Categories
Device

How to prioritize work when everything seems important

How to prioritize work when everything seems important

How to prioritize work when everything seems important

Life is a treasure of wishes, desires, dreams and goals to be achieved but achieving every goal or desire is neither essential nor possible. Moreover, the burden of ambitions to achieve every goal you wish for is huge enough that will never let you enjoy even a moment of relaxation.

How to prioritize work when everything seems important

To have a beautiful, accomplished and satisfying life, you need to prioritize your goals in life. Set an aim to achieve the goals in the order of their necessity and importance in your life. See achieving goals as the way you can keep your life going and more fulfilling. And if you think chasing too many goals at a time is bad, having none is even worse.

Working to achieve a number of goals is quite frustrating and does no good to you and your surroundings. The cure is with you and quite simple; just cut down the list of goals to be achieved and make it look manageable and hence, achievable.

Create a list of all goals in your mind

Sit down quietly, take a pen and paper and start with writing the goals you are going to start. However, create a category of personal and professional goals as they both go hand-in-hand.

What you count as a Goal

Before you list your goal, first see if you are listing real goals or just including your routine jobs in your list of goals. Things like going to work or completing your daily household chores are not goals. Goals are those tasks that you want to accomplish but they require your efforts and time. They are long-term tasks.

Your goals may be getting a new qualification, or achieving the top position in your next examination, losing 10 Kg, writing a book, going on a trip, renovating your house and so on.

Once your list gets ready, you will see that there are some goals that have been pending for years.

Prioritize your goals in Life

When you see your list of goals, you might find it difficult to achieve all of them. Now, cut down your list to some of the most important and most desirable goals. Think of achieving one goal at a time.

Find out the best way to prioritize your goals in life—like you can choose to do most important goal first or the smallest goal first or a goal that can give your life a big boost. It is your choice how you prioritize your goals in life.

If you have some goals and targets in your life which can be crucial in your life, they are the most important goals.

If you want a certain position in your career at a certain point of time, it is important that you obtain the essential qualification and expertise at the right time. Your priority in your life should be to obtain the qualification, education, and expertise that can lead you to that position.

Similarly, if you want to buy a house in a particular location, it is important that you work hard to earn the required amount of money.

Another criteria for prioritizing your goals can be achieved by reaching those smaller goals that can create a “snowball” effect for bigger things on your agenda. Winning a prize in a musical event can lead you to gain prestigious assignments if you are aiming to be a singer.

However, sometimes, we end up working with so many smaller goals and do not find time for bigger, more important goals.

Your priority should be doing a task that is important and also create a big impact in your life in immediate future.

Planning milestones for your goal

Now when you have prioritized your goals, it is important that you chalk out a plan that leads you in the right direction. If this is a small goal, set a deadline and if it is a bigger goal like having a certain professional position, work towards having desired qualifications.

Similarly, you can prioritize a second important goal that you can work upon along with the first goal. However, first assess your energy level. If your health and other circumstances do not allow you to commit to two goals at a time, focus on the first important goal only at a time.

Working on more than one goal simultaneously can lead to struggle and higher stress levels.

We all have those days, your to-do list seems never ending, but you are just laying in bed because you don’t know where to start. Everything on it seems like a #1 priority which makes you feel even more overwhelmed.

Prioritizing your tasks is crucial for success in life. We all know it is hard sometimes, but if you know how to get your head around it and have control over the situation, you will be able to complete your list without panicking or procrastinating.

So how to prioritize your to-do list when you are sure that everything is equally important. We give you 6 useful tips to get full control of your situation and actually get things done.

#1 Write all you tasks down

Write down everything you need to do on that day. Don’t prioritize them yet, just get everything you need to do visible on a piece of paper.

#2 Mark urgent vs. important

The following step is to see how many of your tasks need your immediate attention. Everything on your list can be important, but not everything is as urgent as others. When we talk about urgent it is those kinds of tasks that needed to be completed within a couple of hours or that day, otherwise it might have negative consequences.#3 What has most value

Your next step in this process is to see which tasks have the most value. What is the most important for you, your business or the organization you work for? In order to do that, you need to rank what has the most impact and where are the most people involved. Write down what has the most value for you and base your outcome on that list.

#4 Order the tasks by effort

If all your tasks seem to have high priority, try to rank them based on effort. Start with the one that seems to be the task with the most effort. Experts say it is best to start with the one that will take you longest and is the hardest, but some people prefer to start with the ‘easiest’ tasks. But it is basically whatever floats your boat.

