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How to patrol recent changes on wikihow

I am unsure about the source code just for RC patrol, but I do know the source code that wikiHow runs off of is located at src.wikihow.com

That page states they run MediaWiki 1.22 which was supported until 2014 (means: their custom code likely requires updates to run in supported MW versions).
Code might be in the subfolder /extensions/wikihow/rcpatrol if anyone felt like playing with that and working on updating that code.

But this probably will require modification anyway to get the extension running on Wikimedia projects.

Most wikiHow things, or dare I say all of them, are not 1:1 portable to vanilla MW as-is and have been designed with the wikiHow platform and its requirements etc. in mind. Or to put it somewhat bluntly, they’re a dependency hell. (Mind you, the same certainly is true for certain “regular” MediaWiki extensions as well.)

A few extensions originally of wikiHow origin, though (ironically) not currently used on wikiHow, which are somewhat maintained on WMF gerrit are MultiUpload, SpamDiffTool and TextScroller. (mw:Category:Extensions by wikiHow has 5 pages as of now.)

But as for this specific ticket, I’m curious as to why you’d like to have the RCPatrol extension installed? I’ve never considered it that great myself, so I figured there must be something I’m missing as plenty of other people have found RCPatrol very useful.

The main problem is that going through recent changes on large projects like Wikipedia is a nightmare. Because Wikipedia gets thousands of edits every hour, it becomes extremely difficult to patrol recent changes for vandalism, etc.

Filtering edits helps very little as there are many false positives or false negatives. Sure there are bots like Cluebot NG that reverts vandalism with high accuracy. However, bots like these have been criticized for being too robotic and not super human.

RC patrol has a “quick edit” feature to correct simple mistakes in good-faith attempts to improve Wikimedia projects. It also has a “quick note” feature to allow more human messaging to a specific editor. If a user makes a mistake by accidentally patrolling a bad edit, they can go back and revert the change easily. Also a user can send thanks (more technically thumbs up with wikiHow’s implementation) to other editors for good edits with one click.

This is what RC patrol users see when patrolling edits. This tool is intuitive and works directly in your browser, meaning no discrepancies between mobile or desktop. (Not everyone edits from a device that supports AutoWikiBrowser or Huggle.)

The official unofficial wikiHow blog – if you are a part of the wikiHow community, or would like to be, feel free to follow this blog!

Friday, March 30, 2012

The Community Dashboard

The Community Dashboard, (http://www.wikihow.com/Special:CommunityDashboard), is the central for everything. You can find a lot of things to do there, Write articles, Patrol articles, add images, do the Quality Guardian, Categorize articles, format, and tons more! Every day, I’m going to post about a certain activity, so, today’s will be, Patrolling! I love to patrol, and so does a lot of other people!
http://www.wikihow.com/Special:RCPatrol

Patrolling is the “Control panel” of wikiHow, simply because that’s where everything comes out, when you hit “OK”, or “Publish”. You have to be careful when you patrol, and look at every edit, because if you don’t, and bad edits come through, they stay, unless an Admin, or a person who pays close attention changes it back.

“Quality is better than quantity” on wikiHow, so, Don’t rush.

If you’re not sure about an edit, like if it’s something in a category you don’t know too much about, just skip it. There’s no harm done in it, and it’s better then patrolling a bad edit. Or in another case, if you’re not sure if it looks good, or not, just skip it, because someone else will come across it, eventually, and look at it.

Giving Thumbs Ups, is like a pat on the back! “Spreading wikiLove” as they call it! If you see someone doing a good job on wikiHow, no matter what, adding an image, or categorizing an article, it’s a nice, and kind gesture to do!

If you know it’s vandalism, rollback is the right choice. If you see someone who put swear words, roll it back. If they put something in all caps, that’s completely irrelevant, roll it back. There are all types of vandalism, so keep a close, watchful eye! If it’s something as little as a few typos, but the edit was good, push “Quick edit”, and change the words.

Quick note allows you to give a message giving them a bit of wikiLove, and TU as well! Type them a kind message, or just use the pre-set one. Also, if the edit was bad, you can roll it back, and quick note the author, asking him why he did the edit.

Well, that wraps up all of the patrolling directions, you can also look at How to patrol Recent Changes on wikiHow (http://www.wikihow.com/Patrol-Recent-Changes-on-wikiHow), and check out the community Dashboard to see more activities to do. But remember, make great edits, instead of okay, or good edits! 😉 http://www.wikihow.com/ June Days

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Question/Answer time

Meet our community members!

Every week, I’m going to interview a few of our wikiHow members. This week, we have a total of 5 members, interviewed. Metsguy234, ISahreMahKnowledgeWisley, Not Perfect But Almost, Love2, and Knight Hawk.

Metsguy234, AKA, Mike’s interview

Mike Massaroli joined wikiHow 5 years ago. He wrote one article, anonymously. (How to start a baseball card collection) Mike is an NAB, patrols more, as well as spell-checks, categories, and NFD Guardian. He’s written the most articles in our “Fans of baseball” subcategory, and a few, in other categories. “I’d like to maybe write an article about NY state government or political internships at some point, in conjunction with the work I’m currently doing in my spare time with a local politician.” He used to be a committed troll, but that’s all changed! He’s running in this March’s Admin election, and has ran 8 times! Hopefully he’ll get elected this time! Good luck Mike! http://www.wikihow.com/User:Metsguy234

Thank you Mike for letting me interview you!

Next, a wonderful friend:

Not Perfect But Almost, AKA, Beth’s interview

Beth found wikiHow one day, looking up “How to look like a punk”. “The article was really well written,” She said, “And the site was really well organized”, so, she ended up joining! Beth loves to patrol Recent Changes and has patrolled a total of 2,318 edits! But the thing she’s most proud of, is that she’s a great page designer! She’s designed my page, multiple times, and tons of others! She writes articles in our Personal Care and Style, and Relationships Category and life choices in general. Beth is a Featured Author with many Rising Stars, and Featured Articles. She likes to make templates, and has gotten 16 Thumbs ups! She’s a very friendly, and wonderful community member. http://www.wikihow.com/User:Not-perfect-but-almost

Thanks Beth! Up next, a person from another country, who has learned the English language, and is a wonderful author at wikiHow

Love2, AKA, Salma’s interview

Salma found wikiHow while searching for an article, and when she found wikiHow, she edited part of it, then, she made her account. She enjoys patrolling the most, and has patrolled 1,604 edits, and she writes about animals. She loves music, and has written a few articles in that category, as well as some life choice articles. She’s a wonderful page designer, and she’s gotten two Rising Stars! http://www.wikihow.com/User:Love2

Wonderful interview Salma! Next is a person who cares about me, and his friends, and an active member in the wikiHow IRC chat room

Knight Hawk’s interview

Knight Hawk found wikiHow by accident, he was just surfing the web, when he found wikiHow. “Interested in helping other people learn, I signed up”. He likes to do the Quality Guardian, and writes/edit articles about pets, in our Pets category. “Pets have always been there for me and they don’t judge, they just want you for you”. He currently has 1,765 article views, and 31 Thumbs ups! Go Knight Hawk! http://www.wikihow.com/User:Knight-Hawk

Thanks so much Knight Hawk for doing this!

Last but not least is

IShareMahKnowledgeWisley, AKA ISMKW’s interview

RSS is a method of distributing links to content in your web site that you’d like others to use. In other words, it’s a mechanism to “syndicate” your content.

