Categories
Device

How to measure tiles

Last Updated: August 3, 2019 References

This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. wikiHow’s Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards.

There are 13 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 3,657 times.

If you’re thinking of replacing, redoing, or just adding tile to your floor or wall, having an accurate measurement is key to buying the right amount of tile to get the job done. In order to accurately measure the tile you need, you need to find the square footage of the area you plan to tile. Then, you can divide that measurement by the square footage of the tiles themselves and you’ve got an accurate measurement of the tile that you need!

How to Measure Tiles

\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
\n

How to Measure Tiles

\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
\n

How to Measure Tiles

\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
\n

How to Measure Tiles

\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
\n

How to Measure Tiles

\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
\n

Tip: For example, if you have a length of 20 feet (6.1 m) and a width of 15 feet (4.6 m), then you have a square footage of 300 feet (91 m).

If you’ve landed here, you’re probably confused on how to make sure you get your tiling project started on the right foot. The best way to do that is by taking measurements to ensure that you’re not buying too much tile or that you’re not ordering too little tile. Luckily, when it comes to the conversation around “how to measure tile”, the answer is pretty straight forward: It’s based on a formula. If you know the formula, which you will once you read today’s post, you can perform your tiling project successfully and without any headaches.

Why Is Measuring Tile So Important?

Measuring tile before diving into your project is the best way to ensure that you’re not going to end up with time or monetary losses.

First off, we all know that tile is a great investment. It’s not a cheap product, it’s a piece that you add into your space to elevate it and keep floors/walls looking nicer for longer (learn how to keep your tile tidy here). For this reason, you don’t want to end up purchasing too many tiles and having leftovers that you won’t use. Not only is that wasteful, it is costly! So measuring is the best way to save yourself from losing any money.

On the other hand, there’s the potential issue that you order too little tile. While it may not be a monetary loss to you, it is definitely a time loss. There are two risks involved–One is that you simply have to place another order for more tile, and then wait for it to come which delays your redesign or renovation process; the other is that you risk the tile you ordered selling out.

Hopefully this brings reality to the issue, and you’re ready to learn the know-how on measuring so you can avoid the problems covered above.

How To Measure A Room or Wall

How to Measure Tiles

There’s a clear process involved when it comes to measuring the amount of tile that is needed. We’re going to break that down in 3 clear and easy-to-understand steps below.

Step 1: Gather Your Materials

For the task at hand, you’ll need the following items

Step 2: Measure Your Areas

Once you’ve gathered your materials, next is to measure the space that you’re working with. To do this, you’ll want to grab your measuring tape. Measure the length of your walls or floors and the width of your walls or floors.

Step 3: Multiply For Total Coverage

You’re now ready to put on your math cap and get the full square footage of your room. To do so, take the length measurement and multiply it by the width measurement.

Here’s the formula: Length x Width = Area

A Note On Irregular Spaces:

This formula covers spaces that are standard shaped. If you’re dealing with an irregular space, say an L-shaped one, you’ll want to break that down into smaller sections and use the area formula in each section. From here, you’d add the areas of the squares together for a total.

Now That You Have Your Space’s Area, How Many Tiles Do You Need?

How to Measure Tiles

Think that you’re all set now that you know the area? Not so fast. There’s one more piece to add to the handy formula above and that’s the square footage of the tile you’re installing. It’s important to know this so you can figure out the tile amount down to the last piece.

Here’s what you do:

First, you need to figure out the total area of the tile. To do this, you should always account for grout lines. While they can vary, the standard is ⅛”. So, whatever your tile measurements are, tack on an ⅛” to it. This will ensure that you get a more accurate answer for your tile needs.

From here, you’re ready to calculate the area. If the tile dimensions aren’t listed in feet, convert them. To do that you take the total area of the tile and divide it by 144 (the number of square inches in a foot).

So, for example, if you have a tile that is 24” x 24”, you’d first add the ⅛” grout line to both sides so that it comes to 24.125” x 24.125”. Then, you’d get the total area (length x width): 582.02”. Take this number and divide by 144. In this case, you’d get 4.042 sq. ft. as the total area of the tile.

Finally, you’ll want to place that number in your number of tiles formula which is:

Number of Tiles = Area of Room / area of tiles

As an example, let’s say your room is 2,200 sq. ft., you’d plug that in as follows:

Number of Tiles = 2200 / 4.042

Number of Tiles = 544.3

Voila! You’ve calculated the number of tiles precisely.

Now that you know how much tile you need, get some inspiration on finding the perfect tile for the job here.

But, Wait. Don’t Forget About Ordering Extras.

The last step, and surely one of the most crucial, is to tack on extra tiles to guarantee that you’re covered should there be any breaks or cut errors. While no one wants to think of worst case scenario, it is more than likely that these mistakes will occur, so you want to be prepared.

To do this, multiply the room’s square footage by 10%. This will give you the number of extra tiles to order.

Going off our example, it would be 220 sq. ft. or about 55 tiles.

It should be noted, if your tiles do arrive broken, you should contact your seller immediately with photos of the damage. While we can’t speak for every company, here at TileBar we pride ourselves with great customer service and we’re always ready to listen to you about your damages and work together to replace them if need be. So if you received damaged tiles, make sure to give us a ring!

Additionally, let’s say you played it safe, and ordered the extra tiles but are a lucky person that dodged the damages bullet. What are you supposed to do with the extras? Our suggestion is to keep them! You never know if a tile will need to be replaced in the future, and it’s just best practice to have them on hand. Don’t want to? Then you can return them to us within 365 days, if there isn’t any damage, and we’ll refund you. We just charge a small 15% restocking fee and have you pay for shipping. Then, they’re off your hands forever.

We feel confident that you can now go and tackle all the measurements you need. Do you feel confident yourself? We sure hope so! In the event you have anymore questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to us.

In the meantime, now that you know your measurements, start your tile hunt with 5 samples for $5 with free shipping.

While undoubtedly the easiest way to ensure your floor is tiled correctly is to leave it in the hands of professionals, adding floor tiles to your house can also be a fairly simple DIY task. You can do away with having to worry about failing to measure the tiles correctly and the end result being completely off – with the right tools, patience and precision you can master measuring floor tiles yourself easily.

Aside from your choice of floor tiles, you’re going to need a tile cutter or tile scorer, tape measure, string and pencil. Before you get started with moving the furniture and making the measurements, you want to make sure that you have worked out your floor plan.

Good measure(s)

For a traditionally shaped square or rectangular room, all you’d need to do is measure the width and length of the area using the tape measure and then multiply the two. However, if the room you’re tiling is an awkward shape, you’re going to have to break it down into rectangular areas and separate them using the string.

It’s usually also useful to have a rough sketch of your floor plan with the measurements of each wall (in meters); this would make it easier to work out the total floor area of the room you’re tiling, especially if you are breaking it down into sections.

Get the numbers right

Once you have your total floor area calculated (the multiplied length and width) and picked out the floor tiles you’d like to use, you can work out the total number of tiles you are going to need by dividing the total floor area by the tile area. You can use our tile calculator tool – which can be found on all of our tile range pages – to accurately estimate the number of tiles you are going to need.

It’s always advisable to add extra for wastage and to allow for any mistakes – the recommended allowance is between 10 and 15 percent for regular size tiles, and up to 20% for large format tiles.

On your marks

Regardless of whether you are planning to tile a simple shaped room or a more complex layout, chances are you are going to come across areas which are more troublesome to measure, such as alcoves and the edges of the space. These kinds of areas require more patience – use a pencil to mark the tiles dedicated for use in the area and cut the materials into the correct shape using the tile scorer or tile cutter.

Set the floor up

Once you’ve made all your measurements and have the tiles marked, you should also check that your floor is ready before you commence the tiling work. Sometimes additional preparations might be required – for instance, you may need to add a primer to some adhesives before applying them.

Go ahead and tile

With the right measurements taken and the materials prepared, you have the ideal foundations and are all set to begin tiling!