#5 Be flexible and adapt

Circumstances change, always be ready for that. There is always the possibility that your priorities change during the day, something you did not expect. Being flexible and adaptable are skills that are really important and will cause you way less stress in the end.

#6 Know when to cut

It is normal and no reason for panic if you can’t get to everything on your list. If you completed the previous steps and ranked your tasks in an order you can cut everything of that you will not be able to do in one day. This will allow you to focus more on the priorities that have more importance and must be done that day.

There’s no question like “Why do you need to prioritize?” in the life of an entrepreneur because a usual entrepreneur witnesses a clutter of unfinished tasks, new tasks, tasks that need attention, tasks that have crossed the deadlines, meetings, phone calls, presentations, and other tasks which are becoming more complex and demanding day by day.

If you’re one such entrepreneur, the magnitude and complexity of such tasks could be overwhelming and could lead to stress and a dip in your productivity.

No matter how good you are at multitasking (which is actually bad for your health), prioritization always helps. It not only gets the work done easily but also helps you to increase the pace of completing your tasks.

Why Is Prioritizing Important?

One of the biggest factors which separate highly productive people from not-so-productive people is that the highly productive people consider their time to be a valuable asset and know that priority management leads to time management. They don’t prioritize their schedule, they schedule their priorities to increase the productivity in the least time possible.

According to the Pareto Principle, 20% of the efforts are responsible for the 80% of the output. Prioritization helps you to direct that 20% effectively and efficiently.

But how to prioritize when everything seems to be the #1 priority?

Well, here’s a prioritization process to help you in such a situation.

The Priority Management Process

Am I Prioritizing correctly?

If this question makes you re-prioritize your work, you aren’t following the right technique. But what exactly is the right technique?

Manage priorities, not time.

Follow this priority management process for better results.

Make one to-do list and write every task that you need to accomplish for the day or for the week. Include every task no matter how easy or hard it is for you.

Divide

Learning the art of organizing is important before learning the art of prioritizing.

The next step is to divide the tasks according to their level of importance and urgency. This grid will help you.

How to prioritize work when everything seems important

Vital & Urgent: Out of the 100 “I need to do this now” tasks, 98 are crucial to your business’s growth, but 2 might have significant consequences if these tasks are not completed in the specified time. These tasks should be labelled vital and urgent.

Vital & Not Urgent: These tasks are of critical importance and can have significant consequences, but these tasks aren’t that urgent and can be performed after other important tasks.

Important & Urgent: These tasks are also very important but do not harm you or your business as significantly as vital tasks if missed.

Important & Not Urgent: These tasks do not carry a significant harm and are also not urgent. Nevertheless, they do require your attention.

Optional: These are the ‘add-on tasks’ which, if performed, will provide some benefit, but they don’t have any consequence if not performed. Optional tasks can also include ‘Important & Not Urgent At All’ tasks.

Your next job is to rank the tasks that are needed to be performed according to the grid above. The flow goes in this way:

  1. Vital & Urgent
  2. Important & Urgent
  3. Vital & Not Urgent
  4. Important & Not Urgent
  5. Optional

You also need to rank the tasks in one head according to their level of difficulty. This will further help you prioritize your work. For example, if there are two tasks under the vital & urgent head, rank the more difficult task above the easier one.

Because we naturally avoid things we don’t want to do and this tendency to procrastinate the difficult task affects the other tasks following it. Hence, it is better to perform the difficult task before the easier tasks.

The next task is to perform the tasks according to the ranks assigned by you.

Following this prioritization process will surely help you to prioritize work when everything seems to be important. But we’ll also suggest you follow the following steps to increase your productivity.

Learn To Delegate & Outsource

Prioritization isn’t all about determining the order in which the tasks are to be done. It also involves determining which tasks should be done by you, which tasks should be done by your juniors, and which tasks can be outsourced.

Time is expensive and you should learn to weigh the cost of your time and cost asked by a third party and outsource the work which can be outsourced.

Avoid Multitasking

A simple search on Google will tell you why is multitasking bad for your brain.

How to prioritize work when everything seems important

Multitasking is also one of the biggest barriers to healthy prioritization. Avoid multitasking and start time blocking as it’ll help you devote your 100% attention to one task, which will eventually lead to more efficient results.

Reduce Or Remove Interruptions & Distractions

Social media, emails, phone calls, cigarette breaks, etc. interrupt your concentration and the ability to complete the task efficiently.

