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How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrtHow to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrtNetwork traffic shaping is an interesting topic, that allows you to ensure that certain traffic gets priority over other traffic. When applied at the ISP level, this can get controversial, as you start getting into Network-Neutrality issues (where one company’s traffic gets priority over another company’s, which could lead to large media corporations silencing grassroots communication).

At the local network level, though, it means that you can ensure that certain traffic (like streaming Netflix videos) won’t be slowed down just because other, less important traffic (like an off-site backup job), is also flowing through your WAN connection. DD-WRT makes all of this possible (and not too difficult) on the NAT/QoS->QoS tab.

In the first section, titled ‘Quality of Service (QoS)’, set the following options:

  • Start QoS => Enable
  • Port => WAN
  • Packet Scheduler => HTB
  • Uplink => (whatever your ISP gives you for an uplink speed)
  • Downlink => (whatever your ISP gives you for an downlink speed)

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

You may want to check out speedtest.net or a similar service to see what your uplink and downlink speeds are. If you can get this information from your ISP, that would be better, since the more accurate these values are, the better this will work. If you enter too high of a value, the shaping won’t kick in because the router will think that it has more bandwidth to paly with. If you choose too low of a value, you will end up wasting bandwidth, and your router will not use it all.

Now, if you only ever watch Netflix from a device that won’t be sending low-prioirty traffic as well (such as a Wii or Roku box), you can just enter that device’s MAC address in the MAC Priority section. Add the MAC address(es) and then select ‘Premium’ for the priority.

On the other hand, if you have a home server connected to your television, and you use this both as a file server (which runs off-site backup jobs to ensure your data is not lost in the event of fire, burglary, or other catastrophe) and as a media player, you will want more fine-grained control, since not all of the traffic to that device will have the same priority.

So, we will need to set up some Netmask Priority rules. This will give traffic to/from Netflix a higher than normal priority. Inspired by Jonathan Kamens, I first set my offsite backup (to Amazon’s S3 service) a lower than average priority. Then, I followed the same approach to itentify the subnet used by Netflix to stream their movies.

Using Little Snitch, I learned that Netflix uses LibSyn’s content-delivery network to stream the data. Specifically, I noticed a lot of traffic coming from netflix-380.vo.llnwd.net . Now, that server alone is not enough, because no doubt every time you connect, you will get a different server int he pool (like netflix-379…, netflix-381… etc). So, I got the IP address for this server using the ‘ping’ command:

Now that we have the IP address (208.111.173.130), we need to know what block of IP assignment it belongs to. IP addresses are assigned to companies in blocks, so it is a good bet that we want to prioritize all traffic to that network in the same way. The ‘whois’ command will help us learn this information:

What we are interested in is the ‘CIDR’ field. This is what refers to the block of IP Addresses that we are trying to prioritize. Go back to DD-WRT, and in the ‘Netmask Priority’ section, add an entry for this network. Then, assign it to the ‘Premium’ priority. (In the screenshot, you can see that I have the S3 network set to ‘Bulk’ as well as the Netflix traffic set to ‘Premium’.

In the end, I can watch movies while my 130GB photo collection is copied to Amazon’s cloud service!

Generally, we have no reason to change network connection priority, because Windows computer has chosen the right network connection. But if you want to select the preferred one network and want to automatically connect to it, or you just want to make the connection sequence different, this article could help you.

Firstly, let’s see the current network card priority or network connection priority. And then move the network you like to the preferred place in Network Advanced Settings or prioritize the wireless network with command.

Part 1: check network card priority with command in Windows 10

1. Press Win + X keys and select Command Prompt (Admin) in menu.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

2. Enter command “netstat –rn | more” and press Enter button.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

In the following results, you can see the Interface List in CMD window. Under Interface List, the number in the left side means that order of network card. So we can see now the first connection network is “Software Loopback Interface”, followed by “Gigabit Network Connection”.

