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How to make a fairy house

How to Make a Fairy House

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Dress up your garden by making some fun little fairy houses. Your kids will love this imaginative project! You can craft a single house or make an entire town. Most of the items needed to make these houses can be found lying around your yard. Follow these step-by-step instructions to create your own fairy house!

How to Make a Fairy House

  • Age Guideline: 8 Years and Up
  • Time Required: 60 minutes (Does not include drying time)

The above age and time guidelines are estimates. This project can be modified to suit other ages and may take more or less time depending on your circumstances.

Materials Needed

  • Flat bases, such as a piece of bark from a tree.
  • Craft sticks
  • Twigs, leave, or other wall items
  • Tiny stones, gravel, etc. for walkways
  • Tiny dried flowers (a bag of potpourri works great)
  • Anything natural that you find outdoors
  • Wood glue
  • Spray varnish

Instructions

Start by searching your yard for a large, flat base. You can make the initial wall structures out of craft sticks. Glue these onto the base. Choose an item for walls, such as twigs or leaves, and use them to cover the outside of the craft stick walls. Use other items you find outside to create walkways, trees, flower beds, windows, antennas, gazing balls, swings, porches, little piles of firewood, and other fairy garden accessories. Just let your imagination go wild. Spray with varnish and you’re done.

Here are two more ways to have fun with fairies:

How to Make a Fairy House

If you’re looking for a Stone Fairy House diy, you have come to the right place, we have a video that shows you how. Check out all the awesome ideas now and Pin your favorites.

How to Make a Fairy House

We were stunned when we came across these amazing Stone Fairy Houses in our travels and

We have put together a collection of the most creative and inspirational Stone Fairy Homes. Whilst many that are featured are available for purchase, we have included some basic diy ideas that you can experiment with for some alternative versions.

How to Make a Fairy House

Scroll our page for some amazing ideas and if you make something yourself, be sure to share your photos with us. We’d love to feature you. There are so many styles that your head will be spinning.

You should also check out our popular Broken Clay Pot Fairy Gardens too. Don’t forget to Pin all your favorite ideas.

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

Just look at the detail of this River Pebble Fairy House that Roger from Enchanted Cottage has made. He has a thriving business making bespoke creations for his appreciative clients.

How to Make a Fairy House

As a builder by trade, Roger J. Davies has spent most of his working life shinning up and down ladders working on real buildings. Now he puts those same skills into practice to create these lovely miniature cottages and enchanting creations.

By using traditional building methods, albeit, in miniature, Roger is able to construct these fabulous little cottages knowing they will stand the test of time and withstand all weathers. They are all handcrafted, original in design and built to last.

You can now purchase any of the ‘Enchanted Cottages’ collection or Roger will also undertake bespoke commissions. You can see all of Rogers work on his website here

How to Make a Fairy House

This River Pebble Fairy Tower is another adorable version. Again, look at the exquisite detail of the slate stairs that lead steeply up to the door. We love the gable on the lower level too.
How to Make a Fairy House

Who doesn’t love a Stone Windmill – we could see one of these in our own garden for sure. Again, when you break this beautiful piece down, you could get quite creative and it will look beautiful sitting in your garden bed.How to Make a Fairy House

These Miniature Stone Cottages are a nice straight design that will be extremely easy to recreate. You will want to add them to your collection for sure.

How to Make a Fairy House

This Stone Enchanted Cottage looks lovely with its clear sealant that has given the stones a richness and shine. We love the detail above the windows and door and check out that fabulous chimney and ridge capping! How to Make a Fairy House

Who lives here? We love the wonkiness of this Enchanted Cottage. It is almost like a Hobbit House and the curve of the shingle roof is a lovely touch. The finials on the roof ridge capping is also very complementary to the overall appearance.

How to Make a Fairy House

Purchase this adorable Fairy House Kit from ‘Plow and Hearth’ on Amazon. Get yours Here –River Stone Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy HouseHow to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

The following photos are from an extremely talented artist Michael Stephens. He has made these incredible Stone Houses and he has a Website ‘Stonework By Stephens‘ that is filled with beautiful examples of his work. You can connect with him and ask for a custom made design and his works are truly inspirational and will give you some wonderful ideas. How to Make a Fairy House

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Author by Amanda Formaro on July 19, 2012 Updated on March 27, 2019

I’ll admit, I don’t really know too much about fairy houses. Yes, I have four kids, but three of them are boys. My daughter and I seemed to learn about fairy houses far too late for her to be able to get “into them” like some little girls do.

How to Make a Fairy House

And yeah, the boys didn’t really have an interest, no surprise! I still don’t know a lot about fairy houses other than they are constructed mostly from things found in the woods and are often surrounded by pretty flowers. So when I created my fairy house, these were the aspects I built into it.

Related – fast forward several years and I’ve made many fairy gardens!

How to Make a Fairy House

I used a $1.00 wooden bird house from the craft store. I dug around in my craft room and found some moss, pine cones and acorns. I had a lot of fun creating the flowers since they are just simply dots with the handle end of a paintbrush.

How to Make a Fairy House

I took several shots close up so you can see some of the details…

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

As you can see from this shot in the tree, it’s not very big, maybe 7-inches in height. I created this for DecoArt, so I did have to ship it off to them. I would have loved to have nestled this among my herbs, so I’m tempted to make another one just for me. 🙂

How to Make a Fairy House

click picture for larger view

I started by cutting the scales from 3 medium sized pine cones. I painted the birdhouse with Woodland Brown paint. I glued moss to the outside of the house, leaving some space around the window for my flowers. I began constructing the roof tiles using the scales of the pine cone.

How to Make a Fairy House

click picture for larger view

I started at the bottom and worked my way up, adding an acorn top to the top of the roof. To build the base I used some wood discs my neighbor had cut for me when I made these Rustic Northwoods Christmas Ornaments a few years ago. See? it pays to save stuff! After gluing the discs together I added some pebbles to the ends. I glued the house to the base and painted some green for grass then started adding flowers with different colors. I just kept adding until I was happy with how it looked 🙂

How to Make a Fairy HouseThere are more detailed instructions in the printable tutorial below.

How to Make a Fairy House

Do you think the toads in my herb garden would like this fairy house? Do you think the fairies would get mad? I’ve seen signs that say “Don’t piss off the fairies”… Just sayin’.

How to Make a Fairy House

Come see Emma Kate’s fairy house on my Facebook fan page!

AFTER this project was posted I received some pictures from Alice of her 4 year old granddaughter making their very own fairy house 🙂 To see the entire album go here.

How to Make a Fairy House

More you might like:

How to Make a Fairy House

If you’d like to make a more colorful fairy house, try the instructions from Suzy’s colorful birdhouse shelf here!

How to Make a Fairy House

My friend Pauline made adorable gingerbread houses with dried pasta! Full tutorial at the link.

This Posts may contain affiliate links. This means we earn a commission from sales made via product links in this post. For more information click here.

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

Learn How to Make a Fairy House. This is fun project will keep your kids busy for hours. Simple DIY ideas using natural items or craft stuff you already have. Make magical memories with your children. A great activity for all ages!

How to Make a Fairy House

I work at a small library in a rural community. One summer our very talented Summer Reading Program coordinator spent an afternoon making fairy houses with the children. What excitement! We mounted an expedition to the nearby woods to gather materials. Then constructed homes fit for fairy royalty.

How to Make a Fairy House

The library is my gift to subscribers. It contains eBooks and printables, to support you in your parenting journey. Scroll down the page to the free printables.

