: Mobile devices are ideal for those who need a very portable desktop that can be accessed from anywhere.

Setting up User Devices

Detailed setup instructions for PCs, Linux desktops, Macintosh computers, Wyse, and 10Zig thin clients, and various mobile devices including iPads are in Citrix eDocs under VDI-in-a-Box > User Devices.