Part 2: Change wired/wireless network connection priority

2 ways for wired network connection:

Way 1: Change Network connections advanced settings

1. Press Windows key + X and select Network Connections from the menu.

2. Press the Alt key in keyboard and click Advanced Advanced Settings.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

3. Select the network connection and click the arrows in the right side to change the network connection priority.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

4. Click OK at last when you think you have organized the priority of the network connection.

Then the computer will follow the order to connect to network. Besides the simple and direct way, you could also change network priority through Internet Protocol.

Way 2: Change Internet Protocol settings

1. Open Network Connections and right click the network you want to change its priority.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

2. Select Properties and click “”nternet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)” in network Properties. Click “Properties” again.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

3. In the Protocol Properties dialog, click Advanced button.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

4. In Advanced TCP/IP Settings dialog, uncheck the option Automatic metric and enter the connection sequence for the network. Click OK to save priority changes.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

2 ways for wireless network connection:

Way 1: Change the automatic connected network

  • 1. Click the wireless icon in the notification area.
  • 2. Connect to a network and choose connect automatically, to move the network up in the priority list.

Way 2: Command prompt

1. Run Command Prompt (Admin).

2. Display all the connections that linked to your computer.

netsh wlan show profiles

Note: If there is no wireless network, the command would prompt you that “The Wireless AutoConfig Service is not running”.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

3. Chang the order of precedence with command below.

netsh wlan set profileorder name=”Guest1″ interface=”Wi-Fi” priority=1

Note: Guest1 is the name of the active network which you want to prioritize. You substitute this name with the one whose precedence is to be changed.

We live in an age where having a fast Internet connection is extremely important. As such, regardless if you are at home or at work, you want to make sure your network traffic is running at full speed. It doesn’t matter how fast your Internet connection is; if you share a network with people who hog bandwidth, you are going to experience slowdowns. This is why it’s important to know how to prioritize your traffic. This is something that can be done by using Quality of Service rules in DD-WRT.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

Before we jump into learning how to prioritize traffic on a network, there are some key terms you need to understand.

DD-WRT

Since we are going to be talking about DD-WRT firmware, you need to know what DD-WRT is. This is basically firmware for wireless routers and access points that use Linux software. This is a popular firmware choice because it’s compatible with a large number of routers and offers a wide variety of features.

Keep in mind that DD-WRT is third-party firmware. This means that it’s an update designed to replace the firmware that comes factory installed on commercial routers. As such, this firmware may offer certain functions and features that were not originally offered by the factory firmware. Users can either choose to replace this firmware themselves, or, they can purchase a flashed router from a trusted vendor.

Quality of Service

The term Quality of Service refers to a method that can be used to control the amount of bandwidth that is allowed to be used by certain individuals or applications. Using QoS, you can prioritize your traffic to make sure that certain users and applications get the bandwidth that they need to run flawlessly. This is very handy if you often max out your Internet connection and need certain applications to have faster streaming capabilities.

Router Throughput vs Bandwidth

Another term that you need to make yourself familiar with is router throughput and how it differs from bandwidth. Your bandwidth can tell you just how much information your network can move over a certain period of time. However, your actual network speed might be much slower. This is because your router throughput refers to the actual bandwidth available to your network, as opposed to the theoretical amount of bandwidth at your disposal.

How to prioritize your network traffic with dd-wrt

There are a number of aspects that can affect your router throughput. For example, your hardware capability will limit the amount of bandwidth that is available to you. You may pay for the fastest Internet speed, but you can only use the amount of bandwidth that your router can output. A gaming router usually has faster streaming than a basic router. This is because these routers are designed to give you faster game performance online. You may want to reference a buyer’s guide prior to purchasing, if you are confused by router product descriptions

Initial Setup of Quality of Service Rules

There are two main ways that you can prioritize your traffic, but you need to know the initial setup process first. This involves accessing your router’s Web interface. This is done by typing in the IP address 192.168.1.1 into the address bar in your Web browser, just like you would a website address. Be sure to put this into the address bar and not the search engine bar.

