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How to make atholl brose

Atholl Brose Recipe
Preparation Time 10 Minutes
Cooking Time 15 Minutes
Difficulty Easy
Recipe Type Veg.
Serves 4
  • 25 g Medium Oatmeal
  • 2 tbsp Clear Honey
  • 2 tbsp Whisky
  • 284 ml Double Cream (heavy cream)
  • Raspberries or Blueberries, to taste
  • Heat a non-stick pan, over medium heat and toast the oatmeal in it, while stirring continuously. Let it cool down.
  • Take a small bowl and whip the double cream in it, so that it forms soft peaks.
  • Mix honey and whisky in another bowl and add this mixture to the whipped double cream.
  • Before serving, add this mixture to the roasted oatmeal and mix well.
  • Put raspberries or blueberries in a tall glass, followed by the oatmeal mixture.
  • Stir it with Atholl Brose (silver spoon) and serve.

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Ingredients

25 g , or demarara

1 teaspoons, heaped

0% fat natural Greek yogurt

200 g , frozen, then thawed

Instructions

  1. Preheat a medium grill. Sprinkle the porridge oats onto a baking sheet and grill them until lightly browned, turning occasionally. Let them cool.
  2. Mix the porridge oats with the sugar. Stir the honey and whisky together. Fold the oats and honey mixtures through the yogurt.
  3. Lightly crush the raspberries with a fork. Tip them into the oat mixture and partially fold through. Spoon into serving glasses, then cover and chill until ready to serve.

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How to make atholl brose with this oatmeal and honey recipe for the Scottish whisky liqueur drink

It is not known for how long Scottish folk have been drinking Atholl Brose liqueur but the earliest recorded recipe dates back to 1475. Prior to this Atholl Brose recipes were handed down from generation to generation as each person was taught to make this delicious whisky liquer drink.

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How to Make Atholl Brose

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The drink is so sweet and tasty that legend has it that it led to the capture of renegade Iain MacDonald the Lord of the Isles who was leading a rebellion against the King. He was caught supping at a well that had been filled with whisky, oatmeal and honey at the order of the Earl of Atholl who knew that MacDonald drank regularly from the small well. The Duke’s drink was the downfall of Iain MacDonald who stayed to enjoy it and was captured by this cunning trap. Since then it has been enjoyed by many a Scot since.

Other stories of its origins give the name of the Lord as Lord John who was the last Lord of the Isles and was under sentence of death but had escaped and fled to the hills. It is said it was he who could not resist the drink at the well and stayed drinking it rather than fleeing the Earls of Atholl and Crawford.

It can be drunk on its own and can also be enjoyed with various other drinks and accompaniments such as with crushed ice, with mixers like coca cola, soda, ginger beer, lemonade or with cream floated on top.

The recipe for Atholl Brose below can be drunk straight away but it does taste better when left to mature for a week.

It is often made specially at Hogmanay and makes a welcome drink and dessert treat. It is very sweet so should only be served in small drams to see in the New Year.

Atholl Brose Recipe

This easy to make Atholl Brose recipe can be made in a few minutes and can be made on the day it is to be drunk but tastes much better if stored for a week.

How To Make Atholl Brose

One bottle of Scotch whisky
10 fluid ounces (Half Pint) of double cream
450g of clear Scottish honey
The whites of six large eggs
One handful of fine ground oatmeal

1. Soak the oatmeal with the Scotch whisky and set aside.

2. Beat the egg whites until they become stiff.

3. Fold the cream into the egg white mixture.

4. Add the honey.

5. Blend in the whisky and oatmeal mixture at a slow but steady pace.

6. Pour the liquid into some bottles and set aside for one week. Shake each bottle of Atholl Brose each day.

Athole Brose

It is sometimes spelt as Athole Brose. For example in the Maw Broon’s Cookbook by the Sunday Post there is an Atholl Brose recipe in the inside front cover. This is spelt as Athole Brose. This differs slightly from the one above and suggests adding Scottish raspberries. The Athole Brose recipe was originally sourced from Housewife Weekly as part of their cut out and keep Scottish Recipes number 8.

It is also spelt this way in the book The Scots Kitchen by F. Marian McNeill. Hers uses heather honey, whisky and cold water as the only ingredients and cites a reference to it in The Heart of Midlothian by Sir Walter Scott. The Scots Kitchen has a brief history which includes its use as a cure for the cold and that sometimes a beaten egg yolk is added to the mixture. It also describes how two subalterns and a piper carry Athole Brose into the sergeants mess of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders on Hogmanay where it is served in a quaich to each officer and sergeant.

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How to Make Atholl Brose

It is possible to buy Atholl Brose in bottles from whisky liqueur sellers and off licences. Most distillers use single malt whisky to give a richer tasting liqueur. Others have secret recipes and use secret herbs to give unique flavours.

The book Scots Cooking: The Best Traditional and Contemporary Scottish Recipes by Sue Lawrence has a recipe for Atholl Brose pudding for those who do not like to drink.

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Create your own whisky liqueur with this traditional Scottish recipe for Atholl Brose.

A traditional whisky liqueur recipe, Atholl Brose is steeped in rich history and combines Scotland’s love of whisky with its love for all things sweet.

Perfect as an after dinner treat, Atholl Brose is usually served during Hogmanay and Burns Night celebrations.

There are many stories of how Atholl Brose came to be, though one of the original tales is that of Dougal and the Giant of Atholl. A long time ago, a great giant was said to terrorise the land of Atholl (what is now the upper parts of Perthshire). The giant – creatures that were apparently a common problem in those days – had nothing but contempt for humans and would often steal cattle. Worse, he would empty any grain stores he found, filling his great sack and leaving entire communities to struggle to survive through winter.

Fed up with the constant predations of this bothersome giant, Dougal, a young hunter from one of the many clachans surrounding the giant’s glen, hatched a daring plot to rid the lands of this nuisance.
Dougal was smart enough to know that to fight the creature head on would be foolish, as many had tried and their bodies were by now scattered across the glens.
Instead, Dougal sneaked down to where the giant kept his ill-gotten gains, finding there sacks of oats, jars of honey and incredibly, several small casks of whisky. It was then he began to formulate a plan.

Using his knife he cut open the sack of oats, he poured them into what was clearly the giant’s drinking cup (a hollowed out boulder that rested before a stone well), before adding the honey and both of the casks of whisky.
Coming across this bountiful surprise the giant drank his fill, and eventually fell asleep beneath an ancient oak tree. Seeing his chance, Dougal slipped out from his hiding place beneath the sacks of oats and slew the giant as he slept.
Dougal returned to his homestead as a hero and his recipe for the Atholl Brose was passed on from generation to generation.

The first official recipe for Atholl Brose was recorded in 1475, when Iain MacDonald, the Lord of the Isles was leading a rebellion against the king. The Earl of Atholl, who had been dispatched to capture the errant chieftan, discovered that MacDonald regularly used a well near where the rebels were said to be encamped.
The Earl ordered his scouts to stealthily fill the well with whisky, oats and honey (perhaps Atholl himself took inspiration from Dougal’s story). When MacDonald and his troops stopped to use the well, the recipe was so delicious they tarried there and were captured by Atholl’s troops.

Our step by step guide shows you how to create your very own Atholl Brose:

Ingredients:

• One bottle of Scotch whisky (A decent blend will do)
• (Optional) 1/2 Pint of double cream
• 450g of clear Scottish honey
• One handful of fine ground oatmeal

Pick whichever whisky takes your fancy but a decent blend will work just as well as a good malt. We recommend that you perhaps don’t use a peaty whisky as this can detract from the sweet flavour.

Atholl Brose also works well as a dessert just add raspberries and drizzle over a nice ice cream.

Step 1:

Combine the oatmeal and whisky in a shallow container. Cover with linen and leave in a cool place for several hours or overnight.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Step 2:

Remove the liquids from your oatmeal and whisky mixture. Use linen or a spoon and strainer to squeeze every last drop of whisky out of the oatmeal solids. Discard the oats.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Step 3:

This step is optional, some more traditional recipes don’t use cream, while others even recommend mixing the cream with egg whites. This step can be used or left out as per your preference.

Add cream and stir.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Step 4:

Gently whisk in honey, until dissolved.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Step 5:

Stir the final mixture well (according to tradition, this should be done with a silver spoon). Pour the brose into a bottle for storage.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Step 6:

Store bottle in the fridge for up to a week, Atholl Brose is at its best when given a few days to mature, howe,ver it tastes great freshly made too.

Step 7:

Serve chilled from the fridge or over ice. Enjoy!

About The Author

How to Make Atholl Brose

Driven by a passion for all things drinks-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over 10 years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink. Recently, his first book was published. Dubbed Gin Galore, it explores Scotland’s best gins and the stories behind those that make them.

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How to Make Atholl Brose: Timeless Scottish Drink

How to Make Atholl Brose

This old-fashioned Scottish beverage has a magnificent flavor that most people have never enjoyed. It needs enrichment prep work, most are dissatisfied with the rich smooth taste. Atholl Brose has also emerge as an another name for the sweet course Cranachan, which utilizes identical components.
There are a lot of variants in making this beverage, which have been bied far over numerous decades. According to legend, the beverage is listed after the first Earl of Atholl, which reversed a Highland uprising in 1475 by filling the revolutionist leader’s well with the mixture, making him quickly caught. Right here is the classic Atholl Brose, from a formula announced by the Duke of Atholl some years back. A delicious oatmeal, honey and whisky beverage.

Ingredients:
• 3 rounded tablespoons of medium oatmeal
• 2 tablespoons heather honey
• Scotch whisky

Instructions:
1. The oatmeal is put together by placing it into a basin and combining with cold water till the proportion is that of a thick paste.
2. Leave behind for half an hour then put through a fine filter, pushing with a wooden desert spoon to extract as much fluid as possible.
3. Throw out the oatmeal and use the creamy liquor licence from the oatmeal for the brose.
4. Mix up 4 dessert doses of pure honey and 4 sherry glassfuls of the ready oatmeal and stir properly.
5. Purists insist on a silver spoon for stirring!
6. Take into a quart bottle and loaded with malt whisky; shake before serving.

What makes a great liqueur? To us, it must play well with other spirits, while still contributing a ton of character and flavor on its own. Such is the case with Atholl Brose, our new favorite ingredient for spring cocktails.

In general, Atholl Brose is a rich drink made with Scotch, cream, oatmeal, and honey. (A little odd, but hey, we’d hit that). However, Dunkeld Atholl Brose is also the name of a Scotch-based liqueur, named the “best liqueur in the world” by the World Whisky Awards. Made from a base of Benromach Scotch, it’s got a distinctive smoky whisky base that’s underlaid with honey and spice, making for a warming, yet lively and floral sweet liqueur — ideal for bridging winter and spring.

While Atholl Brose, to our taste, is a bit sweet to sip on its own, it’s dynamite in cocktails, where it can play many roles. It can take the place of a base spirit, sweeten up straight liquor, or add its smoky-sweet character to lighter spring drinks. Here are three of our favorites.

Easy: The Edinburgh

It’s little surprise that this whisky-based liqueur pairs perfectly with more whisky. If you want to go full Scottish, you could use your favorite single-malt or blended Scotch here. But we like the balance that spicy rye brings in.

Instructions: In a mixing glass with ice, combine 2 ounces of rye, 1/2 an ounce of Carpano Antica sweet vermouth, and 1/2 an ounce of Atholl Brose. Stir all that up until well-chilled, then strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry.

Intermediate: Atholl Brose & Lime

At 35 percent alcohol, Atholl Brose is within shouting distance of being considered a full-on spirit, so it can serve as the base ingredient in cocktails. Here, we lighten it up considerably with ginger, fresh lime, and soda — a great lesson in how even the bold flavors of Scotch can shine in lighter drinks.

Instructions: In the bottom of a cocktail shaker, muddle a small segment of fresh ginger (a slice about a quarter-inch thick and an inch long). Add 1 1/2 ounces of Atholl Brose, 1/2 an ounce of fresh lime juice, and ice. Shake all that up hard, then double-strain — through the shaker’s own strainer, and through a fine-mesh strainer — into a tall glass with fresh ice. Garnish with 3 ounces of club soda, and garnish with a few lime half-moons.

Advanced: Atholl Brose Sour

Since Atholl Brose has a whiskey base, it’s great in a whiskey sour; we like it best of all in a traditional whiskey sour, which includes egg white to give it a soft, silky texture.

Instructions: In a cocktail shaker without ice, combine 1 1/2 ounces of Atholl Brose, 1 ounce of fresh lemon juice, and 1 egg white. Shake all that up without ice (that’s called a “wet shake”) then add ice and shake again (“dry shake”). Strain into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with a thin lemon slice.

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Ingredients (12)

For the honey syrup:

  • 1 cup honey
  • 1 cup boiling water

For the oat-infused milk:

  • 1 cup steel-cut or stone-ground oats
  • 1 quart (4 cups) whole milk
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar

To make the cocktail:

  • 1 1/2 ounces blended Scotch whisky
  • 1/2 ounce honey syrup, chilled
  • 2 ounces oat-infused milk, chilled
  • 1/4 ounce cold-brew coffee concentrate, chilled
  • Ice
  • Freshly grated nutmeg

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How to Make Atholl Brose

How to Make Atholl Brose

In Scotland, Atholl Brose is a traditional drink of Scotch whisky mixed with the liquid from soaking steel-cut oats, stirred with honey, and topped with lightly whipped cream. I tried a bunch of different combinations of these ingredients in various iterations and was starting to think I wouldn’t find a really good drink. One of the cooks from The Coachman (a British pub in San Francisco, now closed) tasting an early test version, said I needed to heighten the flavor of the oats. I took the toasted and soaked oats home and, for breakfast the next day, made oatmeal. That’s when it hit me: My coffee was heightening the toasty flavor of the oats without overwhelming them. I bought some cold-brewed coffee concentrate on my way to work and made another cocktail. As soon as I tasted it, I knew we had a winner.

You can serve this drink warm instead of chilled—just heat the honey syrup and oat-infused milk before mixing and skip the ice, stirring the ingredients to mix. And don’t toss the toasted oats you’ve infused the milk with. Make breakfast oatmeal by adding 2 to 3 cups of water and cooking over low heat for about 45 minutes.

What to buy: Choose a good coffee concentrate, such as Jittery John’s Cold Brew Coffee (available in the San Francisco Bay Area), or Trader Joe’s Cold Brew Coffee Concentrate, available on Amazon. Of course, you could always make your own Cold Brewed Coffee too.

This recipe was updated on December 13, 2017 to note The Coachman’s closure.

For more Scottish cocktail recipes, check out our Rob Roy.

Good intentions to pave the road ahead…

Atholl Brose is a Scottish drink obtained by mixing an oatmeal-based brose with honey and scotch. Brose is a Scottish word for an uncooked form of porridge, which could be made with oats, barley, peasemeal, or a mixture of different meals. In the case of Atholl Brose, the brose refers to a mixture of oats and water.

According to legend , the drink is named after John Stewart, the First Earl of Atholl (1440-1512). It is believed that he had a hand in suppressing an uprising led by John MacDonald, the 11 th Earl of Ross. It is said that the Earl of Atholl ordered whisky, honey, and oats to be added to the MacDonald water well. The MacDonald troops became so intoxicated with the resulting mixture that they were easy to capture; and the drink became known as Atholl Brose in honor of John Stewart’s cunning.

Atholl Brose Base Recipe

The main ingredients of Atholl Brose come directly from the original legend: scotch, water, oats, and honey. The ingredients are mixed together and allowed to rest for as little as 4 weeks or as long as you like, then the oats are strained out and then the Atholl Brose is served.

1.75L (1 handle) Scotch

42oz Old Fashioned or Steel Cut Oats

Some notes about the in gredients:

Scot ch : With so many fine choices for scotch, if may seem difficult to decide which to use in your Atholl Brose. The quick answer is: You may u se any scotch y ou like. Using a nicer scotch will speed up the process to as little as 4 weeks. Using a cheaper scotch can turn out just as delicious, but it will take 8 to 12 weeks of rest before it is ready to for bottling. For the budget conscious: in college, I made Atholl Brose with scotch f rom a plastic bottle (I can’t remember the name of the brand); after 3 months of rest, you really couldn’t tell that it was $17.99 for a han dle. Along those same lines: I would not recommend using very expensive scotch, as it will not make enough difference in your end product to warrant the difference in price. I have been using Johnnie W alker Red or a similar grade scotch with rest times between 4 and 8 weeks.

Oats : Any brand of old fashioned or steel cut oats may be used. Do not use quick oats, 5-minute oats, or rolled oats. I use regular Quaker Old Fashioned Oats or the store brand old-fashioned oats.

Spices and Flavorings : While the Atholl Brose is tasty on its own, there are many ways to add additional fl avor. You can add anything from star anise, to cloves, to pumpkin pie spice, and beyond. Experimentation is the key. I like to add ground cinnamon and nutmeg, crushed allspice berries, and vanilla extract. I encourage you to try out your own combinations to make your Atholl Brose your own. Use your nose and taste test a pinch before it goes in if you are unsure. Note: flavorings are added before the rest period.

Making your Atholl Brose

Wire Mesh Strainer

5qt bowl (or larger)

Combine the scotch, water, honey, and any additional spices in your rest vessel. The rest vessel is any large food-safe container with a wide mouth. Rest vessels can be: a large (2 gal. or more) pickle jar, brewing bucket, or kombucha jar, just to name a few options. I have recently discovered these large food-safe buckets and screw-on lids from Menards. It is large enough for a triple bath of Atholl Brose and easy to use and clean. Once the honey has dissolved, you can add the oats. Stir until just blended.

Rest Period : This can last from 4 weeks to as long as you like, depending on the scotch you use and your personal preferences. Stir the mixture gently every day, just until the oats reach the top. Alternatively, if you have an airtight container, you can invert the container, and then turn it right side up again. This will bring the oats to the top so they can restart their journey back to the bottom of the container throughout the rest of the day.

Straining : Put the wire mesh strainer over a large bowl or food safe bucket. You will want to use a strainer that has hooks for resting it on the top of a bowl. Cut a double layer of cheesecloth larger than your strainer by about 3-4 inches on each side. Lay the cheesecloth in the strainer. Ladle about 2 cups of the mixture into the strainer. Then gather up the sides of the cheesecloth and squeeze the scotchy goodness out of the oats. If you squeeze too hard, you will feel the cheesecloth begin to rip. You want to squeeze hard enough to get all the liquid out, but not so hard that you blow a hole in the cheesecloth. You may need to replace the cheesecloth about halfway through a single batch.

Bottling : Put the strained Atholl Brose in one bowl (if you had to strain it in batches). I recommend using a bowl with a handle on it if you are doing this by yourself. You can also pour the strained mixture in a pitcher to make pouring easier. Gather the bottling supplies: funnel, bottles, corks, etc. Stir the Atholl Brose until it is uniform throughout just before you pour the first bottle. Stir again between each bottle. The remaining oat sediment will settle to the bottom rather quickly so you need to stir between each bottle to ensure a uniform amount of goodness in each bottle. I learned this the hard way.

Serving : Atholl Brose must be mixed prior to serving as the oat sediment settles to the bottom- just give the bottle a good shake. It is good cold or room temp. However, I would not recommend storing it in the fridge, since it is difficult to mix in the bottle when cold. Enjoy your Atholl Brose straight from the bottle, over ice, or even in your coffee. You can also make a Whistlin’ Trixie, which is made of equal parts Atholl Brose and Bailey’s Irish Cream over ice. Invent a new cocktail with your Atholl Brose and leave it in the comments below. I would love to know how you take it!

To download this recipe, use the links below.

James has written for various magazines, including Celtic Guide, Mythology Magazine, and Pagan Forest.

How to Make Atholl Brose

British Giant (Arthur Rackham)

In the course of my current research into the folklore of the ales and meads of northern Europe, I came across a mention of a drink considered to be northern Scotland’s panacea. Called Atholl Brose, one manuscript just said that it was a mixture of Scotch whisky and honey, and another mentioned that it was to be used on a daily basis to keep the body strong and healthy and that it was even a better cure for colds than turpentine.

Better than turpentine? Wow! With a glowing review like that, it has to be good! Turpentine had been used for health reasons, though, so it’s not entirely a bad comparison. When you’re in a country that historically had to bleed its cattle during the winter for the calories (mixing it with oatmeal), you tend to make do with what you have. Even if that means sometimes using what’s generally a sheep medicine.

Atholl Brose, though, sounds like ambrosia straight from the mead rivers of Tir na nOg! Its name is derived from the Scots’ word for uncooked oatmeal, “brose,” and the region from which in it was legendarily created. The drink itself is fairly simple: whisky mixed with honey. Then many added cream and a slight few added eggs or egg whites. And there are a lot of recipes for this out there, some very modern and some hundreds of years old. I tried out the three-cream-added recipe and will share that recipe later in this article.

But first, folklore! I have found two stories giving the origin for this delicious drink, and have written them in my own style. The first involves the grand beast of the Isles, the giant. In this case, the Giant of Atholl.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Beanstalk Giant (Arthur Rackham)

The Giant of Atholl

In the ancient land of Atholl, high up in the northern wilds of Scotland, lived the terrible Giant of Atholl. This giant terrorized the lands all around and every hero that attempted to stop him found their way in to the giant’s stew pot. With the giant stealing all of their cattle and grain, the local clans were on the verge of starvation.

And so came Dougal the Hunter, who decided it was time to teach this giant a lesson in manners. Rather than attack head on, having learned the dangers of this from those that went before him, he tracked the giant to his cavern lair and snuck around to see if there was a better way. After three days, Dougal began to despair that it was an impossible task.

On the third day, though, it dawned on Dougal that the giant would drink deeply from his cup at the end of the day (well, I say cup, but it was a hollowed out boulder, which is cup-sized for a giant). In the giant’s store room, Dougal took sacks of oats, jars of honey, and vats of whisky. He poured the oats and whisky into the cup, stirring it into a thick porridge, and added the honey to disguise the alcohol. The giant came home, found the sweet drink, and guzzled deeply, not bothering to think about where it came from. Perhaps life had been so easy and unthreatening, that he saw no reason to fear anything. Then again, perhaps this giant was just not very smart.

After quaffing the entire potion, the giant happily passed out and started snoring, having whisky fueled dreams of giantesses and mutton. Dougal crept up and slew the sleeping giant. He returned home and became a hero of the lands, as much for the recipe of this new drink, Atholl Brose, as for ending the terror.

Atholl Brose is a Scottish drink which derives its name from two words; athole and brose. Atholl is the hilly area of Perth and brose refers to a porridge which is made by combining oatmeal with hot water. This drink is usually dense and sweet flavored and the atholl brose recipe is easy to follow and consumes less time. Atholl brose is also known as Athole brose at many places and is considered as one of the traditional cures for cold. Atholl brose is very popular during Christmas AndHogmanay.

History Of Atholl Brose Recipe
Atholl brose is said to have its origin in Scotland and was first made in the year 1475. The duke of Atholl filled a well with the drink made by mixing oatmeal, honey and scotch whiskey to seize Earl of Ross, who had panache for this particular drink. The duke succeeded and prisoned the Earl.
In the year 1842, Queen Victoria and Prince Consort Albert were welcomed by Duke and Duchess of Atholl by presenting the pudding form of Atholl brose. It is known that the queen was served the Atholl brose pudding is a quart cup which originally belonged to 18th century musician, Neil Gow, who was supported by the Dukes of Athole.

Method Of Preparation And Ingredients Used: Atholl Brose Recipe
To make Atholl Brose, the ingredients which are needed include water, oatmeal, honey and Scotch whiskey. The oatmeal is mixed with water until thick and the mixture is allowed to rest for a while. Once done, the mixture is filtered, honey is added to the strained liquid and the mixed drink is transferred to a bottle. Scotch whiskey is added to the bottle and the ingredients are shaken well. The drink is left for a week so that the flavors can get infused fully.

Serving Atholl Brose
Atholl brose is normally served in fancy glasses with a topping of thick cream and toasted oatmeal. Nutmeg and raspberries are also used to garnish the drink. The drink can be consumed neat or mixed with soda, ginger beer, lemon juice or with other soft drinks.

Variation In Atholl Brose Recipe
In some Atholl brose recipes, oatmeal and whiskey are mixed first and allowed to rest. When strained, the removed oatmeal is eaten as porridge. Finally, cream and brandy is added to the mixture and served. At some places, the cream is blended until fluffy and the mixture of honey, oatmeal and whiskey is added to the cream and served as atholl brose. In Edinburgh, the drink is made using egg yolks instead of oatmeal. Herbs are also mentioned in some variations of Atholl brose recipe.

The idea of whisky, honey and cream might be an untraditional combination for some. But in anticipation of World Whisky Day, on May 19, we’ve put together a series of video recipes using whisky to spark the imagination.

2018 marked the 25th anniversary of The Balvenie’s DoubleWood process. Perfected by The Balvenie’s malt master, David Stewart MBE, the process sees the Scotch whisky acquire a rich and smooth taste from maturation in two distinct types of wood.

Broadsheet has produced a video series of experimental whisky-led cocktails in partnership with The Balvenie. The video above shows you how to pair The Balvenie 12 DoubleWood with a simple concoction of honey syrup and vanilla cream for the ultimate showstopper.

Step-by-step instructions below.

The Balvenie Atholl Brose
Makes 1 serve. Approx. 1.4 standard drinks.

Ingredients:
45ml The Balvenie 12 DoubleWood
25ml honey syrup (3:1 ratio honey to water)
1 nutmeg
Vanilla cream float (recipe below)

Vanilla cream recipe:
Add a couple drops of vanilla extract to cream. Lightly whip cream to smooth, fluffy consistency so it will float on top of drink.

Method:
Chill coupette glass. Add The Balvenie 12 DoubleWood and honey syrup to shaker. Shake well and double strain into chilled coupette. Float vanilla cream on top. Garnish with sprinkle of grated nutmeg.

This article is produced by Broadsheet in partnership with The Balvenie.

We last left Claire deposited in Davie Beaton’s old closet, quietly shedding a few tears while her erstwhile saviour, the tinkerer, bounced back to Inverness in his little wagon without her.

It’s that last scene of Claire, left alone in the dungeon of despair, that convinced me we need ALCOHOL for Episode 3 of Outlander on STARZ: The Way Out.

Put in the same position, I’m sure most of us would welcome a liquid escape – although I think we’ll put a two glass limit on the Atholl Brose – did you see the way Claire destroyed that Rhenish last Saturday?!

Be careful, lass. Lips loosened by drink generally result in some sort of mishap.

How to Make Atholl Brose

We’re headed back into the Great Hall this week, to enjoy the sounds and story stylings of Gwyllyn the Bard, storyteller extraordinaire.

I like to picture myself in each scene while I’m watching — not in the middle of the action, mind — but maybe perched next to one of those huge hearths, with the fire warming my back? Give me Gwyllyn, his harp, and a wee dram of the Atholl Brose and I’d be happy as a bannock soaked in butter and honey.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Given that Atholl Brose is boozy, sweet and creamy, the most obvious comparison is Bailey’s Irish Cream. I don’t suggest you make that comparison with a Scot in the room, though. Atholl Brose has a long, colourful history – including the quelling of a rebellion – stretching back to 1475; Irish Cream was first available for purchase in 1974.

With a five hundred year head start, I think it’s safe to give the Scots bragging rights here.

Older recipes call for raw egg whites, but I’ve left those out due to food-safety concerns. Mrs. Fitz, Jenny and other 18th C keepers of chickens didn’t have the salmonella and other problems that plague our modern food distribution system.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Even after three years of Outlander Kitchen, I’m still occasionally surprised by how delicious a hundreds-year old combination of basic ingredients can be, even to my modern taste buds. This recipe is one of those surprises.

If you drink – even if you’re not overly fond of whisky – you want to make this. Not one hundred percent convinced? Make a half recipe. Sip it chilled, mix it into Coke on ice. Heck, I bet it makes a damn fine Highland Coffee.

Atholl Brose is at its best when given a few days to mature in the fridge, but it’s still delicious on the day it’s made. If you want to be sipping on Saturday evening, leave the oats to soak overnight Friday, then mix everything together on Saturday morning and leave it in the fridge until just before the show starts.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Other Outlander Kitchen recipes that pair with Episode 103: The Way Out

Atholl Brose

:Sweet, creamy and delicious, Atholl Brose is a wonderful after-dinner digestif, and makes the perfect accompaniment to tales told by Gwyllyn the Bard in the Great Hall.

Yield: about 2 Cups

Ingredients

  • Steel-cut or Rolled Oats – 1 Cup
  • Whisky – 1 Cup (see notes)
  • Honey – 2 Tble
  • Coffee, Table, Light or Single Cream (18% fat) – ½ Cup

Method

Soak oats in 2 cups of lukewarm water overnight.

Drain oats in a strainer lined with cheesecloth or muslin. Squeeze the oats in the cloth to extract all liquid. Discard oats.

Mix 1 cup of strained oat milk with whisky in a large bowl. Gently whisk in honey, until dissolved. Add cream and stir.

Store, covered, in a pitcher in the fridge for up to 1 week. It gets even better on the 2nd or 3rd day, once flavours have had a chance to meld.

That’s it! 2011 is coming to a close, measured now not in weeks or days, but hours and minutes.

The excesses of Christmas are over, now replaced with plans for more excess on New Year’s Eve. This year I have the good fortune to have been invited to friends, so no need for me to do much other than pitch up on time and with a few drinks.

I’ve got champagne for sure, but I’ve also got a few fun things to take along. The sloe gin is ready, and I have discovered that it lends itself very well to what has been christened the Sloe Gin Fizz Royale – a dash of sloe gin in the bottom of the glass, and top up with quality sparkling wine (forgive me for being a snob…but I prefer champagne straight up!). It works perfectly as a apéritif.

The other trick up the sleeve is a nod to the very Scottish nature of New Year’s Eve. Try calling it that in Edinburgh’s Royal Mile of Glasgow’s George Square. You might just be met with icy stares, but chances are a local will put their arm around you and explain that “we dinnae call it that here – it’s Hogmanay, laddie!”.

Hogmanay is a big thing in Scotland. There are lots of fireworks, lots of drinking, lots of singing Auld Lang Syne. And the festivities go on to such an extent that the delicate Scottish people need not just one holiday – 2 January is also a public holiday north of the Border, and to this day, I still find the idea of going back to work on 2 January to be something of a liberty.

So, in honour of this very Scottish night, the mystery drink I am making is…Atholl Brose!

How to Make Atholl Brose

Just a wee word of warning – don’t dare call this a cocktail. It has an ancient pedigree (stories claim it originates back in the late 1400s) so those 1920s gin joint pretenders are but mere latecomers to the party.

It you like this, you’ll be in royal company – it is said to have been a favourite tipple of Queen Victoria when she encountered it on one her visits to Scotland. It’s a mixture of oat milk, whisky, cream and honey. Now really…could a drink actually use any more typically Scottish ingredients?

The process for making Atholl Brose is quite easy, and the great thing is that it can be made ahead of time – indeed, many sources recommend making it several days ahead of time and allowing it to sit. However, I’ve come up with a version that can be made a few hours before, and so still have enough time to whip up a batch before the magic hour.

You start with soaking oats in water, then mashing and straining them to make an oat “brose” or broth – something like an oat milk. You could just cheat and buy oat milk if you’re in a hurry, but many Scottish matrons would be aghast at this idea…

Now…the whisky. Note the spelling, and more specifically, lack of an “e” in there. Scots don’t use the “e” and everyone else does. Yes, there are battles about who came up with it, who produces the best whisky/whiskey and how it should be spelled, but let’s just call a truce and say different people produce different drinks, and everyone has their own preferences. But regardless of whether you are using whisky, whiskey or bourbon, I would recommend a decent-ish drink, but not the fine rare malt that someone else was given as a Christmas present. The delicate flavours and aromas can get lost in the cream, oats and honey – the fine drinks should be enjoyed just as they are.

The honey, in my view, should be heather honey. It is a rich, thick honey with lots of flavour rather than just providing sweetness. However, I leave the choice completely up to you as the mixologist, but just be careful not to use something that has an overly-strong flavour (such as chestnut or thyme). These types of honey are lovely, but can overpower everything else.

The traditional ratios when making Atholl Brose are 7-7-5-1 (oat milk, whisky, cream, honey), and then these should be stirred with a silver spoon (if such a things is available). However, I’ve found that using a cocktail shaker or large jar gets a good result, but it’s still nice to pour out and stir each with a small silver teaspoon, more for drama than necessity. But it’s Hogmanay, and it’s all about show!

Once you’d added all this, plus single cream, you get a drink that is a little like Bailey’s, but in my view with more interesting flavours, one which is stronger and also lighter. It’s unusual and rather more-ish.

So, that’s it! I hope you’ve enjoyed the posts of 2011 – the quince, the Ecclefechan Butter Tart, the Chelsea Buns, the Royal Wedding special, the Mallorcan Pomada drink, the rockin’ Rock Buns, the luscious Summer Pudding, the visit to the Royal Gardens at Clarence House, the trip to Helsinki, the Scottish Macaroon Bars, the sloe gin and the sheer madness of Twelve Days of Christmas Baking!

Wishing you a Happy Hogmanay and all the very best for 2012!

How to Make Atholl Brose

To make Atholl Brose (serves 8):

Step 1: the oat milk

• 1 cup oats (rolled, pinhead…your choice!)
• 2 cups lukewarm water

Mix the oats and the water. Leave to sit for at least 30 minutes (longer doesn’t hurt). Put into a blender, pulverise, then pass through a cheesecloth. Towards the end, squeeze to get a much liquid from the mixture as possible.

Step 2: making the Atholl Brose

• 7 parts oat milk
• 7 parts whisky
• 5 parts good single cream
• 1 part honey

Mix the honey with the oat milk. Put everything into a cocktail shaker or large jar. Shake until mixed. Taste the Brose, then adjust according to taste (more honey, more cream, more whisky…). Serve chilled or over ice.

Worth making? For sure! It’s a nice traditional Scottish drink and very well-suited as a post dinner drink on Hogmanay. It’s very easy, and it’s pretty much guaranteed that your guests have never had a drink made from raw oats before!

Atholl Brose is a thick, spoonable drink, made from honey, oatmeal, water and whiskey.

You mix the oatmeal and water to form a thick paste, let stand a while, then strain the oatmeal out, keeping the liquid. You mix the liquid with honey and whisky, stir or shake well, and serve. It will keep in a sealed bottle for up to 2 days.

Another version (which calls itself “the original”), calls for oatmeal and whisky to be mixed, and set covered in a cool place for 2 to 3 days. The oatmeal is strained out and discarded (or can be used for porridge), and the whisky is then mixed with cream and brandy.

Another version is cream beaten to a froth, to which is added lightly-toasted oatmeal, honey and whiskey.

An Edinburgh version of it is made without oatmeal. You dissolve honey in water, add whiskey, and froth it. It could be stored mixed like this in a bottle. Occasionally an egg yolk was added.

History Notes

Some sources repeat the pure blarney that Atholl Brose was first heard of in 1475 when the Earl of Atholl — the sources never specify which particular Earl of Atholl, but which would have been Sir John Stewart (born circa 1440 – died 15th or 19th September 1512), 1st Earl of Atholl (8th creation) — used it to capture the rebellious Iain MacDonald, Lord of the Isles, by luring him into stopping longer than he should have at a small well that Atholl had filled with Atholl Brose.

The Lord of the Isles in question at the time, though, was not named Iain, and he was never captured.

In the mid-1470s, John MacDonald II (born 1449 – died 1493) was fourth Lord of the Isles and 11th Earl of Ross, answering to the King of Scots. Dating from Viking times, this realm included the Western Highlands of Scotland, most of the Hebrides Islands, and Arran and Antrim in Northern Ireland. It was the third most powerful realm in the British Isles, after that of the Kings of England and of Scotland. MacDonald wasn’t content, though, to have to answer to the King of Scotland, and wanted to rule independently in his own right. The King of Scotland at the time was James III (born 1451 or 1452 – murdered 11 June 1488.) On 18 February 1462 MacDonald struck a clandestine treaty with Edward IV of England (born 28 April 1442 – died 9 April 1483, just shy of the age of 41. Reigned 4 March 1461 till his death, with a hiatus during the War of the Roses from 1470 to 1471 when Henry VI — murdered 21 May 1471 in the Tower of London — was installed in his place.) The treaty committed MacDonald to helping Edward conquer Scotland, in return for Edward recognizing MacDonald’s realm as a fully independent Kingdom. Edward wasn’t able to assist him, though, owing to having to fight for himself in England during the War of the Roses.

In 1475, James III discovered John MacDonald’s treachery, and declared MacDonald’s lands forfeit and part of the realm of the Scottish crown.

MacDonald was not captured; but surrendered formally on terms to James on 10 July 1476 when he realized that James was about to launch an attack from both land and sea that would be futile to resist. Part of the terms of his surrender was that he give up the Earldom of Ross, and the territory that went with it, as well as Kintyre and Knapdale. James accepted and MacDonald was restored to favour, until his subsequent and final rebellion in 1493, when he was summoned to stand trial in Edinburgh. He was stripped of his titles and all possessions, and died the same year. Some sources say he died in rented accommodations in Dundee; some say he died in 1498.

For the record, the title Lord of the Isles is now held by whomever is the current Prince of Wales.

In 1844, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert stayed for 3 weeks at Blair Castle in Blair Atholl, Perthshire, at the invitation of George Murray (Lord Glenlyon and 6th Duke of Atholl; born 20 September 1814 – died 16 January 1864.) Victoria’s first visit to the castle had been in 1842 for coffee; she would return again for a third time just for coffee in 1861, with Albert, who was still alive then. Reputedly, during her 1844 visit, she was served Atholl Brose. One documented time when she was served it during the visit was not at the castle, but after a picnic lunch with the Duke and his wife on the lawns on the ruined Dunkeld Castle (destroyed in 1560 by Protestant reformers.)

She had also had Atholl Brose during the 1844 visit to Scotland in Moulinearn (outside Pitlochry in Perthshire.)

Victoria had Atholl Brose again in 1866, as an early evening impromptu refreshment offered her by villagers in Ballinluig, Perthshire, where she and John Brown stopped to change horses.

Language Notes

“Brose” means “broth”, but it has come to mean a broth made with oatmeal.

How to Make Atholl Brose

In the historical pissing contest for the title of ‘oldest cocktail in the world,’ there is a faint possibility that the winner is the Atholl Brose. It is generally accepted that cocktails came to the fore in the 1920s, with their genesis in the 19th Century American West with things like the Old Fashioned.

However, there is a tale that dates from the 1400s. If true, this would completely eclipse any American claim to cocktail invention.

Back then John Macdonald of Islay (1434–1503), who was also Earl of Ross, 4th (and last) Lord of the Isles, and Mac Domhnaill (i.e. chief of Clan Donald), started an aggressive revolt against King James III of Scotland. He took castles in Inverness and Urquhart in Glen Ness, before running up against royalist allies that included the John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl – the King’s ambassador to England. The legend goes that in 1475, John Stewart had the MacDonald’s water well filled with a mixture of Scotch whisky, oats and honey. The MacDonalds became completely intoxicated, and were then easily captured.

My problem with this story is that a water well is a very big vessel, and it would take truly biblical quantities of whisky to spike a well sufficiently strongly to get an entire army incapably pissed.

Nevertheless, the mixture of whisky, honey and oats eventually became known as Atholl Brose. The recipe given here is from Simon Difford, and it adds Drambiue and amaretto to give a lovely, rich drink.

Interestingly, Bruce Murray, the 12th Duke of Atholl commands the only legal private army in Europe – the Atholl Highlanders. The regiment was raised as a regular British Army regiment, and was later privatised.

How to Make Atholl Brose

An impulsive trip to Sainsbury’s on my way home from work reminded me that Burns’ Night is 25th January. That’s a good enough reason for me to seek out Haggis, Neeps (Turnips, to us Irish types) and Tatties (Well, potatoes, of course!)

A Scottish dinner needs a Scottish dessert, and this one really fits the bill.

I owe my sister Mary for the recipe, shared many years ago ..

How to Make Atholl Brose

The great thing about Atholl Brose which is what we’ve always called it – incorrectly, as it turns out – or Cranachan, is that is the perfect adult dessert for any time of year. You can make it well ahead of time (like the day before) and keep it in the fridge until it’s needed. I have to say that is this one of my dinner party regulars, and it’s always popular – honey, whiskey, raspberries and cream – who can blame us?

This recipe feeds about 10-12 in shot glasses (ideal for parties, afternoon tea, or as tasters if there are several desserts) or about 6 full-sized portions in ramekins.

EQUIPMENT:

  • A small saucepan
  • enough shot glasses, ramekins, small jam jars or pretty teacups to allow for individual portions
  • An electric or a hand whisk
  • frying pan, or grill
  • A ramekin or shot glass for each of your guests

INGREDIENTS: How to Make Atholl Brose

  • 150g fresh or frozen raspberries
  • dessertspoonful of caster sugar
  • 1 teaspoon of lemon juice (no more than that)
  • Ground cinnamon, to taste ( about half a teaspoonful)
  • 2oz porridge oats
  • 250ml double cream
  • runny honey – about 2 tablespoons, or to taste
  • half a shot glass of Scottish whiskey
  • fresh raspberries and mint leaves, to decorate
  • Thin shortbread biscuits, to serve (optional)

METHOD:

  • Start off by toasting the porridge oats – either toast them in a frying pan, moving them about frequently, or place them on a shallow tray and grill them – you need to keep a close eye on this. When toasted to a golden brown, remove from the heat and allow to cool completely.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Golden and crunchy..(but not burnt!)

  • Put the raspberries, lemon juice, cinnamon and caster sugar into a pot and bring it to a gently simmer. Mash down the raspberries with a wooden spoon, to let the juices run, but try to keep some whole. Allow to cool completely.

How to Make Atholl Brose

This is about right – the raspberries are cooked but still retain some of their shape.

  • Whip the cream until it’s quite stiff.
  • Add the honey and fold in.

How to Make Atholl Brose

‘Mmmm…Honey, said Pooh Bear..’

  • Add the whiskey, and fold in

How to Make Atholl Brose

  • Add most of the cooled oats and fold in – keep a dessertspoon or so for decorating.

How to Make Atholl Brose

  • Now taste it, and make sure there’s enough honey and whiskey – not over-powering, but you should be able to taste it
  • Put a generous spoonful of the raspberry mixture into the bottom of each container
  • gently put the cream mixture on top of it, smooth it out if you like.
  • Cover with cling film, and chill until ready to serve.

How to Make Atholl Brose

We’ve had these little triangular pots for years – they hold a decent sized dessert portion.

TO SERVE:

When you’re ready to serve –

  • Decorate with a few of the remaining oats, a fresh raspberry or two, and a mint leaf, or a drizzle of honey..
  • Serve with wee thin shortbread biscuits.

How to Make Atholl Brose

NOTES:

  • Keep a close watch on the oats – they burn so quickly!
  • It’s hard to say which I prefer – the little shot glasses, where you can see what’s coming your way, or the ramekins, where the contents are a lovely surprise. I’ll leave that up to you..
  • This recipe can be extended as much as you like to feed as many as you like. The great thing is that so many of the ingredients are store-cupboard staples.
  • Frozen raspberries are fine for this – don’t even bother defrosting them
  • Don’t make the mistake of making enormous portions – this is very rich – a once-in-a-while treat!

I started writing down recipes in an old copybook when I was about 16. With 6 children at home, my Mother was always glad of a hand in the kitchen, and really allowed us to experiment – as long as we washed up afterwards, and left the kitchen immaculate! Having a tidy kitchen has followed me through my life, as has the habit of writing down my favourite recipes; except that these days I write them for my website, and add photographs when I can. The website really started when it occurred to me that my daughter might like to have these recipes when I’ve forgotten them. In my early days of cooking for family and friends, I used to phone my Mum all the time to ask her for the recipe for some of our favourite family dinners. She rarely had a recipe to hand – I think, like me, she made a lot of it up as she went along.. So welcome to Eating for Ireland – these are the recipes that my friends and family having been eating these past 40 years.. yes, I truly am ancient! They are tried and tested, and have worked for me for all that time – I have updated them as new ingredients became available – I really hope you’ll find something that you can make into a family favourite of your own. You don’t have to tell anyone where you found these great new dishes that you’re serving up – it can be our little secret, but I’d really love it if you could give me a sneaky ‘follow’ on Facebook and Instagram.. So off you go – have a good rummage around, you’re bound to find something new! My sincere thanks to all of you who have found a recipe that you liked and dropped me a line to tell me – I really do love to hear from you! Happy Cooking! Becks xx

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Atholl Brose

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Atholl Brose

Atholl Brose

Try to buy a coarse oatmeal, as this will give the resulting dish a deliciously nutty texture.

Ingredients

125g / 4oz raspberries, plus extra to decorate

Pinch of ground cinnamon

1 tsp lemon juice

25g / 1oz caster sugar

300ml / ½ pint double cream

25 – 50ml / 1 – 2floz whisky, to taste

50g / 2oz coarse oatmeal, toasted

Method

  • Put the raspberries, cinnamon, lemon juice, caster sugar and 2 tbsp water into a small pan.
  • Heat gently for 1-2 minutes, until the raspberries just soften. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.
  • Whip the cream in a bowl with the honey until it just holds it’s shape, then beat in the whisky. Fold in the toasted oatmeal.
  • Divide the raspberries among the serving dishes and spoon the oatmeal cream on top. Chill in the fridge for 30 minutes before serving.
  • Decorate each one with a few raspberries and serve with crisp dessert biscuits if you like.

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  • ABV 35%

Made from Gordon & MacPhail’s award winning ancient recipe, using herbs and Benromach Speyside single malt Whisky, Atholl Brose has always been considered one the very best in its genre. Now it’s official. David Urquhart, Joint Managing Director of Gordon & MacPhail, commented, “The World Whiskies Awards are one of the most high-profile and highly-regarded in the industry, so to have been presented with the title of ‘World’s Best Whisky Liqueur’ really is a fantastic achievement, particularly when you consider that we were judged by a panel of senior industry representatives from around the world.”

The legend behind Atholl Brose stems back to 1475, when the Earl of Atholl foiled a rebellion against the King by the Lord of the Isles, Iain MacDonald, by filling the well he drew water from with honey, oatmeal and whisky. The mixture was so enticing that MacDonald, rather than flee his pursuers, stayed to enjoy the concoction, giving the Earl time to catch him. To this day, the exact recipe that he found so beguiling remains unknown, but Gordon & MacPhail certainly bring its essence to life in this captivating liqueur.

Tasting note: Brilliant deep gold appearance. The perfumed bouquet yields fresh picked herbs including sweet oregano, thyme and rosemary over a ripe melon, honey base. Aeration brings out the whisky, which is appropriate. Is there a hint of peat here too? A light, silky entry builds to an initially off-dry burst of honey and sweet herbs (clove, liquorice) accompanied by a crescendo of gentle spices adding depth. Mid palate is semi sweet. Concludes perfectly balanced, clean, fresh, and delicately peppermint-like with hints of clove and barley sugar tailing off into the lengthy aftertaste. Superb! 35% Alc./Vol.

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This is like the Scottish version of Baileys but much better!

Ingredients

Steps

The oatmeal brose is prepared by steeping a volume of porridge oats overnight in three times as much cold water, say 1/4 mug of oats to 3/4 mugs water

How to Make Atholl Brose

Strain the liquid (brose) from the oats, squeezing every drop out with the aid of a square of muslin acting as a bag for the oats. Don’t throw the oats away, you can still make porridge from them!

How to Make Atholl Brose

You can make your desired quantity of Atholl Brose by following this guide : 7 parts brose, 7 parts whisky, 5 parts cream and 1 part honey. Store in an old whisky bottle. Don’t refrigerate or it may curdle or solidify, just keep it in a cool dark place. Best left for a 3 days for the flavour to develop before drinking

How to Make Atholl Brose

Originally Atholl Brose didn’t include any cream, or was only added on special occasions but it’s just so delicious including it. The dessert version of this drink is called Cranachan which includes whipping the cream before adding whisky, honey and toasted oats. Gorgeous!

Legend has it that Atholl Brose led to the capture of renegade Iain MacDonald, the Lord of the Isles who was leading a rebellion against the King. He was caught supping at a well that had been filled with whisky, oatmeal and honey at the order of the Earl of Atholl, who knew that MacDonald drank regularly from the small well. The Dukes recipe was the downfall of Iain MacDonald who stayed to enjoy the drink and was thus captured by Atholl in this cunning trap.

Description

Inspired by an ancient Highland recipe, the award winning Dunkeld Atholl Brose is a delicious boutique liqueur that captures the best natural flavours of Scotland. A luxurious golden blend of single malt whisky, honey and carefully-selected herbs, Dunkeld Atholl Brose is a unique product steeped in Scottish history.

the King by the Lord of the Isles, Iain MacDonald, by filling the well he drew water from with honey, oatmeal and whisky. The mixture was so enticing that MacDonald, rather than flee his pursuers, stayed to enjoy the concoction, giving the Earl time to catch him.

To this day, the exact recipe that he found so beguiling remains unknown, but Gordon & MacPhail has brought its essence to life in a captivating, contemporary liqueur.

Perfectly-balanced, silky and smooth, Dunkeld Atholl Brose delights the palate. It combines the finest Speyside Single Malt Scotch Whisky with sweet and aromatic notes and a hint of toasted oatmeal to create an easydrinking and versatile drink that can be enjoyed all year round.

Colour: Rich golden.

Nose: Sweet, spicy and fruity – cloves and cinnamon, eucalyptus and menthol aromas.

Palate: Sweet, warming with menthol and peppermint notes. Spicy, herbal flavours and a subtle whisky edge.

Body: Soft with rich mellow character.

Finish: Sweet with a touch of mint.

Comments: A subtle balance of sweet, spicy elements and malt whisky flavours.

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How to Make Atholl Brose

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Ingredients

    • 1/2 cup oatmeal
    • 1-1/2 cups of Scotch
    • 2 TBSP of honey
    • 1-1/2 cups heavy cream

Preparation

    1. Soak oatmeal in 1/2 cup water for 30 mins. Put through a food mill or push through a sieve into a bowl. Stir in scotch and honey. Separately beat creamuntil it begins to thicken. Gradually add 3/4 cup of the scotch mixture and continue to whipcream untilit forms soft peaks. Serve dessert in 6 stemmed glasses. Store remaining whiskey mixture in a covered jar.

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Have card writing, decorating, baking and wrapping got you in a tizzy yet?

Sit yourself down by the fire and take a sip from Outlander Kitchen’s newest cocktail.

Some of you are going to balk at the amount of booze I call for in one drink, and I will agree that you should definitely not be drinking these if you’ll be driving before you have time for a very long sleep.

However, if you’re sitting down to write a bunch of cards, or wrap a family’s worth of presents at the dining room table, then load your glass with coffee ice cubes and let the drink sit a bit to melt the coffee before you start drinking in earnest. if you keep the coffee ratio fairly high, the caffeine will counteract the creamy, dreamy booze and keep you up long enough to complete your latest holiday task.

At least that’s the theory.

How to Make Atholl Brose

Atholl Brose is a mixture of whisky, cream, honey and oat “milk” that we made to celebrate epsiode 103 of Outlander on Starz. Delicious on it’s own, I’ve discovered over the past months that it’s also tasty in coffee.

I love an iced coffee in the winter, when our wood stove is belting out enough heat for us to need a cool, refreshing drink. And if you don’t have your own fire, there’s always the Outlander Yule Log for atmosphere.

Atholl Brose Iced Coffee

: Creamy, sweet Atholl Brose over coffee ice cubes. The perfect holiday combination.

Yield: 1 Cocktail

Ingredients

  • Double-Strength Coffee, cooled – about 2 Cups
  • Atholl Brose – 4 oz
  • Vanilla Vodka – 2 oz

Method

Pour coffee into an ice cube tray and freeze until solid.

Fill a glass with coffee ice cubes, pour over the Atholl Brose and vodka. Stir and enjoy.

Vintage cocktails and other joys in life. Fasten your seatbelts. It’s going to be a bumpy night.

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

The Atholl Brose

No road trip for this column. I am hard pressed to think of a bar, no matter how well-stocked, that could make me an Atholl Brose. If you know of one, fair reader, please alert me. Perhaps St. Andrews in New York City?

The Atholl Brose, a Scottish oatmeal broth named after the first Earl of Atholl, is a perfect recourse for when it is 34 degrees in Orlando, as it is while I write this. It’s colder here in New York, of course, but 34 in Florida just sounds and feels colder than 34 in New York. At two degrees above freezing, icy margaritas aren’t an option. Drinks in January need to be warming, but egg nog season is over, even if the neighbor’s Christmas decorations are still lit. Atholl Brose is a lethal oatmeal/whiskey combination that has served Scottish warriors since the sixteenth century, making it very vintage indeed.

Not technically a cocktail because it predates such a concept, the Atholl Brose has a glorious history of highland warfare and warm hearths. According to legend, the Earl of Atholl in Scotland used it to win a tribal war in 1475. Supposedly he filled a well with the stuff. The rebelling army drank it and became too inebriated to continue with the raping and pillaging. I believe the inebriation part. It is a strong drink. I don’t quite hold with the idea of filling up a water well with oatmeal and no one noticing. The water in the Atholl wells must have been very dense indeed, except… wait! The Gaelic word for water is uisce, which is mispronounced in English as “whiskey.” I now can picture the enemy army saying, “Whiskey! Whiskey! Whiskey!” and clutching their throats, and the Scottish host, nodding his head and offering more. water, water, water. But it’s not. Wink, wink, Scottish wink.

The earliest recorded history has Queen Victoria drinking Atholl Brose on her visits to Perthshire, Scotland, where the Atholl Earls serve their alcoholic oatmeal broth. Here is a traditional recipe for Atholl Brose, attributed to the Royal Scots Fusiliers from André Simon’s 1948 A Concise Encyclopædia of Gastronomy: Section VII, Wines and Spirits. It must be started the night before.

Steep 1/2 cup of oatmeal (preferably Scottish, but use anything but instant!) in 1 1/2 cups of cold water overnight.

The next day, strain the liquid from the oatmeal. The recipe calls for muslin. You can use ordinary cheesecloth found in a well-stocked supermarket. You’ll have 1/2 cup of oatmeal water — the broth.

Pour 3 1/2 oz. of this liquid into a large rocks glass.
Add 3 1/2 oz. of whiskey. The recipe calls for Scotch, but you might want to use a blended and save the Scotch for sipping.

Add:
2 1/2 oz of cream
1/2 oz of honey

Mixing with a silver spoon is recommended.

I found an alternate, non-alcoholic recipe on the Hamlyns Oats site that, with a little tweak, lends itself to a variation on the Atholl Brose. Hamlyns claims that it is a “warming and relaxing drink, but at the same time stimulating.” Anything that is relaxing and stimulating at the same time, without alcohol, is well worth a try. But imagine how much better it could be with a little whiskey thrown in.

3/4 cup water
2 tsp. Hamlyns Scottish Oatmeal
1/2 tsp. brown sugar
1/2 tsp. lemon juice
1/4 tsp. ground ginger

Put the oatmeal, sugar, and ginger into a mug or small jug. Mix with a tablespoon of cold water taken from the 3/4 cup. Add the lemon juice. Boil the water and add to the mixture, stirring well until all is blended. The amounts of ginger and sugar may be varied according to taste.

To make this into a true Atholl Brose, add 2 oz. of whiskey. Use blended whiskey — save the malt for sipping.

Grain drinks are also very popular in Latin America, discrediting my cold climate/warm drinks insta-theory. Here is a variation on the Mexican Oatmeal Drink, originally posted by Chicana Peach. With some comparison testing, I found that a gold rum works better than bourbon with this sweet drink, and it smells divine in the preparation, something that occurs rarely in mixology. Again, this is best begun the night before.

1 cup Quaker old-fashioned oats soaked overnight in a cup
1 cinnamon stick broken in two or 1 tbsp. ground cinnamon
3 cups water
2 cups skim milk
2 tbsp. honey
2 tbsp. sugar
2 oz. Barbancourt Rhum

Soak the oatmeal overnight, or for at least six hours or so. Once that is done, place it in a medium pot and add the water and broken cinnamon stick. Simmer over medium heat for 10 minutes. Next, add the milk and honey and cook on medium-low heat for 30 minutes. Finally, add the sugar and cook for 5 more minutes. You will know it’s done as the consistency will thicken some and it will be a little creamy. Use more water or milk for a thinner consistency.

This was the sweetest of the three oatmeal concoctions. The original Atholl Brose was the creamiest and quite delicious, a perfect alternative to egg nog for the holidays. I will remind you in eleven months’ time.

If you get discouraged with any of these worthy experiments — as I did with the Hamlyn Oats attempt below; notice the oatmeal collected at the bottom! — you can always try a new-fangled Oatmeal Cookie Drink. Layer 1 oz. Grand Marnier, 1 oz. butterscotch schnapps, and 1 oz. Irish Cream. However, you are probably better off just eating the cookie.

Mar sin leibh an dràsda — Ta ta for now!

No road trip for this column. I am hard pressed to think of a bar, no matter how well-stocked, that could make me an Atholl Brose. If you know of one, fair reader, please alert me. Perhaps St. Andrews in New York City?

The Atholl Brose, a Scottish oatmeal broth named after the first Earl of Atholl, is a perfect recourse for when it is 34 degrees in Orlando, as it is while I write this. It’s colder here in New York, of course, but 34 in Florida just sounds and feels colder than 34 in New York. At two degrees above freezing, icy margaritas aren’t an option. Drinks in January need to be warming, but egg nog season is over, even if the neighbor’s Christmas decorations are still lit. Atholl Brose is a lethal oatmeal/whiskey combination that has served Scottish warriors since the sixteenth century, making it very vintage indeed.

Not technically a cocktail because it predates such a concept, the Atholl Brose has a glorious history of highland warfare and warm hearths. According to legend, the Earl of Atholl in Scotland used it to win a tribal war in 1475. Supposedly he filled a well with the stuff. The rebelling army drank it and became too inebriated to continue with the raping and pillaging. I believe the inebriation part. It is a strong drink. I don’t quite hold with the idea of filling up a water well with oatmeal and no one noticing. The water in the Atholl wells must have been very dense indeed, except… wait! The Gaelic word for water is uisce, which is mispronounced in English as “whiskey.” I now can picture the enemy army saying, “Whiskey! Whiskey! Whiskey!” and clutching their throats, and the Scottish host, nodding his head and offering more… water, water, water. But it’s not. Wink, wink, Scottish wink.

The earliest recorded history has Queen Victoria drinking Atholl Brose on her visits to Perthshire, Scotland, where the Atholl Earls serve their alcoholic oatmeal broth. Here is a traditional recipe for Atholl Brose, attributed to the Royal Scots Fusiliers from André Simon’s 1948 A Concise Encyclopædia of Gastronomy: Section VII, Wines and Spirits. It must be started the night before.

Steep 1/2 cup of oatmeal (preferably Scottish, but use anything but instant!) in 1 1/2 cups of cold water overnight.

The next day, strain the liquid from the oatmeal. The recipe calls for muslin. You can use ordinary cheesecloth found in a well-stocked supermarket. You’ll have 1/2 cup of oatmeal water — the broth.

Pour 3 1/2 oz. of this liquid into a large rocks glass.
Add 3 1/2 oz. of whiskey. The recipe calls for Scotch, but you might want to use a blended and save the Scotch for sipping.

Add:
2 1/2 oz of cream
1/2 oz of honey

Mixing with a silver spoon is recommended.

I found an alternate, non-alcoholic recipe on the Hamlyns Oats site that, with a little tweak, lends itself to a variation on the Atholl Brose. Hamlyns claims that it is a “warming and relaxing drink, but at the same time stimulating.” Anything that is relaxing and stimulating at the same time, without alcohol, is well worth a try. But imagine how much better it could be with a little whiskey thrown in.

3/4 cup water
2 tsp. Hamlyns Scottish Oatmeal
1/2 tsp. brown sugar
1/2 tsp. lemon juice
1/4 tsp. ground ginger

Put the oatmeal, sugar, and ginger into a mug or small jug. Mix with a tablespoon of cold water taken from the 3/4 cup. Add the lemon juice. Boil the water and add to the mixture, stirring well until all is blended. The amounts of ginger and sugar may be varied according to taste.

To make this into a true Atholl Brose, add 2 oz. of whiskey. Use blended whiskey — save the malt for sipping.

Grain drinks are also very popular in Latin America, discrediting my cold climate/warm drinks insta-theory. Here is a variation on the Mexican Oatmeal Drink, originally posted by Chicana Peach. With some comparison testing, I found that a gold rum works better than bourbon with this sweet drink, and it smells divine in the preparation, something that occurs rarely in mixology. Again, this is best begun the night before.

1 cup Quaker old-fashioned oats soaked overnight in a cup
1 cinnamon stick broken in two or 1 tbsp. ground cinnamon
3 cups water
2 cups skim milk
2 tbsp. honey
2 tbsp. sugar
2 oz. Barbancourt Rhum

Soak the oatmeal overnight, or for at least six hours or so. Once that is done, place it in a medium pot and add the water and broken cinnamon stick. Simmer over medium heat for 10 minutes. Next, add the milk and honey and cook on medium-low heat for 30 minutes. Finally, add the sugar and cook for 5 more minutes. You will know it’s done as the consistency will thicken some and it will be a little creamy. Use more water or milk for a thinner consistency.

This was the sweetest of the three oatmeal concoctions. The original Atholl Brose was the creamiest and quite delicious, a perfect alternative to egg nog for the holidays. I will remind you in eleven months’ time.

If you get discouraged with any of these worthy experiments — as I did with the Hamlyn Oats attempt below; notice the oatmeal collected at the bottom! — you can always try a new-fangled Oatmeal Cookie Drink. Layer 1 oz. Grand Marnier, 1 oz. butterscotch schnapps, and 1 oz. Irish Cream. However, you are probably better off just eating the cookie.