According to the book Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain, experience, compensation, and time spent working on a project is less relevant to quality performance than privacy and freedom from interruptions.

Keep a check on interruptions and most of your problems related to prioritization will vanish automatically.

Go On, Tell Us What You Think!

Do you find it hard to prioritize tasks? Come on! Tell us what you think of our article on how to prioritize in the comments section.

📝 If you have found an error in the data provided on this page, please, notify us by selecting that text and pressing Ctrl+Enter.

A startup consultant, dreamer, traveller, and philomath. Aashish has worked with over a 50 startups and successfully helped them ideate, raise money, and succeed. When not working, he can be found hiking, camping, and stargazing.

How to prioritize tasks at work is an eternal challenge when your workload is heavy, there are multiple demands on your time, and everything needs your attention right now.

You end up working all the time in an effort to catch up and fulfil your responsibilities towards colleagues, administrators, your students, and others.

Despite your determination and long work hours, you never seem to feel like you’re on top of your workload. Bleh.

How to prioritize at work: Standard approaches

Here are two ways to start determining what’s most important, and what may not be worth your time. Start here. And, revisit these steps regularly.

Clarify Your Goals

You need to know what’s important in order to determine your priority action items.

Don’t bypass this step, as tempting as it may be!

Ask yourself and decide:

  • What am I working towards?
  • What is the big picture here?
  • What matters? (to me and to the people around me who matter, i.e., my boss, colleagues, family)
  • What’s on my plate that doesn’t reflect my priorities?

Remember: being busy doesn’t necessarily equate to progress. And you can’t have 10 priorities–it defies the meaning of the word and doesn’t lend itself to actually accomplishing things.

Eisenhower Matrix

This matrix or box asks you to sort your tasks into 4 categories:

  1. Urgent and important (tasks you will do right away).
  2. Important, but not urgent (tasks you will schedule).
  3. Urgent, but not important (tasks that may not contribute to your goals; delegate or schedule).
  4. Neither urgent nor important (tasks that you will eliminate).

A LOT of helpful posts have been written about how to use this system, such as this one by James Clear, author of Atomic Habits. I like Clear’s reminder to eliminate before optimizing: “the fastest way to get something done — whether it is having a computer read a line of code or crossing a task off your to-do list — is to eliminate that task entirely. There is no faster way to do something than not doing it at all.”

How to prioritize at work: Less common (yet effective) approaches

The approaches below work well once you’ve clarified your goals and done some categorizing using the Eisenhower Matrix or equivalent.

Create a daily “most important tasks” list (and stick to it)

Once you’ve got a solid picture of your priorities, you need to execute on them. To help you do so, create a daily to-do list that clearly identifies a maximum of 3 most important tasks that will move your priorities forward. Then, establish how long you will dedicate to that task.

Organize your day based on your energy levels

Once you have started to establish tasks to move a priority forward, you’ll want to schedule these into your day/week. Whenever possible, I highly recommend paying attention to your energy.

Mornings are a time when I focus easily and have abundant energy. So, I tackle priority items that require concentration then. For example, my morning tasks might include: drafting a conference proposal, a report write-up, or the design of a workshop.

You may not be a morning person, and that’s ok! The point here is:

  1. Observe when you feel energized and when you feel more lethargic
  2. Determine what kind of energy your daily/weekly priority tasks require
  3. Schedule your week so that your energy levels align with your priority tasks for that day or week.

The above strategies work well together and definitely help prioritize. You can use them together, or “mix-and-match” with other strategies to find a system that works for YOU.

Prioritizing at work when you have multiple demands on your time can be challenging. Sometimes, all you need is a good system. Other times, what you need is to clarify your goals and values. If you want to manage your weeks (and months…maybe even your entire work life!) with more ease and would appreciate some coaching support to get you there, contact me.

How to prioritize work when everything seems important

Sometimes, everything seems important. Work-life balance just disappears. You may stop prioritizing your work when you feel fed up by it or get busy with home tasks. But it is important to prioritize work as well as maintain your home tasks with it. It seems difficult but is not, if done in a calm manner. Your work may seem boring and tiring, but it may help a lot of other people if done in the given time. So, let’s get to it, shall we?

Jot it down: Write all of your tasks as soon as you get it. Arrange them in the order of their priority. Write down their deadline. And their importance and also the benefits they offer. Always put your office work first.

Overload: Do not ever let your workload weigh you down. Do all of your small tasks instantly. If a deadline is given for a task, try to start doing it from the day you get it.