Once the page loads, type in the Username and Password you created when you initially setup the router.. Once you are logged in to the page, you need to look for the Quality of Service tab, which is labeled QoS.

Once inside the tab, follow these simple steps:

  1. Click Enable.
  2. Set your port to WAN, which will cause the QoS to only apply to traffic that is moving in and out of your network.
  3. Select HFSC (Hierarchical Fair Service Curve).
  4. Select FQ_CODEL as your main queuing discipline.

What does all that mean?

  • HFSC queues build a tree. Each queue can have further child queues that act as branches. Each of these branches can have a priority and bandwidth assignment. This choice is excellent for networks with dozens of devices, where there are some critical operations that need to be given priority.
  • HTB helps control the use of outbound bandwidth. It is useful for limiting a single device’s download/upload rates, to prevent bandwidth hogging. For instance, if you wanted to limit a game console or child’s computer in favor of home office devices.
  • FQ_CODEL is an algorithm designed to help the wi-fi buffer and queue traffic. It generally makes websites run faster.

The next step requires you to set your download and upload speeds. The best way to do this is to test your bandwidth online using a site like Speedtest.net.

Pro Tip!

After the test is finished, run it again. If you get near 90 percent of your first measurements, you can move on. Once you find your speed, enter no higher than 95 percent of the values measured.

Once you have your values set, it’s time to prioritize your traffic. The real question now is: How do you want to prioritize it?

Prioritizing Based on Applications

One way to prioritize your traffic is to do it based on applications. This works if you want certain applications, such as Skype or your Internet browser, to be prioritized over other applications. This is a great way to give those programs faster streaming than other programs. To do this, simply choose one of the available Port Ranges or Services from the list. Once you find one, click Add. You can add as many as you want, but remember that all of these services will be given priority.

Prioritizing Based on MAC Address

Another way to prioritize your bandwidth is to allow one device to use more bandwidth than another without a static IP address. To do this, you need to add the MAC address of the device that you want to prioritize, and click Add. This can help you get the most out of both a traditional and a gaming router.

This is one of the best ways to give certain computers or gaming consoles faster streaming. For example, if you needed faster game performance when gaming online, you could prioritize your console’s MAC address. This is one of the best ways to get faster game performance without the need to buy a gaming router. In some cases, your DD-WRT firmware might even offer a box that you can check to optimize that connection for online gaming.

Give QoS a Try

Regardless if you have a gaming router or a traditional router is, you can get the most out of your bandwidth by prioritizing certain devices or applications over others. Setting up your own QoS rules gives you not only faster streaming and faster game performance, but it also ensures that one user does not hog the majority of your bandwidth. Don’t suffer from dropped streams and long load times. Set up QoS rules and take control of your network.

From DD-WRT Wiki

Since it seems there are so many people trying to configure their Xbox 360s without success, here’s how to configure your DD-WRT based router to properly allow Xbox 360 connections.

Contents

[edit] Option 1: UPnP (Universal Plug and Play)

Since the 360 is a UPnP compliant device, we can take advantage of the UPnP functionality offered by DD-WRT to automatically open our ports for us:

  1. Go to your router setup page (generally 192.168.1.1)
  2. Open the NAT/QoS tab
  3. Click on the UPnP sub-tab
  4. Enable both the “Enable UPnP” option and the “Clear port forwards at startup” option.
  5. Save and apply settings.

[edit] Option 2: Manually port-forwarding

You can also set up manual port-forwarding, which is more difficult to do but is considered safer than using UPnP, since you control what ports are being opened.