If you have any queries about how to measure for floor tiles correctly, get in touch with our team and they would be happy to offer their assistance. Haven’t found the perfect tiles yet? Browse the Direct Tile Warehouse floor tiles range for inspiration.

*We do not take responsibility for any extra delivery chargers which may be incurred if top up quantities are needed as a result of incorrect measurements.

If you haven’t installed much tile , well than just thinking about how to measure for tile cuts can seem to be a difficult and frustrating task. But it doesn’t have to be.

There are a few ways to do this, let me show in the video below just how easy this actually is using my method.

Once you decide how big of a grout joint you want, then the formula for measuring is as simple as this – one tile + the grout joint + 1/8 of an inch = ?

That’s it ! It’s really that simple when use a grid system.

Just check out this video on how to measure for tile cuts.

With a few simple measurements and a chalk line, I was able to create the grid. Once the grid is done and I put it to use, it’s almost like I’m cheating.

There are so many benefits to using a grid and this is just the icing on the cake. Let me show you another video, where you will see how to measure for tile cuts around a door jamb

You see, when I show you how to measure for tile cuts, it doesn’t have to be hard. As you seen in the last two videos, it really is simple. I like to use this method when I am measuring for tile cuts for a few reasons, here they are-

It’s Error Proof-

When using my method on how to measure for tile cuts, you will not have miss-cuts. It really takes the stress away of trying to figure out the tile cuts.

You get the exact measurement you need!

There’s only one measurement –

Once I figured out how big my tile was plus the grout joint, then I just added the 1/8 of an inch for the gap between the tile and the wall. That’s it!

I did have one area at the door where I didn’t need the 1/8 of an inch gap, so I eliminated it.

If you want to really keep it simple , then don’t eliminate it. Just use the same number all throughout the installation.

It’s just plain FASTER-

When I first started installing tile I didn’t use this method. Well the truth is, I didn’t know it. After many times of failing, when I tried to measure for a cut and then transfer it onto a tile, I tried this method.

It was really a struggle for me before I used this method. I would miss-cut tile all the time. Take a look at look at a tape measure and try to figure out what the measurement should be after subtracting 3/8 of an inch.

You see what I mean- what a pain in the butt!

The Final result is a better looking tile installation!

If you are not sure how to make the grid system on the the floor, that’s okay. I can show you how to design a tile layout, just click on the button below to check out my post – How to Install Floor Tile the Easy Way.

I also would like to share other tips with you. Many of the tips that I share are exclusive to either subscribers of my Tips and Guides or members of Tile University-

I just had my bathroom floor tiled and I am concerned about lippage. Before bringing this up with the contractor, I want to get an idea of how bad it is really. The tiles are 2.25″ octagons with diamonds filling in the gaps on the

12″x12″ sheets. There are a few places in the bathroom where 1-3 of the octagons seem too high. Before complaining, I would like to measure the lippage on the tile.

I was thinking of using a penny, like I would to test tire tread (if I can’t see all of Lincoln’s head the lippage is too much), but I was hoping that there was a tool that might be more accurate and not have me with my cheek pressed against the floor for an hour or so. What is the best way to measure tile lippage?

How to Measure Tiles

1 Answer 1

Since lippage is how flat the tiles are a penny would be a waste of time, the Height difference from tile to tile would require a straight edge across a section. There will be differences in height for several reasons.

Is there a min max NO. I have had customer sue with a 1/16 difference because of the tile they specified was natural and had a large variance sheet to sheet of 1/16” (they paid lawyer fees) The contractor should have leveled the flooring but it all comes down to the contract. If not specifically listed tile Can be somewhat uneven where the subflooring is not flat causing irregularities in height. It comes down to is this a bargain basement contract or a 5 star contract (it makes a difference) there will be slight differences sheet to sheet but you don’t specify or show a photo the contractor can say it meets standard practices and if you would like a change order they will comply for X dollars.

Sorry but I have done lots of tile jobs and the few problems I have had were on larger and intricate jobs where the owner wanted a change for free or a 10k job for 5k or less, if it is a sloppy job provide a photo and get some opinions other than that industry standards has some variation when it comes to tile.

Use this calculator to estimate how many tiles you would need to cover an area with given dimensions. This tile calculator supports custom gap size and will also output the number of boxes of tiles and total cost given cost per box and tiles per box.

Related calculators

Calculating how many tiles you need

First, to calculate how many tiles you need to cover a given area you need to know the dimensions of the area as well as the dimensions of a single tile. The tile dimensions should be provided by the manufacturer, while the area dimensions can be measured using a long measuring tape or known from the building plan. Knowing these, our online tile calculator can calculate the area size and the area of a single tile.

From there, the basic formula to calculate the number of tiles required to cover an area is to divide the size of the area by the area of a single tile:

Number of tiles = area size / single tile area

This is, however, an idealized situation. Real-world tiles are not perfect, and they might have slight imperfections and discrepancies from the advertised dimensions. In order to compensate for those, gaps are left between tiles which are usually filled with grout, which is why they are often referred to as “grout lines”. Usual values range from 1/16 to 1/2 an inch (2mm to 13mm) and the size varies depending on materials used and the intended design. For example, uniformly cut granite tiles allow for much smaller spacing between tiles, increasing the number of tiles needed.

Finally, you need to enter your expected percentage of wasted tiles. Waste usually occurs due to tiles being broken during handling and manipulation, but also due to the need to cut some of them in pieces in order to achieve the desired floor design / layout pattern. Some of these pieces cannot be used and need to be discarded. Allowing for between 5-10% waste is a good practice.

The calculator will also output the number of boxes and the total price of the tiles if you enter the box size (tiles per box) and the price per box. These two parameters are optional.

How to Measure Tiles

Does the calculation require a particular tile ordering?

No, the result of this tool should be applicable to any type of bond. You can use a linear grid with square/rectangular tiles, or angled squares, diamond shapes, etc. However, it is worth noting that some kinds of bonds like running bonds and herringbones usually result in a higher percentage of wasted bricks (

10%), so you might want to adjust for that by increasing the percentage of expected waste in the settings of our calculator.

While there are many different types of tile shapes, square or rectangular ones are most commonly used due to ease of installation and the low amount of waste with many layouts. Our calculator supports these two types, so if your design involves hexagonal, triangular, etc. shaped tiles you will need to do the math yourself.

The Best Tiler Tools To Make You No.1

Contents

  1. Tile cutting tool laying
  2. Tile floor carpet joint wood pattern
  3. Joint wood pattern ceramic tile marble
  4. Steel ruler. lay

How to Measure TilesRelated Articles. Place a leveler in the center of the room to determine if the floors slant. Replace plywood subfloors if the boards warp in the middle and pull away from the walls. Repair a concrete surface if there are large cracks, water stains or ripples in the cement. A damaged subfloor is often the cause of lippage when you’re laying out large floor tiles.

Grout Tile Walls ceramic floor tile wood Look Best tile cutting tool laying tile floor carpet joint wood pattern ceramic tile marble Tile Countertop No Grout Drilling A Hole In Ceramic Tile Hi . In this video I’d like to show you how to drill easy in ceramic tiles using proper tile drill bit. However when you drill

Sep 16, 2011 · Re: ceramic tile lippage inspection procedure. You would first need to measure the warpage of the tiles, then the apparent lippage. You will be measuring the combined lippage AND warpage, so you would need to know the warpage to know how much to deduct from the measured ‘apparent’ lippage to end up with an actual lippage measurement.

What Size Grout Line For 12×24 Tile What is the recommended grout size for 12 by 24 size tile ?? Please help. Listen to Creative Tile on this question! Also make sure you get a quality tile, since 12″ x 24″ is a very large tile and I’ve seen a lot of breakage with cheaper tile done by inexperienced tilesetters. Porcelain Wood

To measure all you really need is a straight edge, a clamp and a steel ruler. lay the straight edge over the area of concern. Stand the ruler vertically up against the …

Best Drill Bits For Ceramic Tile What Size Grout Line For 12×24 Tile What is the recommended grout size for 12 by 24 size tile ?? Please help. Listen to Creative Tile on this question! Also make sure you get a quality tile, since 12″ x 24″ is a very large tile and I’ve seen a lot of breakage with cheaper
Pro Grout Sanded Pro Grout Sanded is a new-generation, high-quality, polymer-modified, sanded cement grout that is mixed only with water to provide excellent color consistency, high stain resistance with Water-Beading Technology™, and exceptional durability. What Size Grout Line For 12×24 Tile What is the recommended grout size for 12 by 24 size tile ?? Please help. Listen to
Porcelain Wood Look Floor Tiles What Grout To Use On Shower Floor Best tile cutting tool Laying Tile Floor Carpet joint wood pattern ceramic tile marble Tile Countertop No Grout Drilling A Hole In Ceramic Tile Hi . In this video I’d like to show you how to drill easy in ceramic tiles using proper tile drill bit. However when

Related Articles

  • What Type of Grout for Pebble Flooring?
  • Do You Have to Use Spacers When Installing Granite Floors?
  • How to Inlay Tile
  • How to Install Tile Nosing
  • The Best Method to Lay Tile

Before you can purchase tile for a room, you need to know how much to buy. Tile is sold by the square foot; calculating the square footage of the area you want to tile tells you how much tile to purchase. Spacers are small plastic pieces that help you set the tiles the same distance apart from one another as you install the tile, and their size is determined by the type of tile you choose.

Measuring for Tile

Measure the length and width, in inches, of the area to tile. Measure walls separately from one another, and break irregularly shaped floors into smaller segments, measuring each of them separately for the most accurate results. Multiply the length and width measurements together to get the total number of square inches for each area.

Divide the number of square inches needed by 144 to get the total number of square feet needed for an area. Add together all separate areas to get the total amount of square footage for the job. Round up to the nearest full foot.

Add 5 percent to total to give yourself some extra tile in case of breakage or cuts. If you are using a pattern, such as a diagonal layout, add 20 percent extra to the total. Round up to the nearest full foot.

Measure any border or edge areas in inches. Add separate areas together to get the total number of linear inches needed for borders or edge tiles. Divide this number by 12 to get the total number of linear feet needed. Round up to the nearest full foot.

Determining Spacer Size

Examine the edges of the tiles. Tiles with irregular edges, such as tumbled marble tiles, require spacers approximately 1/4 inch in size. Tiles that have smooth edges can use a closer spacer measuring 1/8 inch or 1/16 inch.

Base the size of the grout joints on the area where the tile will be installed. Wall tiles can have smaller grout joints and smaller spacers than floor tiles. Wall tiles with clean edges can use a grout joint 1/16 inch in size, while floor tiles with clean edges may need a spacer 1/8 inch in size.

Find out if the tiles have been vitrified. A vitrified tile has been ground down or manufactured to have extremely straight, smooth edges. Vitrified tiles can use tile spacers that are 1/16 inch, even on the floor.

Normally, We calculate the tile flooring area in order to find the required number of the tiles for a given room. Assuming that situation, we have explained this post with an example.

If you are looking for complete cost estimation, Tile Flooring Cost Estimation post will help you.

Note: This post contains formulas. For a better view, read this post on desktop or read it on landscape view if you are on the mobile device.

For better illustration,

we have separated the calculation in Square meters and Square foot.

Tile Flooring Calculation in Square Metres (Figure . A)

To determine the number of tiles required for the given floor (Fig. A),

Note: Door Size = 2.1 m × 0.9 m

How to Measure Tiles

  • First, multiply the length and breadth of that room to get the area

Total Room Floor Area = Length of the room × Breadth of the room

  • Second, calculate the perimeter of the room, to find skirting tiles requirement,

From the above image (Fig. A), we can find the perimeter as

Perimeter of the room = (4 m + 3 m + 4 m + 3 m) – Door Width

We have assumed 0.1016 m (4 inches) as skirting tiles height.

Skirting Tiles area= Perimeter of the room × Skirting Tile height

Total Area to be laid = Total Floor Area + Skirting Tiles area

= 12 m 2 + 1.33 m 2

Total Area to be laid = 13.33 m 2

  • Third, calculate the area of one tile that we are planning to lay on that floor, Here We are going to use 0.3 m × 0.3 m (or 300 mm × 300 mm) tiles,

Area of one tile = 0.3 m × 0.3 m

  • Finally, the total number of tiles required for the above room is,

Number of Tiles required = (Total Area to be laid / Area of one tile) × Wastage*

= (13.33 m 2 / 0.09 m 2 ) × 5%

= 148.1 + 7.41 tiles

*Wastage – Rendered wastage & damaged tiles

Therefore, we need 156 tiles, for the above room.

You can make use of the below calculator,

Tile Flooring Calculator (In Square meters)

Note: We have not included the option of the door opening for simplicity of the tool. So please calculate the openings and exclude from your calculation.

Tile Flooring Calculation in Square Foot (Figure . B)

To determine the number of tiles required for the given floor (Fig. B),

Note: Door Size = 7 ft × 3 ft

How to Measure Tiles

  • First, multiply the length and breadth of that room to get the area, where you need tile laying

Total Room Floor Area = Length of the room × Breadth of the room

  • Second, calculate the perimeter of the room, to find skirting tiles requirement,

From the above image (Fig. A), we can find the perimeter as

Perimeter of the room = ( 12 ft + 9 ft + 12 ft + 9 ft ) – Door Width

We have assumed 4 inches as skirting tiles height.

Skirting Tiles area = Perimeter of the room × Skirting Tile height

Total Area to be laid = Total Floor Area + Skirting Tiles area

= 108 Sq.ft + 12.87 Sq.ft

Total Area to be laid = 121 Sq.ft

  • Third, calculate the area of one tile that we are planning to lay on that floor, Here We are going to use 12“ X 9” inch (or 12 inch X 9 inch) tiles,

Area of one tile = 12” × 9”

= 0.75 Sq.ft (approx)

  • Finally, the total number of tiles required to be order for the above room is,

Number of Tiles required = (Total Area to be laid / Area of one tile) X Wastage*

= (121 Sq.ft / 0.75 Sq.ft) × 5%

= 161.33 + 8.06 tiles

*Wastage – Rendered wastage & damaged tiles

Therefore, we need 169 tiles, for the above room.

Tile Flooring Calculator (In Square foot)

If you are looking for complete cost estimation, this post may help you

Don’t forget to share this with your friends, Happy Learning 🙂

February 1, 2015

How to Measure Tiles

Tile shown: Paseo in White Gloss; Image: Malcolm Fearon, Bliss Images

Figuring out how much tile you’re going to need for your backsplash project can be confusing. It is important to make sure you’re ordering the right amount, and a little bit extra just to be safe. This is especially true with handmade tile because there will always be natural color variation from one batch to the next. Figuring out the amount of tile you’ll need for your kitchen backsplash requires just a few simple calculations, and we’re here to guide you through the process step-by-step. However if you have a complicated backsplash project, it is always best to hire a professional.

Let’s start measuring!

What you’ll need:

– Pen or Pencil and paper

First, you’ll need to figure out the total area of your backsplash in square inches. To find this number you’ll need to grab your measuring tape and measure the height and width of your backsplash. Be sure to write this down and always round up.To calculate the square inches simply multiply the height times the width. If there are multiple walls or sections, you can find the area of each separately and add them together for your final number. For our example in the video below we’ve measured a backsplash area that is 48″ W x 24″ H. When multiplied you get a total of 1,152 square inches.

48″ x 24″ = 1,152 square inches

Tile is sold by the square foot, so next you’ll need to figure out the total square footage of your backsplash based on the square inches you just calculated. To get this number simply divide your total square inches by 144.

48″ x 24″ = 1,152″/144 = 8 square feet.

Now because we always recommend ordering overage, we suggest ordering at least 10% extra. 10% of 8 square feet is .8, so you should round up and order at least 9 square feet of tile total. That’s it! You’re ready to start ordering your tile! Be sure to check out the video below for an overview of these instructions and a look at how to order trim for your backsplash.

Need some help measuring your backsplash? Simply call, chat, or fill out our Design Assistance Form and one of our talented Design Consultants will get back to you shortly.

Become a friend of Fireclay!

Join our email list for a weekly dose of design inspiration, pro tips and tricks, plus a first look at new products!

Submitting. Please wait.

Error: Sorry, there was a problem with that email address. Please try again.

We’re often asked to help work out how many tiles a customer will need to order for their latest project and it’s no problem at all. We’re the experts after all!

The thing is, it’s not a particularly difficult thing to do yourself. With a bit of guidance you’ll quickly be able to calculate what you need and don’t worry, a maths degree isn’t required! But of course, if in doubt, just pick up the phone and give us a call. We’ll be more than happy to help.

The basic method for calculating the area of floors and walls is the same, but there’s a few things you’ll need to watch out for so we’ll take a look at them separately in this guide.

Here’s what you’ll need to get cracking:

1 A tape measure
2 A Notepad & a pencil or pen
3 A calculator
4 A willing and able assistant (although proper DIY’ers can fly solo)
5 Patience (it’s a virtue remember)
6 A builders brew (you’re doing DIY, it’s allowed)

Measuring your floor area

It’s best to work in centimetres to begin. Inches and feet are allowed of course, but you’ll find that most tile shops and tilers prefer to work in the decimal system which is millimetres (mm), centimetres (cm) and metres (m).

So let’s start with the easiest of all room shapes… a straightforward rectangle, like below.

blogporc/wp-content/uploads/measuringfortiles1.jpg” />
1 Measure wall A and note down measurement in cm, e.g. 260 cm
2 Measure wall B and note down measurement in cm, e.g. 400 cm
3 To work out the area, take you calculator and multiply Wall A x Wall b

260 x 400 = 104000 cm2

4. We now need to convert this into square metres (m2)
To do this we must divide by 10000

2 decimal places is enough to round up or down to.
Now you have the exact area in m2.

6. We now need to add in an allowance for wastage.
Most of the time, 10% extra will be enough to cover you for wastage and cuts
There’s a quick way to add 10% to your area which is to multiply it by 1.1

10.4 x 1.1 = 11.44m2

This is the amount of tiles in square metres you’ll need.

Next up, a more complicated room shape. Think rooms with pipes boxed in, or baths on the floor.

Let’s look at a room complete with things that get in the way, e.g. your bathroom.

This kind of room requires a bit more effort but it’s not to difficult if you follow the steps below:

1 Start with sketching a plan view of the room like I’ve down below. Don’t worry, no one will judge your drawing skills, you’re just doing this to work things out!

2 Divide your sketch up into regular rectangle shapes, making sure you don’t miss out any areas. Give your rectangles names. A, B, C… etc,

3 Now it’s simply a case of working out the area of each named rectangle and dividing by 1000 to get the area in square metres (m2). So…

A 123 x 123 cm = 15129cm2 = 1.51m2
B 226 x 250 cm = 56500cm2 = 5.65m2
C
D

4. Now add up all these areas and hey presto, you have a total.

5. Hopefully the eagled eyed amongst you will have realised that we need to now allow for 10% wastage. And how do we do that? Remember the simple calculation….

Total * 1.1 = Total including 10% wastage. So…

19.56 * 1.1 = 21.80m2

Give yourself (and your assistant) a pat on the back then have a swig of your ever so sweet tea. You’ve earned it. You can now calculate the area of a floor. Next up, walls.

Measuring your walls

Walls are generally rectangular shaped too, but sometimes they have windows or doors on them that need to be accounted for.

So what we need to do is first calculate the area of the entire wall, then subtract the area of the window or door that’s also on the wall. It goes without saying that you wouldn’t want to tile over your window.

Let’s begin. You only need to measure the bit of wall that you want to tile. In this example below, we’re going to be tiling the splash back in the kitchen. Again it’s a good idea to do a quick sketch of the wall in question.

1. Measure the length of the wall area you want to tile
2. Measure the height of the wall area you want to tile
3. Calculate the area of the wall (Length x height)

So 245 x 250 = 61250 = 6.13m2

4. Now measure the window that’s on the wall

So 120 x 120 = 14400 = 1.44 m2

5. Now you need to subtract the area of the window from the wall.

6.13 – 1.44 = 4.69 m2

6. And finally, we need to add the 10% wastage onto our total using the handy calculation again:

Total x 1.1 = Total including 10% wastage

4.69 x 1.1 = 5.16 m2

If there are other walls you need to tile you’ll need to do the same for each of these and then add each of the totals together.

Hopefully this guide will have given you a pretty good idea of how to calculate how many tiles you’ll need to order for your next project. If you need any help at all measuring up or working things out, just give us a call or drop us an email. We’re here to help!

How to Measure For Wall Tiles

Measure For Wall Tiles

Measuring up for wall tiles can be and usually is a tricky job, but if done
correctly, can help to avoid running out of tiles or buying too many tiles and trying to return them.

To Measure a Wall Area in Square Meters –

  • Measure the Height in Meters
  • Measure the Width in Meters
  • Multiply the Height by the Width
  • Allow another 10% for wastage by multiplying your answer by 1.1

2.5 x 2.6 = 6.5 x 1.1 = 7.15 SqMts Required

This needs to be completed for each wall that is going to be tiled (Usually 4 walls per room).
Any Windows or Doors can also be measured up and subtracted from the
Total Square Meters of tiles required for the job.

This area will normally be rounded to the nearest box depending on the tile chosen.

To Measure a Wall Area in Square Yards–

  • Measure the Height in Feet and Inches e.g 8ft
  • Measure the Width in Feet and Inches e.g. 6ft
  • Multiply the Height by the Width e.g. 8 x 6 = 48
  • Allow another 10% for wastage by multiplying your answer by 1.1 e.g. 48 x 1.1 = 52.8
  • Divide your total by 9 to work out the Square Yard Measurement – 52.8 / 9 = 5.86 SqYards

If your wall area is not a perfect square or rectangle, divide up the wall
into sections and measure each section in turn and this will give you an accurate measurement.

Another option would be to draw out a diagram and take this to
McDaids Bathroom Plumbing Tiles where an experienced staff
member can double check measurements for you.

Written by: Sarabeth Asaff

Written on: July 14, 2020

To ensure that enough tiles are purchased to complete any tile installation, proper measuring is a key first step. Wall tile measurements frequently require additional considerations that are lacking in floors, such as finish tiles and borders or the need to subtract for a window.

When measurements are done properly, the correct amount of tile can be purchased. This allows the installation to proceed with no wasted time in the event of a shortage and no overspending from overpurchasing.

Measure the height of each wall to be tiled in inches, to either the ceiling or the place where the tile will be stopping. Measure the width of the same wall in inches.

Multiply the two measurements together and divide by 144 to get the exact number of square feet needed for each wall. Add an additional 5 per cent for waste for straight tile patterns, 10 per cent waste for stone tiles and 15 per cent waste for diagonal patterns.

  • To ensure that enough tiles are purchased to complete any tile installation, proper measuring is a key first step.
  • Measure the height of each wall to be tiled in inches, to either the ceiling or the place where the tile will be stopping.

Measure in inches any exposed areas of the wall that require bullnose or finish tiles. This includes the edges of a shower installation or the top of a wainscot installation. Add together all finish areas and divide by 12 to get the total number of linear feet needed for finish pieces. Add 1 to 2 additional feet for waste.

Measure in inches any area where a border will be installed. Add together the separate areas and divide by 12 to get the total number of linear feet for borders. Add 1 to 2 additional feet for waste.

  • Measure in inches any exposed areas of the wall that require bullnose or finish tiles.
  • Add 1 to 2 additional feet for waste.

Remove a window from a wall tile measurement by measuring the height and width of the window in inches. Multiply these numbers together and divide by 144 to get the amount of square footage that must be removed from this wall to tile around a window.

Take the measurements of a tiled accent area within a wall by marking the area off using blue painter’s tape. Cut the tape to the width of the border surrounding the accent if using a border. For example, if using a 2-inch-wide chair rail as a border, cut the tape to 2 inches in width to see the ultimate size on the wall and determine how big or small the area should be.

Measure the height and width of the area inside the tape in inches and multiply together. Divide by 144 to get the amount of interior accent tile required. Delete this same amount of square footage from the total wall tile needed. Measure the blue tape on the wall in inches and divide by 12 to get the number of linear feet of border, if applicable.

Follow these easy steps to make sure that you stock enough material for your next tile project.

How to Measure Tiles How to Measure Tiles How to Measure Tiles How to Measure Tiles

How to Measure Tiles

Q: I plan on installing tile on my entryway floor and kitchen backsplash. How much tile do I need to buy in each case?

A: You’re wise to mull over your tile needs before you go shopping for materials. Whether you’re installing tile on your foyer floor or on your kitchen or bathroom walls, determining how much tile you need is an essential first step. This calculation will help you ensure adequate tile coverage, budget accordingly for the project, and avoid return trips to your local home center. Conveniently, the steps for determining your tile needs are the same regardless of surface, so grab a measuring tape and a calculator and get started!

How to Measure Tiles

1. Measure the area you plan to tile.

Measure the area you’re tiling based on its shape:

  • For square or rectangular areas, such as a wall or floor, multiply the length by the width to get the area in square feet. If the dimensions aren’t a whole number (i.e., the measurement includes feet and inches), divide the number of inches by 12 to convert it to feet, add that decimal to the number of feet, and complete the rest of the calculation as described above to get the area in square feet. Always round up your total to the nearest foot when the area includes a decimal.

The area of a 10-by-10-foot wall would be 100 square feet (10 x 10).

The area of a 6-foot-9-inch by 11-foot floor would be 74.25 square feet (6.75 x 11), which rounds up to 75 square feet.

  • For round areas, such as a floor, square the radius (half of the space’s diameter) and multiply it by 3.14.

The area of a round floor with a diameter of 20 feet would be 314 square feet (3.14 x 10 x 10).

Advertisement
  • For irregularly shaped areas, such as an L-shaped floor, view and treat the shape as two parts. Calculate the areas of the individual parts and add them together.

Let’s say your L-shaped floor can be divided into two rectangles, each measuring 6-by-3 feet. The area of the floor would be 36 feet (6 x 3 x 2).

How to Measure Tiles

2. Find the number of tile boxes or individual tiles you need based on the area of the space.

Now that you know the area that the tile should cover, figure out how much tile to buy to cover that area. The calculation depends on whether you plan to buy boxes of tile that contain multiple tiles (more common for standard-sized walls or floors) or individual tiles (for small floors or walls, such as those in a half bath).

  • When buying tile boxes, divide the area’s square footage by the square footage listed on the box. The box will specify the total square footage that all the tiles in the box will cover. There’s no need to factor in the size of the tiles. Round up to the nearest whole number if the figure is a decimal.

If the area was 100 square feet, and each box provides 12.5 square feet of tile, you need eight boxes of tile (100 / 12.5).

  • When buying individual tiles, you need to learn the square footage (or fraction of) that each one covers. Tiles sold individually will note the dimensions of the tile in inches on the packaging. Multiply the tile length by the width to figure the area that one tile will cover in square inches. Divide the result by 144 to convert it to square feet. Then, divide the area you’re tiling by the square footage of one tile to determine how many tiles you need. Again, round up to the nearest whole number.

If you choose six-by-six-inch tiles, each tile would cover 0.25 square feet (36 / 144). If the area of your wall or floor is 50 square feet, you would need 200 tiles at minimum to cover the area (50 / 0.25).

Advertisement

How to Measure Tiles

3. Finally, factor in between 10 to 20 percent overage.

Even for a tiling expert, buying the bare minimum amount of tile needed to cover the wall or floor isn’t going to cut it. Many scenarios warrant a little extra:

  • You may need extra tiles to create tile fragments to fill in corners of the wall or floor where a full tile won’t fit.
  • Some of the tiles you buy may already be broken on arrival. (It’s not uncommon for two to three percent of tiles sold in boxes to be broken or chipped!)
  • You may snap a tile while cutting or laying one, or repairing one that has cracked.
  • You may need a fresh tile to replace one that comes loose after install.
  • Your tile may get discontinued down the road. If tile of the specific color or style you chose is later discontinued, you’ll be relieved to have some matching tiles on hand to use as replacements; without them, you may have to retile the whole floor or wall or replace faulty tiles with tiles that don’t match those already installed.

Buying at least 10 percent more tile than you calculated should cover you. Multiply the tile figure you calculated in the previous step by 1.1, and then round up if the figure is a decimal. So, if you figured you would need eight boxes of tile, buy nine boxes instead (8 x 1.1). If you calculated the need for 200 tiles, buy 220 instead (200 x 1.1).

Last Updated: November 24th, 2017 | By The London Tile Co.

How to Measure Tiles

Thinking of giving your kitchen or bathroom a refresh? Planning on revamping your hallway floors? Whichever room in your home you are buying tiles for, it’s important to measure properly so you get the right amount of tiles. It can be confusing working out the correct measurements so we’ve put together some tips to help you breeze through it.

What You’ll Need:

  • Tape measure
  • Notepad
  • Pen or pencil
  • Calculator
  • Strong cup of tea or coffee
  • Motivational background music (we were enjoying a bit of Beyoncé while writing this)

When taking measurements be sure to use centimetres as most tile measurements are given in millimetres, centimetres or metres – so it makes it easier to keep it consistent.

Measuring The Walls

As most walls tend to be square or rectangular measuring them is not too hard, you just need to remove any doors or windows from the overall measurement. If you are not tiling from floor to ceiling or wall to wall make sure you are only measuring up to where you want the tiles to stop.

  1. Measure the height of the wall area that will be tiled
  2. Measure the length of the wall area that will be tiled
  3. Multiply these two numbers together to get the total
  4. Convert this number to m 2 by dividing by 10,000
  5. Measure the window or door and convert to m 2
  6. Repeat for any additional windows or doors, then add these together
  7. Subtract the total window/door m 2 from the wall space
  8. Add an additional 10% to this number by multiplying it by 1.1 to allow for cuts, damages & wastage
  9. Repeat for any other walls, then add all figures together to get a total

Measuring The Floor

For a simple square/rectangular room with no major obstructions it’s really easy to measure the floor.

  1. Measure wall A and write down the measurement
  2. Measure wall B and write down the measurement
  3. Multiply measurement A and measurement B to get the area in cm 2
  4. Convert this number to m 2 by dividing by 10,000
  5. Add an additional 10% to this number by multiplying it by 1.1 to allow for cuts, damages & wastage

How to Measure Tiles

Unfortunately most of us will not have a totally empty or simple room to work with so next we will look at how to measure the floor in a room with baths, showers, cupboards, etc.

  1. Draw a rough sketch of the room showing any obstacles
  2. Split the floor space in the room into square or rectangular sections
  3. Measure each section and note down the measurement
  4. Divide each measurement by 10,000 to get the m 2
  5. Add up the individual shape measurements to get the area, then multiply by 1.1 to allow for wastage

How to Measure Tiles

All tiles on the London Tile website are sold per box, but there is a handy calculator on each page that allows you to enter the total m 2 you need and works out how many boxes that equates to. Browse our range of wall tiles and floor tiles online or pop into one of our showrooms.

Tiling – How To Measure For Floor Tiles

How to Measure For Floor Tiles

Measuring up for tiles can be and usually is a tricky job, but if done correctly,
can help to avoid running out of tiles or buying too many tiles and trying to return them.

To Measure a Floor Area in Square Meters –

  • Measure the Length in Meters
  • Measure the Width in Meters
  • Multiply the Length by the Width
  • Allow another 10% for wastage by multiplying your answer by 1.1

How to Measure Tiles

3.08 x 1.25 = 3.85 x 1.1 = 4.23 SqMts Required

This area will normally be rounded to the nearest box depending on the tile chosen.

If your floor area is not a perfect square or rectangle, divide up the floor into sections and measure each section in turn and this will give you an accurate measurement.

Another option would be to draw out a diagram and take this to McDaids Bathroom Plumbing Tiles where an experienced staff member can double check measurements for you.

–> How to measure and calculate floor area for different types of flooring including carpets, vinyl, lino, laminate flooring and floorboards. In this DIY guide you will learn how to measure the area of a floor that may not necessarily be square and may have odd shapes. Measuring the space accurately will also ensure that you can minimise any waste and also the number of cuts you may have to make.

Measuring for vinyl tiles, ceramic tiles, quarry tiles, softwood flooring, hardwood flooring, chipboard flooring, laminate flooring, carpets and other floor coverings. –>

Measuring Floor Area for Carpet, Tiles, Vinyl etc….

Measuring for a floor covering can be very tricky in some rooms where awkward shapes and alcoves can cause some confusion. We have shown below the simplest method of measuring in these circumstances. As you can see the floor has been divided into rectangles.

How to Measure Tiles

Downstairs floor area example showing the space divided into rectangles for easy measurement calculation

String can be laid on the floor to show these rectangles when measuring, masking tape can be stuck to carpets and pencil lines can be drawn on floors to be permanently covered by tiles etc. You can also use a chalk line to mark any floors which are to be covered and this is a very handy tool to have in your tool box.

There is a laser line generator which, when turned on, shines a laser (harmless!) light across the surface allowing quick and easy measurement.

There is a diagonal wall in this room, which can make it very tricky to measure until you remember that a triangle with a right angle in it is half of a rectangle. Therefore by drawing the line G and multiplying it by the line F, then dividing it by 2, you have the area of the triangle section of the room.

The area of the room above is:

  • A X B
  • H X D
  • E X G
  • ½ of F X G

Add all of these together and you will know how much material you need.

Measuring Floor Area for Floorboards

The area method described above is OK when ordering materials such as tiles, carpet and others that are sold by the square yard or meter. For floorboards there are some additional calculations that need to be made.

We have now added floorboards, and some dimensions to the plan. This is not drawn to scale and the number of floorboards represented is not the amount needed for a room of this size. We will say for the purpose of this demonstration that the face of the floorboard, which will be seen when the boards are laid, is 150mm.

Each board may be wider than this if it is a tongue and grooved board, as the tongue will stick out a little. You must check with your supplier, before measuring and buying, the width of the board that will be left showing. This is called the finished width.

How to Measure Tiles

Downstairs floor area example showing the space divided into rectangles for measurement and also showing floorboards laid over floor space

To work out how many boards we need, and the lengths they need to be, we now must produce what is called a cutting list. We want as few joints as possible so if we can order the correct lengths of board it will make life a lot easier. Its no good telling a supplier we want a total of 100m of floorboard as they may well send it to you in very short lengths which have been left over from other orders. You will then have a great deal of extra cutting to do as each join must be placed on a joist. See our replacing a timber floor project.

Rectangle 1 – A, B, C

  • We know length B is 4 m and by dividing length C by the width of each board (150mm) we can see how many boards we need in the first of our rectangles
  • C = 2.5m divided by 150mm (or 0.15m) = 16.66 (always round number up to avoid being short)
  • So area C x A needs 17 boards of 4m or longer.

Rectangle 2 – D, H

  • For the next retangle, measurement D = 1.00m divided by 150mm = 6.66 (say 7)
  • So area D x H needs 7 boards of 3.4m or longer.

Rectangle G, E

  • For the next rectangle measurement E = 1.5m divided by 150mm = 10
  • So area G X E needs 10 boards of 4m or longer.

Triangle G, F

  • Finally measurement F = 0.20m divided by 150mm = 1.33 (say 2) which in theory can be divided by 2 because it is a triangle. BUT…..Because of the cut you will need to make to go up against the angled wall, it is very, very unlikely you will be able to use the remainder of the first board top complete the space left. It’s always advisable to have a little spare anyway, so in this instance we would order,
  • Area G X F needs 2 boards of 4m or longer.

We can then take these totals to our supplier and give him our cutting list which for the example above would be:

  1. 29 boards of 4m or longer
  2. 7 boards of 3.4m or longer

Measuring Floor Area for Chipboard

For floor coverings such as Chipboard, which, for ordinary flooring can be bought in tongued and grooved panels measuring 2.4m x 1.20m with smaller panels available for lofts, the total area of your floor can be divided by the area of each board to give you the number of boards required. So for our plan above we have:

  • B X C = 10 square m
  • H X D =3.4 square m
  • E X G = 6 square m
  • G X F divided by 2 = 0.40 square m
  • Total area = 19.80 square m.

The area of each board is 2.40m x 1.20m = 2.88 square m

Total area (19.8) divided by a board (2.88) = 6.875 boards (say 7)

The calculation above relies on every bit of every board being used, however when you come to lay them out on your floor joists you will probably need to cut some off the length and even the width to be able to fit the boards to the joists and edges of the room. Obviously this means more boards so be prepared to add to the number you need depending on the layout of your joists and the shape of the room. These calculations however will give you a very good idea of the amount of timber and the cost involved.

When ordering quarry, vinyl and carpet tiles, each box of tiles will say how many square meters its contents will cover. Armed with your total area you can easily work out how many boxes you need. Bags and drums of tile adhesive will have the same information available. For laying carpets you will also need to work out the complete perimeter of the room to order gripper rods for holding the carpet down.

All project content written and produced by Mike Edwards , founder of DIY Doctor and industry expert in building technology.

–>
How to Measure Tiles

For those new to laying tile, the temptation is to pick the straightest wall and start laying the floor along it. While that may work with other flooring materials, tiles must begin from the center of the room. This gives you plenty of space to work outward to the walls and ensure a symmetrical pattern.

The first and foremost rule of tile layout: Make sure your pattern is square. Before laying your first tile, snap a couple of chalk lines to guide the installation.

How to Measure Tiles

The Quarter Method

A standard procedure for tile layout is the quarter method, in which the room is actually divided into four quarters to help sequence the layout. First step is to measure and mark the midpoint of all four walls. Snap intersecting chalk lines at the center point of the site, forming a square cross. Use the 3-4-5 rule to check that the lines form right angles. Measure and mark a point 4 feet from the center along one line. Measure and mark a point 3 feet from the center on the intersecting line. A diagonal line between the two points should measure 5 feet if the chalk lines are at 90 degrees. If that’s not the case, then readjust your chalk lines.

How to Measure Tiles

A large A-square can make checking your guide lines a snap. Just align the A-square with the chalk-line intersection to make sure the lines are at right angles.

How to Measure Tiles

Once the chalk lines are square, lay out the entire floor in a dry run, with no mortar. Start by laying a row of tiles along each of the four lines, all the way to the walls, creating a cross of tiles in the center of the room. If necessary, use plastic spacers to keep the grout joints even.

At the ends of the walls you will likely be faced with a space that’s too small for the width of a last tile. If this space is less than half the width of a tile, adjust the layout so that the last tile along the wall will be at least half the standard size. Also, check that the last row of tiles against each wall is uniform in size so the room’s layout will be symmetrical. If not, adjust accordingly.

How to Measure Tiles

Then fill in the remaining fields of each quarter, keeping the tiles square and the spacing uniform. Work from the intersection toward the walls. Once the tiles are laid for the dry run, you can adjust the placement of individual tiles based on color harmony or texture. Just create a system to help you remember where to place them during the actual installation.

The quarter method is a standard procedure for laying out all tile sizes, shapes and materials. In order to lay the tiles in a staggered fashion, such as a running bond pattern, lay the tiles only along one axis of the intersecting chalk lines. Work from the center, filling in the quadrants and offsetting the grout joints from row to row.

Diagonal Layout

Tiles can also be laid diagonally across the room. Using the center point established with the quarter method, snap lines across the two diagonals of the room creating an “X” on top of the cross. Then install the tiles as with using the quarter method. Make sure the lines are at true right angles and that the cut border tiles are equal in width.

How to Measure Tiles

Complex Layout

More complex layouts can add an artistic appeal to the floor but can be more difficult to install. Many such intricate designs use differing shapes, sizes or colors of tile with borders or special feature strips. When planning a complex layout, use graph paper to create a scale blueprint. Be very careful with your measurements and make note of details such as color choice.

At the Borders

If you’re installing a border of different-style tiles, remember to plan your layout to allow room for the cut tiles. This can be done by snapping chalk lines around the room, parallel to the walls. Keep the lines at the required distance from each wall to allow for the border. Then follow the quarter method for installation, laying the dry run from the center to the border lines, rather than the walls.

How to Measure Tiles

Also, when laying out a dry run, it’s easy to correct your mistakes. But be careful when mortaring the tiles in place during the actual installation. Boxing yourself into a new tile layout is a beginner’s mistake. It can force you to step on freshly laid tile, requiring reinstallation. Laying the field one quadrant at a time helps prevent this. Before tiling the field all the way to the wall, leave enough space to get into the corner. Lay the final rows as you back your way out of the corner. If you have a partner, they can be cutting border tiles as you lay the field so the border will be ready for installation by the time you reach the wall.

Editor’s Note: Thanks to William Moulton of Better Built Construction and Jeff Davis of Straight Line Design for help with this article.

If you have ever noticed large-sized tiles awkwardly installed on small surfaces, then you’ll understand the importance of measuring the right bathroom tile size. Nonetheless, the selection process goes beyond just figuring out what size will fit in.

Whether you are installing the tiles by yourself or employing a contractor to do it, you’ll be presented with different standard sizes that can be applied in a number of ways. You can measure out the area where the tiles are to be installed in square footage to give you a more precise and flexible approach to the task at hand. Let’s go over some of the applications of various tile sizes that improve the appeal of the bathroom surfaces.

Floor Tiles

Generally, bathroom floors are covered in small-sized tiles like mosaic ones. They are great because of the in-depth effect they add to the shower floor. Also, these small mosaic tiles provide a better grip for your feet and can be pitched easily to create slight contours for adequate flow and drainage. Using large sized tiles (more than 18 inches) for bathroom floors may create an overwhelming effect for the relatively small space without offering the friction and flow benefits of smaller ones. However, you should note that bathroom floors can accommodate any size of tile and small-sized ones usually require more cleaning because of their increased grout content. If you want to use large-sized tile, then you should ensure that space can accommodate more than three of it across the floor’s width, or it will come off as weird-looking.

Wall Tiles

Depending on the height of your bathroom walls, you can get creative with the tile size of your choosing. Preferably, medium-sized tiles are best for shower walls. While you may use smaller sized tiles, they usually will prove harder to clean as they contain more grout that will require special scrubbing. For bathroom walls, it’s best advised by Chicago remodeling companies to get your contractors to use optimal-sized tiles based on the measurement obtained from the area. For added effect, you can select those with decorative features. If your shower or bathroom wall is of medium-sized square footage, then you can install large-sized tiles to give the space an open feel and visually expand its reach.

Selecting the Tile Type

You should note that sometimes contractors select the tile sizes based on their ease of cutting, which means that you may end up with a smaller or larger sized one that you aimed for. So it’s important to involve other parameters alongside size to select your choice tile in your bathroom. Durability is a major factor to consider due to the regular scrubbing that’s needed to keep bathroom surfaces clean. Cement tiles are great choices when it comes to how long you want your surfaces to last for. They also come in diverse designs to give your bathroom surfaces a lasting appeal.

In the end, you want to opt for tile sizes that provide the right fit for the space without compromising style and durability.

Today Overwhelmed in Portland writes:

Dear Diva, I’m not that handy but I want to put up a tile backsplash. My main problem though is that I’m not sure how to measure for tile backsplash. I’ve read a bunch of how to’s but no one says how to measure. Please help!

Measuring for tile backsplash is easier than you might think. All you’ve got to do is break it down into little pieces and it won’t be so overwhelming. And no, you don’t literally break it down into little pieces. . .well you might be doing that with the tile, but we aren’t talking about that part! Below I’ve outlined the three things you’ll need to do in order to measure for tile backsplash. I’ve also listed the tools you’ll need and some tips to help make the whole process easier.

How to Measure Tiles

First of all, make sure you have all the right tools. You’ll need a pen or pencil, paper and a steel tape measure. Please don’t use a ruler or cloth measuring tape as this will only make the job more difficult and less accurate. Besides, if you don’t have already have a steel measuring tape, it might be a good idea to pick one up for future projects. You never know what else you’re going to want to make over when you get done with the tile backsplash!

The above mentioned tools work best for rectangular areas. If your backsplash is an odd shape or has any funky cut outs like electrical outlets and switches, you may want to consider additional tools. I’m specifically talking about tools such as: graph paper and a small straight edge. It also doesn’t hurt to have an additional person available just incase you need someone to hold the other end of the tape measure. This isn’t necessary but can come in “handy.”

Next, measure and record your results. If your backsplash is a rectangle then all you need to do is write down the width in inches and the length in inches. However if your measurements aren’t that straight forward, you’ll want to use the graph paper to sketch out a replica of your area. Let the size of your backsplash dictate what ratio you will use on the graph paper. Obviously if you’ve got a large space you’ll want to use a smaller ratio and the reverse if you’re space is small. Use pencil so you can erase any mistakes you make and make sure you record any electrical outlets and light switches.

Lastly, calculate the square footage and/or Lineal Footage. If your space is a rectangle, multiply the length in inches times the width in inches. Then take this number and divide it by 144. This will give you the square footage of your space. For example if your space is 80″ wide by 20″ long, when you multiple them it equals 1600 square inches. Now divide that by 144 and you get 11.11 square feet. Then add 10% for cutting waste. In this case, 10% is going to be just over one square foot, but I would round the number up to 13 square feet just to be safe.

Calculating for lineal foot is a little easier. You simply divide the length in inches by 12 to get the lineal footage. In the case above, 80/12=6.67LF. Remember to round-up to the nearest foot and give yourself at minimum 10% extra. Then do the same to get the lineal footage of the width. This number will come in handy if you are using any bullnose or trim tiles. In general the lineal footage is also nice to know if you are planning on adding any deco or liner tiles. And I would strongly recommend calculating these totals even if you don’t think you’ll need any of the previously mentioned speciality tiles. This way if you change you’re mind later on, you won’t have to remeasure.

Once you get started you’ll realize that it is not as overwhelming as you think! Just take it one step at a time and you’ll be ready to start your tile backsplash project in no time!

Do you have questions about the selecting or the installation of: tile, carpet or wall treatments (window blinds, etc)? Then email me your tale of woe (diva(at)homemakeoverdiva.com) and perhaps I will be able to answer your questions right here at the Home Makeover Diva Blog!

How to Measure Tiles

Cheap Cellular Shades

Today Kathy writes: Can you find cheap cellular shades? I saw your article on hunter douglas but I don’t want to spend that much. I’m purchasing them for a vacation home and don’t want to spend that much money on somewhere we only spend a couple of months out of the year. What do you […]

How to Measure Tiles

1 Inch Blinds vs 2 Inch Blinds

Today Thomas asks: I’m getting ready to put new blinds in my condo and I’m not sure what I want. What is the difference between 1″ blinds vs 2″ blinds? Well Thomas, that is a very good question. It’s very difficult to decide what type of window blinds to purchase, especially if you don’t know […]

How to Measure Tiles

Refinishing Or Replacing Your Bathroom Vanity Cabinet

Today Carissa writes: Dear Diva, I’ve lived in my house for 4 years now and I can’t take my master bathroom any longer! It’s fixtures are old and I’m ready for a re-do! Problem is, my budget isn’t very big. I have given it a lot of thought, and I think if I change the bathroom […]

How to Measure Tiles

Healthy Carpet Choices

Today Pamela writes, Hello Diva, Please help me as I’m confused on which eco-friendly/healthy carpet to choose for my bedroom! I know wool is good but I cannot handle the idea of bugs leaving eggs in it. After reading the blog I know my choices are: Mohawk Smartstrand vs Dupont Sorona vs Beaulieu’s Bliss. I even read […]

How to Measure Tiles

Mohawk Smartstrand vs. Shaw R2X Carpet

Recently I found a series of videos on YouTube that reminded me of the Mac vs. Windows commercials we’ve all seen on TV. The difference however, was that these videos were for Mohawk Smartstrand vs. Shaw R2X Carpet! Needless to say I was intrigued. With the exception of Armstrong, I’ve found that most flooring commercials […]

We’re really excited to be launching our new line of carpet tiles. Here are a few tips to help you determine how much carpet tile you will need:

For rectangular or square rooms, it is relatively straight forward to determine your square foot requirements:

  • Measure the width of your room
  • Measure the length of your room
  • Look up the number of carpet tile boxes that you require using the guide below

For rooms with inconsistent shapes, you can do one of the following:

For a more exact measurement:

  • Break the room up into separate areas that form consistent rectangles or squares.
  • Measure each sub-section separately
  • Look up the number of carpet tile boxes that you require for each sub section, using the guide below
  • Add the number of boxes required for each sub section and order this amount

For a less exact measurement (assuming the room is roughly square or rectangular)

  • Measure the width of your room at the widest point
  • Measure the length of your room at the longest point
  • Look up the number of carpet tile boxes that you require using the guide below

General Notes:

Note: Purchasing extra material is recommended to allow for closets, rooms that may be out of square, and potential future replacement of damaged tile.

Measurement Tips

Most of our in-stock cement tile comes in 8″ x 8″ (20 cm), and several other sizes are available as custom tile. Check on the page that shows a tile’s details to see what size it is.

The solids can be ordered in many sizes including trim pieces and stair treads.

Sometimes it is easiest to figure out how many tiles to order if you calculate your floor’s measurements in inches. Multiply the number of feet by 12 inches per foot. Then divide the number of inches by 10 or 8 for 10″ or 8″ tile. That figure equals the number of tiles in that direction. Do the same for the other dimension of the room.

Multiply the number of tiles for length by the number of tiles for the width to get the total to order.

We suggest that you order at least 10%-15% extra for edge cuts, breakage, etc.

Our tiles are meant to be laid very close together, so just ignore the grout space for the purpose of figuring out how many to order.

If your room has a closet, we recommend that you continue your tiles into the closet floor. If you are using a single-color border, you can carry the single-color tile into the closet for a significant cost savings.

For rooms with a pattern and a border you will need to measure a little differently. We can help with that as well. Decide if you want your ‘rug’ design to be centered in your room, or how you want it placed.

Try to divide your room in rectangles if it has an irregular shape.

To calculate how many tiles you need based on square footage of the space, use these multipliers to see how many tile to order.

How to Measure Tiles

Printable Layout Paper

We’ve put together specially-marked graph paper, with measurements for 8″ and 10″ tiles. You can download and print the PDF pages to plan your layout.

How to Measure Tiles

Use our Grid to Plan Borders

It looks great to use solid color tiles on the outsides of your patterned central feature. You can then trim the solids as necessary to fit in the space between the central ‘rug’ part of the floor and no one will notice if the solids are slightly wider or more narrow on one side or the other. When your installer lays your tiles, he or she needs to start from the center of the room but they will know that. Just give them your diagram and our installation guide, so you know that everyone is “on the same page”. take nothing for granted when it comes to the workers understanding your intent.

  • Login
  • Basket / £ 0.00 0

    No products in the basket.

    Basket

    No products in the basket.

    • Home
    • Bathroom
    • Kitchen
    • Floor
    • Wall
    • Porcelain
    • Porcelanosa
    • Adhesive & Grout
    • Blog
    • Contact

    Although tiling is a popular DIY job, some aspects can be more difficult than they seem. One such aspect is measuring for wall tiling. When you measure for wall tiling, there are a number of steps you need to take to make sure you get it right. Here at Tiles 2 Go in Preston, we are tiling experts. As a result, we have produced a range of how to guides. This is our guide to how to measure for wall tiling.

    Equipment

    First of all, you will need to make sure that you have the right equipment for the job. This includes:

    • The wall tiles
    • Tape measure or rule

    Choosing the tiles

    Before you begin to measure for wall tiling, you should already know which tiles you want to apply. This is because you will need to know the tile size to calculate the amount needed.

    Before measuring

    You will need to make sure that the wall area is flat and prepared before you measure for wall tiling. This is because if it is not, the calculations will not be exact and you could make mistakes. This will cost you both time and possibly money.

    How to measure for wall tiling

    Step 1: Vertical and Horizontal

    To establish just how many tiles you need to cover the wall area, you will need to measure the whole size. Begin by measuring vertically, from the floor to the ceiling if applicable, and then measure the width.

    Once you know the full size you can use the size of the tiles to establish how many you will need. If you will need half or part tiles, you should count these as a whole tile.

    Now you can multiply together the number of tiles needed for the height, and the number of tiles needed for the width, to provide the total number of tiles needed.

    Step 2: Obstacles

    How to Measure Tiles

    Step 3: Scale Drawing

    This is an optional step, but one that is well worth taking. At this stage you should create a diagram or a scale drawing of your wall. This will help you plan a tiling layout and show how the tiles will fit into place. In addition, you will be able to see how many tiles will need to be cut.

    Tiling can begin

    At this point you are ready to purchase tiles and begin tiling. Make sure you have over-calculated for tiles before you begin. Otherwise you could be left short of tiles and this can ruin your tiling.

    If you are ready to being tiling, visit Preston’s leading tiling specialists online or in store today, here at Tiles 2 Go.

    How to measure up a tiling job

    In order to work out how many tiles you need for your tiling project, you need to work out the metre square of the space to be tiled and we are going to guide you through how to do just that. The correct planning is essential to achieve the perfect finish.

    1] Measure the total area of the room / space to be tiled

    Firstly measure the width of the area (a)
    Secondly, measure the height (b)
    Multiply the width with the height (a x b) to calculate the total area of the wall /floor

    2] Measure the area of obstructions

    You definitely do not want wastage when doing a tiling job. In order for your business to be efficient, you need to order the perfect amount of tiles for your job with a few surplus thrown in for good measure. You do not, however, want to have too many tiles left over. For this reason, it is important to take out any obstructions, such as a window or a door or any other fixed feature of a room or floor.

    Calculate the area of the fixed features (door, window etc) with the same method as above

    3 Work out the total area minus obstructions

    X (total area) – (total obstructions) = Total Area Metre Square

    Remember to add 10% to allow for cutting waste, breakages and a few spares.

    4] Adding markers

    It is essential to set out a tiling job correctly to ensure that you have good cuts, remember if you end up with a thin piece of tile anywhere it will look terrible and be hard to do. Try and calculate where the tiles will end up, don’t start with a full tile on the floor or in the corner of a room as these are unlikely to be square or level.

    If you are thinking about a change in career, and a move to tiling where you can be your own boss and create satisfying jobs for your customers, then our 13 day Ultimate Tiling Course will teach you everything you need to know. You will learn from Darren, the owner of the business, who will teach you all the tricks of the trade that he has learnt from his entire career in the tiling business. You will not only learn the skill of tiling great jobs but also the intricacies of business and marketing and generating customers. If you want to speak to Darren about the course first then he would be more than happy to discuss anything with you.