Procrastination: Do not ever procrastinate. This can lead you to depression and can leave you with a lot of your office tasks and home tasks. Do it as soon as you get it. Do not let the thought of procrastination crawl in between.

21 days: Try doing the above mentioned tips for 21 days and you will be surprised to see it turn into a habit. Then you will never have any workload. Or depression. You will be able to handle everything easily.

Difficult work: While doing any kind of difficult or tense work, play a soft music and calm your brain. By doing this your brain will be tricked into believing that this is a calm work and will help you relax while doing it.

There are lot of other things to take care of to prioritize your work and I have listed only some of them. But doing these, will help you a lot. Do not believe me. Just try and see.

Copyright Notice

December 4, 2018 (Updated on February 17, 2021)

How to prioritize work when everything seems important

Want a simple way to prioritize when everything seems important? Read on for the simple strategy that will help you prioritize with purpose.

How to prioritize work when everything seems important

Prioritize with Purpose

You know that feeling when you’ve got a to-do list is a mile long, and it feels like there just aren’t enough hours in the day to get it all done?

You know, that feeling when everything seems important, and there’s absolutely no way you can possibly fit it all in?

Yeah, that feeling is totally normal.

Between work, family, chores, and taking care of wellness, the feeling of never-ending, never-enough, done can creep up quickly.

The longer the list, the more overwhelming the whole thing starts to seem, and the less likely it is that you’ll be able to focus in and get anything done.

Here’s the good news: there is a simple way to prioritize when everything seems important.

The secret? To prioritize with purpose and process.

To take that crazy to-do list and run it through a filter that will allow you to prioritize what actually matters, and that will set you on a sustainable path toward your goals.

It all starts by asking a simple set of questions. Here’s how it works.

5 Key Questions

1. Which tasks are intentional and meaningful?

Take each item on your to-do list, one-by-one, and ask yourself if doing the task has any real meaning to you.

Is is something with significance, that truly matters?

Is it something that’s connected to your “why,” or your overall values?

If the answer is yes, then keep it one your list.

If the answer is no, move onto the next question.

2. Which tasks are not intentional or meaningful?

Using a critical eye, examine those items on your list that aren’t intentional or meaningful.

There are often those items that you think you should do, rather than what really has meaning to you.

Or there are the items related to others’ expectations or demands, but that don’t align with your life and values.

Once you find these non-purposeful items, go ahead and ditch them, or at the very least, move them to the bottom of the list.

3. Which tasks help to create a sustainable path forward?

Think in terms incremental forward progress here.

Does the items connect to a bigger goal or plan?

Is it laid out in a way that allows you to take baby steps, to create momentum, to sustain effort over time?

If so, keep the item on your list!

How to prioritize work when everything seems important

4. Which tasks are without process?

Take a close look at the items left.

This is the stuff that generally fills our days.

The busy work, the stuff that is more for other people than for our own values, the time wasters, the distractions.

If the item isn’t leading you to where you want to be, in a way that’s incremental, then go ahead and take it off the list.

5. How can I repeat and refine?

Now keep coming back to these questions again and again.

Ask which items have purpose and process.

Then work on prioritizing these.

When you apply these questions it becomes clear that everything is not actually equally important, and that some things matter more than others.

Start your day with the purpose and process items, or take them on when you have the most energy.

Then be okay with letting the rest go, or at least letting them fall to to the bottom of the list.

More purpose, more process, more focus on really matters.

It seems like it should be easy: Organizing your to-do list by order of importance. And then simply tackling each task one by one until you’ve checked everything off. You complete the list by 4:59 p.m., and you’re happily driving home at 5:00 p.m. sharp into a glorious sunset.

It’s a lovely dream. But so often, we are overloaded with too many tasks on the list. We either can’t decide what’s actually important or we’re paralyzed by the sheer number of looming tasks. So we just default to doing the easiest thing to check off the list (which is seldom very important).

Not choosing the right priorities leads to stress and overwhelm, missed deadlines, wasted time, and zapped energy. So what are we supposed to do when everything feels equally important and we can’t quite get a handle on our day’s agenda?

Here are eight specific ideas you can implement in order to choose the right priorities and be ridiculously productive during your workday.

Widen your lens.