  1. Go to your router setup page (generally 192.168.1.1)
  2. Set up Static DHCP for your Xbox 360
  3. Open the NAT/QoS tab
  4. Click on the “Add” button
  5. Set the values to the following:
    • Application – name it whatever you want, Xbox 360 makes the most sense
    • Port from – 3074
    • Protocol – Both
    • IP Address – the static IP you set up for your Xbox 360 in step 2
    • Port to – 3074
    • Enable – check this box
  6. Save and apply settings.
  7. Perform a network test with your Xbox 360. If it still shows a moderate/closed NAT, you may have to repeat these steps with the following ports:
    • 88
    • 53
    • 80 TCP only – in rare cases, most likely not needed

If you’re using your 360 and you start having latency issues, especially when others are using the same connection as you at the same time, then you should look into using Quality of Service (QoS) to prioritize your 360’s traffic above other traffic.

  1. Go to your router setup page (generally 192.168.1.1)
  2. Open the NAT/QoS tab
  3. Click on the QoS sub-tab
  4. Enable the “Start QoS” option
  5. Check off the “Optimize for Gaming” option
  6. Set the uplink by using the value of 95% of your maximum uplink. If you don’t know your uplink, use a service such as Speedtest, which will quickly and easily test your speed and show you your result.
  7. Set the downlink by using the value of 100% of your maximum downlink. If you don’t know your downlink, see the above step.
  8. Save your settings, but don’t apply just yet.
  9. In the drop down box under “Service Name”, scroll down until you reach “xboxlive”. Select it and click the “Add” button. When it adds, set the Priority to anything higher than Standard. You generally should start with Express, and if you continue having latency issues, move up to Premium. You should generally not need to use the “Exempt” option.
  10. Save and apply settings.

[edit] Issues with Media Sharing (Windows Media Player/Media Center)

If you cannot share media over your local network but can connect to Xbox Live, here are some steps to help diagnose and solve the problem.

My favorite speedtest application is DSL Reports as it seems to be the most honest in comparison to the others out there. http://dslreports.com/speedtest

Here’s what I would do, first set your DNS settings in your router to cloudflare’s. It’s 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 DNS records. For DNS 3, I put in OpenDNS’ 208.67.222.222 . I had a decent bump up in terms of ping and speed.

Next, do a speedtest with the link above. Do about 3 or 5 and take the average of the speeds. Make sure you are the only one on the network when you do this. No other traffic at all!

Once you have an average, take your up and down speeds and reduce it by 85%. So if you have 100mbps down, you will get 85mbps.

Go into the QOS settings and enable it. I’ve been using HFSC and FQ_CODEL as my settings. Input your downlink and uplink speeds.

Now this is where things get interesting. Since my wife and I work from home, we do a lot of video conferencing. I’ve prioritized all of the TCP packs (ACK,SYN,FIN, and RST) and set up my services priority to support VOIP and Video conferences services the most over video.

However, I’ve set a rule to give our Amazon fire stick “standard” priority over everything else and this has been decently forgiving in terms of allotting speed.

HOWEVER, I have business class internet which is 100mbps down and 10 up. Even if I turn all of this off, I don’t get much of an issue.

My advice is to refrain from fiddling with mac and services priority and see what you get with just prioritizing TCP packets and enabling QOS. The only service I would add initially is “Bittorrent” and set that one to “bulk” (lowest priority). Which hopefully will prevent any bittorrent downloads from saturating your bandwidth.

What you think about this?

I put 20/60 because it gives my low bufferbloat results and less ping spikes while i’m doing the tests.

Service Prio: Xbox Live. (is this needed?)

Note: Xbox MAC is set to PREMIUM not manual. The speed in that box is not affected. I have tried it.

Thanks I totally forgot about that. I tried these settings and it feels great. The Xbox is set to mac prio on standard. Don’t know if I really need that xboxlive set to premium.

Random ramblings of an old geek who lives on a hill. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. All product links on this page are monetized.

Configuring and Optimizing DD-WRT for magicJack

Let me begin by saying that this article is not so much a “how-to” as a “how I did” post. I don’t claim that this is the only way, nor even the best way, to optimize magicJack’s performance. It’s just the way that works best for me. This post is based on a magicJack GO connected to the Ethernet port of a router running DD-WRT firmware.