I expected the younger ones to enjoy this activity, but everyone loved it. Boys, girls, and all ages from preschoolers to tweens had fun that afternoon. This still remains one of the most popular events we ever held.

I loved how the children excitedly shared their creations. The young architects eagerly showed me their fairy houses. Even the shyest child couldn’t wait to tell me about the special features they built for the fairy owners to enjoy. It was wonderful.

HOW TO MAKE A FAIRY HOUSES

YOU WILL NEED
  • A container to collect materials. We also used the container as a base for the houses.
  • Your imagination
  • A collection of natural building materials. these might include fallen leaves, bark from dead trees, twigs, pine cones, stones, feathers, dropped flower petals, nuts, seeds, seashells.
  • Craft supplies (optional). These might include, fabric scraps, silk flowers and leaves, ribbons, craft sticks, beads, shells, gravel, jungle bells.
  • Glue gun (optional)

If possible visit a park and ask everyone to search for materials that can be used to construct and decorate fairy houses. Emphasize that only found materials can be used, as fairies do not wish you to destroy or pick anything living.

If you are unable to go to a park, you will probably find enough materials in your back yard and you can still do this activity with crafts supplies.

How to Make a Fairy House

INSTRUCTIONS

You have your building material, so you are ready to start building! There are two options

  1. Build your house outdoors. Find a suitable place to build and work together to construct and decorate your house. If you have several children you may want to create a fairy court with several dwellings.
  2. Build your house indoors. This is what the children at our library did. We made shallow boxes from card stock, which acted as bases. The children built their houses around the bases using the materials they had gathered outside. We also provided some surplus craft supplies to add a little pizzazz.

For more inspiration watch the start of this short video that features a fairy village built from natural materials

Try to use what you have on hand, rather than buying anything extra. It just adds to the fun! You might also need a hot glue gun for indoor building.

LET YOUR KIDS TAKE THE LEAD

Although you will be working on this project together, I would strongly encourage you to let your children take the lead. Try to focus on the process rather than the end result.

It really doesn’t matter if the finished house looks a little lopsided, as the fairies won’t mind a bit. The most important thing is that you all have fun together and make connections. As you work encourage conversation about who might live in your house.

  • What are their names?
  • Tell me what you think they look like
  • I wonder what work they do?
  • What do you think they do for fun?

Encourage your children to make up stories about the adventures of these little people and prepare to be amazed by your young storyteller’s imaginations.

THE BENEFITS OF MAKING FAIRY HOUSES

This activity is a lot of fun and it is so good for kids to engage in these kinds of activities

  • Your children are outside enjoying the natural world.
  • It gets them away from the screens for a while.
  • Encourages healthy, imaginative, and creative play.
  • But best of all it creates a wonderful opportunity to make memories and build connections.

And you get to make a fairy house! What could be better than that?

I hope the photographs I have enclosed will provide some inspiration. I would also encourage you to visit The Fairy Houses Picture Gallery. It has some lovely photographs of fairy houses built by people of all ages.

Driven by a Child’s Imagination

My daughter is six years old. The other day, she asked for a cardboard box so she could build a fairy house. She made it herself and filled it with grass and a carrot and some candy, which she thought the fairies would like. She was so excited about the idea, that after she went to bed, I made a little paper flower daisy chain and forged a note from a fairy named Daisy. I left it in the house and ate the carrot and waited to see what she would think.

What she thinks is that we have a spring fairy named Daisy, and she is really, really excited about it. The rain destroyed her cardboard house, so I offered to help her make a better one.

Building a Better Fairy House

Anna started drawing her ideas on our whiteboard. I wanted to use corrugated plastic as the building material, so it would be weather proof. I had a simple sloped roof and a square floor plan in mind. Much like a birdhouse but sitting on the ground. Anna however, had other plans.

She wanted a round roof sort of like a thatched cottage and a place to hold flowers on the top. She wanted windows and a door and a whole yard decorated with little shrubberies and flowers and other things she thought a fairy would like.

I decided that an octagonal structure would get us close enough to the round look she wanted, and we got to making it.

Fairy House Template

Before you begin, download and print two copies of the Fairy House Template. Be sure when you print that you do not change the scale. The dimensional mark shows the height of the template is 4.00 inches.

Steps in Pictures

I’ve included the pictures for all the steps below for convenience. You can click on a picture to see it larger, and then scroll left and right through the steps. You will find the same pictures accompanying each step.

This Posts may contain affiliate links. This means we earn a commission from sales made via product links in this post. For more information click here.

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

Learn How to Make a Fairy House. This is fun project will keep your kids busy for hours. Simple DIY ideas using natural items or craft stuff you already have. Make magical memories with your children. A great activity for all ages!

How to Make a Fairy House

I work at a small library in a rural community. One summer our very talented Summer Reading Program coordinator spent an afternoon making fairy houses with the children. What excitement! We mounted an expedition to the nearby woods to gather materials. Then constructed homes fit for fairy royalty.

How to Make a Fairy House

The library is my gift to subscribers. It contains eBooks and printables, to support you in your parenting journey. Scroll down the page to the free printables.

I expected the younger ones to enjoy this activity, but everyone loved it. Boys, girls, and all ages from preschoolers to tweens had fun that afternoon. This still remains one of the most popular events we ever held.

I loved how the children excitedly shared their creations. The young architects eagerly showed me their fairy houses. Even the shyest child couldn’t wait to tell me about the special features they built for the fairy owners to enjoy. It was wonderful.

HOW TO MAKE A FAIRY HOUSES

YOU WILL NEED
  • A container to collect materials. We also used the container as a base for the houses.
  • Your imagination
  • A collection of natural building materials. these might include fallen leaves, bark from dead trees, twigs, pine cones, stones, feathers, dropped flower petals, nuts, seeds, seashells.
  • Craft supplies (optional). These might include, fabric scraps, silk flowers and leaves, ribbons, craft sticks, beads, shells, gravel, jungle bells.
  • Glue gun (optional)

If possible visit a park and ask everyone to search for materials that can be used to construct and decorate fairy houses. Emphasize that only found materials can be used, as fairies do not wish you to destroy or pick anything living.

If you are unable to go to a park, you will probably find enough materials in your back yard and you can still do this activity with crafts supplies.

How to Make a Fairy House

INSTRUCTIONS

You have your building material, so you are ready to start building! There are two options

  1. Build your house outdoors. Find a suitable place to build and work together to construct and decorate your house. If you have several children you may want to create a fairy court with several dwellings.
  2. Build your house indoors. This is what the children at our library did. We made shallow boxes from card stock, which acted as bases. The children built their houses around the bases using the materials they had gathered outside. We also provided some surplus craft supplies to add a little pizzazz.

For more inspiration watch the start of this short video that features a fairy village built from natural materials

Try to use what you have on hand, rather than buying anything extra. It just adds to the fun! You might also need a hot glue gun for indoor building.

LET YOUR KIDS TAKE THE LEAD

Although you will be working on this project together, I would strongly encourage you to let your children take the lead. Try to focus on the process rather than the end result.

It really doesn’t matter if the finished house looks a little lopsided, as the fairies won’t mind a bit. The most important thing is that you all have fun together and make connections. As you work encourage conversation about who might live in your house.

  • What are their names?
  • Tell me what you think they look like
  • I wonder what work they do?
  • What do you think they do for fun?

Encourage your children to make up stories about the adventures of these little people and prepare to be amazed by your young storyteller’s imaginations.

THE BENEFITS OF MAKING FAIRY HOUSES

This activity is a lot of fun and it is so good for kids to engage in these kinds of activities

  • Your children are outside enjoying the natural world.
  • It gets them away from the screens for a while.
  • Encourages healthy, imaginative, and creative play.
  • But best of all it creates a wonderful opportunity to make memories and build connections.

And you get to make a fairy house! What could be better than that?

I hope the photographs I have enclosed will provide some inspiration. I would also encourage you to visit The Fairy Houses Picture Gallery. It has some lovely photographs of fairy houses built by people of all ages.

How to Make a Fairy House

Do your fairytale mad princesses or knights love making crafts that they can show?
Let them give these milk bottle fairy houses a go!
Not only are you keeping them and their imaginations occupied,
you also are recycling an old milk bottle into something new with this guide!

You will need:

Plastic milk bottles (washed in warm soapy water)
Felt Tips
Stickers
Glitter
Scissors
Pipe cleaners

How to Make a Fairy House

How to make:

1) Cut a hole in the bottle as a door and another as a window.

How to Make a Fairy House

2) Use felt tips and stickers to decorate the bottle. If you have time you could paint the bottle first using a mix of paint and PVA glue too. We also added glitter to give a bit of sparkle!

How to Make a Fairy House

3) Make a ladder using pipe cleaners and stand it next to the window!

How to Make a Fairy House

🧚Now you will have a perfect little fairy princess house for your little princess to play with!🧚

What have you been up to? We’d really love to know! Someone else might love it, and really want to go! If you’ve got ideas, suggestions or reviews, you can shout all about it on whatever channel you choose!

Let’s go on a Picniq! Follow us on Facebook , Twitter or tag us on Instagram using #PicniqUK! ❤

Fairies are magical!

Creating a fairy house is a fun way to invite fairies into your outdoor space. You can make them in your yard, a park or open space, and even at your campsite. It is so fun! Here we share with you our method of making fairy houses from materials found in nature.

Note: These are not permanent structures and will eventually fall apart if not kept up.

Step 1 – Pick a location

Find a location for your fairy house that has some flat dirt for a floor. I like to have rocks or trees in the background. Make sure it’s out of the way of foot traffic.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 2 – Gather Supplies

We chose sticks, leaves and flowers from around our yard. If possible gather supplies that have fallen on the ground. If you pick leaves or flowers take only those that are abundant and ask the plant and the fairies before you cut or remove live parts of plants.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 3 – Build the walls

We used sticks to build our walls in a half circle shape. Stick the sticks in the ground so that they come to a point at the top. The more sticks you use the thicker the walls will be. We didn’t have a lot of sticks in our yard so the picture below shows our walls.

How to Make a Fairy House How to Make a Fairy House

Step 4 – Add to the walls and the floor

Use leaves, flowers, grass, or rocks to cover the floor. Then use whatever abundant materials you have to add to the walls. We had an abundance of leaves, succulents and chamomile that we used to adorn the walls.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 5 – Decorate

Decorate your fairy house with crystals, rocks, shells, acorns, or whatever you have around your outdoor area. Fairies love beautiful and shiny things and things from nature. My kids have a collection of rocks and crystals that they decided to put in and around their fairy houses.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 6 – Play and Enjoy!

That’s it! It’s super easy and fun! And you can get creative and make it however you like. I can’t wait to see what you create. Please share!

Below are some fairy houses we have built in the past to inspire you!! Post in our Facebook Page with pictures of your fairy houses and comment below if you are going to make one!

Fairies are magical!

Creating a fairy house is a fun way to invite fairies into your outdoor space. You can make them in your yard, a park or open space, and even at your campsite. It is so fun! Here we share with you our method of making fairy houses from materials found in nature.

Note: These are not permanent structures and will eventually fall apart if not kept up.

Step 1 – Pick a location

Find a location for your fairy house that has some flat dirt for a floor. I like to have rocks or trees in the background. Make sure it’s out of the way of foot traffic.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 2 – Gather Supplies

We chose sticks, leaves and flowers from around our yard. If possible gather supplies that have fallen on the ground. If you pick leaves or flowers take only those that are abundant and ask the plant and the fairies before you cut or remove live parts of plants.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 3 – Build the walls

We used sticks to build our walls in a half circle shape. Stick the sticks in the ground so that they come to a point at the top. The more sticks you use the thicker the walls will be. We didn’t have a lot of sticks in our yard so the picture below shows our walls.

How to Make a Fairy House How to Make a Fairy House

Step 4 – Add to the walls and the floor

Use leaves, flowers, grass, or rocks to cover the floor. Then use whatever abundant materials you have to add to the walls. We had an abundance of leaves, succulents and chamomile that we used to adorn the walls.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 5 – Decorate

Decorate your fairy house with crystals, rocks, shells, acorns, or whatever you have around your outdoor area. Fairies love beautiful and shiny things and things from nature. My kids have a collection of rocks and crystals that they decided to put in and around their fairy houses.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 6 – Play and Enjoy!

That’s it! It’s super easy and fun! And you can get creative and make it however you like. I can’t wait to see what you create. Please share!

Below are some fairy houses we have built in the past to inspire you!! Post in our Facebook Page with pictures of your fairy houses and comment below if you are going to make one!

Awesome Tree Stump Fairy House

How To Build Tree Stump Fairy House – If your daughter really liked fairy, you can invite daughters to create a fairy house made of tree stumps. By playing your creativity, you can make a fairy house from tree stumps with your child. You can use the materials available at home to create a fairy house in the front garden of the house. This will be savings, than you buy on the internet at a price of more than $ 60.

Amazing Tree Stump Fairy House

Beautiful Tree Stump Fairy House

Creative Tree Stump Fairy House

The first step to create a tree stump fairy house is finding a tree stump; make small holes in the bottom of the tree using a drill. Then, make a hole at the bottom of a tree stump using a chisel and hammer. Also use a chisel to frame the windows up on a tree. Made some oblique holes using a large drill to add a branch, then glue with strong wood glue. Sanding wooden stump in order to look smoother and paint it with the colors according to you want. Or you can color it with a brown color which is the original color of a tree stump.

Nice Tree Stump Fairy House

Pretty Tree Stump Fairy House

Simple Tree Stump Fairy House

You can decorate the tree stump fairy house with vines; it will make it more beautiful. Add the sweet bird’s nest in one of the branches. Provides a hammock with some yarn, lined the little hollowed-out room with moss. If you want the extra space further up the tree. You could use a few pieces of bark, cut them to the same length; drilled holes in the ends and use a mixed floral wire them together at both ends. Thin skin but the floor is supported by some bamboo skewers are glued into holes drilled in the tree. And access to the floor as simple as tying a knot around small twigs (secured with craft glue) using my crochet thread. You can add your creativity by making small fairy table and chairs from the bark and twigs and stick them together with craft glue.Tree stump fairy house patterns,

Tree Stump Fairy House Designs

Tree Stump Fairy House Images

Tree Stump Fairy House Pictures

Stumps for kids. Was so she was all templates you can make steps and elves supplies needed to disguise it be a tree stump was designed by playing your garden house cute too thrilled with a flower ornaments little bit of course always examine these fairy house learn how about the allergies well even free pattern and use a day she asked for making simple tasks complex so why not create the fairy doors and cheap ideas about tall it with photos they look a birthday gift for reallife fairy house i made a small but i thought you.

THE LOCKDOWN has proved difficult for both children and their parents, who are struggling to keep them occupied all day. Here’s how you can build a fairy house or fairy garden with your child.

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Getting creative and making with your children is a great way to pass the time when going outside is not an option. With the lockdown having been extended for another three weeks, the thought of keeping children healthy and happy seems daunting – but it doesn’t need to be.

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How to make a fairy house or garden

To create a fairy house or garden, all you need is basic household staples.

You can create a magical resting spot for fairies using just an empty drinks bottle or juice carton.

Start by washing the bottle out of any excess liquid and cut out a door.

Using glue sticks, stick squares of coloured paper to your fairy house and pens to draw on your own designs.

How to Make a Fairy House

Creating a fairy house or garden is an easy way to keep the kids busy (Image: Getty)

READ MORE

How to Make a Fairy House

If you have them, sequins, glitter and other crafty bits will work to add a magical touch.

Make up a game with your children where you decide who lives in the house, and create them too using paper or building blocks.

For this activity, pretty much anything around the house will work.

How to Make a Fairy House

This craft can be done using household staples (Image: Great Ormond Street Hospital)

READ MORE

How to Make a Fairy House

Painting candles

Another simple, crafty activity you can take on with your children is painting candles.

For this, you will need:

  • A plain block candle
  • Crayons
  • Old/cheap paintbrushes
  • A large pan
  • A heatproof bowl
  • An old wooden spoon

How to Make a Fairy House

Make a game with your children where you decide who will live in the house, and make them too (Image: Great Ormond Street Hospital )

Take the pan and fill it one-third of the way up with water, and place on a gentle heat.

Put the bowl in the pan, making sure it does not touch the bottom of the pan.

Put around half a crayon – remembering to remove the paper – into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until completely melted.

Remove the bowl from the pan and stand on something heatproof.

Related articles

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

Paint the candle with the wax – but make sure to take extra care as both the wax and bowl will be very hot.

Wash out the bowl and repeat with a different colour crayon until you and your child are happy with the candle.

You will find that brushes tend to set hard, so you will need a new one for each colour.

Safety note: This craft involves melting wax, which can be scorching hot and requires an adult’s supervision.

You may also want to cover any tables and surfaces as this activity can get messy.

Garden is the perfect place to relax for enjoying the sun, breeze and green in your home after a busy day or on weekends. While your mini nature needs a little change, even though a very small detail can give your garden a big improvement. Today we will recommend you these cute and lovely miniature stone houses. Just like most of other DIY projects, this miniature house is inexpensive, as it just needs some river stones and other raw materials you may easily get from even the junk. We have some rock projects featured, too. The Mandala Pebble Rock Stones is so fabulous to craft with artsy hand and patience, The 20 rock garden projects are one of my favorite to spruce up the garden any time. And these miniature stone houses can be wonderful addition in your own garden decoration.

How to Make a Fairy House

We have lots of inspirational ideas across the website, we will share with you some inspirations as well as the DIY versions that you can create with the plastic bottle or any container in your house with step by step tutorials. They are mush easier that you think and can be made out of materials out of your expectation – Plastic Bottle.

Even a small soda bottle can be turned into a pixie tower fairy house for your garden from inhabitant. Love the idea to use tree bark as house roofing, making the house popping out of the ground overnight.

How to Make a Fairy House

There are more DIY ideas from the web, such as this River Pebble Fairy House Enchanted Cottage complete with its brass tipped turret and shingle roof. Add a hinged doom wood door and window to make it a bit magic for any fairy garden decoration. With the same idea, the River Pebble Fairy Tower is so adorable by adding the slate stairs! Doesn’t it look like it’s been sitting in your mini gardens for decades, experiencing all the winds and rains.

How to Make a Fairy House

Image: Enchantedcottages.co.uk

This Enchanted Cottage is another country design with its lovely gable roofing covered with mini shingles, and the zigzag chimney pipe and wood ridge with 2 delicate gable ends makes it a fairy world into your wonderland.

Design

How to Make a Fairy House

  • 04/23/2015
  • under Design, DIY, Gardening, Innovations

  • How to Make a Fairy House
  • How to Make a Fairy House
  • How to Make a Fairy House
  • How to Make a Fairy House
  • How to Make a Fairy House
  • How to Make a Fairy House
  • How to Make a Fairy House
  • How to Make a Fairy House
  • How to Make a Fairy House
  • How to Make a Fairy House
  • How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

What You’ll Need:

  • Sketch pad or blank paper
  • Pencil
  • Base structure (empty plastic drink bottles work well, as do aluminum cans)
  • Cutting implements (scissors for plastic, metal shears for cans)
  • Natural materials (pebbles, bark, twigs, leaves, pine cones, acorns, etc.)
  • Adhesive (hot glue, double-sided tape, crazy glue, epoxy resin, and such)
  • Grout, if desired (can be regular grouting or a plaster like hydrocal or plaster of paris)
  • Paint, glitter, and accoutrements as desired

Step 1: Make Some Sketches

You don’t have to rival Da Vinci with excruciating detail, but just draw a guideline to work from. Take the general shape of the base structure you have and determine how you’re going to decorate it. Will your fairy house be covered in bark and twigs? Or will it be a stone structure with a little chimney on top? Will there be an elaborate patio and lovely little window-boxes filled with miniature flowers? Or will it be a simple cottage with dried straw thatching? Let your imagination guide you.

If you’re building a house (or houses) with children, give them a couple of different materials to work with, and let those determine the designs: you don’t want to break their hearts if they design a manor house that’s resplendent with acorns and glass pebbles, but all you have to work with are willow twigs and some dry leaves.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 2: Prepare the Structure

If your little house is going to have a door, you’ll probably want to cut one. An empty plastic bottle (or yogurt container, or what-have-you) can easily be cut with a pair of scissors, but if you’re using an aluminum can as your base, you’ll need metal cutting shears. Don’t hurt yourself: cut metal edges can be quite sharp, so you might want to cover the edges in masking tape to avoid hospital visits.

This is the point at which you’ll add in any windows or bits that jut out. You can make a simple chimney with an old plastic film case (remember those?) or empty pill container—just glue it to the top of your can/bottle. If you think that a frog or toad may make a home inside it, keep the entranceway nice and wide: they like to peek out while they’re at home.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 3: Start Attaching Stuff

Since you’ve already decided what the outside of your fairy house is going to look like, you can start attaching things to it in order to bring it to life. The adhesive that you use will be determined by what it is you’re sticking on the structure: heavier items such as pebbles tend to stick best with hot glue or epoxy resin, but if little hands are sticking them down, you can also use a super-strong double-sided tape, such as the type used to lay carpets. It’s entirely up to you how closely you’d like to pack those pebbles, as the grouting you’ll use to finish the effect will fill in any gaps.

How to Make a Fairy House

Once the pebbles are in place, you’ll mix together a bit of grout/plaster, and once it’s the consistency of either thick whipping cream or thin mashed potato, you’ll slather it all over the surface with your fingers, making sure it’s mashed well into the little holes around the stones. You’ll then use a damp cloth or paper towel to wipe away the excess so that most of the stones are somewhat visible, with the grout forming a mortar in between them. This will have to cure for about 24 hours to get really solid.

How to Make a Fairy House

Note: if you’re using actual mortar/grout, you can add dry pigment powder to it in order to change its colour, while plaster or hydrocal can be tinted with a wash of watered-down acrylic paint after setting completely. Or, you could just leave the natural hues alone—it’s your call. It’s also usually a good idea to seal the piece with something like acrylic gloss gel medium to keep rain from attacking it.

How to Make a Fairy House

If you’re decorating your little house with bark or pine cone scales, you can use either carpet tape or glue, and if you’re using twigs, aim for epoxy resin. The long drippy threads left by hot glue can actually add a special shimmer to your piece, so feel free to leave them on.

How to Make a Fairy House

Step 4: Add Details

This is where you get to be creative with all kinds of fussy accoutrements. Will you be setting up your faerie house somewhere outside? You could prep the site by putting down moss and pressing in some shale stepping-stones leading up to it, and even plant some miniature flowers around it. Will you tuck it into the hollow of a tree? You could take some time to help it merge into its surroundings by adding similar materials to those you used to build it in and around the location. If you’ve created a low cottage, you could lash some twigs together to create a simple fence around it, or if it’s a tower, put a flag on top to flip around in the wind.

If you enjoy the process of creating your pixie home, you might branch out eventually and have an entire village arranged around your garden.

outdoor activity summer This post contains affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Now that school is over, the kids and I have had more time for fun craft projects. Last week we made homemade Gak, and this week, my daughter and I made a DIY fairy house for kids.

How to Make a Fairy House

Emily is six and she loves Tinkerbell. She very firmly believes that fairies are real and will argue till the sun goes down if anyone suggests otherwise. So when I asked if she wanted to make a house for fairies, she was immediately full of ideas.

We rounded up a few things around the house and then went to Walmart to pick up a couple more things.

One of the best parts of making a DIY fairy house for kids is that you can use things you already have around the house, particularly those odd craft materials you can’t figure out what to do with, such as buttons or shiny marble rocks. You can also use recycled materials, like an empty tissue box or mismatched Tupperware container.

Your fairy house is completely up to your or your kids’ imagination(s).

In this blog post, I’ll share what we did and hopefully that will help inspire you with your own fairy house creation.

How to Make a Fairy House

Here are a few supplies you may want to use:

  • craft sticks
  • small plastic container (you could buy a new one, but this is a great chance to upcycle an old plastic container you can’t find the lid for!)
  • colorful buttons (these are cute too!)
  • colorful stones
  • hot glue gun
  • cardboard box
  • sticks

How to Make a Fairy House

The best part of this craft project is that you and your child can make your Fairy House however you want. Use stuff from around your house or go visit the craft store; it’s up to you and your little fairy-house-maker. He or she may have some very specific ideas!

We bought some colorful buttons and stones. Also some pipe cleaners, which we actually didn’t use. But maybe you will!

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

You’ll need a plastic container of some sort. We used an old Rubbermaid container. Have your child fill it with dirt. Not too full – about half way. It doesn’t have to be exact. This project is all about your child using their imagination!

How to Make a Fairy House

DIY Fairy House Construction Ideas:

Emily made a stone pathway around her Fairy House container.

How to Make a Fairy House

The next step is to work on the actual house. I took an old tissue box (recycling and reusing too) and cut it up to fit the container.

How to Make a Fairy House

Next, I used a hot glue gun to attach craft sticks to the sides of the box. Obviously, this is a parent or older, responsible teen-only part.

How to Make a Fairy House

We covered all the sides and the roof. Remember (as I had to remind myself!): don’t worry about it being perfect. (I had started telling Emily to lay the craft sticks on evenly because that’s how I prefer it, but remembered that this is actually Emily’s project and I am assisting her.)

How to Make a Fairy House

It was Emily’s idea to add buttons on the house for decoration. She said Tinkerbell and her friends would like it. (I think she’s right!)

How to Make a Fairy House

While we let the craft stick-tissue box house dry, we made a sign.

For the sign, I simply wrote “Fairies Welcome” on a piece of paper. Then we cut it out, covered it with packing tape (for durability), trimmed the edges, and glued it (hot glue gun) to a stick.

How to Make a Fairy House

We also made little button chairs. This was my favorite part.

Emily found a couple somewhat-flat stones and I glued a large button on. Then I attached a second button to the back. I wasn’t sure how well this would hold up, but it was quite solid, thanks to the hot glue gun. Lastly, Emily insisted on putting a second smaller button into the big button.

How to Make a Fairy House

Nathan, of course, commented that the fairy chairs look a lot like a toilet. Um…we’ll just ignore that fact, shall we?

Next, we put the craft stick house into the dirt and began adding the little accessories to our little fairy house craft.

How to Make a Fairy House

We added moss to the front and inside the house so the fairies would have a soft, comfortable carpet and garden area.

How to Make a Fairy House

We even transplanted a violet from the yard. With a little water, it’s still alive and doing well! We literally have an indoor fairy garden with this!

How to Make a Fairy House

Emily took a flower label and taped on a piece of ribbon. She said this is the fairies flag so they can tell how fast the wind is blowing.

How to Make a Fairy House

Lastly, Emily sprinkled lots of pixie dust (glitter) around the Fairy House so the fairies would feel at home.

How to Make a Fairy House

And that’s how we made our DIY fairy house for kids!

How to Make a Fairy House

As you can see, making a fairy house is a great way for kids to let their imaginations run wild and do a fun project with Mom. And you’ll be surprised at how much fun you’ll have helping them craft their homemade fairy house too!

Fairy house out of pebbles stone fairy house tutorial the whoot fairy houses fairy houses out of plastic bottles fairy houses out of plastic bottles stone fairy house tutorial the whoot miniature stone garden fairy house.

10 diy fairy house lamps using plastic bottles you goodshomedesign stone fairy house tutorial the whoot stone fairy house tutorial the whoot diy make garden faerie houses pixie towers and toad homes from how to make a fairy house out of pebbles glue and plastic bottles.

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Posted By MMK on Dec 12, 2015

Miniature garden designs in flowerpots and Fairy gardens in small containers are new trends in small container gardening that offer a fun way to create tiny realistic landscapes that reflect the atmosphere and charming beauty of real natural settings. Miniature garden designs and Fairy gardens are the art of capturing wonderful details that create peaceful and pleasant places.

Here is a collection of fantastic miniature garden designs which will help you to choose your favorite Fairy gardens and implement creative garden design ideas, adding a tiny garden in a pot to your outdoor living spaces. The miniature garden design ideas are endless. You can use any small or large planter or container and decorating theme for your beautiful miniature garden design.

Plan your miniature garden design and keep beautiful details in scale. Usually miniature garden designs are created for viewing from all sides or just one with thoughtfully placed taller and lower plants. The best garden design containers for miniature landscapes have a large open surface area to accommodate as many plants and garden decorations into your Fairy garden design as possible. Tin buckets, wide terracotta pots, wooden wheelbarrows, wagons, wicker baskets, concrete bowls, wooden boxes, baby tubs are excellent for creating fabulous miniature garden designs.

Miniature garden designs and Fairy gardens

Proper drainage with a layer of pea gravel and several holes in the bottom of your container ensure your plants grow lush and happy. Small rocks and miniature furniture, pottery shards or kids toys can be used for adorning your miniature garden designs.

Fairy gardens

Fairy gardens are miniature garden designs with small details that give the appearance of tiny creatures living in the garden. Fairy houses with small fences, garden benches or small tables are whimsical items that bring the magic into miniature garden designs.

Before planting your miniature garden, place all of the garden decorations, furniture and plants on top of the soil. This is your chance to change the layout and experiment with various interesting and surprising arrangements. Once the overall miniature garden design is established, start planting your plants with the largest roots first. Small creeping plants are great for a border or edging.

You can decorate your miniature garden designs and Fairy gardens with small birdhouses, wooden pergolas, tiny gardening tools, a small vase or an old boot. Adding fairy houses, charming cottages, small tables and garden benches, pergolas and arbors enhance and beautify your Fairy gardens.

March 27, 2014 By Angie Kauffman · Disclosure: This Post May Contain Affiliate Links.

How to Make a Fairy House

Last fall, Molly became determined to build a fairy house. She watched videos about fairy houses, and schemed for how to make one in our yard. When it seemed that nobody would offer to help her, she used a small tree stump in our yard and decorated it with things like twigs, leaves, and acorn tops. She called it her “fairy habitat.” One day when she was gone, I even sprinkled glitter all over it, a la Tinkerbell style. How to Make a Fairy House

She came home and loved it, as she is a huge fan of Tinkerbell and all of her movies. In fact, one of her highlights from our last trip to Disney World was getting to see both Tinkerbell and Periwinkle. This also means that she is very excited for the newest Tinkerbell movie, Disney’s The Pirate Fairy You can own it on Blu-ray and Digital HD April 1. (You can preorder it now!)

How to Make a Fairy House

Although Molly thought her fairy habitat was fun, she still had her heart set on having a fairy house. Finally, one day, it was Daddy to the rescue. Together, they built not only a fairy house, but they built a teepee style fairy house. Though we didn’t realize it at the time, it seems that a teepee style fairy house is really the way to go where fairy houses are concerned.

Why build a teepee-style fair house?

In all fairness, I will note that our teepee-style fairy house was built by a little girl who loves building and her engineer Dad. However, since it was built last fall, we have the benefit of time to be a testament to the stability of a teepee-style fairy house. You see, they built the teepee-style fairy house in our yard in September 2013.

It stood in our house through several horrible rain storms. We were sure that it would be knocked down when tornado warnings were coupled with hail one day. That day, in another part of our county, there were several tornadoes that did damage that is still affecting people today. The teepee style fairy house survived the winds. And, here at the end of a winter that brought us the second most snow that our area has seen in the last 130 years of recorded data, the thaw found the fairy house still standing, complete with many of its contents intact.

Six months after being built, the teepee-style fairy house still stands. The structure is definitely a winner.

How to Build a Teepee-Style Fairy House

We built our teepee-style fairy house around a small stump of a tree. I don’t know that that’s necessary, but I think that it helped with stability. If you’re building it over a grassy area, just know that if you leave the teepee-style fairy house up for a long time, you’ll probably end up with a circle of dead grass. So, either find a non-grassy area, only leave it up for a few days, or accept that there will be some dead grass.

Eric and Molly first gathered up handfuls of sticks that were approximately the same size. If they had leaves on them, they took them off. They didn’t worry too much if they weren’t perfectly the same size, because Eric used a knife to trim sticks down to the right size.

Once they had their sticks the same size, they put them around the stump and set them up in a teepee style with an area left open as a front door, per se.

To help with stability, Eric pushed the sticks into the ground. Eric and Molly then wrapped a thick cotton string around the top of the teepee many times before tying it off.

How to Make a Fairy House

After the teepee structure was complete, Molly gathered leaves that they then wove in and out throughout the twigs and string. Even though our leaves died eventually, of course, they still stayed in the teepee.

To complete Molly’s teepee-style fairy house, she filled the inside with things that she found outside, such as leaves to use as beds, acorn tops for chairs, flowers for decoration, little berries from trees as food for the fairies, and a little Pixie dust, of course. We were surprised that after all of those weather extremes, most of the contents of the house remained as Spring rolled in.

How to Make a Fairy House

This was such an easy project, and a great chance for some bonding between our home’s resident builders. Plus, the teepee-style fairy house staying up so long has been a source of happiness and pride for both Molly and Dad.

Join 25,000+ Other Awesome People

Subscribe to the Real Life at Home weekly newsletter to get our latest content, exclusive free printables, learning activities, and ideas for celebrating with your kids all year

March 27, 2014 By Angie Kauffman · Disclosure: This Post May Contain Affiliate Links.

How to Make a Fairy House

Last fall, Molly became determined to build a fairy house. She watched videos about fairy houses, and schemed for how to make one in our yard. When it seemed that nobody would offer to help her, she used a small tree stump in our yard and decorated it with things like twigs, leaves, and acorn tops. She called it her “fairy habitat.” One day when she was gone, I even sprinkled glitter all over it, a la Tinkerbell style. How to Make a Fairy House

She came home and loved it, as she is a huge fan of Tinkerbell and all of her movies. In fact, one of her highlights from our last trip to Disney World was getting to see both Tinkerbell and Periwinkle. This also means that she is very excited for the newest Tinkerbell movie, Disney’s The Pirate Fairy You can own it on Blu-ray and Digital HD April 1. (You can preorder it now!)

How to Make a Fairy House

Although Molly thought her fairy habitat was fun, she still had her heart set on having a fairy house. Finally, one day, it was Daddy to the rescue. Together, they built not only a fairy house, but they built a teepee style fairy house. Though we didn’t realize it at the time, it seems that a teepee style fairy house is really the way to go where fairy houses are concerned.

Why build a teepee-style fair house?

In all fairness, I will note that our teepee-style fairy house was built by a little girl who loves building and her engineer Dad. However, since it was built last fall, we have the benefit of time to be a testament to the stability of a teepee-style fairy house. You see, they built the teepee-style fairy house in our yard in September 2013.

It stood in our house through several horrible rain storms. We were sure that it would be knocked down when tornado warnings were coupled with hail one day. That day, in another part of our county, there were several tornadoes that did damage that is still affecting people today. The teepee style fairy house survived the winds. And, here at the end of a winter that brought us the second most snow that our area has seen in the last 130 years of recorded data, the thaw found the fairy house still standing, complete with many of its contents intact.

Six months after being built, the teepee-style fairy house still stands. The structure is definitely a winner.

How to Build a Teepee-Style Fairy House

We built our teepee-style fairy house around a small stump of a tree. I don’t know that that’s necessary, but I think that it helped with stability. If you’re building it over a grassy area, just know that if you leave the teepee-style fairy house up for a long time, you’ll probably end up with a circle of dead grass. So, either find a non-grassy area, only leave it up for a few days, or accept that there will be some dead grass.

Eric and Molly first gathered up handfuls of sticks that were approximately the same size. If they had leaves on them, they took them off. They didn’t worry too much if they weren’t perfectly the same size, because Eric used a knife to trim sticks down to the right size.

Once they had their sticks the same size, they put them around the stump and set them up in a teepee style with an area left open as a front door, per se.

To help with stability, Eric pushed the sticks into the ground. Eric and Molly then wrapped a thick cotton string around the top of the teepee many times before tying it off.

How to Make a Fairy House

After the teepee structure was complete, Molly gathered leaves that they then wove in and out throughout the twigs and string. Even though our leaves died eventually, of course, they still stayed in the teepee.

To complete Molly’s teepee-style fairy house, she filled the inside with things that she found outside, such as leaves to use as beds, acorn tops for chairs, flowers for decoration, little berries from trees as food for the fairies, and a little Pixie dust, of course. We were surprised that after all of those weather extremes, most of the contents of the house remained as Spring rolled in.

How to Make a Fairy House

This was such an easy project, and a great chance for some bonding between our home’s resident builders. Plus, the teepee-style fairy house staying up so long has been a source of happiness and pride for both Molly and Dad.

Join 25,000+ Other Awesome People

Subscribe to the Real Life at Home weekly newsletter to get our latest content, exclusive free printables, learning activities, and ideas for celebrating with your kids all year

Share with your friends?

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

Two of my favorite things to do are craft with mason jars and make fairy gardens! These Mason Jar Fairy Houses are the perfect combination for both!

A few weeks ago I showed you how to make fairy houses from the tiny little Oui Yoplait yogurt pots. Now we’re going to make fairy houses from mason jars. You can do this with the regular (pint size) mason jars as well as 12 oz and 8 oz (jelly size) mason jars.

How to Make a Fairy House

These mason jar crafts are the perfect kids crafts to do with older tweens and teens. When finished, they have an adorable little fairy or gnome house to take home!

You can use these for centerpieces for a fairy birthday party or make witch houses for a Halloween party. Or, make a single fairy house as a night light for a kid. This post contains affiliate links.

Pin these Mason Jar Fairy Houses for later!

How to Make a Light Up Fairy House Mason Jars

Supplies

  • pint size mason jars OR 8 oz or 12 oz jelly jars
  • 2 felt sheets (11.7 x 8.3 inches)
  • 1 sheet of card stock
  • flickering LED lights
  • embellishments – stickers, trims, ribbons, moss
  • glue gun
  • Sharpie marker
  • Mason Jar Fairy Houses – Pattern Pieces

Directions

Cut out the pattern pieces. Use one felt sheet to cut out the roof. Use the second felt sheet to cut out the rectangle house piece in the follow measurements:

  • 8 oz jelly jar – 2.5 inches x 9 inches
  • 12 oz jelly jar – 4.5 inches x 9 inches
  • regular pint size mason jar – 4.5 inches x 11 inches

In the very middle of the house piece, cut out a doorway. If you want to be a little adventurous cut out windows on either side of the doorway. I make one a little higher up than the other, as if the fairy house had stairs.

Use a Sharpie to go around the edges of the doorway and windows. (You don’t have to do this, but it looks really cool when it’s lit up.)

Make the Mason Jar Fairy Houses

How to Make a Fairy House

Hot glue the piece of house felt to the jar all the way around the jar.

You can leave the house pretty sparse, or you can add embellishments. I added stickers of ivy which I hot glued. I used Jolee’s brand dimensional stickers. They have all kinds from mushrooms to flowers.

How to Make a Fairy House

You can also buy a bag of moss and hot glue small pieces around your fairy house to look rustic.

Once your house is ready, set it aside and let’s work on the roof.

How to Make a Fairy House

Make the Fairy House Mason Jar Roof

Each of these jars use the exact same jar lids, so the lid piece will fit all these sizes. Once you’ve cut the roof piece out, make a glue line about 1 inch above the bottom edge. Then, roll it around the ring lid as you glue.

Carefully glue the seam closed. Before hot gluing the very top of the roof, add a dollop of hot glue and fold the point down inside the roof. Then, hot glue the top of the roof closed together.

Embellish the roof with stickers or ribbons or trim, if desired. I hot glued a dimensional sticker around my roof.

To put the roof on, just place it on top. It should fit fairly snug over the lip of the yogurt pot. I do not glue it down, so I can easily remove it and turn the flickering lights on and off.

Light Up the Fairy House

These LED lights are my favorite because they flicker. I think the flickering is part of what makes these fairy houses so fun. It looks like a hearth fire or maybe the fluttering of wings in the lights of the house.

How to Make a Fairy House

Just drop an LED light into the jar and then screw the roof on top. It’s easy to turn off and on because you can just easily take the roof off and turn the light off.

Turn those Fairy Houses into Haunted Houses!

If you love this craft, stay tuned! In the next few days I’m going to show you how to turn your fairy houses into haunted witch and monster houses for totally fun Halloween decor for the mantle or even centerpieces for your Halloween party. You will not believe how cool these are!

Get the Mason Jar Fairy House PDF Pattern

If you’d like this whole post as a downloadable copy of this pattern + instructions, you can purchase the PDF eBook for $2.00 by clicking the banner below.

Share with your friends?

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

Two of my favorite things to do are craft with mason jars and make fairy gardens! These Mason Jar Fairy Houses are the perfect combination for both!

A few weeks ago I showed you how to make fairy houses from the tiny little Oui Yoplait yogurt pots. Now we’re going to make fairy houses from mason jars. You can do this with the regular (pint size) mason jars as well as 12 oz and 8 oz (jelly size) mason jars.

How to Make a Fairy House

These mason jar crafts are the perfect kids crafts to do with older tweens and teens. When finished, they have an adorable little fairy or gnome house to take home!

You can use these for centerpieces for a fairy birthday party or make witch houses for a Halloween party. Or, make a single fairy house as a night light for a kid. This post contains affiliate links.

Pin these Mason Jar Fairy Houses for later!

How to Make a Light Up Fairy House Mason Jars

Supplies

  • pint size mason jars OR 8 oz or 12 oz jelly jars
  • 2 felt sheets (11.7 x 8.3 inches)
  • 1 sheet of card stock
  • flickering LED lights
  • embellishments – stickers, trims, ribbons, moss
  • glue gun
  • Sharpie marker
  • Mason Jar Fairy Houses – Pattern Pieces

Directions

Cut out the pattern pieces. Use one felt sheet to cut out the roof. Use the second felt sheet to cut out the rectangle house piece in the follow measurements:

  • 8 oz jelly jar – 2.5 inches x 9 inches
  • 12 oz jelly jar – 4.5 inches x 9 inches
  • regular pint size mason jar – 4.5 inches x 11 inches

In the very middle of the house piece, cut out a doorway. If you want to be a little adventurous cut out windows on either side of the doorway. I make one a little higher up than the other, as if the fairy house had stairs.

Use a Sharpie to go around the edges of the doorway and windows. (You don’t have to do this, but it looks really cool when it’s lit up.)

Make the Mason Jar Fairy Houses

How to Make a Fairy House

Hot glue the piece of house felt to the jar all the way around the jar.

You can leave the house pretty sparse, or you can add embellishments. I added stickers of ivy which I hot glued. I used Jolee’s brand dimensional stickers. They have all kinds from mushrooms to flowers.

How to Make a Fairy House

You can also buy a bag of moss and hot glue small pieces around your fairy house to look rustic.

Once your house is ready, set it aside and let’s work on the roof.

How to Make a Fairy House

Make the Fairy House Mason Jar Roof

Each of these jars use the exact same jar lids, so the lid piece will fit all these sizes. Once you’ve cut the roof piece out, make a glue line about 1 inch above the bottom edge. Then, roll it around the ring lid as you glue.

Carefully glue the seam closed. Before hot gluing the very top of the roof, add a dollop of hot glue and fold the point down inside the roof. Then, hot glue the top of the roof closed together.

Embellish the roof with stickers or ribbons or trim, if desired. I hot glued a dimensional sticker around my roof.

To put the roof on, just place it on top. It should fit fairly snug over the lip of the yogurt pot. I do not glue it down, so I can easily remove it and turn the flickering lights on and off.

Light Up the Fairy House

These LED lights are my favorite because they flicker. I think the flickering is part of what makes these fairy houses so fun. It looks like a hearth fire or maybe the fluttering of wings in the lights of the house.

How to Make a Fairy House

Just drop an LED light into the jar and then screw the roof on top. It’s easy to turn off and on because you can just easily take the roof off and turn the light off.

Turn those Fairy Houses into Haunted Houses!

If you love this craft, stay tuned! In the next few days I’m going to show you how to turn your fairy houses into haunted witch and monster houses for totally fun Halloween decor for the mantle or even centerpieces for your Halloween party. You will not believe how cool these are!

Get the Mason Jar Fairy House PDF Pattern

If you’d like this whole post as a downloadable copy of this pattern + instructions, you can purchase the PDF eBook for $2.00 by clicking the banner below.

Introduction: Making a Cement Mushroom Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

How to Make a Fairy House

In this instructable I show you how to make a mushroom fairy house using mainly a cement. It’s fun to make and you can use it as an awesome decoration indoor or in your garden. Generally, this type of project is done with modelling clay, I took the initiative to do it with cement to produce a robust, non-fragile and water-resistant decorative piece

Supplies:

Sand paper C180

Step 1: Making the Basic Shape

To build the basic shape of my house, I mainly use aluminum foil. I start by wrapping a small ball of aluminum foil, and then I gradually cover it by making several layers until reaching the desired shape. To glue both parts, use the hot glue gun.

Step 2: Cover With Compress

Afterwards, I cover all the aluminum foil with the compress. This step step is very important for the preparation of the next step which is the cover with cement. A Compress layer is needed to attach the cement with the aluminum foil, and also to make the surface smoother and more robust. To glue compress with aluminium, use the hot glue gun.

Step 3: Cover With Cement – 1st Layer

We will make two layers of cement. The first layer is with a mixture of cement more liquid and less viscous; an amount of more water is used in this mixture. For this reason, you can use a brush to cover all the house with liquid cement, it is more practical and faster.

This layer may not exceed 4mm thick of cement.

Step 4: Cover With Cement – 2nd Layer

After drying, a more viscous cement mixture is prepared for use as a modelling clay. You can add sand in the mix for a better result. This layer must be thicker so that we can make the door and the windows afterwards. To make the surface smoother, the use of water from time to time is necessary. The only tool used in this step is the trowel.

Step 5: Making the Door and Windows

After 2 hours and using the carving tool, we begin by drawing the door with the grooves to add the wood effect. Small rectangular pieces of cement are cut, and using water to glue them around the door. With this method, you can get a wooden door and stone sides.

Then we make the holes for windows with the same tools.

Step 6: Making Toadstools and Plants

Using aluminum foil, we make miniature mushrooms. they are then covered by compress and then the two layers of cement are made. Regarding plant production, I used different tree leaves as mussels. The technique is simple, we cover a part of the sheet with cement and wait until it has dried.

Step 7: Paint

I used acrylic paint for painting. You can also use watercolors and watercolor crayons. It’s up to you. In the end you can seal the paint using some matte spray varnish.

Step 8: Finish

Finally, I ended up with a wonderful fairy house as shown in the attached photos 🙂

Step 9: Watch

In order to not miss any details and to follow all the real chain of the instructable, enjoy to watch the video tutorial attached.

I hope you like my instructable. See you!

How to Make a Fairy House

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How to Make a Fairy House

If you’ve been on Pinterest or thumbed through decorating magazines lately, you know fairy houses and gardens are all the rage! They add such a fun touch to the garden, and I honestly like them better than yard gnomes. Yes, I know everyone loves gnomes, but they’ve been popular for so long that I am kind of ready to move on. And that’s why I think I just like these houses and gardens better because you get to imagine who or what lives there! You know?

Supplies for your DIY fairy house planter – make it YOURS.

I decided I wanted to make my fairy house to be a planter out in my front garden, so I figured the easiest way to do that was to start with a pot. Luckily, I have a large collection of different sizes of terra cotta pots scattered around my porch (because I replant things a lot). But, if you don’t already have one lying around, they are very inexpensive to purchase. I already had Gorilla glue, which I know works really well for outdoor use. One day when I was at the dollar store, I found bags of rocks and pebbles in the floral section (where the floral foam, silk flowers, and vases are located). So I grabbed a bag of small rocks for a dollar and a bag of green moss (well, actually I got 1 bag of green reindeer moss and 1 bag of brown but only used the green…) also for a dollar!

How to Make a Fairy House

How I got my window for FREE!

My daughter was working on a project for school and we had to go to Joann fabric and all of their garden items were on sale, so that is where I got my resin door. It was on sale for 5.99 but I have seen really cute DIY doors made from popsicle sticks, too. All of the fairy “supplies” were all jumbled together, and as I was looking, I noticed a perfect-sized window that had obviously fallen or was torn off one of the pre-made houses, since it still had bits of glue and paper on the back. A store employee was right there, so I asked her if I could buy the window. She laughed and said that I could just have it. Sweet! So I got my window for free. (By the way, I have included a complete list of the supplies I used at the bottom of this post.)

Because all the items they had were so darned cute (and on clearance!), I also bought a small metal chair and resin table (that looked like wood) to go along with my house.

How to make the fairy house.

Attach the door first.

To use Gorilla glue, one of the surfaces you are gluing needs to be dampened first. Use a spray bottle to wet the surface.

How to Make a Fairy House

Put the glue on the door.

How to Make a Fairy House

Adhere the door to the pot.

How to Make a Fairy House

The directions state to let the glue dry for 30 minutes. Since I wanted to make sure it had a good seal, I used scrap wood and clamps to keep it firmly pressed. This particular Gorilla glue dries white, so if you have a bunch that oozes out around the door, just trim it with a knife or scissors, but it can easily be covered up with bits of moss later, so, don’t worry, it doesn’t have to be exact.

How to Make a Fairy House

Attach the window.

Since the window is so light, I simply used the multi-purpose glue, and it worked great. No clamping needed!

How to Make a Fairy House

Put on the stones.

How to Make a Fairy House

Once the door is dry, begin adding the stones. Because I didn’t want to hold the stones for 30 minutes while using Gorilla glue, I opted to use another glue we had, called 527 multi-use glue. I use it for almost everything. It dries clear and peels off fingers relatively easily, unlike Gorilla glue.

How to Make a Fairy House

Work on one side of the door at a time, otherwise the stones will slide off before they have enough time to set. Trust me, I learned this the hard way! I actually let the stones dry overnight. I just propped the pot between a couple of heavy objects to keep it from rolling. So it took me 2 days to have all the stones in place and dry.

Here’s the left side:

How to Make a Fairy House

And here’s the right side:

How to Make a Fairy House

Next, fill in the cracks with moss.

I squirted some glue in the larger gaps between the rocks and added small pieces of moss.

How to Make a Fairy House

I would tear off a chunk and stuff it in, using a toothpick to make sure the moss got down into the crevices.

How to Make a Fairy House

If you have moss growing near you, go ahead and use it. I don’t, and so ended up buying a bag. However, I really only used a tiny bit, so I have a lot left over to do another project! Yay!

See how nicely it filled in the gaps?

How to Make a Fairy House

Fairy house is done, but plant-less.

Here’s what the house looked like after I put on all of the moss and everything is dry.

How to Make a Fairy House

Add a plant and set your DIY fairy house out in the garden, so it’s ready for the fairies.

I tucked my fairy house into my front garden and planted a Bulbine inside the pot. I love the bright yellow flowers and long, thin leaves. Then, I added the outdoor seating and a large snail shell from my pond to complete the landscape.

How to Make a Fairy House

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