When you are trying to decide what to do on any given day, you are looking through a zoom lens. But in order to know what you’re looking at up close, you need to have an idea of the bigger picture. You have to trade in that zoomed-in lens for the wide-angle version to see the full image. What are the overarching goals of your company and your specific team or department? What are your personal goals for the year ahead of you? (If you don’t know the answers to these questions, you’ll want to figure them out so you have a guidepost for how you choose your daily priorities.) You then narrow down that big picture to monthly goals, then weekly goals, on down to daily goals. The things you spend the most time on day-to-day should be in line with the bigger picture goals.

Make organization a mainstay.

So much of prioritizing comes back to goal-setting. And in order to keep track of all these goals, you should have them written down. And they should be in one place. There are countless apps and programs for organization and keeping notes these days — not to mention plenty of platforms for coordinating team projects (Trello, Asana, Monday, etc.). You could also make use of something simpler like Google docs, MS Word, or your computer’s basic notepad. You could even use an ACTUAL paper notepad! The point is that you don’t want to be at the place where you are choosing your day’s priorities and you aren’t sure what options you have to choose from.

Step into the Matrix.

The Eisenhower Matrix, that is. It’s a four-quadrant grid where “Important” lies on the X-axis and “Urgent” on the Y-axis. With so many tasks on our plates these days, it’s hard to tell what is truly important to our bigger goals. This grid allows you to place a task into one of four categories: Important/Urgent, Important/Not Urgent, Not Important/Urgent, Not Important/Not Urgent. And that’s the order you should do them in. The last category you shouldn’t do at all. It’s a simple system that forces you to assess list items accurately.

Audition every task.

This is a system you can implement side-by-side with the matrix. You are essentially auditioning every task on your list. Does it deserve a place there? With each one, you can say:

  • Can I delegate (or outsource) this to someone else? Or is it crucial that I do it?
  • Does it need to be rescheduled for another time? Or does it need to be done now?
  • Could I automate this? Or does it need a singular focus?
  • Is it aligned with my bigger goals? Or is it a distraction?
  • Has it been on my list so long (as not important/not urgent) that I should just strike it from the list entirely? Or is it worth doing?

Prioritize your catalyst tasks.

There are some things on our lists that tend to be the first to go when we are busy. And those generally relate to our own health and wellbeing. (I call them catalyst tasks because they are the ones that give us mental, emotional, and physical boosts to get through the day.) Have you ever skipped a meal because you had so much to do? Or stayed up too late? Or neglected to get outside to feel sunlight — or even get up from your desk? These tasks rarely make the priority list when things are busy, but they are vital to maintaining your energy. If you can prioritize these catalyst tasks, even for a few minutes throughout your day, you will have better focus and increased productivity when you ARE working towards the goal tasks.

Get real.

Stop putting 47 things on your daily list, when you will never get to them all. It sets you up for disappointment. You should underestimate how much you can do in a day and overestimate how much time each thing will take. And actually write out a number of minutes next to each item for approximately how long it will take. Then you can actually schedule tasks into time slots on your calendar and create a realistic picture of what you can accomplish. This helps you be more selective about what you allow on that day’s agenda.

Only list actions.

When you write out your to-dos and you’re choosing what the priorities are, make sure that (in addition to being real), you are being specific. List the priorities according to ACTIONS, not just a general goal. (i.e. don’t list “Miller Project” on the to-do list. Write out actions like: “Call James to clarify details” or “Brainstorm 10 ideas for the proposal.”) Again, you want to set yourself up for success. Creating opportunities to give yourself clear “wins” is going to make the priority-choosing process even easier. And it will make achieving goals easier, too.

There are all kinds of approaches to prioritizing and productivity. Ultimately, it comes down to taking clear-headed action. Don’t get stuck in decision paralysis. Don’t get distracted by things that don’t matter. And be ready to make the effort and let your dynamically valuable light shine!

“Don’t be afraid to give your best to what seemingly are small jobs. Every time you conquer one it makes you that much stronger. If you do the little jobs well, the big ones tend to take care of themselves.” – Dale Carnegie

#1: Get an app. Unless you just don’t like the digital world, go online and get a simple to-do app for your smartphone. Task apps these days are geared to help people stay prioritized. Make sure to download an app that syncs easily between all of your devices: phone, laptop, tablet, and desktop. Ask a tech friend or look at online reviews for some suggestions. In fact, I recommend that you try out several different apps, as organization is a very personal preference.

#2: Use Covey’s Time Management Matrix. I haven’t found anything clearer or more helpful than Stephen Covey’s diagram from his book “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.” Below is a listing of each quadrant of this matrix, plus I have added an example.

1: Urgent and important: Receiving a call from a major client who is upset with your company

2: Not urgent, important: Planning your monthly calendar based on your goals

3: Urgent, not important: Receiving a call from a friend who is always in crisis, but doesn’t take your advice

4: Neither urgent nor important: Organizing desk drawers

The most important point to remember is to never let #3 become #2. It is so easy to do the urgent and not-all-that-important, while you neglect the non-urgent but very important! Don’t fall into this prioritization trap!

#3: Learn to accept losses. The psychology underneath the software issue is that lots of us have pretty good priorities, but we don’t budget for losses. We are optimistic, positive, energized and full of hope – and that’s a great thing. But the real winners at some point will also say, “To succeed at what’s really important to me, I need to accept that there are lots of things I won’t have time to do.” I know so many people who are full of potential, and as they age, they repeat the same startup projects year after year, because they can’t let go of the “good” for the “best.”

#4: Review your priorities with the right people. Priorities in our heads don’t stand a great chance of succeeding. Priorities reviewed weekly or monthly with people who are on your life team will keep you encouraged and focused. Sharing priorities with other people also helps keep you accountable to them.

It can be very difficult to know how to prioritize when everything seems important. Remember the four tips I’ve shared above to help you establish the right priorities. Keep in mind, too, that being flexible and adaptable is key to success in this area as you learn to accept time losses.

How to prioritize tasks at work is an eternal challenge when your workload is heavy, there are multiple demands on your time, and everything needs your attention right now.

You end up working all the time in an effort to catch up and fulfil your responsibilities towards colleagues, administrators, your students, and others.

Despite your determination and long work hours, you never seem to feel like you’re on top of your workload. Bleh.

How to prioritize at work: Standard approaches

Here are two ways to start determining what’s most important, and what may not be worth your time. Start here. And, revisit these steps regularly.

Clarify Your Goals

You need to know what’s important in order to determine your priority action items.

Don’t bypass this step, as tempting as it may be!

Ask yourself and decide:

  • What am I working towards?
  • What is the big picture here?
  • What matters? (to me and to the people around me who matter, i.e., my boss, colleagues, family)
  • What’s on my plate that doesn’t reflect my priorities?

Remember: being busy doesn’t necessarily equate to progress. And you can’t have 10 priorities–it defies the meaning of the word and doesn’t lend itself to actually accomplishing things.

Eisenhower Matrix

This matrix or box asks you to sort your tasks into 4 categories:

  1. Urgent and important (tasks you will do right away).
  2. Important, but not urgent (tasks you will schedule).
  3. Urgent, but not important (tasks that may not contribute to your goals; delegate or schedule).
  4. Neither urgent nor important (tasks that you will eliminate).

A LOT of helpful posts have been written about how to use this system, such as this one by James Clear, author of Atomic Habits. I like Clear’s reminder to eliminate before optimizing: “the fastest way to get something done — whether it is having a computer read a line of code or crossing a task off your to-do list — is to eliminate that task entirely. There is no faster way to do something than not doing it at all.”

How to prioritize at work: Less common (yet effective) approaches

The approaches below work well once you’ve clarified your goals and done some categorizing using the Eisenhower Matrix or equivalent.

Create a daily “most important tasks” list (and stick to it)

Once you’ve got a solid picture of your priorities, you need to execute on them. To help you do so, create a daily to-do list that clearly identifies a maximum of 3 most important tasks that will move your priorities forward. Then, establish how long you will dedicate to that task.

Organize your day based on your energy levels

Once you have started to establish tasks to move a priority forward, you’ll want to schedule these into your day/week. Whenever possible, I highly recommend paying attention to your energy.

Mornings are a time when I focus easily and have abundant energy. So, I tackle priority items that require concentration then. For example, my morning tasks might include: drafting a conference proposal, a report write-up, or the design of a workshop.

You may not be a morning person, and that’s ok! The point here is:

  1. Observe when you feel energized and when you feel more lethargic
  2. Determine what kind of energy your daily/weekly priority tasks require
  3. Schedule your week so that your energy levels align with your priority tasks for that day or week.

The above strategies work well together and definitely help prioritize. You can use them together, or “mix-and-match” with other strategies to find a system that works for YOU.

Prioritizing at work when you have multiple demands on your time can be challenging. Sometimes, all you need is a good system. Other times, what you need is to clarify your goals and values. If you want to manage your weeks (and months…maybe even your entire work life!) with more ease and would appreciate some coaching support to get you there, contact me.