If you don’t know what magicJack is, it’s an extremely low-cost, self-contained, VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) adapter that, when properly configured over a decent broadband Internet connection, usually provides acceptable-quality voice telephone service.

I’ve been using magicJack for years as a “land-line” number to give to people and businesses who demand a phone number, but to whom I don’t want to give my mobile phone number. Chief among these are banks, retailers who want my number for their loyalty card and rewards programs, government agencies, and others by whom I don’t care to be bothered. Giving them only the magicJack number allows me to limit the people who have my cell number to family members and a few close friends and trusted business associates.

magicJack’s call quality has improved steadily since the first one I bought, but it’s still not as clear as an old-school copper POTS line. But neither is any other VoIP connection I’ve ever used. Some are better than others, but they also cost much more than magicJack does. For my purposes, magicJack works well enough — especially with my Internet router configured to prioritize the traffic to the magicJack adapter.

At this point, one might wonder why I care about the voice quality on a phone number that I give mainly to people and organizations that I don’t want to talk to. The reason is that occasionally I have to call those people and organizations, and I don’t want them to have any number other then the magicJack number showing up on their Caller ID or ANI screens. So it’s important that it work reasonably well for those occasions when I initiate the call.

Configuring DD-WRT for Optimal magicJack Performance

Just to be clear, magicJack adapters almost always work simply by plugging them in and activating them. But the quality can be less-than-wonderful unless you prioritize the adapter’s traffic in the router.

I also should mention that it’s perfectly fine to use a magicJack as a primary phone number for people you actually do want to talk to. In that case, it’s even more important that your router be configured to prioritize the magicJack’s traffic.

The router I use is a Linksys WRT AC3200 ACM on which I installed the DD-WRT router firmware, and that’s the router and firmware this article is based on. Some of the settings may be available on other router firmware, but I make no promises. Please note that these steps apply to a magicJack connected to a router with an Ethernet cable, not one connected to a computer via the USB port.

Here are the steps I used to configure my router running DD-WRT for the best possible magicJack performance.

1. Find the magicJack’s MAC Address

The easiest way to find the magicJack’s MAC address when using DD-WRT is to log in to the router, click the “Status” tab, and then click the “LAN” tab under status. Look for the device with a MAC Address starting with 6C:33:A9. That device is your magicJack. Copy the whole number down, not just the 6C:33:A9 part.

In other routers, look for a section labeled “Active Clients,” “Client Table,” “DHCP Clients,” or something along those lines. When you start seeing MAC addresses, you’re probably in the right place.

2. Determine Your Baseline Upload and Download Speeds

With as little running on your computer and any other devices on the network as possible, do a speed test using a site like Open Speed Test. I suggest you do this several times over the course of a few days, and consider the averages to be your baseline upload and download speeds. If your measured speeds are higher than your provisioned speeds (the speeds you’re paying for), however, then use your provisioned speeds rather than your actual speeds as your baseline values.

3. Configure QOS

While in the DD-WRT interface, click the “NAT / QOS” tab on top, and then the “QOS” tab under it. Here are the settings that seem to work best for me.

QOS Settings

Start QOS: Enable.

Port: WAN

Packet Scheduler: HTB

Queuing Discipline: FQ_CODEL

Downlink (kbps): 90 percent of your baseline download speed

Uplink (kbps): 90 percent of your baseline upload speed

Note that you must enter the speeds in kbps. If you need a bandwidth convertor, this one is about as good as any.

TCP-Packet Priority

Assuming that you have no other special network needs that require that other packets be prioritized, I suggest you only check “ACK” in this section. ACK is short for “Acknowledge,” and at the risk of grossly over-simplifying, VoIP traffic uses a lot of ACKs. Prioritizing ACK helps solve the common problem of choppy sound when using magicJack (and many other VOiP services).

If you still get choppy sound after doing everything on this page, try checking both “ACK” and “SYN” in this section. Then save and apply the settings, and reboot both the router and the magicJack.