Steps

  1. What is RSS?
    • How does RSS syndication work? Say you publish a new web page about a particular topic. You want others interested in that topic to know about it. By listing the page as an “item” in your RSS file, you can have the page appear in front of those who read information using RSS readers or “news aggregators”. RSS also allows people to easily add links to your content within their own web pages. Bloggers are a huge core audience that especially does this.
    • What does RSS stand for? There’s a can of worms. RSS as introduced by Netscape in 1999 then later abandoned in 2001 stood for “Rich Site Summary.” Another version of RSS pioneered by UserLand Software stands for “Really Simple Syndication.” In yet another version, RSS stands for “RDF Site Summary.”
    • History buffs might be interested that there’s been some rivalry over who invented RSS. This is why we have both different names and indeed different “flavors” or versions of RSS.
  2. At the heart of an RSS file are “items.” No matter what version of RSS you settle on, your file will have to include at least one item. Items are generally web pages that you’d like others to link to. For example, let’s say you just created a web page reviewing a new cell phone that’s being released. Information about that page would form an item.To enter your item into the RSS file, you’ll need three bits of information:TitleDescriptionLinkThe title and description of your item need not match exactly the HTML title tag of the web page that the item refers to, nor the meta description tag, assuming you use these. You can write any title and description that you think will describe the page. However, using your page’s title and meta description tag certainly makes it easy to copy and paste to build your RSS feed.In the case of our example page, let’s say this is the information we settle on to define it as an item: Recent Changes – WikiHow
    Patrol all the edits that people have recently made to wikiHow!
    http://www.wikihow.com/Special:Recentchanges
  3. Now we have to surround that information with xml tags. These are similar to HTML tags, with the exception that unlike with HTML, there’s no set definition of xml tags. Anyone can make up a particular xml tag. Whether it is useful depends on the program that reads the resulting xml file. In the case of RSS feeds, they have their own unique set of XML tags that are defined. Use these correctly, and then anything that reads RSS will understand your information.Did that make your head spin? If so, don’t reread – just carry on to see how simple it is. First, open a text editor like Notepad. We’re going to build our RSS file using it.For your title, you need to start it with the tag, then follow this with the text of the title, then end with the tag.For your description, you do the same, starting out with the opening tag, then following with the actual description, then “closing” with the tag.Next, we add the link information, beginning with , following with the actual hyperlink, then closing with . That gives us this:
    Patrol all the edits that people have recently made to wikiHow!
    http://www.wikihow.com/Special:Recentchanges
  4. Now there’s one more thing we need to do. We actually have to define all this information as forming a particular “item,” which we do using a special item tag.You place the opening item tag, ” ” at the top or start of all the information we’ve listed. You then place the closing item tag, ” “, at the bottom or “end” of the item information. The finished product looks like this:

Recent Changes – WikiHow
Patrol all the edits that people have recently made to wikiHow!
http://www.wikihow.com/Special:Recentchanges

Congratulations! You’ve now made your first item. There’s a bit more to do to finish our RSS file. First, what if we have other items we want to syndicate? Then we simply add more item elements, just as we did above. You can have up to 15 items. New items tend to be inserted at the top, with old items removed from the bottom, to make room for new stuff.

  • With our example, let’s see how things look if we add two more items:
  • Having defined items we want to distribute, we now have to define our site as a “channel.” You’ll use the same tags as with the items: title, description and link. However, this time the information will be about your entire site, rather than a particular page. That means our channel information would look like this:
    WikiHow
  • Now, how does something reading our RSS file know that the information above is for our “channel” when it looks just like item information? Simple. As long as we don’t surround this information with an opening and closing tags, it won’t be seen as item information but rather as channel information.
  • There are a few last things we need to do. First, we need to add a tag at the very top of the file saying that this is written according to the XML 1.0 specifications. Right under this, we also have to say what RSS version we are using.So far, everything we’ve done is compatible with UserLand’s popular RSS 0.91 version. However, it also matches UserLand’s latest RSS 2.0 version, as well, so we’ll define the file as meeting that specification. This will allow us to add other neat features in the future, if we want.Finally, after the RSS tag, we need to add an opening “channel” tag. That gives us this at the top of the file:

    At the bottom of the file, after all the items we want to syndicate, we have to insert a closing channel and RSS tag, in that order. Those look like this:

    This means our complete file looks like this:

    The official unofficial wikiHow blog – if you are a part of the wikiHow community, or would like to be, feel free to follow this blog!

    Friday, March 30, 2012

    The Community Dashboard

    The Community Dashboard, (http://www.wikihow.com/Special:CommunityDashboard), is the central for everything. You can find a lot of things to do there, Write articles, Patrol articles, add images, do the Quality Guardian, Categorize articles, format, and tons more! Every day, I’m going to post about a certain activity, so, today’s will be, Patrolling! I love to patrol, and so does a lot of other people!
    http://www.wikihow.com/Special:RCPatrol

    Patrolling is the “Control panel” of wikiHow, simply because that’s where everything comes out, when you hit “OK”, or “Publish”. You have to be careful when you patrol, and look at every edit, because if you don’t, and bad edits come through, they stay, unless an Admin, or a person who pays close attention changes it back.

    “Quality is better than quantity” on wikiHow, so, Don’t rush.

    If you’re not sure about an edit, like if it’s something in a category you don’t know too much about, just skip it. There’s no harm done in it, and it’s better then patrolling a bad edit. Or in another case, if you’re not sure if it looks good, or not, just skip it, because someone else will come across it, eventually, and look at it.

    Giving Thumbs Ups, is like a pat on the back! “Spreading wikiLove” as they call it! If you see someone doing a good job on wikiHow, no matter what, adding an image, or categorizing an article, it’s a nice, and kind gesture to do!

    If you know it’s vandalism, rollback is the right choice. If you see someone who put swear words, roll it back. If they put something in all caps, that’s completely irrelevant, roll it back. There are all types of vandalism, so keep a close, watchful eye! If it’s something as little as a few typos, but the edit was good, push “Quick edit”, and change the words.

    Quick note allows you to give a message giving them a bit of wikiLove, and TU as well! Type them a kind message, or just use the pre-set one. Also, if the edit was bad, you can roll it back, and quick note the author, asking him why he did the edit.

    Through your own example, you can teach social skills and increase the child’s confidence in handling all types of social situations. Over time, your child will begin to own these strengths. Parents can locate sahyadri school pune or schools in hosur of their choice selected from the directory of schools listed on the site and applies to them.Related Articles Keywords: sahyadri school pune, schools in hosur, sudhir memorial instituteThis article has been viewed 6 time(s).

    2. Share Best Practices With CoWorkers: http://www.stostrba.eu/ When covering for a coworker, I am focused on completing two jobs (the coworker and mine) and do not have time to think about process improvement. By taking time to actually share the process, I may find there are actually computer programs or other people with the ability to complete the same process faster, differently, or with less steps.

    For the geeks out there. The fix is of a two level crontab. The first level is the end user of the aggregator service,. That person gets to specify how often to check a site. Just like Fake Ray Bans they do now, once an hour or one every 8 hours for example. It a Timberland Shoes Nz request though, not a command. The second level of crontab, the one that really gets the bits from my wire I Longchamp Uk can control. I am the provider of the bits. People can ask for feeds every 10 seconds,but where is my control knob on whether I think that is reasonable?

    I feel like they’re shamed by being friends with nonasians yet I never knew them to be prideful people. It’s a rare sight when an asian blasts their music and Cheap Hollister Clothes Uk waves their flag screaming their nation’s name. Well. the nations in Far East Asia. This shame Mbt Trainers was only brought into a higher and brighter watt of the “truth” light when an asian friend or mine started to go out with a very close nonasian friend of mine. They had to keep it a secret from his asian friends, and they only told those they trusted wouldn’t tell. Why? Parents. fine. but friends who are supposed to cover your ass?!

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  • wikiHow:About wikiHow

    wikiHow is a collaborative effort to build and share the world’s largest, highest quality how-to manual. Like Wikipedia, wikiHow is a wiki, in that anyone can write or edit a page on the site. Thousands of people from all over the world have collaboratively written 95,545 how-to articles. Over 25 million people a month read wikiHow, which makes it the 150th most popular website according to Quantcast.

    Because wikiHow is editable by anyone, our content changes every day. Each edit can be seen on our list of Recent Changes, which gets reviewed constantly by volunteer editors. Most of the edits made on any given day are helpful, and any poor edits are usually quickly reverted. In this way, articles on wikiHow improve over time, as more and more people contribute their unique knowledge and skills.

    Not only are wikiHow’s how-to articles written and maintained by everyday people, but they’re also shared with as many people around the world as possible. Our Creative Commons license allows wikiHow’s article to be used freely by any organization or person for any non-commercial purpose. Allowing free republication of our content helps achieve wikiHow’s mission by offering our instructions to the problems of everyday life to even more people for free. Plus, multilingual versions of wikiHow are slowly being built in Spanish, German, French, and other languages.

    At the core of wikiHow is the volunteer community of writers and editors, who contribute for a wide variety of reasons and in a wide variety of ways. There’s a small team of employees, whose job it is to make sure the site keeps reaching readers and innovating on the technology, but volunteer contributors like you are the lifeblood of this project.

    If you’d like to help out, getting started is easy. We need authors to start new articles, editors to fix typos,add photos, pick videos, correct inaccuracies, and patrol recent changes. Read this list of the dozens ways you can contribute. If you have any questions, ask the Help Team.

    We recently spoke with Jack Herrick, founder of wikiHow, about how wikiHow’s quality differs from a site like eHow, which is often labeled a content farm with suspect quality. Herrick’s insight on this is particularly interesting, given that he used to run eHow, before selling to Demand Media.

    Herrick has now shared more information with us about the quality control process at wikiHow. We’ll let you be the judge on how effective it is.

    “One of the apparent mysteries of wikis like wikiHow is how they can produce such high quality content while simultaneously allowing anyone at any time to edit almost any page,” says Herrick. “You can go to wikiHow or Wikipedia right now, press edit, remove everything and write ‘I like cheese’ and press save and that is what will be published, at least for a short while.

    He even invited me to give it a try. So I did, at 10:02am.

    How to Patrol Recent Changes on wikiHow

    “Why doesn’t ‘I like cheese’ stay on the page for days and days? The answer is twofold,” he says. “First of all, there is a group of passionate people working hard day in and day out to make sure that every part of wikiHow is the best that it can be. Secondly, the wiki technology provides them with powerful tools, including a system of checks and balances, which helps them ensure that every edit that stays on wikiHow improves its overall quality.”

    “The wikiHow community thinks of wikiHow as a second home,” Herrick tells us. “Within wikiHow they accomplish tasks, organize, clear lists of things to do, and socialize with like minded people. The people who contribute on our site pride themselves deeply in the work they do. It is hard for some people to imagine why people would dedicate so much time and do so much work when they are not being compensated financially. But, it is often financial compensation that muddies people’s motivations to accomplish goals. (See Daniel Pink’s book ‘Drive’ if you are curious to learn more about how money can pollute motivation.) Each individual in our community completes tasks because it satisfies them on a deep personal level. As an analogy, every individual prides himself on something different – like taking great care of their dogs, fine tuning their snowboarding skills, learning to play an instrument, or being artistic. The people on wikiHow pride themselves on building and maintaining the best online how to manual they can. As a result, they take quality very seriously.”

    “The wiki itself is a busy place, sort of like a busy city, where people are all doing different jobs that make the city function,” Herrick continues. “There are tons of activities that people can do, some of which are quite social, all which help the wiki become better. Some examples are: categorizing articles, curating images, selecting videos, expanding articles, clearing out lists of articles that need attention, fact checking, answering how-to requests, writing articles, copyediting, formatting, reviewing edits, etc.”

    “One of these jobs is wikiHow’s first layer of defense against bad edits,” he says. “Typically within an hour of an edit being made, a volunteer wikiHow editor reviews the edit in an app called Recent Changes Patrol. Think of Recent Changes Patrol as a social app that helps volunteer editors review edits made by other contributors.”

    Herrick says volunteers review edits one at a time, and that they take one of the following four actions:

    1. Improve an edit: Editors make quick changes to fix grammar errors or polish obtuse text.

    2. Rollback vandalism and nonsense. Open editing attracts a fair amount of ludicrous edits. Fortunately, volunteer editors typically revert such nonsense within minutes. This is where the ‘I like cheese’ edit would get addressed.

    3. Mark the edit as patrolled without changing it.

    4. Leave a message for the editor asking for further improvements or clarifications, or complimenting them on what a great job they did.

    Here is what the Recent Patrol Patrol app looks like:

    How to Patrol Recent Changes on wikiHow

    “In the case of the edit you see here, this edit which smells like link building would almost certainly get rolled back,” says Herrick.

    “While wikiHow has 300,000 registered users editing on the site, most of them are not active recent changes patrollers,” he says. “This is probably a good thing! Typically on any given week less than 50 very dedicated patrollers will do the majority of the work. The power patrollers do a heck of a lot though: the top patrollers will review thousands of edits each week. They get a lot of satisfaction out of the work they do. And, as you can imagine, wikiHow also has a system to patrol the patrollers to make sure they are doing a good job. If not, they will receive coaching.”

    There are still more layers of quality control. A second layer, he says is a watchlist system that notifies people via email (and on wikiHow) when an article they are following gets changed.

    “When a person starts an article, they’re given the option to get notified whenever it gets edited,” he explains. “On top of that, anyone can watch any page on wikiHow, whether they wrote it or not. So, when a page gets edited poorly, it’s likely that someone subscribing to watchlist emails will fix the page when they check their inbox.”

    “A third layer of quality control is a system called accuracy patrol,” he says. “Like many websites, we ask our readers to flag articles for accuracy. When we get a certain ratio of reader flags, we place the problem articles on a list for further review and improvement from editors.”

    While plenty of details here given here, Herrick says all of this explanation really only scratches the surface. “There is some mystery and magic to wikis that is difficult to capture in a brief description,” he says.

    Do you think the system i working? DuckDuckGo, obviously thinks it works pretty well, considering they’re using wikiHow content as instant answers in their search engines. More on that from DuckDuckGo founder Gabriel Weinberg here.

    By the way, at 11:17, as I’m about to click publish on this story, the page I edited still says, “I like Cheese.”

    Update at 11:45:
    It’s now back to normal as of sometime in the last few minutes. Under two hours. Not too bad. It’s hard to say with any certainty that this article didn’t play a role, however.

    Windows genuine advantage notifications occur when your computer hasn’t passed the validation test. The validation test can be failed due to being sold a pirated (non-genuine) copy of XP, or because you have changed your XP product key to a software-generated key, or sometimes it just happens for no reason at all. The failed validation installs three types of notifications on your computer: one on the log in screen, one log in timer, and one balloon. It also stops updates from Microsoft and disables your ability to install IE7 and Windows Media Player 11. This solution can get rid of all three notifications, even though you will still not be able to update through Windows Update. You will not be able to download things from Microsoft that requires a valid license either.

    [edit] Steps

    1. If you have only just installed Windows Genuine Advantage notifications, simply using the system restore function will remove the program. Then refuse to accept the WGA update next time Windows updates. Otherwise, proceed as detailed below. (NOTE: If you try these steps while you are in “Safe Mode,” step #8 is unnecessary).
    2. Firstly, Try the Following:
    3. Open a CMD Line Window by Clicking on Start ==>Run ==> type CMD and Press OK.
    4. Change Directory into the System32 Folder (Like Cd c:\Windows\System32)
    5. Open a notepad Window and type the following lines:
      • taskkill -IM wgatray.exe
      • del wgatray.exe
      • del wgalogon.dll
    6. Highlight and copy to the Clipboard the three lines above
    7. Paste the the contents of the Clipboard to the CMD Window
    8. This should kill the wgatray.exe Process from the Taskbar and imediately delete both files wgatray.exe and wgalogon.dll without the need to to go through all steps bellow.
    9. If that does not work, then continue and follow the steps below;
    10. Open System32 by either A or B of the following methods:

    Click “Start”, “Run”, then type-in ” System32 “. Click “Okay”.
    b) Find System32 manually by clicking “Start” > “My Computer” > “(X:)” (Replacing “X” with the drive letter of the host of Windows) > “Windows” > “System32”.

    The official unofficial wikiHow blog – if you are a part of the wikiHow community, or would like to be, feel free to follow this blog!

    Thursday, March 29, 2012

    Meet our community members!

    Every week, I’m going to interview a few of our wikiHow members. This week, we have a total of 5 members, interviewed. Metsguy234, ISahreMahKnowledgeWisley, Not Perfect But Almost, Love2, and Knight Hawk.

    Metsguy234, AKA, Mike’s interview

    Mike Massaroli joined wikiHow 5 years ago. He wrote one article, anonymously. (How to start a baseball card collection) Mike is an NAB, patrols more, as well as spell-checks, categories, and NFD Guardian. He’s written the most articles in our “Fans of baseball” subcategory, and a few, in other categories. “I’d like to maybe write an article about NY state government or political internships at some point, in conjunction with the work I’m currently doing in my spare time with a local politician.” He used to be a committed troll, but that’s all changed! He’s running in this March’s Admin election, and has ran 8 times! Hopefully he’ll get elected this time! Good luck Mike! http://www.wikihow.com/User:Metsguy234

    Thank you Mike for letting me interview you!

    Next, a wonderful friend:

    Not Perfect But Almost, AKA, Beth’s interview

    Beth found wikiHow one day, looking up “How to look like a punk”. “The article was really well written,” She said, “And the site was really well organized”, so, she ended up joining! Beth loves to patrol Recent Changes and has patrolled a total of 2,318 edits! But the thing she’s most proud of, is that she’s a great page designer! She’s designed my page, multiple times, and tons of others! She writes articles in our Personal Care and Style, and Relationships Category and life choices in general. Beth is a Featured Author with many Rising Stars, and Featured Articles. She likes to make templates, and has gotten 16 Thumbs ups! She’s a very friendly, and wonderful community member. http://www.wikihow.com/User:Not-perfect-but-almost

    Thanks Beth! Up next, a person from another country, who has learned the English language, and is a wonderful author at wikiHow

    Love2, AKA, Salma’s interview

    Salma found wikiHow while searching for an article, and when she found wikiHow, she edited part of it, then, she made her account. She enjoys patrolling the most, and has patrolled 1,604 edits, and she writes about animals. She loves music, and has written a few articles in that category, as well as some life choice articles. She’s a wonderful page designer, and she’s gotten two Rising Stars! http://www.wikihow.com/User:Love2

    Wonderful interview Salma! Next is a person who cares about me, and his friends, and an active member in the wikiHow IRC chat room

    Knight Hawk’s interview

    Knight Hawk found wikiHow by accident, he was just surfing the web, when he found wikiHow. “Interested in helping other people learn, I signed up”. He likes to do the Quality Guardian, and writes/edit articles about pets, in our Pets category. “Pets have always been there for me and they don’t judge, they just want you for you”. He currently has 1,765 article views, and 31 Thumbs ups! Go Knight Hawk! http://www.wikihow.com/User:Knight-Hawk

    Thanks so much Knight Hawk for doing this!

    Last but not least is

    IShareMahKnowledgeWisley, AKA ISMKW’s interview

    The official unofficial wikiHow blog – if you are a part of the wikiHow community, or would like to be, feel free to follow this blog!

    Thursday, November 8, 2012

    A how-to manual – Story

    You haven’t seen a post here in a while (And I know my last little series wasn’t too productive. But no need to worry!), but that’s about to change!

    Throughout this month, you’ll get wikiHow like it is. What it really is, and little things people do along the way. And although I’m not starting at the very beginning, I would like to tell you a little about patrolling and one of the things we recently added to the tool. I love to patrol, and so do other users too. Many of them do it, and some are successful, some aren’t. And that’s why we have. The Patrol Coach!

    The Patrol Coach is there to help new patrollers become better patrollers. The Patrol Coach pops up whenever a user doesn’t pass the “Patrol test”. It is a variety of random tests a patroller might accidentally miss. If a patroller misses the edit and doesn’t pass the test, the Patrol Coach pops up and explains what the user did wrong, and what to do in the future. Pretty cool huh? Well, wikiHow just made something new.

    As Krystle announced in this thread —> http://forums.wikihow.com/discussion/comment/75572/#Comment_75572

    ” Late in 2011 we launched the Patrol Coach to give people valuable feedback as they’re patrolling. The feature that we’re launching today will undo someone’s patrols based on their performance on the Patrol Coach tests. A new patroller is going to be faced with lots of easy tests when they start out. By “easy” I mean obvious acts of vandalism or spam that a new patroller should rollback. If they fail an easy test, all of their patrols since their last easy test get undone and put back into the queue, and they get an automated talk page note from me explaining that/why this happened. They will continue to be faced with easy tests (approximately every 50 patrols) and have their patrols undone every time they fail until they pass a total of 7 easy tests. From that point on they will get harder tests, but there will be no auto-unpatrolling.”

    It is a thing that has been with us for a few months now, and I think it’s going pretty well.
    The Patrol Coach hasn’t gotten me with any unpatrol tests. Yet. =P Joking, I’m pretty sure I passed all of the tests. Anyway, the Patrol Coach will not pop up at you after you’ve passed 50 in the patrol queue. It’s a neat tool, that I believe will benefit us in the long run.
    Congrats to wikiHow, you’ve made a pretty awesome new thing!

    Until tomorrow,

    December

    Tuesday, October 16, 2012

    5 Year Interviews

    This October, we had three people who had wikiHow birthdays. Know how old they are? 5 years! Congrats to them for this major milestone. To honor their wikiBirthdays, I wanted to do a special post for each of them. A little interview (Which they graciously agreed to), and my personal opinion of the three (They are awesome!) Today’s interview is for BR.

    BR is a five year veteran, an awesome patroller/coacher (for patrolling) and friend!

    June: What made you want to join wikiHow, and why have you stuck with it for all of these years?

    BR: Nothing really ”made me join”, just like most people I was searching for how to do something, and found my way here, found out how friendly everyone is, and how easy it is to publish nonsense articles, and decided to stick around. So far as ”sticking around”, I enjoy wikiHow, and there is always something new to learn.

    June: What changes have you seen wikiHow make? Community Dashboard changes, new tools, wikiHow’s overall design scheme, etc..

    BR: The dynamics of the site, videos, dynamic elements on pages, and the sheer volume of traffic, not to mention the dramatic increase in article pages. There are always changing personalities, I miss some of the old timers, one who passed away a couple of years ago who mentored me with RC patrolling, some who still drop by from time to time.

    June: This month is your five years on wikiHow. What did you gain throughout the time you’ve been here? What’s the difference between the current time, and the time years ago?

    BR: I have learned a lot about a wide variety of subjects, and I have learned not to underestimate even the least likely contributor to make a big difference in the quality of the website. I would even say I have learned a bit about navigating the web, although that isn’t a particular interest of mine. One of the larger differences is the volume and speed of the website, the number of visitors, the number of edits daily, and the speed of web page downloads and uploads is tremendous with the increase in bandwidth and computer processors, not to mention smart phones, tablets, and other devices (that we provide content to help people use).

    June: If you could make changes, improvements or have instructive critisism you’d like to give, what is/are it/they?

    BR: I would like to see downsized pages, the dynamic features scrolling around, the side bars in general, and other attachments are great for people wanting the full featured model, but I would like a wikiHow “lite” pageview to speed up loading times and to help my poor old eyes. It would be nice to make some page features optional, especially videos, which are often poor quality anyway. Give a visitor an option of images/no images, videos/no videos, especially with the growing number of visitors using smaller devices. It would be nice to see some serious devotion to coaching, so the above mentioned videos and images could see a general improvement in quality, similar to what wikiPhoto has managed in a limited scope.

    And that’s the end of BR’s interview. Personally speaking, BR is an awesome person who has a pretty awesome sense of humor. On wikiHow, he has patrolled over 500,000 thousand edits and is a wikiHow Admin. He also awarded me the Patrollers Barnstar, and, coming from The patrolling maniac (Good maniac), I was very happy. =)

    Here’s the BR, an awesome patroller, happy wikiBirthday! =)

    WinPatrol is a great utility that you can use to protect your computer if you know how to use it to monitor changes made to your files and folders. Unlike using FCV (FolderChangesView) from Nirsoft Labs which we discussed in an earlier article, WinPatrol is made for beginners and experts alike for in depth PC monitoring.

    There are two options to choose from when you download WinPatrol as with most programs online, the free, and the paid version. For the purposes of this article, we will focus on using the free version to monitor changes on your computer.

    To begin, you will need to navigate to WinPatrol’s download page to download the installation file. This file will be used to install both the free and paid versions of WinPatrol. Once you have downloaded program to your computer and installed it, simply double click on its icon to launch it. You will notice that the home screen for this program offers 14 different tabs with monitoring functions of which three are only available with the PLUS version.

    Startup Programs

    From the “Startup Programs” tab, you can monitor the programs that turn on when you start up your machine. To enable or disable any item that is currently in the list, simply click on the entry then click the enable or disable button. The orange arrow shows a box that, when ticked, will make WinPatrol to check for any changes to the startup programs.

    By clicking on the pink arrow, on the small clock icon, you will be able to change how often WinPatrol checks for these changes. I recommend that you leave it at two minutes, which is the default.

    When a startup entry is removed manually or because of an uninstallation, it will be detected by WinPatrol and you will see a notification like the one below.

    If a new entry is added, such as when you install a program, you will be asked whether or not this task has permission to start with windows. You can either accept or reject the change from this window. You can also open the folder where the executable file is located or view the file’s properties. If you did not install a program or recognize the change, it is safest to reject the change. Since this is just a startup notification, it will not uninstall the program; just prevent it from automatically turning on.

    Scheduled Tasks 1.0

    This tab is where you can see any tasks that are scheduled to run on your computer. If you select an item and press the “info” button, you will also see any information related to the program’s schedule. To change how frequently WinPatrol checks for changes to this section, just press the stopwatch and change the timer.

    Services

    The services tab will show you a list of all the services on your computer that are running and stopped. You will also see details about the startup settings, executable name, and the company that it comes from. To change how frequently WinPatrol checks for changes to this section, just press the stopwatch and change the timer.

    Cookies

    On the cookies tab you can search for, and remove, cookies with specific text in their titles. This helps you to filter out cookies that you don’t want to keep on your computer. You can also select which browser you want to search and whether you want to remove them. For example, if you type the word “facebook” in the “Add” section, you can prevent the selected browser (Mozilla Firefox) from storing them.

    Recent

    If you happen to know that you had a recent malware infection and you need to ensure that all residual traces of the program have been removed, you can use the “Recent” tab. This will show you a list of all programs and processes that were recently active. You can select any item in the list and kill the task. Before or after killing the task, you can right click on the item and select “Delete on Reboot” to delete all traces of the program the next time you start your computer.

    Options

    The options tab will present you with several report functions which you will see on the right side of the screen. On the left, you can click on the two stopwatches to edit the time it takes before the corresponding actions take place.

    If you click on the “Repair and rest tools,” you will be taken to a new popup screen with several other tasks to choose from. These are user tools to undo changes, cleanup specific areas of the program, and delete any files that have been deleted with WinPatrol.

    Wrapping Up

    As I mentioned earlier, WinPatrol’s main function is to monitor your system for any changes. This is highly useful when you are installing new programs and when you are browsing sites with bad reputations as malware hosts. Whenever it detects a change in your system, it will bark and present a popup screen that asks you whether or not you intended to make any changes and will ask for permission to carry out the operation.

    More than one-third of adults wake up in the middle of the night on a regular basis. Of those who experience “nocturnal awakenings,” nearly half are unable to fall back asleep right away. Doctors frequently diagnose this condition as a sleep disorder called “middle-of-the-night insomnia,” and prescribe medication to treat it.

    Wednesday, February 16, 2011

    RSS is a method of distributing links to content in your web site that you’d like others to use. In other words, it’s a mechanism to “syndicate” your content.

    Steps

    1. What is RSS?
      • How does RSS syndication work? Say you publish a new web page about a particular topic. You want others interested in that topic to know about it. By listing the page as an “item” in your RSS file, you can have the page appear in front of those who read information using RSS readers or “news aggregators”. RSS also allows people to easily add links to your content within their own web pages. Bloggers are a huge core audience that especially does this.
      • What does RSS stand for? There’s a can of worms. RSS as introduced by Netscape in 1999 then later abandoned in 2001 stood for “Rich Site Summary.” Another version of RSS pioneered by UserLand Software stands for “Really Simple Syndication.” In yet another version, RSS stands for “RDF Site Summary.”
      • History buffs might be interested that there’s been some rivalry over who invented RSS. This is why we have both different names and indeed different “flavors” or versions of RSS.
    2. At the heart of an RSS file are “items.” No matter what version of RSS you settle on, your file will have to include at least one item. Items are generally web pages that you’d like others to link to. For example, let’s say you just created a web page reviewing a new cell phone that’s being released. Information about that page would form an item.To enter your item into the RSS file, you’ll need three bits of information:TitleDescriptionLinkThe title and description of your item need not match exactly the HTML title tag of the web page that the item refers to, nor the meta description tag, assuming you use these. You can write any title and description that you think will describe the page. However, using your page’s title and meta description tag certainly makes it easy to copy and paste to build your RSS feed.In the case of our example page, let’s say this is the information we settle on to define it as an item: Recent Changes – WikiHow
      Patrol all the edits that people have recently made to wikiHow!
      http://www.wikihow.com/Special:Recentchanges
    3. Now we have to surround that information with xml tags. These are similar to HTML tags, with the exception that unlike with HTML, there’s no set definition of xml tags. Anyone can make up a particular xml tag. Whether it is useful depends on the program that reads the resulting xml file. In the case of RSS feeds, they have their own unique set of XML tags that are defined. Use these correctly, and then anything that reads RSS will understand your information.Did that make your head spin? If so, don’t reread – just carry on to see how simple it is. First, open a text editor like Notepad. We’re going to build our RSS file using it.For your title, you need to start it with the tag, then follow this with the text of the title, then end with the tag.For your description, you do the same, starting out with the opening tag, then following with the actual description, then “closing” with the tag.Next, we add the link information, beginning with , following with the actual hyperlink, then closing with . That gives us this:
      Patrol all the edits that people have recently made to wikiHow!
      http://www.wikihow.com/Special:Recentchanges
    4. Now there’s one more thing we need to do. We actually have to define all this information as forming a particular “item,” which we do using a special item tag.You place the opening item tag, ” ” at the top or start of all the information we’ve listed. You then place the closing item tag, ” “, at the bottom or “end” of the item information. The finished product looks like this:

    Recent Changes – WikiHow
    Patrol all the edits that people have recently made to wikiHow!
    http://www.wikihow.com/Special:Recentchanges

    Congratulations! You’ve now made your first item. There’s a bit more to do to finish our RSS file. First, what if we have other items we want to syndicate? Then we simply add more item elements, just as we did above. You can have up to 15 items. New items tend to be inserted at the top, with old items removed from the bottom, to make room for new stuff.

  • With our example, let’s see how things look if we add two more items:
  • Having defined items we want to distribute, we now have to define our site as a “channel.” You’ll use the same tags as with the items: title, description and link. However, this time the information will be about your entire site, rather than a particular page. That means our channel information would look like this:
    WikiHow
  • Now, how does something reading our RSS file know that the information above is for our “channel” when it looks just like item information? Simple. As long as we don’t surround this information with an opening and closing tags, it won’t be seen as item information but rather as channel information.
  • There are a few last things we need to do. First, we need to add a tag at the very top of the file saying that this is written according to the XML 1.0 specifications. Right under this, we also have to say what RSS version we are using.So far, everything we’ve done is compatible with UserLand’s popular RSS 0.91 version. However, it also matches UserLand’s latest RSS 2.0 version, as well, so we’ll define the file as meeting that specification. This will allow us to add other neat features in the future, if we want.Finally, after the RSS tag, we need to add an opening “channel” tag. That gives us this at the top of the file:

    At the bottom of the file, after all the items we want to syndicate, we have to insert a closing channel and RSS tag, in that order. Those look like this:

    This means our complete file looks like this:

    Users with the administrator, content moderator, or rollback permissions can use the recent changes patrol feature on the wiki, which allows them to mark edits as patrolled in order to reduce the workload of other patrollers and reduce the likelihood of unwanted edits slipping through. Users who are not administrators, content moderators, or rollbacks can still check and revert edits they see on Special:RecentChanges, but will not be able to actually mark such edits as patrolled.

    Criteria for patrolling [ edit source ]

    Patrolling is not a way of adding scrutiny to an edit you merely dislike or disagree with. Its main purpose is to filter out edits that have major problems requiring immediate attention. Edits should not contain:

    1. blatantly obvious vandalism and/or spam;
    2. blatantly unacceptable copyright violations;
    3. libel, legal threats, personal attacks, or unsourced information about a living person;
    4. content that is clearly and verifiably incorrect; and
    5. content that exhibits inappropriate behavioral standards, like sockpuppetry

    Edits that are found to contain any of these five things should either be fixed or reverted before being marked as patrolled. If the edit is of low quality, either fix the issue or add a tag and then patrol it.

    When patrolling edits to fanon pages, you should check to see if the author who made the page is one of the the fanon authors; if not, check to see if their edit would be considered minor enough not to warrant reversion. Edits that fix unintentional typos correctly or fix a broken template transclusion can be marked as patrolled; edits that add substantial content, or make non-cosmetic changes that unnecessarily change the output of content (like changing from one variation of English to another) should be reverted. Be scrutinous of edits that change the wording as well, since a change in wording in the text can change the entire meaning or effect of the fanon. If the edit was made by the fanon author(s), simply check to see if any of the content they have added may be illegal or grossly inappropriate for the wiki, but otherwise the edit should be marked as patrolled.

    Edits that are reverted using the rollback tool are automatically marked as patrolled. In addition, edits made by autopatrolled users, administrators, content moderators, rollbacks, and bots are automatically marked as patrolled.

    How to Patrol Recent Changes on wikiHow

    Recent Changes Patrol is a utility for Wikitravel users who have been registered for over 30 days to see which recent changes have not been reviewed by another user.

    Contents

    • 1 Use
    • 2 Autoconfirmed users
    • 3 Patrolling edits
    • 4 Tools and techniques to help with patrolling
    • 5 See also

    Use [ edit ]

    If a change hasn’t been reviewed by another editor, a red exclamation mark (” ! “) appears next to the line for the edit.

    If you have turned on “Enhanced recent changes” in your preferences then you can review all changes made to an article on that day at one go and mark them as patrolled.

    There is an option to “Hide patrolled edits”, which you can use to narrow it down to recent changes that still need attention. It is a good idea to turn it on and go through changes from the bottom of the list rather than from the top, so that there is less chance of bad edits slipping through.

    Autoconfirmed users [ edit ]

    Users who have been registered for longer than 30 days are marked as “autoconfirmed”. In addition to this allowing them to review other edits, it also means that their own edits are patrolled automatically.

    Therefore, there is no current way to use the patrolling feature to review edits made by users who have been registered for longer than 30 days.

    Patrolling edits [ edit ]

    How to Patrol Recent Changes on wikiHow

    In diff mode, you’ll see a [ Mark as patrolled ] link for unpatrolled edits.

    If the edit is constructive and substantially complies with Wikitravel policies, mark it as patrolled. Patrolling an edit does not mean that you have verified all the content of the edit as correct. Others familiar with the destination will check this using their watchlist and during subsequent edits.

    However, when patrolling, in additional to blatant vandalism, you should also check for

    1. Breaching Wikitravel policies, particularly policies on external links, tours and touting
    2. Changing existing accommodation listings url or phone numbers to a consolidator, or agent.
    3. Deletion of information, with no explanation in either the comment or the talk page.
    4. Reordering of listings, without explanation.

    If you are in doubt, don’t mark the change patrolled. Someone else can double check it later.

    This page is part of the MediaWiki Action API documentation.
    MediaWiki version:

    GET request to list all the recent changes to the wiki, in the same manner as Special:RecentChanges lists them.

    Contents

    • 1 API documentation
    • 2 Example
      • 2.1 GET request
      • 2.2 Response
      • 2.3 Sample code
      • 2.4 Python
      • 2.5 PHP
      • 2.6 JavaScript
      • 2.7 MediaWiki JS
    • 3 Possible errors
    • 4 Parameter history
    • 5 Additional notes
    • 6 See also
    The following documentation is the output of Special:ApiHelp/query+recentchanges, automatically generated by the pre-release version of MediaWiki that is running on this site (MediaWiki.org).

    list=recentchanges (rc)

    • This module requires read rights.
    • This module can be used as a generator.
    • Source: MediaWiki
    • License: GPL-2.0-or-later

    Enumerate recent changes.

    The timestamp to start enumerating from.

    Type: timestamp (allowed formats) rcend

    The timestamp to end enumerating.

    Type: timestamp (allowed formats) rcdir

    In which direction to enumerate:

    newer List oldest first. Note: rcstart has to be before rcend. older List newest first (default). Note: rcstart has to be later than rcend. One of the following values: newer, older Default: older rcnamespace

    Filter changes to only these namespaces.

    Values (separate with | or alternative): -1, -2, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 90, 91, 92, 93, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 486, 487, 828, 829, 1198, 1199, 2300, 2301, 2302, 2303, 2600, 5500, 5501 To specify all values, use * . rcuser

    Only list changes by this user.

    Type: user, by any of user name, IP, interwiki name (e.g. “prefix>ExampleName”) and user ID (e.g. “#12345”) rcexcludeuser

    Don’t list changes by this user.

    Type: user, by any of user name, IP, interwiki name (e.g. “prefix>ExampleName”) and user ID (e.g. “#12345”) rctag

    Only list changes tagged with this tag.

    Include additional pieces of information:

    user Adds the user responsible for the edit and tags if they are an IP. If the user has been revision deleted, a userhidden property will be returned. userid Adds the user ID responsible for the edit. If the user has been revision deleted, a userhidden property will be returned. comment Adds the comment for the edit. If the comment has been revision deleted, a commenthidden property will be returned. parsedcomment Adds the parsed comment for the edit. If the comment has been revision deleted, a commenthidden property will be returned. flags Adds flags for the edit. timestamp Adds timestamp of the edit. title Adds the page title of the edit. ids Adds the page ID, recent changes ID and the new and old revision ID. sizes Adds the new and old page length in bytes. redirect Tags edit if page is a redirect. patrolled Tags patrollable edits as being patrolled or unpatrolled. loginfo Adds log information (log ID, log type, etc) to log entries. tags Lists tags for the entry. sha1 Adds the content checksum for entries associated with a revision. If the content has been revision deleted, a sha1hidden property will be returned. Values (separate with | or alternative): comment, flags, ids, loginfo, parsedcomment, patrolled, redirect, sha1, sizes, tags, timestamp, title, user, userid Default: title|timestamp|ids rctoken Deprecated.

    Values (separate with | or alternative): patrol rcshow

    Show only items that meet these criteria. For example, to see only minor edits done by logged-in users, set rcshow=minor|!anon.

    Values (separate with | or alternative): !anon, !autopatrolled, !bot, !minor, !patrolled, !redirect, anon, autopatrolled, bot, minor, patrolled, redirect, unpatrolled rclimit

    How many total changes to return.

    Type: integer or max The value must be between 1 and 500. Default: 10 rctype

    Which types of changes to show.

    Values (separate with | or alternative): categorize, edit, external, log, new Default: edit|new|log|categorize rctoponly

    Only list changes which are the latest revision.

    Type: boolean (details) rctitle

    Filter entries to those related to a page.

    When more results are available, use this to continue.

    When being used as a generator, generate revision IDs rather than titles. Recent change entries without associated revision IDs (e.g. most log entries) will generate nothing.

    Type: boolean (details) rcslot

    Only list changes that touch the named slot.

    One of the following values: main

    GET request Edit

    Get the 3 most recent changes with sizes and flags

    From Homestar Runner Wiki

    Ever noticed a little red exclamation point ( !) next to an edit listed on the recent changes page? Did you know you can remove those exclamation points by patrolling edits? The idea is that having a group of people patrolling edits should reduce spam and vandalism.

    To mark an edit as patrolled, click the “diff” link next to an unpatrolled edit, survey the edit to be sure it isn’t spam or vandalism, then click the “Mark as patrolled” link near the top right of the page.

    It’s a different process to mark a new page patrolled. Since there is no “diff” link, you instead click on the article name. The link to patrol says, “Mark this article as patrolled”, and it appears at the bottom right corner of the article.

    If you’d like to help out in the effort of patrolling recent changes, put your name on the list below. Adding your name to the list constitutes a commitment of time to patrolling. This page will serve as a hub for patrollers to get in contact with one another. Feel free to list any questionable edits at the bottom of this page to call them to the attention of other patrollers. For an example of how this page might serve our community, see the Recent changes patrol on Wikipedia.

    Do you want to become the ramblin’ wreck of RC check? Then feel free to join one of our IRC channels, #hrwiki-RC, where recent changes made to the wiki will appear live.

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Toutes les traductions de recent changes patrol

    Contenu de sens a gent

    • définitions
    • synonymes
    • antonymes
    • encyclopédie
    • definition
    • synonym

    dictionnaire et traducteur pour sites web

    Une fenêtre (pop-into) d’information (contenu principal de Sensagent) est invoquée un double-clic sur n’importe quel mot de votre page web. LA fenêtre fournit des explications et des traductions contextuelles, c’est-à-dire sans obliger votre visiteur à quitter votre page web !

    Essayer ici, télécharger le code;

    Solution commerce électronique

    Augmenter le contenu de votre site

    Ajouter de nouveaux contenus Add à votre site depuis Sensagent par XML.

    Parcourir les produits et les annonces

    Obtenir des informations en XML pour filtrer le meilleur contenu.

    Indexer des images et définir des méta-données

    Fixer la signification de chaque méta-donnée (multilingue).

    Renseignements suite à un email de description de votre projet.

    Jeux de lettres

    Lettris est un jeu de lettres gravitationnelles proche de Tetris. Chaque lettre qui apparaît descend ; il faut placer les lettres de telle manière que des mots se forment (gauche, droit, haut et bas) et que de la place soit libérée.

    Il s’agit en 3 minutes de trouver le plus grand nombre de mots possibles de trois lettres et plus dans une grille de 16 lettres. Il est aussi possible de jouer avec la grille de 25 cases. Les lettres doivent être adjacentes et les mots les plus longs sont les meilleurs. Participer au concours et enregistrer votre nom dans la liste de meilleurs joueurs ! Jouer

    Dictionnaire de la langue française
    Principales Références

    La plupart des définitions du français sont proposées par SenseGates et comportent un approfondissement avec Littré et plusieurs auteurs techniques spécialisés.
    Le dictionnaire des synonymes est surtout dérivé du dictionnaire intégral (TID).
    L’encyclopédie française bénéficie de la licence Wikipedia (GNU).

    Changer la langue cible pour obtenir des traductions.
    Astuce: parcourir les champs sémantiques du dictionnaire analogique en plusieurs langues pour mieux apprendre avec sensagent.

    calculé en 0,047s

    Copyright © 2000-2016 sensagent : Encyclopédie en ligne, Thesaurus, dictionnaire de définitions et plus. Tous droits réservés.

    What the Recent changes patrol does:

    • Highest priority: new and anonymous user edits. If you want to take on a more manageable role, you could specialize in one of these:
      • anon editors’ contributions (or click “Hide logged-in users” on RecentChanges).
      • New users: Newbies
    • New pages: Special:NewPages. Select a namespace to focus on – Main is most important. New user pages are often posted by spammers, but this should be picked up by the other patrols, above. (If you want a simpler view, see Special:NewestPages.)

    For a more complete patrol, monitor the Recentchanges page.

    • If you are an admin, you will see a link that lets you “mark article as patrolled.” This helps admins to cooperate in making sure that all new pages and new edits are checked, polished, linked, etc.

    MediaWiki lets you filter the RecentChanges feed:

    • Tweak the settings at the top of Special:Recentchanges. If you want to focus on a particular area (e.g. anon editors, contributions by new user accounts, [article talk pages]. ) then you can mention that if you “sign up” below.
    • To track a subject area, you can use the “Related changes” link, found in the lowest section of the left sidebar. Go to a category you want to monitor and click “Related changes” and it will show all recent changes made to pages in the category. However, it’s not a complete solution – it will not show when pages are added to or removed from the category. (It also doesn’t show you relevant pages which are not yet in the category – see Appropedia:Categorization project for work on this.)

    Other logs are also worth monitoring, e.g. Special:NewFiles shows a gallery of new files – monitor it for possible spam , copyright violations and missing licensing or missing fair-use justification.

    Patrol members [ edit ]

    Lots of people keep an eye on Special:RecentChanges – if you do, you might want to add your name here. You can use an asterisk and three tildes,

    The @ symbol, pronounced “at”, is widely used on the internet, especially in email addresses. There are various way to type it on a laptop. However the exact keys that you must press to create the @ symbol, will vary depending on your operating system (Windows or Mac), the configuration language of your keyboard and whether or not your laptop has a numeric keypad. We have the solutions for each of these cases below.
    How to Patrol Recent Changes on wikiHow

    How To Get the @ Symbol on a Windows Laptop

    On a laptop with a numeric keypad, press Ctrl + Alt + 2, or Alt + 64.

    On an English keyboard for the United States, press Shift + 2.

    On an English keyboard for the UK, use Shift + `.

    On a Spanish keyboard for Latin America, press Alt Gr + Q.

    On an international Spanish keyboard, press Alt Gr + 2.

    On an Italian keyboard, press Alt Gr + Q.

    On a French keyboard, press Alt Gr + à.

    How To Get the @ Symbol on a Mac

    On an English keyboard, press Shift + 2.

    On a Spanish-language keyboard, press Alt + 2:

    How to Patrol Recent Changes on wikiHow
    Image: © martan – Shutterstock.com

    A few words of thanks would be greatly appreciated.

    How to Patrol Recent Changes on wikiHow

    Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, speaks alongside members of the Hispanic Caucus after touring the Border Patrol station in Clint, Texas, on Monday. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

    Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, speaks alongside members of the Hispanic Caucus after touring the Border Patrol station in Clint, Texas, on Monday.

    Customs and Border Protection has launched an investigation into a secret Facebook group for current and former Border Patrol agents in which members posted derogatory remarks targeting migrants and lawmakers.

    The group, which called itself “I’m 10-15” — a reference to the Border Patrol code for “aliens in custody” — was revealed Monday by ProPublica, a nonprofit news organization, as a delegation of Democratic congressional lawmakers toured three migrant detention facilities in southwestern Texas.

    Among the group’s most offensive posts were discussions of recent migrant deaths, including that of a 16-year-old Guatemalan boy who died in May while he was in Border Patrol custody in Texas. Other posts joked about throwing burritos at lawmakers visiting its facilities.

    Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, who were both part of the delegation, were also targets of the group. Members referred to the women as “scumbags” and on multiple occasions posted graphic illustrations falsely depicting Ocasio-Cortez performing a sex act.

    “These posts are completely inappropriate and contrary to the honor and integrity I see—and expect—from our agents day in and day out,” Border Patrol Chief Carla Provost said in an emailed statement. She added that any employees who have violated the agency’s standards of conduct “will be held accountable.”

    Matthew Klein, assistant commissioner at the CBP, said that after learning of the “disturbing social media activity,” the agency immediately informed the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of the Inspector General and initiated an investigation.

    Border Patrol has come under intense scrutiny for its treatment of migrants seeking asylum in the U.S. as the Trump administration has moved to implement more aggressive measures to curb the surge of migrants at the border.

    Chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, condemned the online group, following a tour of the Border Patrol’s Clint facility.

    “That was a vulgar, disgusting and vile page,” he told reporters. “That shows, unfortunately, that there are many within CBP who’ve become desensitized to the point of being dangerous to the migrants in their care.”

    Castro added: “It shocks the conscience that these agents are entrusted with the lives of anybody in their custody.”

    The Clint shelter became a flashpoint last month for critics of the Trump administration’s policies over how it treats unaccompanied migrant children. A group of lawyers who visited the Border Patrol-run facility said roughly 300 children were being detained in filthy conditions with no access to showers or personal hygiene products and with little food, for weeks at a time.

    On Monday, The Associated Press released video of an unidentified girl talking about her experience there after she was reunited with her mother. She said hundreds of children were mistreated by the people who were meant to care for them; children were denied showers and had to sleep on the floor, often sharing blankets, she said.

    Last week, Congress passed a $4.6 billion emergency aid package to improve conditions at temporary shelters housing migrants.

    Do I need new glasses, or are all the exclamation marks gone on RecentChanges? — User:Sean Fennel @ 03:03, 27 May 2006 (EDT)

    I still see them, except on pages that’ve been patrolled. TedErnst | talk 16:53, 28 May 2006 (EDT) Found out why I can’t see them: It seems that the “patrol” permission isn’t automatically granted to regular users as of 1.6. — User:Sean Fennel @ 22:54, 21 June 2006 (EDT)

    is this an option we need to turn on? TedErnst | talk 01:34, 22 June 2006 (EDT)

    The update to version 6.5 implemented a different scheme of user privileges I have listed the default values below. We don’t want to give any special privileges to regular users because those could be used by spammers. I propose that we create a new user group “Editors” for people who we trust and who work on the wiki content, we can then create a set of “Sysop Like” permissions that would allow things like patroling. The last section in this list is my suggestions for permissions for the “Editors” group. John 13:52, 4 July 2006 (EDT)

    I would rather turn off the recent changes patrol flag. I am not in favor of making more complexity than what is needed. My two cents 😉 MarkDilley

    Can’t we just give users the patrol ability? Patrol can’t be used maliciously, can it? The only thing it could do would be to hide spam a bit, but that’s a lot better than turning off the patrol function. I use the patrol function and really like it. Plus, I’d like others to be able to use it as well (like Sean). TedErnst | talk 13:30, 5 July 2006 (EDT)

    That would be fine, just concerned about expanding admin functions. MarkDilley

    could you say more about this concern? we wouldn’t be giving anyone permission to do anything they can’t already do, except for patrolling recent changes – unless I’m missing something, this feature can be isolated from everything else, so there would be no admin powers granted (although I’d love to see us expand admin powers to more people, but that’s a seperate issue) TedErnst | talk 18:46, 5 July 2006 (EDT)

    I want wiki to stay as simple as possible. By creating new administration levels, such as John metioned above is counter to that. I think it is fine if a regular user can use this function, but am against expanding the categories of administration on this wiki. I also agree that I would like to move regular contributors to our admin level. MarkDilley

    Just to clarify, I don’t support the idea of an “editor.” I’d like to simply give regular users the ability to patrol recent changes. Let’s take our admin proposal to a new page, shall we? TedErnst | talk 19:35, 5 July 2006 (EDT)

    I don’t know about block or delete as that’s really just missing protect to be, in essence, the same thing as sysop, but deletedhistory and patrol ought to be given, and rollback just removes a couple of clicks from something everybody with read and edit permissions can already do. — User:Sean [email protected] 12:06, 30 August 2006 (EDT)

    Cruising on auto-pilot? [ edit ]

    So, here I am, a newcomer poking around, trying to figure out what kind of place this is, what ways I might want to get involved. And I can quickly see who the core people seem to be. But when I look at core infrastructure, like this page, it seems like there was a founding phase of high energy a while back, and now things are — coasting? Languishing? Cruising on auto-pilot? Neglected? If you admins are still percolating, it would be good to see updates here and similar places, from time to time – or a link to wherever ongoing related conversations are actually occurring.–69.87.200.20 04:33, 30 January 2007 (PST)

    IP ban request [ edit ]

    Somebody please ban 65.44.66.100? And 217.77.36.131, while you’re at it. This one has come back twice in a row. FYI, a visitor adding random words to several pages is a spammer testing the ground for a full scale attack. And no, they can’t change IPs so easily, so banning them is effective.

    I did block them for short, if they do it again, this will be for a longer period –Wolf | talk 05:55, 6 October 2007 (EDT)

    F riday, Nov. 13, 2015 was a strangely balmy night in Paris, the kind that makes visitors fall in love with the city. People spilled out of the cafés, winding down the workweek over glasses of wine, their chatter and laughter creating a soft hubbub on the streets, as pedestrians sidestepped the crowds.

    And then, in a few ghastly moments, everything changed. When the news first broke of automatic gunfire, there was a moment when some people, including me, thought that the idyllic evening had perhaps been shattered by a gang fight: unsettling, for sure, but outside our realm, and to be honest, our concern. Then came another attack, and another, and another, and another. Three teams of gunmen/suicide bombers rampaged through the 10th and 11th arrondissements, aiming their weapons at the sidewalk cafés, and into the packed auditorium of the Bataclan concert hall. They targeted the very heart of what people relish about Paris—the city’s easy, flirty atmosphere tinged with flair, beauty and intelligence. In just two hours, in France’s worst terror attack in history, 129 people lay dead; one more died later. And there was another casualty, too: the protective membrane that has long sealed us off from the realities just out of view, was punctured.

    In the aftermath, Paris is a different place. “Changed” may be too strong a word, but the optic on our world has shifted. In a city usually swarming with tourists, many thousands of visitors have stayed away. Soldiers patrol the streets, rifles in hand. We instinctively open our bags before entering department stores, and spread our arms for magnetic wand searches. Inside, we take furtive glances around.

    For those of us journalists living in Europe, those habits are not new, of course. Until now, however, many of us have largely used them in that other side of our reporting lives: In the field, rather than back home. Sure, there has been regular terror in Europe, including the Madrid train bombing in 2004, the London bombings in 2005, and on March 22, bombs in Brussels’ airport and Metro system. Yet for years, many of us Europe-based correspondents have jetted in and out of gleaming airport hubs to far rawer datelines in Central Asia and the Middle East, covering this century’s dominant narrative—hate and terror—before returning to our comfortable cities to catch our breath, and plan our next assignments. The two realities have allowed us to limit the risks, balancing them on a scale, and knowing that we could always opt to stay home, and stay safe.

    But on Nov. 13, the story finally made its way to our doorsteps. That might be why the Paris attacks felt deeply personal to so many, and why their impact in the news has been so amplified. As we swarmed into the Place de la République for huge vigils, the relatives of the dead, and the victims themselves, seemed like us, urban professionals who had been out having fun on a Friday night. A banner in the square under the Marianne statue, above the melted candles and withered bouquets, reads “même pas peur”—roughly translated as “we are not afraid”—a slogan that is surely as fitting for journalists as anyone else. The Paris attacks were not aimed at a particular nationality, allegiance or even faith (several victims were Muslim). It targeted a way of life: ours. And unlike 9/11, or Syria, the attackers were not foreigners, sent by a far-off emir or conducting executions in the desert. They were born-and-raised Europeans, a few from the banlieues just a short train ride away, who looked their fellow Europeans in the eye and then shot them dead, before blowing themselves up.

    With the dividing wall in our journalistic lives now breached, there is much to think about. We correspondents in Paris are left grappling with crucial questions about our work, sometimes within the press club for American and British correspondents, which now holds its monthly happy hour—on a Friday night—in one of the cafés where the gunmen murdered five people on Nov. 13.

    First question is how scattershot the reporting by English-speaking journalists is from the banlieues, where virtually none of us lives, and which many journalists probably visited just twice during 2015: after the Charlie Hebdo attacks in January, and in the aftermath of the November attacks. In the U.S., the erratic coverage has been made far worse in recent years as many news organizations have shut their Paris bureaus and let their stringers drift away.

    Then there is the question of how we failed to grasp the major threats unfolding close by, even while we focused intently on the Syrian war thousands of miles away, and on the overwhelming migrant crisis it has spawned in Europe. After all, almost all the Paris attackers were known to police, either in France, or in Belgium, where most of them came from one tiny neighborhood.

    Weeks after the attacks, TIME dispatched me to Brussels, a 90-minute train ride away, to try to understand how the devastating plot had been hatched under the noses of officials seemingly asleep on the job. I could stand in the office of the local mayor and look across the square into the apartment of some of the Paris attackers (all but one believed dead) before walking over and ringing their doorbells. It took Belgian police more than four months to corner that one fugitive attacker, on March 18, right in his neighborhood just a few blocks from the precinct. That was hardly the end of the story. Four days later, his accomplices blew themselves up in Brussels Airport and in a subway train, killing at least 31 people and injuring about 260 others. Once again, crowds of shaken residents huddled in a grand public square, grieving not only for the dead, but also for a lost insouciance – the high price paid for years of governments’ slow-footedness. “It’s like they were blind,” one Belgian journalist told me, describing his country’s officials. “They saw the screws on the Titanic, but not the whole ship.”

    That’s easy to say, with hindsight. But the same might also be said for journalists, who had regularly quoted intelligence officials warning that a spectacular attack in Europe—somewhere, sometime—seemed likely. Now, those same officials are predicting an attack even bigger than Paris and Brussels. “It will have terrible consequences,” one intelligence veteran tells me.

    How we cover the next horrific attack will depend not only on our journalistic smarts. It will also rest on our editors’ wavering appetites for the quiet lulls in between. With little demand from our news organizations to go deep inside communities, journalists often find themselves scrambling for sources, and understanding, when major news occurs—as it is sure to do again. The days of a big Paris foreign press corps might be gone forever. But if the attacks have proved anything, it is that Europe is no longer a place for frontline journalists simply to rest up before flying off to the next hotspot.

    Vivienne Walt is a member of the Board of Governors of the Overseas Press Club of America. This article was originally published in the OPC’s Dateline Magazine, on the occasion of the OPC annual awards dinner in New York on April 28, 2016.

    Ready to move on up to Windows 10? Here are all the steps you need for success.

    Windows 10 is finally here and it’s the best version of the operating system we’ve seen in a while. Even better, it’s a free update if you already have Windows 7 or newer.

    The new operating system is available as an update starting July 29 and we recommend you upgrade. If you’re ready to bring your Windows 8 or 7 machine up to the latest version of Microsoft’s OS, there are few things you’ll have to do to make the upgrade as painless as possible. I’ve outlined the key steps to follow below.

    Step 1: Make sure your computer is eligible for Windows 10

    • Windows 10 is free for anyone running the latest version of Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 on their laptop, desktop or tablet computer.
    • You can figure out which version your computer by heading to Microsoft’s website.
    • You must be an administrator on your computer, meaning that you own the computer and set it up yourself. It’s very likely that you will not be able to update work computers that are managed by an IT department on your own.

    Step 2: Back up your computer

    To protect all of the files you have on your computer, I highly recommended that you back up your computer, just in case something goes wrong during the upgrade process. For a detailed process on how to do this, check out CNET’s guide to preparing your PC for Windows 10.

    Step 3: Update your current Windows version

    You will need to install all of the updates for the current version of Windows you have on your machine. If you’ve set up automatic updates, you should be all set, but double-check first.

    • On Windows 7, go to Start, Control Panel, System and Security and Windows Update.
    • On Windows 8 and 8.1, go to Start, PC Settings, Update and recovery, and Windows Update.
    • On all versions of Windows, your computer will you if there are any available updates and walk you through the process of downloading and installing them.
    • You may need to check for and install updates several times to finish this process.

    Step 4: Wait for the Windows 10 prompt

    Once your computer has the latest updates, you’ll need to wait for a Windows icon to pop up in the taskbar on your desktop, letting you know you can reserve Windows 10. Follow the directions on the screen to let Microsoft know that you would like the Windows 10 update. You may enter your email address to confirm the update, but it is not necessary.

    When you’re finished with the reservation process, all you can do is sit back and wait for Microsoft to automatically send Windows 10 to your computer, a process that can take several days or weeks. When it’s time to install the update, you will get a notification on your computer.

    Advanced users only: Get Windows 10 directly from Microsoft

    If you’ve finished all the above steps and do not want to wait another minute to get Windows 10, there is a way to speed things up. Check out CNET’s guide to manually downloading and installing Windows 10 to jump the line and get started now. However, use this process at your own risk, because it can be more complicated than simply waiting for the update to arrive.