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Об авторе (2007)

Date- 2003-04-02
Edward de Bono studied at Christ Church, Oxford (as a Rhodes Scholar). He also holds a PhD from Cambridge and an MD from the University of Malta. He has held appointments at the universities of Oxford, London, Cambridge and Harvard.

In 1967 de Bono invented the now commonly used term ‘lateral thinking’ and, for many thousands, indeed millions, of people worldwide, his name has since become a symbol of creativity and new thinking. He has written numerous books, which have been translated into 34 languages, and his advice is sought by Nobel laureates and world leaders alike.

Edward de Bono has had faculty appointments at the universities of Oxford, London, Cambridge and Harvard. He is widely regarded as the leading authority in the direct teaching of thinking as a skill. He originated the concept of lateral thinking and developed formal techniques for deliberate creative thinking. He has written sixty-two books, which have been translated into thirty-seven languages, has made two television series and there are over 4,000,000 references to his work on the Internet. Dr de Bono has been invited to lecture in fifty-two countries and to address major international conferences. In 1989 he was asked to chair a special meeting of Nobel Prize laureates. His instruction in thinking has been sought by some of the leading business corporations in the world such as IBM, DuPont, Shell, Ericsson, McKinsey, Ciba-Geigy, Ford and many others. He has had a planet named after him by the International Astronomic Union and was named by a group of university professors in South Africa as one of the 250 people in all history who have contributed most to humanity. Dr de Bono runs the most widely used programme for the direct teaching of thinking is schools. This is now in use in many countries around the world. Dr de Bono’s key contribution has been his understanding of the brain as a self-organizing system. From this solid base he set out to design practical tools for thinking. His work is in use equally in the boardrooms of some of the world’s largest corporations and with four-year-olds in school. His design of the Six Hats method provides, for the first time, Western thinking with a constructive idiom instead of adversarial argument. His work is in use in elite gifted schools, rural schools in South Africa and Khmer villages in Cambodia. The appeal of Dr de Bono’s work is its simplicity and practicality. For more information about Dr de Bono’s public seminars, private seminars, certified training programmes, thinking programmes for schools, CD Rom, books and tapes, please contact- Diane McQuaig, The McQuaig Group, 132 Rochester Avenue, Toronto M4N 1P1, Ontario, Canada. Tel- (416) 488 0008. Fax- (416) 488 4544.

How to Have Creative Ideas

Creative marketing ideas don’t just happen. The kinds of ‘ideas’ we’re used to seeing in marketing – cliched, tired, repetitive – come about because no one is dedicating time to creativity.

What is an idea?

I’ll tell you what it’s NOT: a thought. We’re all guilty of having believed our idle thought was worthy of the title ‘Idea’.

But an idea very rarely appears, fully formed, as a sudden out-of-nowhere revelation.

Archimedes’ famous bath-time eureka moment about water displacement was the result of years of intense study and much pondering on the problem of calculating the volume of an irregular object. All that thought on the matter had finally turned into an idea.

Archimedes then had to work out how he’d prove his idea worked and apply it in real life. At that point, it turned into a strategy for how to calculate the volume of an irregular object.

How creative marketing ideas happen

For a marketer, creativity is fed in part by your years of experience. Successes and failures, knowledge of the market, customer feedback – musing on these things can often produce creative ideas for solving problems.

But creativity demands space, time and stimulation for that musing. And marketing doesn’t provide an awful lot of spare thinking time. As we saw above, even once a thought has occurred, it’s not an idea until it’s been developed.

So, we have to work thinking time into our discipline. That’s hard, because ‘inactivity’ is often seen as wasting time. Being tough about how creative marketing ideas happen is really important and takes good communication with whoever pays your salary.

A Technique For Producing Ideas by James Webb Young

James Webb Young wrote a very small book about how to have ideas, particularly in advertising, in the 60s. It’s 48 pages long and describes a simple process for sparking creativity.

Five steps (which in my mind demand a pipe and a record player for musing time) and you’ll have your idea. Charming.

1. Gather your materials

  • Specific materials: about your product or audience
  • General materials: unrelated stuff – yes, really (it’s brain-stimulating!)

2. Digest (with pipe, if necessary)

  • Read, interrogate and play with the materials
  • Combine specific and general materials – what do you get?

3. Leave your unconscious to work

  • Stop thinking about the subject entirely
  • Do something else (make a cocktail?)

4. Wait for the spark

  • As if
  • By magic
  • An idea
  • Appears

5. Develop your idea (AKA: the hard bit)

  • Write out the idea
  • Name it
  • Describe it in one sentence
  • Test it on other people
  • Give it hell

Ideas happen when two unrelated things collide

This is why James Webb Young told us to gather both specific and general materials. To get our brain into idea-making gear, we need to trick it into being creative.

And when we need just a quick spark, we can do a cheaty version of the five-step process above by mashing some things together.

Example: I need an idea for an ad to sell my beautiful, hand-embroidered and sequinned cushions

1. I gather materials about my customers: I know from Instagram that they’re 95% women and their average age is 40.

2. I gather materials unrelated to my conundrum: a pineapple.

3. I knock them together to create a new universe of creativity: a classic and darkly dramatic still life with gorgeous fruit and any of my cushions featuring sequinned fruit or animals arranged in between, so they’re part of the still life. BUT the still life is on a scratched wooden table with crumbs and abandoned toys on it just out of focus – the average 40-something mum’s lockdown life right now!

The idea is here: my expensive cushions can be a little glimpse of glamour and luxury in an otherwise earthly day.

I can see this scene so clearly that I actually want to be the cushion seller. Ideas are violent and dangerous things…

So, now you know what an idea is and how to have one, you’re ready to mangle your brain with how to ‘do’ strategy.

Everybody wants to be creative. Creativity makes life more fun, more interesting and more full of achievement, but too many people believe that creativity is something you are born with and cannot be learned.

In How to Have Creative Ideas Edward de Bono – the leading authority on creative thinking – outlines 62 different games and exercises, built around random words chosen Everybody wants to be creative. Creativity makes life more fun, more interesting and more full of achievement, but too many people believe that creativity is something you are born with and cannot be learned.

In How to Have Creative Ideas Edward de Bono – the leading authority on creative thinking – outlines 62 different games and exercises, built around random words chosen from a list, to help encourage creativity and lateral thinking. For example, if the task were to provide an idea for a new restaurant and the random word chosen was ‘cloak’, ideas generated might be: a highwayman theme; a Venetian theme with gondolas; masked waiters and waitresses. Or, if asked to make a connection between the two random words ‘desk’ and ‘shorts’, readers may come up with: both are functional; desks have ‘knee holes’ and shorts expose the knees; traditionally they were both male-associated items.

All the exercises are simple, practical and fun, and can be done by anyone. . more

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فكرة الكتاب الأساسية تدور حول استخدام جدول من الكلمات مزود في آخر الكتاب بشكل خارج عن المألوف لإنتاج أفكار إبداعية . أعجبتني كثيرا فكرة اللعب على الكلمات .

و أيضا ، كما الكتاب السابق الذي قرأته عن الإبداع الفكري ، يؤمن الكاتب أن الإبداع الفكري ليس إلا مهارة يتم تنميتها بالتمرس ، من خلال تمارين يومية .

مما اقتبسته من الكتاب :
The use of creativity and the practice of creativity is the best way to develop the mental skill and the mental habits of creative thinking.

With creativity, there is no ‘righ فكرة الكتاب الأساسية تدور حول استخدام جدول من الكلمات مزود في آخر الكتاب بشكل خارج عن المألوف لإنتاج أفكار إبداعية . أعجبتني كثيرا فكرة اللعب على الكلمات .

و أيضا ، كما الكتاب السابق الذي قرأته عن الإبداع الفكري ، يؤمن الكاتب أن الإبداع الفكري ليس إلا مهارة يتم تنميتها بالتمرس ، من خلال تمارين يومية .

مما اقتبسته من الكتاب :
The use of creativity and the practice of creativity is the best way to develop the mental skill and the mental habits of creative thinking.

With creativity, there is no ‘right answer.’ . more

Uses your unique creativity to deliver new and inspiring ideas.

ISBN-13: 978-0953107346
Paperback: 256 pages
Size: 180mm X 120mm
Shrink-wrap

This is a book that offers you some techniques for generating ideas.

However, rather than describing brainstorming processes that already exist, I look to the unconscious as a source of inspiration.

You already carry this unconscious material with you, all the time, as a repository, a library of information inside yourself.

The trick is to use your awareness in order to make it manifest.

From paper, to objects, to process – my book details a series of exercises that you can use to build a relationship with this unconscious element.

To assist me, I call on the influences of art, psychology, experimental writing, anthropology and concrete poetry.

Always with the intention of waking you up, overturning conventional processes and finding the best, most innovative ideas.

It’s a journey to the self.

Take a deep breath.

WORKING WITH PAPER

Write It Down / Read Down The Page / Words Are Clues / Employ Ambiguity / Integrate Mistakes / Find Ideas In Unexpected Places / Use Cut-Ups / Magnetise Audacity / Cutting Room Floor Technique / Experimental Conditions Persist / The Fold / Invite Nonsense / The Noigandres / Try Word Games / Start In The Wrong Place / Enduction

WORKING WITH OBJECTS

Use Your Hands / Follow The Street / Paper Plane / Chinese Tiles / Be Physical / Sixty Seconds / No Accidents / Provoke Bad Ideas / Remember The Anonymous / Integrate The Reverse / Inverted Constable / Printing Upside Down / Work Backwards / Rename Things / Enduction

WORKING WITH PROCESS

Apply Your Instinct / Find Double Meanings / Latoa / Make A Pack Of Cards / Shuffle The Group / Create Conflict / Integrate Feelings / Water And Sand / Trust What You Can’t See / Fringes Of Perception / Evoke Dream Analysis / Use Magic / Appurtenances / Better Magic / Enduction

NOTES ON THE CREATIVE UNCONSCIOUS

As you read the book, write your ideas down.

It seems obvious. However, in most cases, people don’t do this, so the concepts escape. They can’t remember the exact version of words that made their thoughts so unique.

Ideas have a fleeting life. Writing concretises them on the page, makes them real. It gives them substance.

If you don’t download from your brain to the page your ideas on a regular basis, you clog up your mind with old thoughts, now past their sell-by date and therefore don’t create a space for new ideas to come through.

So buy a cheap notepad and pen and write all your ideas down. Every time you have a thought about creativity, your business, products or the client – make a note of it.

Even if you work visually, still write your ideas down.

If the blank page looks empty and frightening, start at the end of your notepad and work backwards, as if you are filling in void spaces, like colouring in a drawing in a child’s picture book. Each day complete only a single sheet of paper.

Stalk your big idea slowly. When the notepad is full, your project will be complete.

How to Have Creative Ideas

As a writer, having ideas is one of the most important parts of your craft. But often it seems like one of the most difficult and challenging parts of the whole process.

How do you keep ideas flowing? How do you create a wealth of ideas to choose from? How do you make sure you get to the one killer idea that will make your advert, novel, article or blog post really stand out from the rest?

Some people like to wait for inspiration to strike. Most professional writers, however, don’t have that luxury. You need ideas every working day, not just every now and then.

Luckily, there is a formula for producing ideas on a consistent basis. Of course, like all formulas, it has its limits. You can’t constrain creativity, and to only ever use one method for coming up with ideas would be utter madness.

But if you need to produce strong and creative ideas regularly as part of your writing career, then it pays to know the formula, and how to use it.

First of all, what is an idea? Well, according to James Webb Young in his book ‘A Technique for Producing Ideas’, first published in the 1940s:

“An idea is nothing more nor less than a new combination of old elements.”

So how do you combine old elements into new? Luckily, Young tells us:

“The capacity to bring old elements into new combinations depends largely on the ability to see relationships.”

Young says the ability to see relationships between facts is the most important factor in coming up with ideas. This, he says, is a habit of mind “which can be cultivated.”

How do you cultivate it? By reading widely, taking an active interest in life, the world, people around you, a wide variety of subjects and areas of study.

There is also a formula, however, a five step plan which Young outlined in his book. By adding two more steps, you can complete a virtuous circle with a feedback loop that refines and extends your creativity.

So, the seven steps to having ideas are:

Step 1 – Gather your information

Information is the raw material from which ideas are born. There are two types of relevant information, specific and general.

General information includes just about anything and everything, and gathering it is a lifelong exercise. It basically comes down to general knowledge and education, and can be cultivated through the usual channels: reading widely and having an active interest in life and the world around you, and in particular in people, how they live, what they think and how they behave.

Specific information is directly relevant to the topic in hand. You clearly need to get all the specific information you can lay your hands on. If you’re writing an advert for a product or service, you would expect the client to come up with most of it, although you’ll probably want to do some of you own research as well. If you’re writing a blog post on a topic, you’ll need to gather your information from far and wide.

These days, gathering information is a much faster process thanks to the internet. The down side to that is you’ll need to be judicious, and discard that which isn’t really relevant. Otherwise, you’re likely to get overwhelmed during step 2, where you have to sift the information.

Step 2 – Sift the information

Work over the information, turning it over and around until you see how it all fits together. A direct pursuit of ‘meaning’ might be counterproductive. You may need to try a subtle approach, and sneak up on the topic, looking at things from various angles.

If small snippets of ideas start coming to you at this stage, write them down, even if they seem crazy.

The more you turn and sift the information, the better you understand it, the easier it will be to see and really understand the relationships. And the more ideas you will have.

Step 3 – Let the information bubble

The next stage is to let the information bubble away for a while, keep it on simmer in your mind. You need to let your unconscious mind work on it for a time. It’s a good idea to do something else for a while, to stimulate your imagination and emotions. Try reading, listening to music, meditate, go for a walk, while your mind digests the facts.

Or you could try the traditional approach – take a warm bath and wait for the eureka moment.

Step 4 – Eureka! Let the ideas flow

It’s at this stage that ideas should start to appear, as if from ‘nowhere’. This is where you hope for a ‘Eureka’ moment. The answer to your problem may appear to leap into your mind for no apparent reason.

But what if it doesn’t come? You keep going, writing down the best ideas you can come up with. If your ideas aren’t strong enough yet, don’t panic, because you’ll get to have another go at this part of the process. So take the very best ideas you can come up with, and move on to step five.

Step 5 – Shape and develop your idea

Now your idea needs to be shaped and moulded, turned into something real. This where your writing skills come to the fore.

Step 6 – Share your idea

Now show your idea to others and see what they think. They may be able to add to it and make it better. That may spark new ideas, and so the process becomes ever more creative.

Step 7 – Rinse and repeat

If necessary, use the feedback you got in step 6, and add that to the information you gathered in step 1. Now repeat step 2, sifting the new information with the existing facts. Then repeat steps 3, 4, 5 and 6.

Keep it going, until you have the best idea you can come up with, or you hit the deadline, and have to go with what you have developed so far.

So, the good news is that you can learn to be more creative and have stronger ideas. You:

  • Gather the information
  • Sift it
  • Let it percolate
  • Let the ideas flow
  • Shape and mould the ideas
  • Share them with others
  • Put the feedback into the loop; and repeat the process to strengthen your ideas.

That’s the good news. The bad news is, despite what I said at the start about the importance of ideas – and don’t get me wrong they are important – despite that, the truth is that having ideas is the easy part of writing.

Yes, ideas are easy. It’s the execution that is truly difficult, that’s where the real genius lies. And you can only master the craft of writing through hard work and long, steady perseverance.

How to Have Creative Ideas

What makes the difference between a good idea and a great idea? Good ideas come along all the time and help people solve minor problems in work and daily life. Great ideas appear a little less frequently and require a little more work to execute. Great ideas aren’t necessarily the result of highly-paid think tanks or drug-induced vision quests in the desert. Often they are unexpected moments of inspiration that help keep the napkin companies in business.

The big challenge of generating great ideas is freeing yourself from the conventional, mundane thoughts that occupy most of your brain time. Here are seven tips to help you open your mind and stimulate your great idea generator.

1. Engage in Observation Sessions

Great ideas won’t happen in a vacuum. You need some way of getting your brain to think in new and creative ways. Commit time to specific sessions where you stimulate your brain into thinking differently. Being a New Yorker, my favorite method is people watching. A simple walk through Manhattan can introduce me to exciting activity and behavior that makes me think anew. Any crowded urban area, mall or zoo can do the same.

2. Socialize Outside Your Normal Circles

Hanging around with the same friends and colleagues can get you in a thinking rut. Take advantage of all those LinkedIn connections and start some exciting conversations. New people don’t know all your thought patterns and old stories, so you’ll have to revisit your existing inner monologues. The refreshing perspectives will help to surface new thinking and possibly a lightning bolt or two.

3. Read More Books

Books are wonderful for creating new thoughts and stimulating great ideas. For a long time, I didn’t read much. When I added business books to my routine, it helped me learn more and expand my way of thinking. But several years ago, I started again reading fiction and histories. These stories really got me out of my daily headspace and activated my idea generator. Even if you can’t make the time for a novel, go hunt down a bookstore and spend an hour browsing. You’ll find plenty of thought stimulation.

4. Randomly Surf the Web

Google is great when you know what you are looking for, but the best way to generate new ideas is with unexpected learning. Take an hour each week and go on a web journey. Start with the I’m Feeling Lucky button and just take it from there. Try to pick the stranger and more obscure references as you surf and stretch your brain a bit.

5. Keep a Regular Journal

A journal is great for recording thoughts, feelings and the history of your life. It also is a great way to structure and develop ideation habits. If you don’t keep a journal, start today. If you already do, simply add the practice of finishing every entry with: Here is my new idea for the day .

6. Meditate

It’s hard to come up with great ideas when your mind is crowded with everyday thoughts and concerns. You need quiet space. Meditation will help you clear your mind of daily business and stress. Then you can quietly focus on your future — or solving world issues. Commit to two hour-long sessions every week and soon you’ll find new ideas flowing.

7. Use Structured Exercises

Structure breeds creativity. Simple exercises can get your brain working in a focused manner to yield great ideas. My favorite comes from author and Baylor University professor Dr. Blaine McCormick. With a partner, take ten minutes (timed) to come up with 42 ideas on a specific topic or problem. You may only think of 30 or 35 but no matter. You’ll find that there are at least two or three gems in the list.

All of these methods require a commitment of time and energy, but that’s the key to great ideas. You need to give your brain the time and space to work for you. If you try each of these methods, you are bound to come up with a great idea or two. Make sure you record them and set a plan of accountability. The execution is up to you.

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  • A propos
  • Informations

Everybody wants to be creative. Creativity makes life more fun, more interesting and more full of achievement, but too many people believe that creativity is something you are born with and cannot be learned.

In How to Have Creative Ideas Edward de Bono – the leading authority on creative thinking – outlines 62 different games and exercises, built around random words chosen from a list, to help encourage creativity and lateral thinking. For example, if the task were to provide an idea for a new restaurant and the random word chosen was ‘cloak’, ideas generated might be: a highwayman theme; a Venetian theme with gondolas; masked waiters and waitresses. Or, if asked to make a connection between the two random words ‘desk’ and ‘shorts’, readers may come up with: both are functional; desks have ‘knee holes’ and shorts expose the knees; traditionally they were both male-associated items.

All the exercises are simple, practical and fun, and can be done by anyone.

Livres
Loisirs et hobbies
Animaux
Publié par Ebury Digital
Date de parution 31 mai 2012
Nombre de lectures 8
EAN13 9781407030098
Langue English

Informations légales : prix de location à la page €. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

How to Have Creative Ideas

How to Have Creative Ideas

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How to Have Creative Ideas

With so many organizations shifting to virtual teams, there’s no shortage of advice on how to best organize and manage these teams to maximize engagement and productivity. However, the trend toward virtual does pose an interesting problem for a longstanding workplace tradition: The holiday office party.

How do you throw a holiday office party when there’s no office?

Fortunately, there are plenty of creative ways to throw an exciting office party in a virtual context. Much like their in-person versions, these parties are a great way to strengthen relationships and reward teams for a job well done.

Here are 10 Creative Ideas for Hosting the Best Virtual Holiday Party:

1: Engage People in Planning

People are more likely to attend and enjoy a party they have a hand in planning. A few rounds of simple, online surveys can narrow down a list of potential activities to a more manageable amount that everyone is excited about. Engaging people in planning also helps to avoid possible scheduling conflicts (always a challenge with virtual teams) and allows the process to be more culturally inclusive for more diverse teams.

2: Offer Teasers or Prizes

It might sound like bribery, but there’s nothing wrong with enticing team members to attend by offering virtual party favors or prizes like online gift cards or coupon codes. Setting up prizes for the winners of various party activities can ignite a little friendly competition and get the team excited about the event.

3: Send Customized Online Invitations

Online invitations from sites like Evite or Punchbowl offer plenty of fun and creative ways to remind everyone about the virtual party. And since many of these invitations can be delivered for free, they’re a quick and easy way to build excitement for the event.

4: Exchange Donation Gifts

Gift exchanges can be rather difficult in a virtual context (although delivering small gifts via Amazon and watching everyone open the box could be a fun activity), so many remote workers elect to make a donation to a charity of a coworker’s choice. There are plenty of ways to get creative with donation gifts, however. The Dale Carnegie Institute once encouraged employees to think about what a coworker was like as a child and then donate a toy that personified that person to a charity.

5: Kick Off With Team Video Content

A fun “year in review” video that covers the team’s accomplishments for the year can be a good way to get the party underway. Someone could also assemble a fun “blooper reel’ of humorous moments throughout the year or compile a series of song parodies recorded by each person.

6: Dress Up and Vote On the Best Outfit

Since virtual employees don’t need to leave home to attend the party, they can go all out on creating a costume for the event. This could lead to some entertaining moments as everyone votes for the best outfit. If team members aren’t interested in dressing up, they could hold an ugly Christmas sweater contest.

7: Submit Videos of Kids/Pets

Who doesn’t love to see a toddler on Santa’s lap or a dog wearing a little scarf? The team could easily share short videos to show how what they’re doing to celebrate the holidays with their family and friends (and pets!).

8: Share Holiday Memories/Traditions

Everyone has a funny holiday story or two. They may also have a unique tradition that sets their holiday experience apart from other families. Team members can take turns sharing both, which can not only provide plenty of laughs, but also help them get to know each other a bit better.

9: Split Into Groups for Games

While holiday games can be fun, virtual parties suffer the same challenges as virtual meetings in that it’s difficult for more than one person to talk at a time. Using collaborative meeting software such as WebEx Training or Adobe connect and breaking into smaller groups to play games can help ensure that everyone stays engaged in the festivities and doesn’t leave them looking to log off.

10: Give Out Fun Awards

While a holiday party may be a good time to reward people for good performance throughout the year, it’s an even better opportunity to hand out fun awards. This would be a good time to recognize the person who loves singing along with the video conference room’s on-hold music or always knows how to perk everyone up.

Just because your team is virtual doesn’t mean you can’t throw a holiday party to remember. Many companies are already making virtual office parties an important part of their holiday traditions. With a little forethought and planning, the same tools that make virtual teams so effective can easily be deployed in the service of a memorable virtual holiday party.

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Amy Morin, LCSW, is a psychotherapist, international bestselling author and host of the Mentally Strong People podcast.

  • Cognitive Psychology
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Creativity is all about finding new ways of solving problems and approaching situations. This isn’t a skill restricted to artists, musicians or writers; it is a useful skill for people from all walks of life. If you’ve ever wanted to boost your creativity, these tips can help.

Commit Yourself to Creativity

How to Have Creative Ideas

The first step is to fully devote yourself to developing your creative abilities. Do not put off your efforts. Set goals, enlist the help of others, and put time aside each day to develop your skills.

Become an Expert

One of the best ways to develop creativity is to become an expert in that area. By having a rich understanding of the topic, you will be better able to think of a novel or innovative solutions to problems.

Reward Your Curiosity

One common roadblock to developing creativity is the sense that curiosity is an indulgence. Rather than reprimanding yourself, reward yourself when you are curious about something. Give yourself the opportunity to explore new topics.

While rewarding yourself is important, it is also important to develop intrinsic motivation. Sometimes, the true reward of creativity is the process itself, not the product.

Take Risks

When it comes to building your creative skills, you need to be willing to take risks in order to advance your abilities. While your efforts may not lead to success every time, you will still be boosting your creative talents and building skills that will serve you well in the future.

Build Your Confidence

Insecurity in your abilities can suppress creativity, which is why it is important to build confidence. Make note of the progress you have made, commend your efforts, and always be on the lookout for ways to reward your creativity.

Make Time for Creativity

You won’t be able to develop your creative talents if you don’t make time for them. Schedule some time each week to concentrate on some type of creative project.

Overcome a Negative Attitude

Focus on eliminating negative thoughts or self-criticisms that may impair your ability to develop strong creative skills.

Fight Fear of Failure

The fear that you might make a mistake or fail in your efforts can paralyze your progress. Whenever you find yourself harboring such feelings, remind yourself that mistakes are simply part of the process. While you may occasionally stumble on your path to creativity, you will eventually reach your goals.

Brainstorm New Ideas

Brainstorming is a common technique in both academic and professional settings, but it can also be a powerful tool for developing your creativity.

Start by suspending your judgment and self-criticism, then start writing down related ideas and possible solutions. The goal is to generate as many ideas as possible in a relatively short span of time. Next, focus on clarifying and refining your ideas in order to arrive at the best possible choice.

Explore Multiple Solutions

The next time you approach a problem, try looking for a variety of solutions. Instead of simply going with the first idea you have, take the time to think of other possible ways to approach the situation. This simple activity is a great way to build both your problem-solving and creative thinking skills.

Keep a Creativity Journal

Start keeping a journal to follow your creative process and track the ideas you produce. A journal is a great way to reflect back on what you have accomplished and look for other possible solutions. This journal can be used to save ideas that can later serve as future inspiration.

Use Mind Maps and Flow Charts

A mind map is a great way to connect ideas and look for innovative answers to questions. Create a mind map by writing down a central topic or word. Next, link related terms or ideas around the central word. While similar to brainstorming, this technique allows for branching ideas and offers a very visual way of seeing how these ideas are linked.  

As you start to develop a new project, create a flow chart to track the presentation of the project from start to finish. Look for various paths or sequences of events that might occur. A flow chart can help you visualize the final product, eliminate potential problems and create unique solutions.

Challenge Yourself and Create Opportunities

Once you have developed some basic creative skills, it is important to continually challenge yourself in order to further advance your abilities. Look for more difficult approaches, try out new things and avoid always using the same solutions you have used in the past.

In addition to challenging yourself, you also need to create your own opportunities for creativity. This might involve tackling a new project or finding new tools to use in your current projects.

Try the Six Hats Technique

The “six hats” technique involves looking at a problem from six differing perspectives.   By doing this, you can produce more ideas than you might have had you only looked at the situation from one or two points of view.

  • Black Hat: Use a negative perspective. Which elements of the solution won’t work?
  • Blue Hat: Think broadly. What is the best overall solution?
  • Green Hat: Think creatively. What are some alternative ideas?
  • Red Hat: Look at the situation emotionally. What do your feelings tell you?
  • White Hat: Look at the situation objectively. What are the facts?
  • Yellow Hat: Use a positive perspective. Which elements of the solution will work?

Look for Inspiration

Never expect creativity to just happen. Look for new sources of inspiration that will give you fresh ideas and motivate you to generate unique answers to questions. Read a book, visit a museum, listen to your favorite music or engage in a lively debate with a friend. Utilize whatever strategy or technique works best for you.

Consider Alternative Scenarios

When approaching a problem, utilize “what if. ” questions to consider each possible scenario. If you take a specific approach, what will the outcome be?

By looking at these alternatives beforehand, you’ll be better able to develop creative solutions to problems.

Try the Snowball Technique

Have you ever noticed how one great idea often leads directly to another? You can take advantage of this by utilizing a “snowball technique” when you are generating ideas for your project.   If the idea isn’t appropriate for your current work, set it aside to work on later, or implement it in a future project.

How to Have Creative Ideas

Many people think you’re either a creative person or you’re not. While I agree that some people may be slightly more predisposed to thinking creatively than others, I think creativity is a muscle that can be exercised and improved upon. Here are six ways to stimulate creative thinking.

1. Consume content that’s way outside your comfort zone.

We all love reading about stuff in our industry, but typically this doesn’t boost creativity. If you’re lucky, it might help with motivation or inspiration. If you want to get your creative juices flowing, start consuming content you wouldn’t normally consume. Read blogs outside of your industry. Read books outside of your normal genre of choice. Heck, grab lunch with a complete stranger (just make sure they’re not a bad stranger).

2. Write a 500 word article with no topic whatsoever.

This is a fun exercise I use when I can’t seem to get my thoughts focused or come up with interesting ideas. I’ll open a blank document and just start typing. No headline, no topic, no editing, and most importantly no self-critiquing. I just let my fingers start typing and let my brain decide what words get written next. Usually I end up with some pretty weird and crazy stuff I’d never share, but I always feel a boost of creative energy afterwards.

3. Go see a movie in a movie theater.

Movies on the big scene are one of the last few places you can enjoy a complete sensory-captive experience. The giant bright screen. The sound-rumbling surround sound. The smell and taste of freshly popped popcorn. The somewhat uncomfortable seat with plastic armrests that don’t move. Whenever I leave a movie theater, my mind is always spinning with thoughts and ideas.

4. Take a phone call with someone you don’t know.

Hearing someone’s story that’s completely new to you can be an eye-opening and mind-expanding experience. Maybe you’ll learn something from them? Maybe they’ll give you a new perspective you’ve never heard about your stuff? Maybe they’ll drop knowledge bombs on you?

5. Eat differently.

There are studies upon studies that discuss how our diet affects the way we think. Want to start thinking differently? Start giving your body different (and healthier) fuel. You’d be shocked how much more creatively you can think and act when you eat a healthier diet.

6. Do the “No Bad Ideas Brainstorming” exercise.

Get at least one other person to join you for a 45-60 minute brainstorming session. No technology and no criticism whatsoever. Bring a topic or idea you want to brainstorm to the table, and just start riffing on it back and forth. Write down all your ideas (on actual paper) and don’t critique a single idea. It’s important to do this in person and to make absolutely sure you don’t have any negative energy or feedback throughout the process. You may end up with 100 horrible ideas, but I bet you’ll have one or two good ones. Plus, you’ll get better at this the more you do it.

You don’t have to be a creative thinker to be able to think outside the box, you just need to do more stuff that stimulates creative thinking. Even the most creative people need help getting inspired.

Having, stretching and selling creative ideas – course open from November 4 2019

How to Have Creative Ideas

75 Videos, 10 Downloadables, 2 Audios

About this course

Great ideas are at the heart of all brilliant creative work. They can inspire action, create a new way to live, last a lifetime, and even change the world.

But these ideas don’t appear as if by magic. They take bravery, collaboration, resilience, imagination and more, which means sometimes it’s easier to play it safe and recreate what’s gone before.

We’ll be breaking down the process into five main steps that will help you understand how great ideas happen – everything from the first inkling to the final feedback.

Part 1: Think It

The first part of this course takes us back to the beginning of the creative process and we’ll discuss how ideas are born with a range of creatives, including Tony Davidson, ECD at Wieden+Kennedy London, and legendary ad-man Patrick Collister.

Part 2: Commercialise It

In Part 2 we’ll look at how to make ideas that thrive in a commercial landscape. Alongside our course leaders, we’ll hear from marketing expert Daryl Fielding and see examples of brave ideas from across the world.

Part 3: Create It

During Part 3 you will start doing, and bring your big idea to life with the help of the team behind Google’s award-winning NSynth Super project and graphic design genius Jim Sutherland.

Part 4: Push It

Once you have your big idea it’s easy to stop there. Part 4 will help you keep going and push your idea further than ever before, with advice from over 20 of the worlds best creative brains, including ad guru Ben Priest. You will also get access to a brand new creative tool.

Part 5: Refine It

Part 5 will guide you through the scariest part of the creative process: getting feedback. A trio of top creatives, including the brilliant Becky McOwen-Banks from FCB Inferno, share their experiences (good and bad), and our course leaders will guide you through giving feedback to each other.

By the end of the five weeks, you’ll have heard from over 50 of the creative industry’s smartest minds, have a toolkit of tried and tested methods of creating big ideas, worked – in real time – on a brief with your fellow participants and have take-away tools to help create world-changing ideas over and over again.

Who is this course for?

This course is for everyone who wants to understand the importance of great creative ideas, and how to have them. It’s particular relevant for those at the start of their creative careers, specifically in advertising, marketing and design.

Having, stretching and selling creative ideas – course open from November 4 2019

How to Have Creative Ideas

75 Videos, 10 Downloadables, 2 Audios

About this course

Great ideas are at the heart of all brilliant creative work. They can inspire action, create a new way to live, last a lifetime, and even change the world.

But these ideas don’t appear as if by magic. They take bravery, collaboration, resilience, imagination and more, which means sometimes it’s easier to play it safe and recreate what’s gone before.

We’ll be breaking down the process into five main steps that will help you understand how great ideas happen – everything from the first inkling to the final feedback.

Part 1: Think It

The first part of this course takes us back to the beginning of the creative process and we’ll discuss how ideas are born with a range of creatives, including Tony Davidson, ECD at Wieden+Kennedy London, and legendary ad-man Patrick Collister.

Part 2: Commercialise It

In Part 2 we’ll look at how to make ideas that thrive in a commercial landscape. Alongside our course leaders, we’ll hear from marketing expert Daryl Fielding and see examples of brave ideas from across the world.

Part 3: Create It

During Part 3 you will start doing, and bring your big idea to life with the help of the team behind Google’s award-winning NSynth Super project and graphic design genius Jim Sutherland.

Part 4: Push It

Once you have your big idea it’s easy to stop there. Part 4 will help you keep going and push your idea further than ever before, with advice from over 20 of the worlds best creative brains, including ad guru Ben Priest. You will also get access to a brand new creative tool.

Part 5: Refine It

Part 5 will guide you through the scariest part of the creative process: getting feedback. A trio of top creatives, including the brilliant Becky McOwen-Banks from FCB Inferno, share their experiences (good and bad), and our course leaders will guide you through giving feedback to each other.

By the end of the five weeks, you’ll have heard from over 50 of the creative industry’s smartest minds, have a toolkit of tried and tested methods of creating big ideas, worked – in real time – on a brief with your fellow participants and have take-away tools to help create world-changing ideas over and over again.

Who is this course for?

This course is for everyone who wants to understand the importance of great creative ideas, and how to have them. It’s particular relevant for those at the start of their creative careers, specifically in advertising, marketing and design.

As a creative, I’m sure you can relate to the feeling of having so many ideas filling your head that you don’t know what to do with yourself.

I know that sometimes I am so completely overwhelmed with possible projects and art I’m desperate to make that I don’t know where to begin. I don’t know which idea to choose first or how to separate everything out in a way that makes sense. And why is it that right when I’m trying to drift off to sleep, my mind goes into overdrive with ideas?

It’s like that old saying about buses – you’ll be waiting forever for one to come, and then they’ll arrive all at once. The same is true of ideas.

These are a few of my favorite ways to make sense of all the inspiring things tumbling around in my mind so that I can actually get to creating!

How to Have Creative Ideas

Get it all out

This might seem like an obvious tip, but start by getting all your ideas out of your head and onto paper (or screen).

One lovely way to do that is to use a bullet journal – these appeal to a lot of artists. I think this is partly because there’s a lot of potential to make them look beautiful, but also because they’re an incredibly useful tool for us visual types.

To learn more about bullet journaling and how you can start making it work in your creative practice, watch this short video.

If you’d prefer to have an app to capture ideas, I’m a big fan of Trello. I use it to stash all of the ideas that pop into my head, and the best part is that I have it on my phone, so I can update on the go.

Keeping organized makes a huge difference so find what works for you!

Feel how you feel

Make a note of how you feel about all these ideas. If something really excites you, run with it. If there’s something that you keep putting off, take it off your list.

This thinking should be applied to your completed projects too. Once you’ve played around with an idea, think about your process. Did you enjoy it? Did you find it frustrating?

For me, the best ideas are the ones I keep thinking about. the ones that really get me excited.

Pick a focus

One of the drawbacks (if there are any, really) of being a mixed media artist is that you want to play with all of the techniques and all of the supplies – but that is not a time or cost effective way to create, particularly if you want to transform your creative practice from hobby to business.

At the start of each month, pick a focus. This could be a theme, or a particular technique or even a specific color palette. Use that focus to select the ideas you’re going to try first.

Just create

If you’re feeling overwhelmed by all the things you could or should be creating, hide your list away for a while. Set a timer for an hour (or however long you can spare) and just go play. Choose your materials based purely on instinct. Don’t listen to any negative self-talk, just go wherever the inspiration takes you.

“ It’s more about putting energy into the things that you love, the things that light you up, and not staring at the things you feel you “should” be working on. ”

How to Make a Good Impression During a Presentation

How to Have Creative Ideas

Speaking engagements have become standard practice for many businesses. Whether it is a 10-minute presentation at the local Chamber of Commerce meeting or a TED Talk, start your presentation off properly with a solid self-introduction. Although a self-introduction must provide meaningful credential information, it should also captivate your audience. Don’t ignore professional standards when presenting a creative self-introduction.

Find the Creative Angle

Find a creative angle that works for you. Using jokes or other personal anecdotes are commonly used as introduction methods, and these remain strong opportunities for creative engagement when done appropriately. This means you are telling your audience information that’s not just relevant to yourself and your topic, but also keeping the content, like a joke, clean and appropriate for the audience.

Grab Their Attention

While icebreakers are generally reserved for team meetings and team building, it is possible to use an icebreaker to start a presentation if it smoothly leads into the topic. For example, a presentation about overcoming limiting self-beliefs might start with having the audience members stand and touch their toes, then incorporate a tip or trick to help them reach further on a second attempt. This is a creative way to get everyone’s blood flowing, capture their attention and segue into your experience and concepts about overcoming mindset limits.

Example:

Everyone believes they know themselves. Let’s see how true that is. Everyone get up. Come on, join in. Now everyone touch your toes. That went about as well as you expected, right? OK, now everyone take three deep breaths, let a breath out, and touch your toes again. How many people went further this time?

Show Your Human Side

Find a unique way to relate to your audience. Speaking about a pet is something easily relatable. Perhaps show a picture of your pets and ask the audience to share their pet’s names. This engages the audience by hitting a positive trigger topic.

Example:

Loyalty is crucial in any business. You know how many people learn about loyalty? From their first pet when they were a child. I’ve still got mine. This is Wilbur, my cocker spaniel. Yeah, I know, weird name. Anyone else got a pet with a funny name?

Dress the Part

Always dress appropriately when making a presentation to any group. This doesn’t always mean a suit and tie, but don’t show up in dirty or wrinkled clothing. It is possible to be a bit creative with your attire. For example, assume you regularly speak at local business venues. If you always wear a short-sleeved button-downed shirt with a green bow tie, audience members will recognize you immediately upon taking the stage.

This tactic becomes part of a speaker’s persona. While your attire isn’t discussed in the introduction, it nevertheless becomes part of the introduction by creating your unique reputation. Audience members might remember you and continue to refer to the “green bow-tie guy.”

Deliver the Introduction

An old school of thought is to tell the audience what you are going to tell them, then tell it to them, and then summarize by telling them what you just told them. This method can stagnate messaging even though repetition helps the audience remember the concepts. When it comes to self-introductions, avoid saying you “want to tell a story that you just remembered” or that you “have a great joke.” Just delve into the content. Don’t warn people because it sometimes leads to a preconceived judgment, such as, “Oh, not another joke.”

Speak slowly during the introduction and don’t list your education or experience. Ask the audience a question to find common ground. For example, “Do we have any Los Angeles natives in the room?” Then offer how your life and Los Angeles are related. This bonds a speaker with his audience.

How to Have Creative IdeasGenerating a large number of ideas is a key part of the creative thinking process. The more ideas you come up with the more likely you are to find something truly innovative. But having a long list of ideas creates an issue. How do you select the best ideas to carry through to implementation?

Have you ever been in a brainstorm session where you filled flip charts with ideas and then the manager said, ‘Thanks very much, leave those with me and I will analyse them later.’ And then you never heard anything again? The ideas on their own are just the starting point. Without proper evaluation there will be no follow through to completion.

For brainstorms and creative thinking sessions the evaluation phase of the process is critical and typically needs as much time and attention as the idea generation stage. In evaluation we switch from suspending judgment to exercising critical judgment in order to whittle down the ideas to a short-list of actionable items.

Selection Criteria

How do you evaluate the ideas? By setting some selection criteria. The criteria should be reasonably broad but not vague. ‘We are looking for good ideas,’ is too fuzzy – all sorts of things can get through. ‘We want ideas we can implement immediately with no extra resource,’ is almost certainly too tight and will result in good ideas being rejected.

Say you were analyzing ideas for new products. The criteria you agree might be:

Will customers like it?

Is it technically feasible?

Will it make money?

Each idea is then assessed against these measures. A recommended general set of criteria for all sorts of ideas is the FAN method from Synectics. Are you a FAN of the idea? i.e.:

Is it attractive?

The third criterion here is important to ensure that fresh ideas are valued highly.

The British retail giant, Tesco, uses the following criteria for selecting ideas in brainstorms or suggestions sessions.

Is it better? (For customers)

Is it simpler? (For staff)

Is it cheaper? (For Tesco)

Any idea that is better, easier and cheaper is likely to be a good idea and will probably be approved. Putting the criteria into context – e.g. simpler for staff – makes it easier to understand and apply.

Choose the criteria you want and then apply them rigorously to the ideas on your list.

Group evaluation methods

If you are working in a group and have used the criteria above to construct a short list here are some methods for selecting the best ideas to implement..

a. Each person is given 5 ‘ticks’ they can spend. They come to the front and puts ticks next to their favourite ideas. The ideas with the most ticks go forward. This method is quick and energetic but it does mean that some of the more obscure ideas may be overlooked. Their potential may be developed if they are discussed. Another possible drawback is that in controversial or political situations people can be inhibited or influenced by the opinions of others.

b. There is a secret ballot and people write on slips of paper their favourite ideas. This overcomes the problem of political correctness where people may be afraid to support controversial ideas or may be influenced by the more powerful voices in the room. There is no discussion during the ballot but once the ideas are ranked the group discussion can begin.

c. Each person in turn states their favourite idea. The facilitator goes around the room and gives everyone the opportunity to speak. This is quick and interactive but it means that the people who speak later can be unduly influenced by what has gone before.

Summary

It is important to remember to separate the two types of thinking used in the two stages of the brainstorm process. We use divergent thinking while generating ideas. We suspend judgment and generate a long list of ideas including silly and unreasonable ideas. When we have enough ideas or when we have exhausted our creative process then we use convergent thinking to select the best ideas. We can now be critical and analytical. We compare the ideas against clear criteria and make judgements as to which will succeed and which will not. Many people mix the two methods and apply convergent thinking to eliminate lines of enquiry as they go along. This is fatal; many potentially fruitful ideas will be killed at birth. Stay divergent in idea generation and only use convergent thinking when you move to the evaluation phase.

More details on all my brainstorm methods in How to Generate Ideas – available on Kindle

How to Have Creative Ideas

November 12th, 2017

For newcomers, one of the great mysteries of design is how ideas get created in the first place.

A lot of the time we see beautiful end results in people’s portfolios, looking all polished and shiny. Although portfolios do occasionally gives some insight into process as well, what professional designers usually don’t like showing us are the messy early stages. But the truth is that amazing ideas usually evolve from pretty unpromising, or even downright ugly early sketches.

Once you start leafing through a designer’s sketchbook, it becomes clear why we often say that design is not art. To be an amazing designer, you don’t have to be great at drawing. It might even help if you’re not great at drawing, because you won’t be held back by worrying about making your sketches beautiful.

But what is important is your ability to quickly generate ideas. So, how do designers do it? Read on for some key tips!

1. Learn the importance of idea generation

Personally speaking, the importance of idea generation has been a key lesson for me as I’ve learned design over the past couple of years. Due to a misspent youth programming BBC Micros (aka Acorns), and becoming dubiously competent in other forms of coding, I’m pretty comfortable using computers and learning software, and can usually execute stuff quickly.

But what I’ve had to learn recently is that those skills are pretty useless if you don’t have a strong idea to take to the computer. As a rule, software is for executing an idea, not for coming up with one.

So I’ve had to become more disciplined in making myself develop ideas away from the computer. The key for me is to try and push beyond my comfort zone before attempting to digitise any ideas.

If you, too, find yourself stuck with a blank piece of paper and a half-chewn pencil, how can you start creating concepts? The good news is that you don’t have to be a creative “genius”. You just have to use methods that activate your innate human creativity.

How to Have Creative Ideas

As a writer and a creative, I have way too many ideas and too little time (as I tell myself). Therefore, I have to find ways to deal with them.

How to Have Creative Ideas

Write everything down. Including every version of the idea as it evolves, because it will.

I carry around a pocket-sized notebook when I can, but sometimes I get lazy. The Notes app on my iPhone is filled with notes. Random musings, last night’s dream in a few words, story prompts that read like haikus.

Select a few and entertain them in my head.

I look through my notes and organize my ideas. The Notes app also contains to-dos and grocery lists, which get deleted after they expire.
Review the ideas are just as important as coming up with them, and I would add new insights as I go.
If an idea was hastily jotted down, it would make little sense a few years later. However, if you review it in a few days, it would still be mostly fresh on your mind, and you can add more details to it to make it clear. Think of it as a convenience for later.

Focus on the main work-in-progress.

New ideas are always shiny and full of potential. My current WIP would look dull and used in the comparison. Feel free to run with the latest idea, but if I do, I never end up finishing anything.
To me, the key is to focus on my current work and get it finished. Even though it’s not perfect, at least it is completed. A completed content is out of my head and onto paper, but an idea, no matter how full of potential it is, is in my head.

Combine ideas into one.

You can combine similar ones and save space in your document. Ideas for the same project should be grouped together, tagged, or put into a “WIP idea” document.
Another thing I often do was combine interesting but different concepts together to create an idea for a larger project, such as a novel. It would have depth and multitude. It would be weaved with subplots, character developments, and also challenge the tropes.

Decide what idea is for what.

When I get ideas for new stories, I go on to decide which is a short story and which is a novel. Short stories make it really easy if you just want to get the story down in a few thousand words, and it’s a complete project.
Novels could take months even years to write, and I don’t have time to write a few hundred novels.

Flesh out the idea, but still keep it contained.

If I don’t have time but still want to expand on an idea, I write micro pieces. They are usually a scene, a few lines of dialogs, a description of an environment.
The point is to get the idea out and make them into usable snippets, which is what I name the document that contains these, “Usable Snippets”.
Sit on them. Come back to them a month later, or a year. Sometimes I fill in or edit the prose, because my prose had improved with time.
Sometimes the snippet has stood up with the test of time, and I can just copy and paste it into the correct spot of my WIP.

Starve your brain if you don’t want to get more ideas, just for a while.

It’s not as bad as it sounds. If you really want to, you can stop yourself from getting more ideas. When reading, don’t be distracted by great concepts. Focus on the prose and languages. You can improve your writing skills without getting more ideas.
When listening to music, listen to it. Don’t analyze the lyrics and dream of the stories they hold. Listen to the rhythm, the beats.
When out for a walk, look at the colors of the trees, the shape of the hills. Live in the moment. Not in your head and in an imaginary world.

Document dreams and therefore have more ideas.

My dreams are usually really interesting. I dream every night, sometimes 3–4 dreams per night. I only write down the best or better ones, and of course, I had to remember them first. Oftentimes they just vanish from the first second I woke up.

Go out and find more ideas.

Ideas are cheap. Investing in even one takes energy. The execution is key.
I read through my idea document regularly, and add to it regularly. I separate the good ones from the others, but never delete anything. Anything.

Do regular braindumps.

Get things out of your head and onto paper. Clear your head. Disk capacity is cheap, brain space is not. And who knows, what if something were to happen to you and you suffer from memory loss or worse, but you’d still have your ideas recorded and ready to be executed.
But let’s hope it doesn’t come to that.

If you have a roomie, your new normal when it comes to your home office space might be a challenge. You’ve set up your workspaces at the kitchen table and the living room couch, and came up with “office” rules. Wearing headphones when listening to music and keeping one another in the know when you have Zoom meetings is a huge help. However, your daily work setup may need some of these creative home office ideas for roommates that’ll take the WFH situation for the both of you to the next level.

Get ready to turn your apartment into an IRL version of The Office, or send you and your roommate on a productivity kick that can’t be beat. If you recreate any of these ideas, you’ll likely truly enjoy your lunch breaks, hopping on Zoom calls, and tackling assignments. You may never want to go back to your traditional office setting again.

These ideas will start new traditions that you won’t want to let go of. Find a plan that works for you and run it by your roommate. Then, purchase the few products you need to make the ideal setup a reality. Making small changes can be a big game-changer, so don’t sleep on this too long.

1. Set Up A Coffee And Tea Station

A caramel macchiato — whether you pick it up from Starbucks or make it at home — is always your sidekick. That’s why you should set up a coffee and tea station in your home office, or even your kitchen. Make sure the station has enough mugs, a variety of tea bags, an espresso maker, and a mason jar filled with stirring sticks. This bar cart will help you set it up in a fashionable way for your very own coffee break.

2. Put Your Goals For The Day On A White Board

The beauty of coworkers is that they help you reach your big dreams and goals. When you need to talk a project out, they’re there to listen and help you work through the kinks.

You and your roomie can share a white board and draw a line down the center. Each of you can have your own space to work on projects or list your goals for the day. This way, you’re in tuned with the other person’s workload and day. Get one that’s on wheels so you can put it in different spots, and don’t forget to purchase markers, too.

3. Have Dance Parties During Your Lunch Break

When you’re sitting at your laptops all day long, you and your roommate need to get up and move around. What you need is a bluetooth speaker so you can dance to an upbeat song when you’re both on a lunch break. It’ll make your body and brain ready to take on the last hours of work and be a part of the day you always look forward to.

4. Create A Communal Workspace With A Garden

Odds are, you and your roommate have your separate spots to work in during the day. But, that doesn’t mean you can’t have a communal workspace as well where you can type alongside each other and tend to a garden. If the weather’s nice, this spot could be outside where your plants can get lots of sun, or in the kitchen next to a window where you’ve set up a countertop with barstools. Get these ceramic planters that’ll truly brighten up that space with good vibes and new friends.

5. Put Up A Sticker Chart In Your Kitchen

When you were a kid, did your parents put a sticker on a chart every time you did a chore? You should recreate that for your WFH space by putting up your own chart in your kitchen. To motivate you and your roommate, give yourselves a sticker if you complete a project, tackle a task, or get your inbox to read “no new messages.” Let each other pick out which sticker you want, from this trendy sticker pack.

6. Wear Matching Outfits On Fridays

Casual Friday isn’t really a thing anymore, because you wear sweatpants and a sweatshirt almost every day. But, you can spice up your weekly wardrobe and decide, “On Fridays, we wear matching outfits.” Try to coordinate based on what’s already in your closets, or plan to wear tie-dye, overalls, or the same color. Take a picture to post on IG on each Friday to create this neat tradition with a larger community.

7. Create Your Own Yoga Corner

You’ve gotten pretty good at stretching your back and wrists while sitting at your desk. The perk of being home, though, is you can build your own yoga studio to retreat to in the middle of the day. There, you can roll your shoulders and follow short YouTube videos with mindful flows. You can even meditate on this cozy mat if your roommate doesn’t mind staying quiet or would like to join, too.

8. Put Together A Shelf Of Snacks

Put together a shelf of healthy snacks for when you get hungry in the afternoon. You can include granola bars, pita chips, raisins, peanuts, and coconut water. Organize them in several woven baskets like these.

It’ll make grabbing a snack so much more exciting than it was when you were at the office and hit up the vending machine. You and your roommate will love restocking it together and shopping for new items at the grocery store.

Creative ideas to get feet pics

Feb 16, 2012 #1 2012-02-16T06:51

Some of the most prized feet are from girls who I actually know and never really reveal their feet to me. So over the years I thought of different ways of getting friends to send me pictures of their feet without them thinking I actually had a foot fetish.
First one, I had an art project. The project was for a Photoshop class in which we had to create a piece that captured our “soul”. I was texting a girl friend one night and an idea just sparked. I asked her if she wanted to help me with my art piece and be the model in it (she was a sucker for the limelight). I played the rebellious artist act and said that the project was stupid, so instead a project about “souls” I was going to mock it with a piece about “soles”. She was hesitant with many questions, like why use her feet and why not just Google for pics. “My teacher only allows for original photographs we’ve taken and I was offering to you because I thought you were my friend and wanted to do it!” easyyy.

Another time, I was texting a girl and somehow got her to say something weird and then accused her of having a foot fetish. This girl was the type to play along with things to be sarcastic. So after a while she accused me of having a foot fetish. I played a new role saying “ewww, I hate feet. Don’t you dare even think of sending pics of your feet to me”. After enough poking around, I was getting pics for a good while and eventually changed roles to “I don’t have a foot fetish but If I did you would probably win me over with feet [insert pose/shot]”. I think she was honestly only doing it because she was attracted to me and had the idea that I actually did have a foot fetish (i got high and did some reallllly bad acting on night). She asked me a couple times if I really did have a foot fetish but at the time I was too scared to tell anyone but my close friends. Now a days I would just admit and get some really good foot shots.

A third time, I posed as a fake photographer for a spa ad. This was way over the ethics/legal lines so I feel I shouldn’t go into detail on this one.

Anyone else have some good ways of getting pictures of friends’ feet?

Do you have trouble coming up with a descriptive, cool or unique username? Sit for ages in front of the create account screen trying to come up with a username that hasn’t been taken and isn’t lame? I feel your pain as I do that very thing. That’s why I have put together ‘How to generate creative username ideas’. To help all those people like me who have trouble being creative when put on the spot.

How to Have Creative Ideas

When it comes to grabbing a cool username, early adopters have a real advantage. They get to choose all the best usernames while latecomers get dumb ones or have to put numbers at the end of their name. While adding ‘567’ to the end of a cool username may seem a decent workaround, it doesn’t look cool and you won’t like it for long.

That’s where this tutorial will come in handy. You will learn how and where to generate creative username ideas that reflect your personality, are different from the usual and that get you noticed.

How to Have Creative Ideas

Generate creative username ideas

If you need to generate creative username ideas, you can do it one of two ways. You can come up with it entirely on your own using tricks to trigger ideas or you can use some web-based username generators. You can of course use both and take a little from each, it is entirely up to you!

Generate your own usernames

While you may stumble at the account creation screen like I do, if you give yourself a little time, you will come up with something. Here are a few ideas to help. Different tips will work in different places. Some ideas will generate great gamer names but won’t work so well on social media while other work great as a Twitter handle but not so much on Instagram or as an email address. Mix and match as you see fit.

Consider your favorite hobby, animal, music, movie, color, actor, sports team, random word, adjective, food or whatever. Write a few down and begin putting them together to see what you can come up with.

For example: I like the Dallas Cowboys, hot dogs, the color orange, Inglorious the movie and the word moist. So I could come up with DallasHotDog, Inglorious Cowboy, Dallas Orange, Moist Orange Cowboy and so on. The more effort you put into it the more you get out of it.

Generating your own usernames is often best done in advance when you have a spare hour and have some inspiration. Write them down and keep them safe for use when you need them.

How to Have Creative Ideas

Username generators

The other way to generate creative username ideas is to use a web-based generator. I tend to visit these for gamer tags as I can never come up with anything that describes my playstyle without sounding lame.

Here are some of the ones I use.

Rum and Monkey

I was first drawn to Rum and Monkey purely because of the name. Now I go to it anytime I need a new username for anything. It has categories for different types of name such as Viking, military, Minions and so on. While you certainly don’t have to choose a specific category, you have to pick one to generate a name. Many of the suggestions are actually very good which is why I keep going back.

Fake Name Generator

I tend to recommend the Fake Name Generator for all sorts of uses. This site generates real names, so if you’re setting up a fake email address or social media profile, this is the place to come. It isn’t so good for gamer tags but works very well for character creation for stories or whatever.

Cool Name Generator

The Cool Name Generator is another that will create ‘normal’ names. It is also the only generator site I know of that offers a ‘neutral’ option for gender. Some of the initial suggestions tend to be a bit lame but give it a chance and it can generate some good ones.

Spinxo

Spinxo is another decent way to generate creative usernames. Add details into the top and hit Spin. The app will generate a bunch of names depending on the information you provide. There is also a list of ones already generated underneath. Like the others here, some of those generated just don’t work while others are actually very good indeed. I tend to get more good results from Rum and Monkey but Spinxo is worth a try too.

Got any other suggestions for generating creative usernames? Tell us about it below if you do!

I hate to tell you, but you can’t just ‘have ideas’. You can only create conditions conducive to having good ideas by equipping yourself with as much intellectual ammunition as possible and keeping those creative muscles well exercised.

Steve Jobs said, ‘creativity is just connecting things’ and that’s exactly what having ideas is in its simplest form: connecting one thing to another thing to come up with a new thing.

Whether you’re in a creative role and it’s literally your job to come up with ideas daily, or they’re needed in a less obvious way, like finding a solution to a client’s problem, ideas are always needed in the workplace in some capacity.

So here are some things we do at Builtvisible to create the right environment for the ideas to come.

Research

An obvious first step, but one that often gets skipped in favour of getting down to it.

Have a look at what’s currently out there about the topic you need ideas for. This will show you what types of content or solutions are already out there and therefore where you need to get to with your idea. There’s nothing more frustrating than a Eureka moment only to find out it’s already been done to death.

Take note

Inspiration is something that happens to you. You need to capitalise on it when it does, rather than letting it pass you by. Making notes of ideas as and when you have them will save you time and preserve ideas that could later be connected.

These notes don’t even have to be ideas, they can be keywords associated with a topic, client or niche, for example.

There are hundreds of note apps these days, and for good reason, but we’ve found the best to be:

  • OneNote, the black sheep of the MS Office family, allows you to cross-reference notes between multiple notebooks, and have as many people as you like to share the same notebook and use it collaboratively.
  • Mural is an online brainstorming platform. Make mind maps, create sticky notes and share them with your team for them to view, add and edit.
  • Evernote is a note-taking app that helps you make, prioritise and archive lists.

Remember: when you are making notes, try to explain yourself instead of writing vague one-liners. Try to provide context, a source, or even the client the idea is referring to when you’re jotting something down.

We’re not talking about War and Peace here. Read the widest variety of material you can. Sit and click on random articles on Wikipedia or pick up a book because it’s on a topic you’ve never heard of before.

Accruing knowledge from a host of unfamiliar and broad subjects will equip you with knowledge about things you find interesting, all fodder for making connections and ways to relate one topic to another.

It helps if you’re naturally curious about pretty much everything, but you also have to be interested in the topic. It’s hard to really engage with something if you just don’t care about it, and your level of interest will certainly come through in the finished piece.

Ask questions (and answer them)

Who am I coming up with this idea for? Why do I need to come up with this idea? What problem will my idea solve? The answers to these questions, no matter how simple, will be the formulation of a vague notion that, when connected, develop into a concrete idea.

Change your medium

There are myriad ways that switching from laptop keyboard to old-fashioned pen and paper can get your creative juices flowing:

  • It allows you to retain the information you’re writing better, which can help to formulate ideas later on.
  • Handwriting slows your cognitive processes down to make room for new ideas and creativity, which is handy in our hyper-connected world.
  • Writing with a paper and pen works a different part of your brain than typing, unlocking creativity that can’t always be accessed easily.

Write

Once you have this arsenal of information (and a pen and paper in hand), begin to write. It may seem difficult at first but take your topic and write continuously about it for a few minutes. Your conscience may throw something up that you didn’t even know was in there. This constant stream of thought spilling onto the page will also help you connect all the thoughts and bits of information you’ve read much quicker.

Try something new

Doing something you’ve never done before, getting out of your comfort zone, allows you to gather new snippets of information from different worlds and apply them to the areas that require it. Remember, inspiration is often hiding in the most unlikely places.

Ideation

Coming up with ideas is so much easier when you’re bouncing them around amongst a group of people. Ideation sessions can be effective, but only when they’re done productively. Here are some tips for a fruitful ideation:

  • Make it a morning session: as the day goes on, your brain becomes increasingly jaded. A post-coffee session when the minds of your attendees are fresh will invite the group’s best thinking.
  • Have terrible ideas: no idea is a bad idea. Think of 100 concepts and pick the best three.
  • Write everything down: use a whiteboard to keep a record of any idea mentioned.

For more tips on ideation you can read our blog post on how to get the best out of your team in ideation sessions.

How to Have Creative Ideas

Ideas that work

Just like headlines follow certain conventions that grab reader attention, there are some themes you can use to help you come up with ideas when you’re stuck, pushed for time and inspiration isn’t striking you. These are the ones we have found to gain the most traction amongst a wider audience. As you’re reading, see if you can think of any recent campaigns that have used these notions at their core.

Change

Think about the fields that are in a constant state of change: politics, technology, environment, economics and style. People like to see how history has changed things over time. Take the crux of your idea and see if you can’t create a campaign that would show how it has changed in recent years.

Nostalgia

Nostalgia is the sensation you experience when you hear a familiar sound or see an everyday object that takes your memory back to another time. You experience a sense of happiness or slight sadness for a time that has passed. In essence, instilling nostalgia makes someone feel warm and fuzzy inside before you plant your message.

Scale

How many campaigns have you seen that use the idea of taking something impossibly big and breaking it down in an easily digestible visual format? People measure the world in comparison to themselves, so comparing humans to the size of the planets, or a number of bacteria on a surface or the population allows them to make sense of that new information in a way that is engaging and relatable.

Conventions

People respond to content that identifies activities or commonly accepted themes that we barely think about. Social conventions, especially. We rarely question conventionalism, such as shaking hands, so questioning these behaviours or explaining the deeper meaning of the familiar is fascinating to audiences. This is especially true when looking at cultural differences, languages and traditions that are a far cry from our own.

As with all good ideas, the trick is to understand the emotional triggers that will encourage a reaction to the work. Put simply, it has to be exciting and it has to resonate with people.

After answering some of your questions on Instagram, I wanted to share my quarantine virtual date ideas! During this challenging time, it’s important to stay connected, you could even do some of these with friends or family if you’re single and not dating right now.

1) Virtual Happy Hour: Get the same bottle of wine. Set a date and time and have a “happy hour.” Get dressed etc as if you were going to real happy hour. It makes all the difference!

2) “Sansy” Cooking Together: If you’re apart and unable to co-quarantine, get the same cooking ingredients and cook via FaceTime. You can even set a timer and make it more of a cook-off challenge too!

If you are together safely co-quaranting, create a fake restaurant. Make a menu. Really get into the role, light candles make it a vibe, etc. Check out what my boyfriend and I did the other night here.

3) Paint Party: Have a “painting party” via FaceTime. I’m going to do it this weekend! These are the supplies I bought for my paint party for reference:

  • Jekkis 4 Packs Easel with Canvas Sets, 12 x 9.5 Inches Canvas and 16 x 9.5 Inches Wooden Easels, Tabletop Display Painting Set for Kids and Adultshttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B07VS6B51W/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_tzKMEbHWVXENW
  • GOTIDEAL Acrylic Paint Set, 12 Colors/Tubes(23ml, 0.77 oz) Non Toxic Non Fading,Rich Pigments for Artist, Hobby Painters, Adults & Kids, Ideal for Canvas Wood Clay Fabric Ceramic Craftshttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B07RGNK89V/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_8zKMEbA2A50JC
  • Mont Marte Art Paint Brushes Set for for Watercolor, Acrylic, Oil 15 Different Sizes for Artists, Adults & Kids, Blackhttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DDHTQZG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_AAKMEb4RQ2Y2Q

4) Pack a Picnic: Clear out the furniture as much as you can in your living room. Put on a really good playlist. Open all the windows and create a picnic on the floor. Literally pack a cooler and napkins etc.

5) Truth or Drink: (like we play on my ‘Scrubbing In’ podcast: Put a bunch of questions for each other in a mason jar or cup. Each person alternates picking one out of the jar. You either answer the question or if you don’t want to, you drink 😚

Let me know how it goes! Sound off on social @TanyaRad and @OnAirWithRyan