Services Priority

Look for “sip [ 0

0 ]” in the dropdown list, click “Add,” and assign it a priority of “Premium.” SIP stands for “Session Initiation Protocol” and is the protocol that magicJack and most other VOiP providers use.

MAC Priority

In theory, setting the MAC priority shouldn’t be necessary if you have SIP prioritized. But I’ve found that it often helps with magicJack devices. Next to the “Add” button enter your magicJack’s MAC address, then click “Add” and assign it a priority of “Premium.” If you have more then one VoIP adapter, you can add them the same way.

Finally, click “Save” and “Apply Settings,” and make sure that all your settings have been saved.

Theoretically you should be done at this point, but I’ve found it’s often necessary to restart both the magicJack and the router for these changes to take effect. Just unplug the magicJack’s power adapter and let it sit for a few seconds, unplug the router and wait for a few seconds, plug the magicJack in again and wait for it’s lights to come on, and plug the router in again. After it boots up, go back to the QOS page in the router interface and make sure all the settings were saved.

Random ramblings of an old geek who lives on a hill. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. All product links on this page are monetized.

Configuring and Optimizing DD-WRT for magicJack

Let me begin by saying that this article is not so much a “how-to” as a “how I did” post. I don’t claim that this is the only way, nor even the best way, to optimize magicJack’s performance. It’s just the way that works best for me. This post is based on a magicJack GO connected to the Ethernet port of a router running DD-WRT firmware.

If you don’t know what magicJack is, it’s an extremely low-cost, self-contained, VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) adapter that, when properly configured over a decent broadband Internet connection, usually provides acceptable-quality voice telephone service.

I’ve been using magicJack for years as a “land-line” number to give to people and businesses who demand a phone number, but to whom I don’t want to give my mobile phone number. Chief among these are banks, retailers who want my number for their loyalty card and rewards programs, government agencies, and others by whom I don’t care to be bothered. Giving them only the magicJack number allows me to limit the people who have my cell number to family members and a few close friends and trusted business associates.

magicJack’s call quality has improved steadily since the first one I bought, but it’s still not as clear as an old-school copper POTS line. But neither is any other VoIP connection I’ve ever used. Some are better than others, but they also cost much more than magicJack does. For my purposes, magicJack works well enough — especially with my Internet router configured to prioritize the traffic to the magicJack adapter.

At this point, one might wonder why I care about the voice quality on a phone number that I give mainly to people and organizations that I don’t want to talk to. The reason is that occasionally I have to call those people and organizations, and I don’t want them to have any number other then the magicJack number showing up on their Caller ID or ANI screens. So it’s important that it work reasonably well for those occasions when I initiate the call.

Configuring DD-WRT for Optimal magicJack Performance

Just to be clear, magicJack adapters almost always work simply by plugging them in and activating them. But the quality can be less-than-wonderful unless you prioritize the adapter’s traffic in the router.

I also should mention that it’s perfectly fine to use a magicJack as a primary phone number for people you actually do want to talk to. In that case, it’s even more important that your router be configured to prioritize the magicJack’s traffic.

The router I use is a Linksys WRT AC3200 ACM on which I installed the DD-WRT router firmware, and that’s the router and firmware this article is based on. Some of the settings may be available on other router firmware, but I make no promises. Please note that these steps apply to a magicJack connected to a router with an Ethernet cable, not one connected to a computer via the USB port.

Here are the steps I used to configure my router running DD-WRT for the best possible magicJack performance.

1. Find the magicJack’s MAC Address

The easiest way to find the magicJack’s MAC address when using DD-WRT is to log in to the router, click the “Status” tab, and then click the “LAN” tab under status. Look for the device with a MAC Address starting with 6C:33:A9. That device is your magicJack. Copy the whole number down, not just the 6C:33:A9 part.

In other routers, look for a section labeled “Active Clients,” “Client Table,” “DHCP Clients,” or something along those lines. When you start seeing MAC addresses, you’re probably in the right place.

2. Determine Your Baseline Upload and Download Speeds

With as little running on your computer and any other devices on the network as possible, do a speed test using a site like Open Speed Test. I suggest you do this several times over the course of a few days, and consider the averages to be your baseline upload and download speeds. If your measured speeds are higher than your provisioned speeds (the speeds you’re paying for), however, then use your provisioned speeds rather than your actual speeds as your baseline values.

3. Configure QOS

While in the DD-WRT interface, click the “NAT / QOS” tab on top, and then the “QOS” tab under it. Here are the settings that seem to work best for me.

QOS Settings

Start QOS: Enable.

Port: WAN

Packet Scheduler: HTB

Queuing Discipline: FQ_CODEL

Downlink (kbps): 90 percent of your baseline download speed

Uplink (kbps): 90 percent of your baseline upload speed

Note that you must enter the speeds in kbps. If you need a bandwidth convertor, this one is about as good as any.

TCP-Packet Priority

Assuming that you have no other special network needs that require that other packets be prioritized, I suggest you only check “ACK” in this section. ACK is short for “Acknowledge,” and at the risk of grossly over-simplifying, VoIP traffic uses a lot of ACKs. Prioritizing ACK helps solve the common problem of choppy sound when using magicJack (and many other VOiP services).

If you still get choppy sound after doing everything on this page, try checking both “ACK” and “SYN” in this section. Then save and apply the settings, and reboot both the router and the magicJack.

Services Priority

Look for “sip [ 0

0 ]” in the dropdown list, click “Add,” and assign it a priority of “Premium.” SIP stands for “Session Initiation Protocol” and is the protocol that magicJack and most other VOiP providers use.

MAC Priority

In theory, setting the MAC priority shouldn’t be necessary if you have SIP prioritized. But I’ve found that it often helps with magicJack devices. Next to the “Add” button enter your magicJack’s MAC address, then click “Add” and assign it a priority of “Premium.” If you have more then one VoIP adapter, you can add them the same way.

Finally, click “Save” and “Apply Settings,” and make sure that all your settings have been saved.

Theoretically you should be done at this point, but I’ve found it’s often necessary to restart both the magicJack and the router for these changes to take effect. Just unplug the magicJack’s power adapter and let it sit for a few seconds, unplug the router and wait for a few seconds, plug the magicJack in again and wait for it’s lights to come on, and plug the router in again. After it boots up, go back to the QOS page in the router interface and make sure all the settings were saved.

Unless you’ve upgraded to a whole home wi-fi solution like Linksys’ recently announced Velop , you’re probably finding your wireless network struggling to keep up these days. If you’re a gamer, the last thing you want is lag and dropped frames during online multiplayer matches because someone in another room is watching The Crown on Netflix. So Linksys has created a wireless router that puts gamers first.

There are already quite a few wireless routers on the market that the gaming community has embraced, including Linksys’ own WRT1900AC ; a revival of the much loved, and easily upgraded, Linksys WRT54G. What’s most important to gamers is easy access to QoS (Quality of Service) settings that allows them to prioritize network traffic for video games. Those occasional buffering pauses you experience while streaming a video are a minor inconvenience, but they can mean game over during a multiplayer first person shooter match.

What Linksys has done with the new WRT32X is to automate the prioritization of gaming network traffic. The router is also open source, supporting OpenWrt and DD-WRT for players who want to further tweak their network’s performance. But for gamers who aren’t savvy enough to dive into complex router settings, Linksys now lets the router handle those performance tweaks.

Powered by a 1.8GHz dual-core processor, the stealth-styled Linksys WRT32X is an AC3200 wireless router with optimized MU-MIMO (multi-user, multiple input, multiple output) performance that uses custom firmware tuned for “gaming traffic.” Linksys hasn’t shared what exactly’s in that secret sauce, but it has revealed that the WRT32X is designed to automatically detect computers using the Killer-line of network adapters , indicating it’s probably a gaming-focused PC from a company like Alienware, MSI, or Razer that requires priority access to the home’s internet. It does the same thing for an Xbox as well, if console gaming is more your thing.

That being said, the WRT32X can actually benefit non-gamers in your household too. In an effort to appease those who would rather spend the night watching Netflix or streaming a movie from iTunes, the WRT32X will actually throttle download speeds and reduce the priority of a gaming PC or console on a network when they’re downloading large updates or game patches. For $300 when it’s available this Spring, the Linksys WRT32X might finally bring some peace to your home.

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DISCUSSION

Ah yes of course, a “gamer” piece of equipment with lofty promises which uses technology that’s existed forever, but very rarely does the job correctly at a consumer-level price.

So this thing leverages QoS *clap* *clap* bravo bravo. And so it presumably dumbs down the implementation/interface so that it presumably just works.

So this thing promises that it’ll intelligently prioritize gaming packets over Netflix streams and such. So by that I expect that it would have catalogued all the commonly used gaming ports across all multiplayer titles – easy enough.

I’ve seen this stuff before. And rarely do they work as advertised, because all too often they fail the basic utilization tests, eg:

a) Timmy launches Netflix, watches for a few minutes to get things going

b) Sarah launches Youtube and is a few minutes into her favorite documentary

c) Jim watches Pornhub and he’s well engrossed

d) Tyrone fires up his torrent client at full speed, download and upload maxed

e) Now Tyler fires up Call of Duty. He’s got his headset going, his comms going aaaaaand.

Oh it’s laggy as hell. These things can try to prioritize “gaming” traffic all they like, but when things like torrent clients are firing on all cylinders, taking all the bandwidth they can possibly grab with no respect for anything else – I’ve yet to see a consumer-grade device be able to knock those bandwidth suckers down a peg and intelligently say “ok I’ve determined that your maximum upload/download numbers are thus, and I’m gonna ration off each of you accordingly, and give game dude first dibs”

Netflix/YouTube and the like have gotten much better in the past years when it comes to streaming content. They don’t try to buffer everything as they go – they’re far more considerate on bandwidth compared to a few years ago. And they aren’t hungry on upload bandwidth – which is exactly the thing that multiplayer games must have, a consistent, uninterrupted flow of traffic to the gaming service/peers.

But tack something on which is upload hungry, and kiss your low-latency gaming goodbye. It isn’t going to be intelligently prioritized, mark my words.

I’m running torrent client on my headless Ubuntu server. Also number of computers are connected to this server, which is used as internet gateway/router. The question is whether it’s possible to configure iptables to prioritize traffic from eth1(lan if) over local traffic generated by server? Something like QOS..

3 Answers 3

There are several alternatives to achieve what you are looking for. But first of all, yes it is possible. Though, many of the possibilities are rather complex.

One of the easiest options might be to run the torrent daemon under a own user\group. Then use iptables to mark all traffic from that user\group with a flag. Then later let the tc filter on that flag and put it in the low priority queue. Look at the bottom of this wiki for an idea.

For what you are asking do you only need two queues(fig 1.), one low priority and one high. Though it might be better to stick with something closer to this example. You can adopt the example to your needs, just drop the part with nat and make the default mark lower value than the mark you will use for the traffic generated by the daemon.

So for my suggestion you can use something like iptables -A OUTPUT -t mangle -m owner –uid-owner ZZZZ -j MARK –set-mark 6 ZZZZ is the user identificator.

An alternative for setting a flag might be to use iptables -A OUTPUT -t mangle -m owner –uid-owner ZZZZ -j CLASSIFY –set-class X:Y where X and Y is the class identifier, and ZZZZ is the user identificator.

Fig 1:

The best might be to have a leaf for every fw mark. But my best advice now is, read and try to understand the example referred above to adopt it to your needs. If you have any questions add them.

In the example referred above, is it important that you understand this part (fig 2.) when you want to write iptables rules for marking or classifying traffic. For a short explanation of it with a slightly different looking diagram have a look at this.

Fig 2:

This will point you in the right direction: