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How to make the impossible happen – lifehack

As an entrepreneur, you’re used to seeing things that others don’t see. You have already taken risks that most people simply won’t. But every now and then, you need to remind yourself how to make the impossible possible.

Create New Possibilities
Our personal experiences make up our belief systems, our internal values which generate most, if not all, of what we believe to be possible and impossible. Just because something hasn’t been done before doesn’t mean that it’s impossible. Sure, there are laws of physics such as gravity that we must obey (at least here on earth), but the more we open our minds to new possibilities, the more we can see paths forward-some of which we must trail blaze in order to create a new way of doing things.

The 4-minute mile was once thought impossible, as was a self-aware robot. Whenever you look back with the benefit of hindsight you can easily see how the innovators took bold moves to make the impossible possible. However, looking forward feels different because you must take a leap of faith in order to accomplish anything that is a breakthrough-especially things that are giant leaps forward.

Know Your Why and Let It Inspire Others
Before you dig deep into how you make the impossible possible, you must first focus on your why. Why is it that this must happen? How does making the impossible possible benefit others? The more you can paint a clear picture on why what you’re doing is important and will serve others, the deeper a seed you will plant in your own mind and influence those around you. If your reasons are important, then you will find a way to make it happen. If not, then you’ll end up chalking your idea up to a dream and won’t spend the time needed to turn that dream into a reality.

Reframe the Question: “How Could I Do This?”
When turning your vision into reality, it can be helpful to understand all the reasons people tell you that it can’t be done. Listening is not the same thing as believing. If you believe that your vision is critically important, then you can listen with confidence to all the people who believe what you’re looking to do is impossible. What they are actually telling you are the hurdles that you will face and must overcome in order to be successful. As long as you can avoid being overwhelmed by these insights, they can help you formulate your plan of action.

Instead of obsessing about what you can’t do, it’s important to focus on how you could accomplish your vision. Your brain is a powerful tool for overcoming obstacles. Direct your energy and focus around what you would need to do in order to make the impossible possible. What’s never been tried before, but could work? What can we learn from other people’s failures and apply to a new way of thinking?

What Would I Need to Make This Happen?
This is perhaps the most important question of all. When you ask better questions, you get better results. By thinking deeply about what you would need to make your vision a reality, you can start to see the possibilities that most people are closed off to seeing (since they’ve already dismissed the idea as impossible). Get really specific so that you know what precisely you’d need. You don’t have to do it all yourself, you simply need to map out possible ways to get it done and enlist the help of others.

Who Would I Need to Support My Vision?
Once you know what you need to do in order to make the impossible possible, then it’s time to get leverage by asking others to help you. When you tell them you need their help on something they don’t believe is possible, they will be reluctant to agree. However, when you have broken down what you need into individual tasks and are simply asking for their help with a specific task, it doesn’t feel overwhelming and therefore they are more likely to support you.

Gather enough support from enough people and you can do just about anything. The bigger your vision for the future, the more likely you are to inspire others. So dream big, listen to those who doubt your vision, and then lead with confidence as you show those around you how to make it happen.

How to make the impossible happen - lifehack

In the early 1950s, many people believed that it was impossible for humans to run a mile in under four minutes. Runners had been trying to break the four-minute barrier since the late 1800s. The world’s top coaches and most gifted athletes had been trying to go sub-4:00 for years. They were dedicated, and they’d tried all sorts of training plans, but the milestone was believed to be out of reach — that the human body just couldn’t go that fast.

Then in 1954 Roger Bannister ran the mile in 3 minutes 59.4 seconds. A month and a half later, John Landy ran even faster. Then a year later three more runners broke the 4-minute barrier. Today high school runners break the barrier routinely, and Hicham El Guerrouj of Morocco holds the record of the world’s fastest mile at 3 minutes and 43.13 seconds.

Here are four things to keep in mind to make the impossible possible:

1. Your negative beliefs are powerful.

If you believe something is impossible, that belief will erode your confidence and turn that impossible belief into a self-fulfilling prophecy.

2. Positive beliefs are even more powerful.

If you believe you can and will do something, you will find the means to make it happen. For proof, look at our history: Imagine how the world would be if U.S. President John F. Kennedy believed that it was impossible to put a man on the moon. What if Martin Luther King Jr. had believed it was impossible to achieve civil rights in the United States or if Mahatma Gandi had believed it was impossible to overthrow the British occupation of India without violence. Could Barack Obama have become the first African-American president of the United State if he’d thought the quest was impossible? Highly unlikely.

3. Authority figures don’t always know best.

If a person with authority tells you that you “can’t” do something, you will likely believe it-or at least have less confidence in your own abilities. And once you believe it, you will behave as if that prediction is true, by default making it come true. For instance, if I told a patient, “You are a mess. There’s no hope for you,” it could cause the patient to stop trying, even though there really is hope.

4. Believe in what’s possible.

It’s the first step towards fearlessly reaching goals. Fearlessness is a state of mind, not a genetic trait. You can acquire it and strengthen it. Start to build your courage now by reminding yourself of all of the amazing feats you’ve already accomplished in your life. Chances are, you have probably already made the impossible possible several times in your life. What have you already accomplished that you once thought could never be done? Write it down. Keep this list handy and read it whenever you are tempted to believe that you don’t have what it takes to begin to make changes in your life.

Is creativity something people are just born with? For many of us, creative thinking isn’t purely intuitive—it’s also plain hard work. As writer Iris Shoor explains, coming up with fresh ideas isn’t always a natural gift—it’s a skill that can be learned.

A few days ago I was telling someone about my startup company. “How did you come up with the idea?” he asked, and added very nicely, “you must be very creative.” This line always makes me smile, as I believe being creative is not a natural gift. Every day I try not to think outside the box, but rather work hard on trying to live outside of it. I believe that creativity can be taught, and I know for a fact that I’ve become more creative over time. It’s not about finding the ‘one’ idea, but rather about using creativity to achieve everyday personal and professional goals. I use creative thinking to sell my product and ideas to people, design better, and even to overcome personal obstacles, going outside my comfort zone.

Here are some methodologies I use to come up with fresh ideas.

Changing one part of an idea at a time

The biggest creativity challenge we face is that while we want to innovate and change, our brain actually prefers to stick with what it knows. Whether it’s a first draft or a five year old plan—once an idea has taken root it’s very difficult to think of another. Once we have a new look for the office in mind, a presentation flow or a web site design, it’s almost impossible to get it out. Try to think for a minute or two of a new design for Google.com. Hmmm. almost impossible!

A powerful tactic to overcome this is taking a project and breaking it down into smaller pieces. Once you stop looking at your project as a whole, things don’t look as obvious as they were before. Write down a list of all the elements in your current project—presentation topics, blog post paragraphs, web site elements, and more. Then focus on one part at a time and change just that one. The most interesting thing about this tactic is that just dividing a project into a discrete list of elements will help ideas to start flowing. Once you have your list you can do wonders with it. Here are a few quick examples:

  • Focusing on one part and changing it completely.
  • Removing a part.
  • Combining random parts.

Use this tactic when working on my product designs, marketing strategy and presentations. Here’s a fun example of how it’s done:

A crisis is, often, an impossible situation. You have to make immediate decisions without enough information. You need to keep people safe, but you don’t have the time or resources for the usual safety measures. The Guardian recently asked people who’ve handled extreme situations how they knew what to do. Here are their tips.

Drop Unnecessary Decisions

Multitasking is a myth . If you want to do a job well, you can’t also be doing a bunch of other things at the same time. Pilot Chesley “ Sully” Sullenberger says that he was trained to drop non-essential decisions in a crisis, so that you don’t clutter up your brain while you’re trying to think clearly. You’ll also have to drop some of your usual actions . As he explains:

We have a three-page checklist designed to be used when landing from 35,000ft and it usually takes half an hour. But I broke protocol and took only the actions we had time for: from the time we hit the birds until the time we landed was under three-and-a-half minutes.

Expect Uncertainty

When a crisis is developing, you don’t know what’s going to happen next. Karim Brohi, a surgeon who was on duty during the London Bridge attacks, led the emergency department in evaluating and treating the patients that were rushed to his hospital. But the hospital’s work load depended on factors that weren’t under control of anyone there. He says:

We received around 30 patients and were expecting a second wave who had been trapped in Borough Market, but that didn’t happen. It’s important for us to not be flustered by information when it’s wrong because we have to be able to respond no matter what.

Prepare for the Next Phase of the Crisis

Julia Brothwell, a British Red Cross team leader, flew to the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, but she didn’t wait to be called; her policy is to call the office and start packing when she knows there’s a crisis that could need her help.

She also paid attention to the aftershocks, wondering if the next one could be a real quake. And she was prepared with a go-bag for when that quake came:

Two weeks after the first quake, I was working in our office on the sixth floor of a building when a second quake happened. It was like being on a fairground ride where the floor moves under you. I got everyone out of the office, but we had to get down five flights of stairs. Most people ran without their belongings, but I always have my grab bag with my extra phones, water and spare clothes by the doorway of whatever room I’m in and I grabbed it as we exited.

Examine Your Biases

In a crisis, you might need to make split-second decisions on tiny scraps of information. Brett Lovegrove, London’s former head of counter-terrorism, explained how he dedicated time to understanding how his brain filled in the gaps:

When I was a young firearms officer in the Met police, I had a number of situations where I didn’t shoot but could have done and it was important to me to understand why. The only way I could do that was to take myself into a dark room and look at what I had relied on. I found it was a mixture of my role models and how I’d been brought up. I learned a lot from my father and, although we sometimes have different views, I have an appreciation of diversity and making decisions for the right reasons by seeing the person and not their background. I strongly believe crisis leaders need to make fast and difficult decisions based on what’s right and not let their own prejudices come to the fore in their response.

Consider How Your Reactions Affect Other People

When people are depending on you, you don’t have the luxury of freaking out. Several of the crisis responders that the Guardian spoke to mentioned the importance of not just staying calm, but appearing calm to the people around you, especially when you’re the acknowledged leader in the situation. Sullenberger chose his words carefully (“This is the captain. Brace for impact.”) because, he explains, courage can be contagious.

Keeley Foster, deputy assistant commissioner of the London Fire Brigade, points out that not everybody will respond the same way. To keep your team effective, you have to consider each person’s reaction:

I’m naturally calm but the way you lead the people around you is important, too, and you have to change your leadership style to handle different people in different ways. Because you’re being directive you can so easily alienate people and once they feel out of the loop, they might not feed you the information you need.

My father is a pseudo-vegetarian, though he does eat the occasional bird or fish. He’s recently gotten into animal-free, meat-like products—the man loves an Impossible Burger!—and I’ve been making his favorite food (spaghetti) with either ground turkey or some sort of meatless crumble instead of beef or pork.

Tofu Freaking Rules

We need to talk about tofu. As Beyond Meat and Impossible Burger mania sweeps the globe, the OG…

Impossible and Beyond “meats” and even crumbled tofu can get you close to the genuine article, texture-wise, but I often tweak and futz to make things taste a bit more meaty; meatiness is a specific kind of glutamate-heavy, umami-forward savory flavor that you often miss when using a meatless meat. Using one (or more) of the following vegetarian- and vegan-friendly ingredients completes the flavor profile, resulting in a more satisfying meat-free eating experience.

Better Than Bouillon No Beef Base

My stepmom has been using the BTB line of products for years, and she’ll often mix a little of this variety (sometimes in conjunction with browning sauce ) into whatever vegetarian stew, stir fry or pasta dish she’s making to beef it up. It adds some of the nice, dark depth you get from roasted meat— kind of like a meatier-tasting soy sauce (if soy sauce was a paste). I like to add BTB towards the end of the cooking process, and to taste; and I rarely need more than a 1/2 teaspoon (1/4 is usually plenty).

MSG

Monosodium glutamate is the quickest way to get that pure hit of meaty savoriness. It doesn’t add much depth, so it’s especially useful in dishes where you’ve developed a ton of veggie-based flavor but are still missing that little meaty something. You just sprinkle it into or onto whatever fake meat product you happen to be using and cook as usual, or add it at the end to taste. Around 1/8th of a teaspoon per pound of protein is usually enough, though you can add as much as 1/4 of a teaspoon. (Any more than that and the MSG will dominate the dish in an unpleasant way.)

Put MSG in Everything, You Cowards

By now, we should all be completely unafraid of monosodium glutamate, the umami-boosting molecule…

Chinese Olive Vegetable

This popular Chinese condiment is combination of immature Chinese white olives and mustard greens that has been cooked for a long time, creating a paste with a strong, savory, complex flavor. It’s funkier and stickier than MSG (though some brands contain the glutamate salt), lending a quality kinda like aged beef. I like to mix it with a bunch of crispy minced mushroom bits to make a vegan bolognese , but you can use it just like the no-beef BTB and mix it in to taste. (Just look out for olive pits.)

Burnt Onions

A burnt onion doesn’t add quite the same pure, meaty flavor as the above three, but it does bring a savory darkness, and sometimes that is enough. The charred allium adds a roasted quality and a bit of bitterness—two things one often associates with meaty stews and braises. (Just as liquid smoke can make remind one of a grilled burger while not actually tasting meaty, burnt onions can remind one of a roast.) Burnt onions work best when pureed into something, particularly sauces and stews. (Just cook a whole onion until it’s way past caramelized , then blend it in with an immersion blender.)

What’s Inside Article

Dua To Make Impossible Possible

In case, you wish to know about the wazifa in detail, you can seek the help of our Molvi ji. Our Molvi sb. will provide you with the right guidance and suggestion. They will provide you with the dua to make impossible possible according to your situation and Insha Allah, very soon you will see your most impossible dreams turning to reality. The most commonly used dua to make impossible possible is mentioned below along with the namumkin ko mumkin karne ka wazifa –

  • Make fresh ablution.
  • Sit on the prayer mat and keep facing the Kaa’ba Shareef.
  • Recite Durood Shareef 7 times or 11 times at the beginning of wazifa
  • After that recite this dua 874 times “Allahu Rabbi La Shareeka Lahoo”
  • Recite Durood Shareef 7 times or 11 times at the end of wazifa
  • Make the dua for the impossible wish you have.
  • Keep reciting this dua day and night while doing anything.
  • Do it till your wishes get fulfilled.
  • Insha Allah, in one week, you will see things changing and improvements coming in.

Wazifa To Make Impossible Possible

If you’re a Mohammaden, then you must be having the faith that only Allah can make the impossible possible. Only He has the power to turn anything into reality. So, if there is anything that seems impossible to you, then only your prayers can help you turn it into reality. The wazifa to make impossible possible is very effective and will give you desired results in a very short span of time. For those people, who are literally worried about how they will get things done, the wazifa to make impossible possible is the best remedy to help them sort the most impossible matters of their life

Sometimes it seems impossible to convince your parents for your love marriage; sometimes it appears impossible to win your lost love back. Very often gaining wealth or job for oneself looks impossible. For a lot of people having good health seems to be the most impossible thing in the world. If there is anything that seems impossible to you, remember, that above all, it is Allah (SWT) to make things possible for you. All you need to do is just pray with a pure heart for legit things and Insha Allah, you will get it.

Related Post: Wazifa To Make Impossible Possible

Wazifa For Quick Results

Once you commence reciting the wazifa for quick results, you will start seeing results soon. A large number of Muslim brothers and sisters have gained immense benefits with the help of the wazifa for quick results. So, if you are having a hard time and you literally don’t know what to do, then just seek refuge in this light of Allah (SWT) and Insha Allah, you will get what you desire. Remember you do not have to ask from anyone else, it is just Allah (SWT) who can make all your wishes and desires come true, no matter how tough they appear.

If you do not get sufficient results in a week, then speak to our Molvi ji instantly. Have patience and keep faith in the namumkin ko mumkin karne ka wazifa. Recite it with full dedication and devotion. You will get what you desire only if you have the right faith in the Almighty. So, pray with a clean heart and right intention and you will get results.

Having a bad day can happen from time to time, b ut then there are longer stretches that can turn into weeks or months of feeling unmotivated, lost, or hopeless . Life may keep piling it on, but here are a few starting points for how you can climb out of your hole and get back on track.

This is an awfully big topic, so we asked you for personal experiences , and you delivered. There were so many great contributions, so thank you to all who told your story. These are all great stories and tips from readers just like you—mixed in with our own tips and strategies, as well as research—that show how it’s possible to get out of any rut in your life.

Just do something

It’s possible you feel stagnant because. well, you are. You wake up, work , go to bed, and repeat. Sometimes when it feels like you’re not going anywhere, you just need something to loosen up the gears. It doesn’t matter what it is—many of you recommended volunteering, taking a class, or doing some community service—but if you try something outside of your norm ( especially if you learn something ), it can go a long way. You can discover something you love, or meet new people that bring a new flavor to your normal day-to-day recipe.

A lot of people may feel unhappy because there is nothing in their life that excites them, so it’s important to look for it everywhere. Chances are your comfort zone is exactly what’s bringing you down. You never know where something will lead you. If something interests you at all, give it a shot. Ken Reynolds did just that:

I decided to be proactive instead of reactive. I had always been fascinated by programming and software engineering, but always dismissed pursuing it in the past because I had convinced myself that I didn’t have enough intelligence to do it. Rather than dismiss it again, I signed-up for an account on Code A cademy and learned how to write JavaScript… I applied for a position as a Software Engineer at IBM via the encouragement of another close friend. I got the position, I’m learning and growing more than I ever have before, and have achieved one of my wildest dreams, which I never before dreamed was possible. The best thing you can do is simply do something. Anything. Once you do something, don’t give up doing it. Ever.

A crisis is, often, an impossible situation. You have to make immediate decisions without enough information. You need to keep people safe, but you don’t have the time or resources for the usual safety measures. The Guardian recently asked people who’ve handled extreme situations how they knew what to do. Here are their tips.

Drop Unnecessary Decisions

Multitasking is a myth . If you want to do a job well, you can’t also be doing a bunch of other things at the same time. Pilot Chesley “ Sully” Sullenberger says that he was trained to drop non-essential decisions in a crisis, so that you don’t clutter up your brain while you’re trying to think clearly. You’ll also have to drop some of your usual actions . As he explains:

We have a three-page checklist designed to be used when landing from 35,000ft and it usually takes half an hour. But I broke protocol and took only the actions we had time for: from the time we hit the birds until the time we landed was under three-and-a-half minutes.

Expect Uncertainty

When a crisis is developing, you don’t know what’s going to happen next. Karim Brohi, a surgeon who was on duty during the London Bridge attacks, led the emergency department in evaluating and treating the patients that were rushed to his hospital. But the hospital’s work load depended on factors that weren’t under control of anyone there. He says:

We received around 30 patients and were expecting a second wave who had been trapped in Borough Market, but that didn’t happen. It’s important for us to not be flustered by information when it’s wrong because we have to be able to respond no matter what.

Prepare for the Next Phase of the Crisis

Julia Brothwell, a British Red Cross team leader, flew to the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, but she didn’t wait to be called; her policy is to call the office and start packing when she knows there’s a crisis that could need her help.

She also paid attention to the aftershocks, wondering if the next one could be a real quake. And she was prepared with a go-bag for when that quake came:

Two weeks after the first quake, I was working in our office on the sixth floor of a building when a second quake happened. It was like being on a fairground ride where the floor moves under you. I got everyone out of the office, but we had to get down five flights of stairs. Most people ran without their belongings, but I always have my grab bag with my extra phones, water and spare clothes by the doorway of whatever room I’m in and I grabbed it as we exited.

Examine Your Biases

In a crisis, you might need to make split-second decisions on tiny scraps of information. Brett Lovegrove, London’s former head of counter-terrorism, explained how he dedicated time to understanding how his brain filled in the gaps:

When I was a young firearms officer in the Met police, I had a number of situations where I didn’t shoot but could have done and it was important to me to understand why. The only way I could do that was to take myself into a dark room and look at what I had relied on. I found it was a mixture of my role models and how I’d been brought up. I learned a lot from my father and, although we sometimes have different views, I have an appreciation of diversity and making decisions for the right reasons by seeing the person and not their background. I strongly believe crisis leaders need to make fast and difficult decisions based on what’s right and not let their own prejudices come to the fore in their response.

Consider How Your Reactions Affect Other People

When people are depending on you, you don’t have the luxury of freaking out. Several of the crisis responders that the Guardian spoke to mentioned the importance of not just staying calm, but appearing calm to the people around you, especially when you’re the acknowledged leader in the situation. Sullenberger chose his words carefully (“This is the captain. Brace for impact.”) because, he explains, courage can be contagious.

Keeley Foster, deputy assistant commissioner of the London Fire Brigade, points out that not everybody will respond the same way. To keep your team effective, you have to consider each person’s reaction:

I’m naturally calm but the way you lead the people around you is important, too, and you have to change your leadership style to handle different people in different ways. Because you’re being directive you can so easily alienate people and once they feel out of the loop, they might not feed you the information you need.

Is creativity something people are just born with? For many of us, creative thinking isn’t purely intuitive—it’s also plain hard work. As writer Iris Shoor explains, coming up with fresh ideas isn’t always a natural gift—it’s a skill that can be learned.

A few days ago I was telling someone about my startup company. “How did you come up with the idea?” he asked, and added very nicely, “you must be very creative.” This line always makes me smile, as I believe being creative is not a natural gift. Every day I try not to think outside the box, but rather work hard on trying to live outside of it. I believe that creativity can be taught, and I know for a fact that I’ve become more creative over time. It’s not about finding the ‘one’ idea, but rather about using creativity to achieve everyday personal and professional goals. I use creative thinking to sell my product and ideas to people, design better, and even to overcome personal obstacles, going outside my comfort zone.

Here are some methodologies I use to come up with fresh ideas.

Changing one part of an idea at a time

The biggest creativity challenge we face is that while we want to innovate and change, our brain actually prefers to stick with what it knows. Whether it’s a first draft or a five year old plan—once an idea has taken root it’s very difficult to think of another. Once we have a new look for the office in mind, a presentation flow or a web site design, it’s almost impossible to get it out. Try to think for a minute or two of a new design for Google.com. Hmmm. almost impossible!

A powerful tactic to overcome this is taking a project and breaking it down into smaller pieces. Once you stop looking at your project as a whole, things don’t look as obvious as they were before. Write down a list of all the elements in your current project—presentation topics, blog post paragraphs, web site elements, and more. Then focus on one part at a time and change just that one. The most interesting thing about this tactic is that just dividing a project into a discrete list of elements will help ideas to start flowing. Once you have your list you can do wonders with it. Here are a few quick examples:

  • Focusing on one part and changing it completely.
  • Removing a part.
  • Combining random parts.

Use this tactic when working on my product designs, marketing strategy and presentations. Here’s a fun example of how it’s done: