Categories
Device

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

As the premier professional social networking site, LinkedIn encourages sharing in a public space — as reflected in the initial/basic LinkedIn privacy settings.

These initial settings can be helpful when looking for a new career, but all of this public information can also be a major privacy concern. Plus, with the high number of LinkedIn-related phishing scams — it’s always wise to keep your public information, especially contact information, to a minimum.

Our tutorial includes direct links to some account settings — you must be already logged into LinkedIn to be correctly directed.

Getting to your settings:

Manage your LinkedIn account and privacy settings from your Privacy & Settings page.How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

To access this page, click on your profile picture in the top right of your account homepage and click Manage beside Privacy & Settings.

Access settings directly by visiting www.linkedin.com/settings.
How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

LinkedIn breaks up their security settings into three distinct categories: Account, Privacy and Communications.

Account Tab

The account tab is where you manage your basic information and account settings, such as adding or changing your password, altering visibility and exporting your data.

Phone numbers: Add a phone number that can be used to reset your password.

Password: Create a strong, unique password that contains uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers and symbols. Change your password frequently.

Name, location, and industry: Change how your name and professional title appear to the public.

Show profile picture: Choose to show your profile picture to everyone, your network, your connections or no one.

Third party apps: View apps you’ve authorized to connect to your LinkedIn profile. Review what data you share with them by clicking “change.”

Subscriptions: Manage your premium services and billing information or delete your LinkedIn account under this setting.

Privacy Tab

The privacy tab covers all privacy and security settings related to what can be seen about you, what information can be used, and how you can make sure your account stays secure with two-step verification.

Edit your public profile: Click change and use the sidebar to hide either your full profile or certain aspects from users you are not connected with on LinkedIn.How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

How you rank: This feature shows how you compare to your connections in terms of profile views. You may toggle this feature on or off under this setting.

Share profile edits: If enabled, this feature shares your activities with your connections — such as when you like a post or follow a company. It’s wise to disable this when discreetly job searching.

Profile viewing options: Decide how you would like your profile to appear in search results.How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

Notifying connections when you’re in the news: Toggle this feature to decide if you would like your network to be notified if you are mentioned in an article or blog.

Blocking and hiding: Use this section and its settings to review your followers — those who you have blocked and unfollowed.

Suggesting connections based on email: Select “nobody.”

Suggesting connections based on phone number: Select “nobody.”

Representing your organization: Select “no.”

Security: Use this section to enable two-step verification.How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

Communication Tab

The communication tab houses your preferences for how LinkedIn and other parties are able to contact you, and how frequently you’d like to hear from LinkedIn.

Basics: Change email and notification frequency under this section. Being knowledgeable about what to expect from LinkedIn can help you better detect a phishing scam.

Groups: Do you wish to receive alerts and invites about professional groups on LinkedIn? Toggle between options under this setting.

LinkedIn messages: Turn off promotional messages and research requests — these only jeopardize your privacy; they do not enhance your experience.

Editing your profile

Your profile is filled with personal information — including your name, location, work history, education and contact information. It is wise to take a careful look at your profile and omit overly sensitive information.

To adjust your profile settings, visit the LinkedIn homepage and select “Profile” from the top navigation bar. You may also visit your profile directly by clicking here.

You may edit information using the pencil icon and see how others view your profile by clicking on the blue “view profile as” button under your profile picture.

Internet privacy is a really hot topic right now between the NSA spying scandal, the Target credit card hacking problem and fears about leaks on the Affordable Care Act website. We’re all aware now that every site we log into with a name or other identifying information may be a target for the bad guys. This includes our social sites.

Let’s start by reviewing how to manage the LinkedIn privacy settings. Were you aware that there are quite a few places on LinkedIn to control what people see, read and learn about you? You have to dig deep for some of them. Once you find them, do you know what they mean? I’ll touch on a few of them here that can be found in the Privacy & Settings area of LinkedIn. If you don’t remember, here’s where you can find it. Click on your profile photo in the top right corner of your LinkedIn home page. Click on Privacy and Settings. They might ask for your word here.

Profile Tab: Privacy Controls Section

Turn on/off your activity broadcasts. Use this setting when you don’t want your connections to see the changes you’re making to your profile. A good time to uncheck the box (turn off your broadcasts) is when you don’t want your boss and other connections to see that you’re updating your profile to make a job change. Here’s a list of things that you can hide by turning off your broadcasts:

    • Adding a new current job
    • Changing your current job title in the experience section
    • Adding a new current school
    • Adding a new link to a website
    • Adding connections
    • Adding skills
    • Recommending someone
    • Endorsing someone

Select who can see your activity feed . This is the setting that determines who can see your activity broadcasts when they are turned on. Your choices are a) everyone; b) your network which includes 2nd connections; c) your connections; and d) no one. Be aware, there are some things that you can never hide. Ever. They’ll show up no matter what. They are:

  • Adding/changing your profile photo
  • Connecting with others (except if you hide your connection list)
  • Following companies
  • Group activity (these can be hidden within group settings though)
  • Status updates (but you can select who sees it when posting the updates)
  • Upgrading to a paid account
  • “Liking” shared content

Select what others can see when you’ve viewed their profiles. This pertains to the section on the right of your home page where you can see who’s been looking at your profile. The first option is the default setting that it shows the name, profile photo and headline of the person that has viewed your profile. The second option is to hide your name and photo and just list a generic industry and title. The third is to be completely anonymous. Be sure to note here that if you want to hide your identity, it will turn off the ability for you to see who was looking at your profile. You might want to choose this option if you are searching for people at a specific company or are snooping in general. Another thing you should know, recruiters pay a lot of money for a premium account that automatically hides their contact information, so you may never know they’re looking at your profile.

Select who can see your connections. You have two options here; a) your connections, and b) only you. If you are not interested in networking or are concerned about your competition looking at your connection list then clicking the “only you” option may be the way you want to go.

Change your profile photo and visibility. This is the setting that lets you decide who can see your picture when they look at your profile. Do you want only your first degree connections, your network or everyone? That’s the decision you have to make based on why you’re using LinkedIn and your goals. The default is everyone.

Show/hide “viewers of this profile also viewed” box . This refers to a box in the right column of your profile that people can see when they look at your profile. If you leave it checked, you might be letting others see who your competitors and connections are.

Groups, Companies & Applications Tab: Privacy Controls

Turn on/off data sharing with 3rd party applications. The default is YES, that allows your basic profile and contact information to be shared with 3rd party applications. An example of a 3rd party application is SlideShare or the LinkedIn app on your mobile device/tablet. Without allowing some of basic information about your account, you won’t be able to use the app. The question lies in how much information is shared. The LinkedIn User Agreement spells it out pretty nicely. There is an option in this setting. Read it carefully before clicking that box.

Manage settings for LinkedIn plugins on 3rd party sites. The default is “Yes, allow LinkedIn to receive information about my visits to pages that use LinkedIn plugins.”. Here’s how LinkedIn explains it:

If you’re signed in to LinkedIn when you view any page that uses our professional plugins, we receive information that you’ve visited that page. This allows us to improve your LinkedIn experience and provide you with insights from your professional network, like how many of your connections have shared an article into LinkedIn using the Share on LinkedIn plugin.

Account Tab: Privacy Controls

Managing advertising preferences . I bet you didn’t know this was here did you? I searched the help section for a clearer definition about this and couldn’t find it. That being said, LinkedIn does not share our personal data with third party sites. However, they do track when we are logged into LinkedIn and visit third party sites (can you say cookies?). They have given us ability to opt out of getting what ads we do see. The default allows:
* LinkedIn may show me ads on third-party websites
* LinkedIn may show me ads based on my third party data

Again, these are just some of the LinkedIn privacy controls. Keep in mind that a lot of the decisions you make about your privacy are based on why you’re using LinkedIn and what goals you’ve set for connecting and being found.

It’s really important for everyone to spend a little bit of time going through and reviewing this information on every website you use from Amazon to Zappos and every social media site in between.

by Jared Howe · December 7, 2015

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

LinkedIn privacy settings appear to be straightforward, but if you leave the default settings in place, you might be surprised to know what information you make public on LinkedIn. So you might want to change them to make sure you are not displaying information that you don’t want strangers to know about you.

To access the privacy settings, go to Account > Privacy & Settings.

Your Public Profile

While the LinkedIn Account & Settings page has a special section marked for privacy, other categories affect the amount of information other people on LinkedIn see when they visit your page or search for your name.

Under Profile Settings, pay particular attention to the information you make available on your Public Profile. This information may be visible to people who are your “connections.” In other words, it is information you should feel comfortable for anyone to see.

After clicking on the Profile option, you can select options that allow your profile to be seen by others. The default for these settings makes most of your LinkedIn profile information available to everyone, including your picture, work summary, education and past jobs. You might want to change these if you don’t want certain people or groups of people to access this information.

Back on the main Account & Settings page, under Profile Settings, you can also adjust who sees your LinkedIn status message or your member feed. Your member feed displays all the actions you take on LinkedIn, such as updating your resume or changing a link within your profile.

Your Privacy Settings

In general, LinkedIn does a good job of keeping your information anonymous as it relates to market research. But it’s important to remember LinkedIn is running a business, and the power of its business relies on access to your data.

  • Turn on/off invitations to participate in research (Communications tab): LinkedIn allows companies to ask questions of the LinkedIn user base. While the information for such a survey is completely private, you can turn it off.
  • Select who can see your connections (Profile tab): By clicking your connections for this option, all your connections can view your list of connections. Unless you are worried about competitors sniping contacts from your LinkedIn list, you should probably leave this setting on.
  • Select what others see when you’ve viewed their profile (Profile tab): LinkedIn likes to inform users that people in their industry have viewed their LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn’s default setting allows other users to know someone visited their profile page, but only by industry and general title. You can also just turn it off entirely, so no information is broadcasted to other LinkedIn users when your visit their profile.
  • Turn on/off your news mention broadcasts (Profile tab): People use LinkedIn not only to track colleagues, but to see the collective activity of businesses in the company profiles section. When you update your resume, that information gets fed into company profiles and also LinkedIn’s Movers & Shakers list. You must also decide whether or not to include your status update and make it available to your connections.
  • Turn on/off data sharing with third party applications (Groups, Companies & Applications tab): LinkedIn has partnered with other companies to cull “non-personally identifiable information” from your LinkedIn profile. Better to turn this off.
  • Manage Advertising Preferences (Account tab): This allows you to turn off cookie tracking by LinkedIn.

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

While I maintain that LinkedIn is the best way to boost your visibility to hiring managers and recruiters online, not everyone wants their information accessible to the network’s several million users.

If you are actively job searching, LinkedIn offers privacy settings to maximize your exposure and ability to build your network. If you’re not actively searching or considering job opportunities, you can limit the access that people outside your network have to your profile and information.

About LinkedIn’s Privacy & Visibility Settings

You can easily change your visibility settings to control if you want to display all of your information, a limited view, or only to those in your immediate network.

How To: These options can be changed directly on your LinkedIn profile:

  1. How to manage your linkedin privacy settingsClick on “Edit Public Profile & URL” in the top right of your screen
  2. Under “Edit Visibility”, you’ll see options to modify your profile’s public appearance based on the setting choices:
    1. Only 1st-degree connections
    2. Your network
    3. All LinkedIn members
    4. Public

Once the level of visibility is selected, you can further select which sections of your profile are visible to that particular group. This is helpful if say, you want to hide your photo, activity, or groups that you’re a part of, but still want your name, headline, and current job title to be visible to recruiters and prospective connections.

Control Who Sees Your LinkedIn Profile with Privacy Settings

Below are the privacy settings options relating to your profile data, broken down from highest to the lowest level of visibility.

1) LinkedIn’s Public Setting

The Public setting makes your information and profile available to all users across the network. This includes everyone outside of your first, second, and third-degree connection circles, and those not actively signed into the LinkedIn network.

This also means your information is directly searchable by public search engines like Google, Yahoo!, and Bing.

Who this is helpful for – As the highest level of visibility, the Public setting is a good option if:

  • you’re actively job searching
  • you want to have the highest level of exposure
  • you want to increase your chances of connecting with recruiters while also boosting the SEO power of your profile

You can still maintain some level of privacy, as viewers not logged into LinkedIn will only be able to see the sections of your profile that you choose to display publicly.

2) The All LinkedIn Members Only Privacy Setting

Opting for the “all LinkedIn Members” setting enables your profile to be viewed by all active (logged-in) LinkedIn users, including anyone outside of your first, second, and third-degree connections.

In this case, your profile cannot be viewed to those who are not actively signed into LinkedIn. It also limits the likelihood of your profile coming up in a Google search of your name.

Who this is helpful for – This is the best setting for job searching if you’re looking to maintain some privacy by limiting who can access your profile offline. With this feature, your information will be limited to those outside your first and second-degree connections.

3) Your Network LinkedIn Privacy Setting

“Your network” makes your profile visible only to your direct network, which includes first degree, second degree, and third-degree connections. This offers more privacy, but may limit your exposure to potential employers, recruiters, and hiring managers outside of your direct network.

Who this is helpful for – This is an option for passive job seekers or those not actively looking but still wanting to build their network.

4) Only 1st-Degree Connections on LinkedIn

With this setting, your profile will only be visible to those within your first-degree connections.

Who this is helpful for – This is the best setting if you’re not actively searching and only want users you know directly to have access to your profile information. If privacy is a big concern, this may be a good option for you, but know that your visibility to hiring managers and recruiters outside of your network is disabled.

How to Completely Hide Your LinkedIn Profile

You can also completely hide your profile from public visibility by switching off the toggle, “Your profile’s public visibility” on the Edit Public Profile & URL screen. Do not select this option if you want to be found on LinkedIn at any level. Turning this off will completely hide your profile from any search results both in or out of LinkedIn. Also, note that it can take time for search engines to detect and refresh changes, as that is not directly controlled by LinkedIn.

Looking to update your LinkedIn profile for your job search? Contact us to find out how we can help you.

How much of your profile have you made public? Can others see that you’ve viewed their profile? If you’re unsure of these answers, it’s time to revisit these five privacy settings.

Many regard LinkedIn as the “safe” social network—there are no games that jeopardize your privacy and you aren’t posting incriminating photos of last weekend’s Halloween party. But that’s no reason to ignore the privacy and account settings that LinkedIn has in place.

You can find your list of settings by clicking on your name on the top right of the screen and choosing Settings. This list includes profile settings, e-mail notifications, home page settings, personal information, privacy settings and more.

How much of your profile have you made public? Are all of your tweets being pushed to LinkedIn? Can others see that you’ve viewed their profile? If you’re unsure of these answers, take a look at the following five privacy settings and adjust them appropriately.

1. Public Profile

When your LinkedIn profile appears in public searches, how much of it can people see without logging in to LinkedIn themselves? That’s what the Public Profile settings tell you. By default, visitors have access to your entire profile—your picture, summary, current positions, education, website, groups and more.

If your intent is transparency, the full view is recommended. However if you’re not looking to disclose all of your information, go to the Profiles Settings section and update by unchecking the profile features that you don’t want displayed publicly. You can find this setting under the Profile Settings section.

[Want more LinkedIn tips, tricks and analysis? Check out CIO.com’s LinkedIn Bible.]

The Public Profile settings section also has a feature similar to Facebook’s where you can make changes and view your public profile as others will see it.

Another feature on this settings page: customized buttons. If you’re looking to add a button to your blog or website to promote your LinkedIn profile, this page will give you the code for several different ones.

2. Member Feed Visibility

Your personal feed on LinkedIn displays Network Updates from actions you’ve performed on LinkedIn. These might include an announcement when you update your work experience, join a group, add a new connection or post a recommendation to someone’s profile.

You can find this setting under Profile Settings. Member Feed Visibility gives you four settings to choose from. Your LinkedIn actions can be visible to everyone, only those people in your network, only your direct connections or nobody (which means your member feed won’t be displayed). If you prefer that your LinkedIn actions are private, choose one of the latter two settings.

3. Twitter Settings

About a year ago, LinkedIn and Twitter announced a partnership that lets you tweet your LinkedIn status or stream your tweets to your LinkedIn profile. While this feature can be handy, you need to be careful: Generally, many experts advise that you should not send all your tweets to LinkedIn because not all of them might be business-appropriate.

To find out whether or not you are posting all of your Tweets to LinkedIn, choose Twitter Settings under the Profile Settings section. Here you can add or remove a Twitter account, choose whether or not you want to display your Twitter account on your LinkedIn profile and decide whether or not you want to share all your tweets or only the tweets that contain the #in hashtag. Here, you can also adjust how you want your tweets to appear (i.e. with a picture, title page and short description).

4. Profile Views

Located about halfway down your LinkedIn homepage on the right-hand side is the box “Who’s Viewed My Profile,” which gives you two statistics: how many times your profile has been viewed recently and how many times you have appeared in search results recently.

Clicking on this link will bring you to a page that displays vague statistics related to who has viewed your profile, such as “Someone at XYZ company,” “Someone in the technology/new media function in the Greater Boston Area” and “Vice President at XYZ company.”

Visit the Profile Views setting, found under the Privacy Settings section, if you want to adjust how you appear to others when you visit their profile.

You have three options: You can have your name and headline included (which also will display your picture and current title); you can be displayed anonymously with only profile characteristics such as your industry and title; or you can be invisible to the users you have viewed.

5. Authorized Applications

Last November, LinkedIn opened its APIs and launched the LinkedIn Platform, which lets developers integrate LinkedIn into their business applications and Websites.

Since then, you’ve probably tried some of these apps and granted sites access to your LinkedIn profile. You can find a list of these applications and partners under Authorized Applications in the Privacy Settings section, and remove them accordingly.

Removing the applications from this page will remove them from your LinkedIn home page, profile page and prevent any further access to your LinkedIn data. If you only want to remove them from your profile page, choose “Edit My Profile” and click the remove link next to the title of the application.

The same goes with the external Websites that you have granted access to your profile and network data: removing the access here will prevent them from accessing your LinkedIn data. If you want to re-enable them in the future, visit the Website and grant access again.

Kristin Burnham covers Consumer Technology, SaaS, Social Networking and Web 2.0 for CIO.com. Follow Kristin on Twitter @kmburnham. Follow everything from CIO.com on Twitter @CIOonline. Email Kristin at [email protected]

Next read this:

Kristin Burnham is a reporter and editor covering IT leadership, business technology, and online privacy and security.

We’ve been spending a lot of time lately wrestling with what Facebook has been doing with our information from our personal lives—but Facebook isn’t the only place where you’re sharing a lot of information about yourself. LinkedIn, everyone’s favorite professional-networking service, gets a ton of data from you about your career and interests, and uses it to sell ads and other services. You should definitely be careful about what you information you post on LinkedIn, and do you what you can to limit the free flow of data you might consider private. Here are a few ways to start.

Turn on Two-Factor Security

We are staunch supporters of using two-factor security whenever you can. Luckily, LinkedIn makes it easy to set up two-factor authentication for your account. Click on the “me” icon in the top right section of your profile, then select “settings and privacy.” In the “account” section, “Two-Step Verification” is the fifth option down. (If you have not supplied LinkedIn with a phone number, you will need to do so). Click change and follow the steps to set up two-factor on your account.

Considering how much information you naturally add to your LinkedIn, it makes sense to make sure that it is well-protected. Doubly so if you’re a LinkedIn Premium subscriber, as you’ve given the site your credit card.

Stop Syncing Things

LinkedIn loves. linking. The social network is owned by Microsoft, so it can sync with Microsoft Office to help you make resumes in Word. It syncs with job and employers when you share your account via an API (often through a “Connect LinkedIn” button). It can sync to your Twitter account, so you can cross-post content to both networks.

Subscribe for 2 years and get an extra 1-month, 1-year-, or 2-year plan added to your cart at checkout.

Here’s the thing: When you connect all these accounts, they all get access to some portion of your data, and they all increase the risk of your LinkedIn account getting compromised if one of the other services gets hacked. While some of these connections can be genuinely useful, most of them are not worth it. You have to opt-in to these connections, so remember—if a website prompts to connect to LinkedIn, just say no.

If you’ve already connected services and would like to untether them, click on the “me” icon in the top right section of your profile, then select “settings and privacy.” From there, go down to “partners and services” and you’ll find three options; one for managing Microsoft services, one for managing Twitter settings, and a third for other “permitted services.” Simply click on them and press “remove” on any accounts you wish to disconnect.

Keep LinkedIn o ut of Your Contacts

LinkedIn also asks you to sync your contacts and calendar from your phone to help you find your professional network on the site. Users often do this when they create their accounts to find people they know quickly, but forget that, by “syncing” the accounts, LinkedIn can and will continue to monitor your contacts over time.

To unsync your contacts and calendars, click on the “my network” tab, then the connections button on the left side of the window, which should bring you to your big list of everyone you’re connected with on LinkedIn. On the upper right side of the list, there’s a small open book icon and some text that says “manage synced and imported contacts.”

Now you’ve come to a new list, which shows every contact you’ve synced using your phone and address book. As part of your contact data purge. You can delete the entire list or individual contacts. As the LinkedIn points out, deleting contact sync information does not “unfollow” or otherwise disconnect you from those contacts on LinkedIn.

To unsync your contacts, click on “manage contacts syncing” on the right side of the window. On this screen you will be able to see all the contacts lists and calendars with which LinkedIn has synced, and you can remove them piecemeal or press “remove all” to sever all your contact and calendar connections. They are two separates lists, so you will need unsync your calendars and contacts separately — pressing remove all on “calendar” will not affect your address books.

Turn off targeted ads

Like every social network, LinkedIn wants to show you targeted ads based on your interests. It finds out what your interests by tracking your activity on LinkedIn, and on the sites you visit after checking it. You can’t really prevent LinkedIn from tracking you, but you can minimize how many of LinkedIn’s advertising and marketing partners get to see and use it by telling LinkedIn that you do not want your data used for personalized ads.

To turn off personalized ads, click on the “me” icon in the top right section of your profile, then select “settings and privacy.”

From there, click on the “ads” section, and you get a long list of data-related features you can turn off. I recommend turning all of them off, but especially the first three options, “insights based on websites you visited,” “ads beyond LinkedIn,” and “profile data for personalization.”

The first two allow LinkedIn to gather and use data gained from tracking your web activity outside of LinkedIn, and the third allows LinkedIn to use your profile info as part of the ads it serves you.

Don’t be Linkedin’s Guinea Pig

Similarly, LinkedIn shares data from its users to share insights on trends related to work, job-seeking, etc. You can turn this off by going to the “settings and privacy” menu, clicking on communications. Scrolling down to “participate in research” and click no.

If it isn’t public, don’t post it

I’ll cap this with an overall “rule of thumb” for giving LinkedIn information. Despite the fact that it exists to facilitate communication with your colleagues, employers and job-seekers, whom you may trust, you should only post information on LinkedIn if you’re ok with everyone seeing it.

Yes, we’re talking about marketing companies and advertisers, but also people you may actually know. LinkedIn shares your data with recruiters and corporate HR professionals, including people at your current and past employers. It may seem like common sense, but LinkedIn is designed to extract information about your personal and professional life. Having you share that information is always in the site’s best interest, even if it isn’t necessarily in yours.

For example, LinkedIn asks you to let them know if you are “actively” looking for a new job. According to the site, flipping this setting lets the site know to push your profile to recruiters more aggressively. While doing this may help in your job search, it is also playing with fire if you are already employed: The fine print for the feature states that, while the site takes steps to hide your status from your employer, LinkedIn may still share your “job-seeking” status with them.

While being “good at LinkedIn” may seem important because it’s a career-related service, you’re probably better off leaving your account partially unfinished or unoptimized, rather than offering up more personal information than necessary to accomplish your professional networking goals.

Mike Epstein is a freelance writer covering tech, games, and culture at Lifehacker and Gizmodo, among others.

How much of your profile have you made public? Can others see that you’ve viewed their profile? If you’re unsure of these answers, it’s time to revisit these five privacy settings.

Many regard LinkedIn as the “safe” social network—there are no games that jeopardize your privacy and you aren’t posting incriminating photos of last weekend’s Halloween party. But that’s no reason to ignore the privacy and account settings that LinkedIn has in place.

You can find your list of settings by clicking on your name on the top right of the screen and choosing Settings. This list includes profile settings, e-mail notifications, home page settings, personal information, privacy settings and more.

How much of your profile have you made public? Are all of your tweets being pushed to LinkedIn? Can others see that you’ve viewed their profile? If you’re unsure of these answers, take a look at the following five privacy settings and adjust them appropriately.

1. Public Profile

When your LinkedIn profile appears in public searches, how much of it can people see without logging in to LinkedIn themselves? That’s what the Public Profile settings tell you. By default, visitors have access to your entire profile—your picture, summary, current positions, education, website, groups and more.

If your intent is transparency, the full view is recommended. However if you’re not looking to disclose all of your information, go to the Profiles Settings section and update by unchecking the profile features that you don’t want displayed publicly. You can find this setting under the Profile Settings section.

[Want more LinkedIn tips, tricks and analysis? Check out CIO.com’s LinkedIn Bible.]

The Public Profile settings section also has a feature similar to Facebook’s where you can make changes and view your public profile as others will see it.

Another feature on this settings page: customized buttons. If you’re looking to add a button to your blog or website to promote your LinkedIn profile, this page will give you the code for several different ones.

2. Member Feed Visibility

Your personal feed on LinkedIn displays Network Updates from actions you’ve performed on LinkedIn. These might include an announcement when you update your work experience, join a group, add a new connection or post a recommendation to someone’s profile.

You can find this setting under Profile Settings. Member Feed Visibility gives you four settings to choose from. Your LinkedIn actions can be visible to everyone, only those people in your network, only your direct connections or nobody (which means your member feed won’t be displayed). If you prefer that your LinkedIn actions are private, choose one of the latter two settings.

3. Twitter Settings

About a year ago, LinkedIn and Twitter announced a partnership that lets you tweet your LinkedIn status or stream your tweets to your LinkedIn profile. While this feature can be handy, you need to be careful: Generally, many experts advise that you should not send all your tweets to LinkedIn because not all of them might be business-appropriate.

To find out whether or not you are posting all of your Tweets to LinkedIn, choose Twitter Settings under the Profile Settings section. Here you can add or remove a Twitter account, choose whether or not you want to display your Twitter account on your LinkedIn profile and decide whether or not you want to share all your tweets or only the tweets that contain the #in hashtag. Here, you can also adjust how you want your tweets to appear (i.e. with a picture, title page and short description).

4. Profile Views

Located about halfway down your LinkedIn homepage on the right-hand side is the box “Who’s Viewed My Profile,” which gives you two statistics: how many times your profile has been viewed recently and how many times you have appeared in search results recently.

Clicking on this link will bring you to a page that displays vague statistics related to who has viewed your profile, such as “Someone at XYZ company,” “Someone in the technology/new media function in the Greater Boston Area” and “Vice President at XYZ company.”

Visit the Profile Views setting, found under the Privacy Settings section, if you want to adjust how you appear to others when you visit their profile.

You have three options: You can have your name and headline included (which also will display your picture and current title); you can be displayed anonymously with only profile characteristics such as your industry and title; or you can be invisible to the users you have viewed.

5. Authorized Applications

Last November, LinkedIn opened its APIs and launched the LinkedIn Platform, which lets developers integrate LinkedIn into their business applications and Websites.

Since then, you’ve probably tried some of these apps and granted sites access to your LinkedIn profile. You can find a list of these applications and partners under Authorized Applications in the Privacy Settings section, and remove them accordingly.

Removing the applications from this page will remove them from your LinkedIn home page, profile page and prevent any further access to your LinkedIn data. If you only want to remove them from your profile page, choose “Edit My Profile” and click the remove link next to the title of the application.

The same goes with the external Websites that you have granted access to your profile and network data: removing the access here will prevent them from accessing your LinkedIn data. If you want to re-enable them in the future, visit the Website and grant access again.

Kristin Burnham covers Consumer Technology, SaaS, Social Networking and Web 2.0 for CIO.com. Follow Kristin on Twitter @kmburnham. Follow everything from CIO.com on Twitter @CIOonline. Email Kristin at [email protected]

Next read this:

Kristin Burnham is a reporter and editor covering IT leadership, business technology, and online privacy and security.

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

Inevitably during a workshop presentation I am asked a question at least once from someone who is reluctant to broadcast updates to their contacts as they edit or add to their LinkedIn profiles. “I don’t want to bother them,” is the excuse I hear most often.

LinkedIn is social media for business and social media is about sharing!

My personal preference (and recommendation) is yes, I do want to broadcast my updates. It is a way to stay ‘top of mind’ and be in front of my connections who monitor their home page for updates.

You may agree or disagree with me. Maintaining your privacy is your choice on LinkedIn.

LinkedIn Profile Privacy Options.

All privacy options are controlled in your LinkedIn profile control panel dashboard. Access your dashboard by hovering over your picture (or the default icon) on the far right of the top black navigation bar. (Note: You can be anywhere in your ‘Profile’ to access.)

From the exposed menu select and click on . You may be asked to sign in to LinkedIn once more. This is for security reasons.

At the bottom center of your profile dashboard your will see your “Privacy Controls” options (see image below).

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

Activity Broadcasts: You get to choose whether or not you wish to tell people when you change your profile, make recommendations, or follow companies.

Activity Feeds: Who can see them? All, your network, your connections or just you.

What others see when you view their profiles: You name, headline and profile photo or your anonymous profile characteristics or you remain totally anonymous. Note: Your tactics and strategies plan an important part of your decision here.

Who can see your connections: Your connections or only you.

Who can see your profile photo: Connections, network or everyone.

Viewers of this profile also viewed box: Display on your profile page or not.

Blocking: If you’ve blocked someone, here’s where you manage that. (Note: You will need to sign in again for security purposes.)

Professionals or small businesses owners can add LinkedIn tools to your holster when you understand how to apply the available features to benefit your marketing strategies. I always stress at my seminars though: Someone has to do the grunt work!”

LinkedIn este o modalitate excelentă de a vă conecta cu profesioniști din domeniul dvs., de a găsi oportunități de angajare și de a vă dezvolta datele de acreditare. Cu toate acestea, setările sale de confidențialitate pot fi confuze și dificil de gestionat. Iată cum să remediați asta.

Solutie

Confidențialitate LinkedIn: o imagine de ansamblu

Spre deosebire de alte rețele de socializare, confidențialitatea pe LinkedIn nu se referă doar la gestionarea celor care vă pot vedea postările și profilul dvs., ci și despre gestionarea cine poate vedea ce faceți pe site. Deoarece LinkedIn se rezumă la formarea conexiunilor profesionale, ca alți utilizatori să vadă o parte din activitatea dvs. este activată în mod implicit. De exemplu, schimbările în starea de angajare, conexiunile noi și chiar dacă te-ai uitat sau nu la profilul cuiva, sunt informații care pot fi accesibile pentru alții. Acesta este motivul pentru care este important să rămâneți în topul setărilor dvs. de confidențialitate LinkedIn, mai ales dacă îl utilizați pentru a găsi un loc de muncă.

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

Când deschideți setările de confidențialitate în LinkedIn , veți vedea următoarele secțiuni:

-Cum vă văd alții informațiile despre profilul dvs. și rețea: Acest lucru vă permite să controlați ce informații sunt vizibile pe profilul dvs. și cine este permis să il vadă.

-Cum vă văd alții activitatea LinkedIn: Acest lucru vă permite să schimbați vizibilitatea activității dvs. pe site, cum ar fi starea dvs. online și modificările la profilul dvs.

-Modul în care LinkedIn folosește datele dvs.: Acest lucru vă permite să gestionați modul în care LinkedIn folosește și împărtășește datele cu alții.

-Blocarea și ascunderea: Acest lucru vă permite să schimbați cine vă poate vedea postările și bloca anumite persoane în întregime din rețeaua dvs.

Vizibilitate profil

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

Cele două secțiuni principale implicate în configurarea vizibilității profilului dvs. sunt „Cum văd alții informațiile despre profil și rețea” și „Blocarea și ascunderea”. În „Cum văd alții…”, puteți personaliza cine vă poate vedea profilul, conexiunile, interesele, prenumele și organizația pentru care lucrați. Cea mai de bază setare aici este „Modificați profilul dvs. public”, care limitează cantitatea de informații vizibile pentru persoanele care nu sunt conectate la LinkedIn.

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

Dacă faceți click pe aceasta, vă duceți la pagina „Setări profil public” separate. Puteți vedea o previzualizare a aspectului profilului dvs. pentru persoanele care vă descoperă profilul prin motoarele de căutare sau prin link-uri externe. În dreapta, puteți comuta ce secțiuni ale paginii dvs. sunt publice. De asemenea, puteți opta pentru a vă ascunde poza de profil de orice persoană care nu se află în rețeaua dvs.

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

Pe „Blocare și ascundere”, veți putea vedea pe cine l-ați blocat de pe site. Conturile pe care le-ați blocat nu vă vor putea vedea profilul. În această secțiune, puteți selecta, de asemenea, ce tipuri de conturi vă pot urmări pe site. Când cineva te urmărește, va putea să actualizeze și să publice postări.

Activități pe site

Următorul lucru care poate fi configurat este vizibilitatea activității dvs. pe site, care se află în secțiunea „Cum vă văd alții activitatea LinkedIn”.

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

Spre deosebire de alte site-uri de socializare, LinkedIn permite utilizatorilor să vadă cine și-a vizitat profilul. Puteți schimba acest lucru cu „Opțiuni de vizualizare a profilurilor”, care vă pot face anonimi atunci când navigați în conturile altor persoane. Cu toate acestea, trecerea la privat vă împiedică să vedeți cine a vizitat pagina dvs., cu excepția cazului în care faceți upgrade la LinkedIn Premium.

How to manage your linkedin privacy settings

It may seem odd to want to control privacy on a social network like LinkedIn, especially when your goal is to be known and promote your career or home business. However, there may be situations when you want to limit the information shared particularly outside the network.

One positive aspect of social media is that your information can be found through Google searches. But maybe you don’t want that. Or maybe you only want people you’re connected with on LinkedIn to see your full profile, while keeping it hidden from others.

LinkedIn makes controlling and protecting your privacy relatively simple when compared to other social networking sites like Facebook. While those you connect with will be able to see your complete LinkedIn profile, you have considerable control over what portions of your profile are displayed to the public (people outside the network or through search engines).

Why Limit Access to Your Profile?

It seems counter-intuitive to limit who can see your profile if your goal is to expand your (freelance) career or home business. However, there may be reasons to hide your profile or limit what people can see including:

  • You’re moonlighting your home business and you don’t want your boss to know.
  • You want to avoid a former boss from finding you and posting a bad reference.
  • Your goal in using LinkedIn is more for support and resources, not for business building and marketing.

You can control what people can and cannot see, or be alerted to on your Linkedin profile.

How to Hide Your LinkedIn Public Profile

If you don’t want your profile to appear in Google or other search engines, and don’t want your profile visible to non-LinkedIn members, you can completely hide your profile. Here’s how:

  1. Login to LinkedIn
  2. Click on “Me” in the top right hand corner to see the drop-down menu. The click on “Settings & Privacy.”
  3. Click on “Edit your public profile.”
  4. On the right-hand side of the page, you’ll see a box marked “Your profile’s public visibility” with a button next to it. If the button is on, click to turn it off from appearing in all search engines.

According to LinkedIn, if your profile has been visible, it might take a few weeks for it drop out of search engines.

How to Control What Parts of Your LinkedIn Profile Are Visible to the Public

If you want your profile to be found in search engines and by non-LinkedIn users, but want to limit what they have access to viewing, you can do that through your profile as well. Here’s how:

  1. Login to LinkedIn
  2. Click on “Me” in the top right hand corner to see the drop-down menu. Then click on “Settings & Privacy.”
  3. Go back to the area marked “Your profile’s public visibility.”
  4. You will see a series of categories (including your headline, websites, posts, summary, current and past experience, and education) that you can make public or private. If the item is visible, it will be marked “Show” and the button will be blue. To turn it off, click on the button to hide it. The button will turn gray.
  5. To see what your profile now looks like to the public, click “View My Public Profile” as others see it link.

You can also customize who sees your profile photo—your connections, your network, all LinkedIn members or the public through search engines.

Remember, the controls offered here are designed to limit access to people who are not a part of the LinkedIn community. Your connections and other LinkedIn members will be privy to information you provide.