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How to put your music collection online and access it from any device

If you’ve got a sizable music collection at home or at work, the odds are that you’ve wanted access to it elsewhere. Syncing MP3 players can be a hassle, and few can handle the storage requirements for a big library. Audiogalaxy is a free service that can stream your music from your library to any Web-enabled device. Here’s how to use it.

Rob Lightner is a tech and gaming writer based in Seattle. He has reviewed games, gadgets, and technical manuals, written copy for space travel gear, and composed horoscopes for cats.

Most personal music-streaming services rely on the cloud to keep your tunes flowing, but they all tend to limit how much you can stream unless you pay up. You could set up a server at home that delivers your music more or less securely wherever you want it, but for those of us who don’t have the time, skills, equipment, or inclination to do so, there’s Audiogalaxy. This “cloud music player” scans your music library and then streams up to 200,000 songs to any Web-enabled device. Here’s how to get started:

  1. Go to Audiogalaxy and set up an account. You can use Facebook if you like, but there’s no special reason to do so beyond convenience. Step 1: Set up an account with Audiogalaxy.
  2. Install the Audiogalaxy Helper application. It works on Windows XP and up and Mac OS X 10.5 and up. Step 2: Install Audiogalaxy Helper.
  3. When the installation is complete, you should see a pop-up window that tells you Audiogalaxy is scanning. If your collection is located in an unusual folder or spread out across several folders, you’ll need to add more locations by clicking the link in the pop-up or selecting “Your Music Folders” from the Audiogalaxy Helper icon. Step 3: Select music folders to scan.

It should take some time for Audiogalaxy to scan your entire collection. If you need to restart your machine, that’s fine–when you reboot the app should start up and get back to work.

  • You can now access your music collection from anywhere, as long as the computer running Audiogalaxy is powered on and connected to the Internet. Just use a Web browser to sign in from any device, or download the Audiogalaxy app for iOS or Android. It’s easy to browse artists, albums, and genres, and just as easy to access playlists created within Audiogalaxy. Step 4: Play music from anywhere.
  • If you’ve got a sizable music collection at home or at work, the odds are that you’ve wanted access to it elsewhere. Syncing MP3 players can be a hassle, and few can handle the storage requirements for a big library. Audiogalaxy is a free service that can stream your music from your library to any Web-enabled device. Here’s how to use it.

    Rob Lightner is a tech and gaming writer based in Seattle. He has reviewed games, gadgets, and technical manuals, written copy for space travel gear, and composed horoscopes for cats.

    Most personal music-streaming services rely on the cloud to keep your tunes flowing, but they all tend to limit how much you can stream unless you pay up. You could set up a server at home that delivers your music more or less securely wherever you want it, but for those of us who don’t have the time, skills, equipment, or inclination to do so, there’s Audiogalaxy. This “cloud music player” scans your music library and then streams up to 200,000 songs to any Web-enabled device. Here’s how to get started:

    1. Go to Audiogalaxy and set up an account. You can use Facebook if you like, but there’s no special reason to do so beyond convenience. Step 1: Set up an account with Audiogalaxy.
    2. Install the Audiogalaxy Helper application. It works on Windows XP and up and Mac OS X 10.5 and up. Step 2: Install Audiogalaxy Helper.
    3. When the installation is complete, you should see a pop-up window that tells you Audiogalaxy is scanning. If your collection is located in an unusual folder or spread out across several folders, you’ll need to add more locations by clicking the link in the pop-up or selecting “Your Music Folders” from the Audiogalaxy Helper icon. Step 3: Select music folders to scan.

    It should take some time for Audiogalaxy to scan your entire collection. If you need to restart your machine, that’s fine–when you reboot the app should start up and get back to work.

  • You can now access your music collection from anywhere, as long as the computer running Audiogalaxy is powered on and connected to the Internet. Just use a Web browser to sign in from any device, or download the Audiogalaxy app for iOS or Android. It’s easy to browse artists, albums, and genres, and just as easy to access playlists created within Audiogalaxy. Step 4: Play music from anywhere.
  • Подписавшись на Apple Music, Вы можете сделать всю свою медиатеку доступной на всех своих устройствах, где Вы выполнили вход с одним Apple ID. Медиатека доступна Вам в любое время, когда Вы подключены к интернету, а загруженная музыка — даже без подключения.

    Следующие объекты медиатеки могут храниться в облаке:

    до 100 000 песен, не считая песен (и видеоклипов), приобретенных в iTunes Store (размер файлов не должен превышать 200 МБ);

    песни, для которых найдено соответствие (песни, доступные в iTunes Store, независимо от того, приобретены ли они там) с качеством iTunes Plus (файлы AAC 256 кбит/с без защиты DRM) и другие песни в исходном качестве;

    видеоклипы, приобретенные в iTunes Store;

    плейлисты из песен и видеоклипов;

    правила составления смарт-плейлистов, действующие на компьютере или устройстве, куда они загружены.

    Примечание. Некоторые функции недоступны в плане подписки Apple Music Voice. Подписка Apple Music и подписка Apple Music Voice доступны не во всех странах и регионах. См. статью службы поддержки Apple Доступность мультимедийных сервисов Apple.

    Также можно сделать медиатеку доступной на всех устройствах, используя iTunes Match.

    В приложении «Музыка» на Mac выберите «Музыка» > «Настройки», нажмите «Основные», затем установите флажок «Синхронизировать медиатеку».

    Если этот параметр не отображается, выполните вход в Apple Music со своим Apple ID. Чтобы синхронизировать медиатеку и пользоваться ей на разных устройствах, нужна подписка Apple Music.

    Можно включить медиатеку на другом устройстве следующими способами.

    На другом компьютере. В приложении «Музыка» на Mac выполните вход в iTunes Store с тем же Apple ID, что и на первом компьютере, затем выберите «Музыка» > «Настройки», нажмите «Основные», затем установите флажок «Синхронизировать медиатеку».

    На iPhone, iPad или iPod touch. На экране «Домой» на устройстве коснитесь «Настройки», коснитесь «Музыка», затем касанием включите параметр «Синхронизировать медиатеку».

    О том, как добавлять музыку на устройство и слушать ее офлайн, рассказано в руководствах пользователя iPhone, iPad и iPod touch. Для устройств, на которых не установлена новейшая версия iOS или iPadOS, загрузите руководство пользователя со страницы руководств на сайте службы поддержки Apple.

    This article was co-authored by Nicolas Adams and by wikiHow staff writer, Kyle Hall. Nicolas Adams is a 5th generation musician of Serbian Gypsy descent and the lead guitarist of the band Gypsy Tribe. Based in the San Francisco Bay Area, Nicolas specializes in Rumba Flamenco and Gypsy jazz and playing the guitar, Bouzouki, Balalaika, and piano.

    wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 80% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status.

    This article has been viewed 174,479 times.

    Nowadays it’s easier than ever to put your music online, with a variety of platforms out there where fans can discover and enjoy your songs. SoundCloud and YouTube are great if you want to release your new track or album for free, while Bandcamp makes it easy to charge people for your music. By uploading your music to the right platform and tracking your success online, you can start to build your fan base and grow as an artist.

    You Might Also Like

    1. ↑https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/1696878?hl=en
    2. ↑https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/1696878?hl=en
    3. ↑https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/1714323?hl=en
    4. ↑https://bandcamp.com/pricing
    5. ↑https://bandcamp.com/help/selling#pricing_performance
    6. ↑https://bandcamp.com/artists#features

    About This Article

    If you want to put your music online, there are a variety of platforms you can use, like SoundCloud and YouTube. To put your music on SoundCloud, sign up for an account if you don’t already have one. Once you’re on the upload page, click on the orange “choose a file to upload” button and select an audio file from your computer. Choose a genre from the drop-down menu and add any tags that might help people find your music. If you want people to be able to download your music, make sure to enable this feature. Another way to put your music online is to share it on YouTube. Convert your audio file to a .WMV video file if you’re using Windows or to a .MOV video file if you’re using a Mac. Then, sign up for a YouTube account, if you don’t already have one, and click the upload button to the right of the top menu bar. Click on “select files to upload” and pick the video file you made. To learn how to make extra cash with your music on Bandcamp, keep reading!

    Learn five ways to stream your music collection over the internet.

    Senior Editor / How To

    Donald Bell has spent more than five years as a CNET senior editor, reviewing everything from MP3 players to the first three generations of the Apple iPad. He currently devotes his time to producing How To content for CNET, as well as weekly episodes of CNET’s Top 5 video series.

    A few weeks ago, I predicted that, along with the iPad, Apple would also debut a version of iTunes that would upload your music collection to the Web and let you stream it back down to your iPhone or iPod Touch.

    Well, it turns out I was wrong (for now, anyway).

    Fortunately, if you’re someone whose music collection outstrips the storage capacity of your iPhone, iPod Touch, Android phone, Netbook, iPad, or whatever, there are a number of tools you can use to get your music collection online and beam it to whatever device you find handy.

    Be forewarned: not all of the following methods will stream music to a mobile device. Some will bridge the gap between your home computer and work computer; some will store actual copies of your music; some will simply sling songs from your home computer; and some offer just an approximation of your music collection.

    As the name implies, the concept behind Simplify Music is fairly simple. After installing the application on your home computer (Mac or PC), you can browse and stream any song from that machine using an iPhone, iPod Touch, or another computer.

    • No limit to the size of your library
    • Add libraries of friends (up to 30)
    • Recognizes playlists
    • Works with UPnP devices such as Xbox, Roku, Sonos
    • Doesn’t work with DRM music
    • Requires iPhone OS 3.0 or later,
    • Requires your host system to always be on
    • You can’t transfer music

    MP3 Tunes wrote the book when it comes to moving your music collection to the cloud. Since 2005, MP3 Tunes has offered an easy, yet surprisingly sophisticated, system for uploading your music and streaming it over the Web. Recent compatibility with the iPhone, iPod Touch, Android, and Squeezebox makes MP3 Tunes more compelling than ever.

    • Free Airband app for iPhone/Touch and Android
    • 2GB free, paid accounts up to 200GB
    • Transfers playlists
    • iTunes
    • like Web interface for streaming and organizing your music
    • Compatible with several desktop Internet radios, including Logitech Squeezebox
    • Tune Up feature allows you to edit track info and album art online
    • LockerSync feature automatically updates cloud with any new music you’ve added to your library
    • Beyond 2GB, you’re paying $4.95/month for 50GB, all the way up to 200GB for $12.95/month
    • Free accounts are ad-supported
    • You can’t transfer music
    • Doesn’t work with DRM music

    The online megastore’s Cloud Drive online storage service starts with a free 5GB base plan that can be increased to 20GB, 50GB, 100GB, 200GB, 500GB, and 1,000GB, priced at $1 per gigabyte, per year (so that a 100GB plan costs $100 per year). For a limited time, customers who purchase an album from Amazon’s MP3 store are automatically upgraded to a 20GB trial account for one year. Read CNET’s full review.

    • 5GB free
    • Amazon music purchases automatically backed up
    • Files are downloadable
    • Taps into iTunes and also uploads playlists
    • Works with Android and free to stream on any PC
    • Audiophile formats not supported (WAV, FLAC, Ogg)
    • Need a paid account to upload more than 5GB
    • Only specific media formats can be uploaded (documents, videos, photos, and music)
    • Doesn’t work with DRM music,
    • No iOS app

    MSpot is one of many solutions that has cropped up as a solution for on-the-go listening. The company offers a music cloud service that lets you upload up to 2GB of music for free and access it from any Wi-Fi-capable computer or Android device. ( More information on the service here ).

    • Free 2GB plan
    • Android app
    • Attractive web-based player
    • Intelligent desktop app
    • Sort collection by ID3, create playlists, rate songs
    • No iOS pp
    • Storage plans are relatively pricey
    • Your library can’t be shared with other users

    Like Lala, Last.fm doesn’t literally move your music to the cloud, but instead, learns everything about your collection and your listening habits and reflects a streaming version of your music collection online. For example, you can’t just log in to your Last.fm account and cue up your copy of “Folsom Prison Blues.” That said, your Last.fm page will show that you have Johnny Cash in your collection and provide a quick link to streaming a randomized selection of Cash’s music. It’s not a great system for people who want instant access to specific songs from their collections, but the price is right if you can be flexible about song choice.

    • Completely free
    • Huge community of music fans
    • Emphasis on music discovery
    • Apps for iPhone, iPod Touch, Blackberry, and Android
    • Compatible with Xbox 360, Sonos, and Logitech Squeezebox
    • Updates new music automatically
    • Keeps track of song plays for running tally of your listening habits
    • Creates personalized radio station based on songs you like
    • Compatible with DRM music
    • Available internationally
    • Does not have capability to stream specific songs on demand, but you can browse the artists in your collection and start listening to a randomly selected track. Maybe you’ll get lucky.
    • More of a complement to your music library than a replacement
    • Doesn’t upload playlists

    Disclaimer: Last.fm is a property of CNET’s parent company CBS Interactive.

    Update: Honorable mention to Nutsie , MeCanto, and Psonar.

    Apple has temporarily disabled Home Sharing access to your iTunes music library for mobile devices. But there are other ways to stream music from your iTunes library to your phone or tablet.

    Lance Whitney is a freelance technology writer and trainer and a former IT professional. He’s written for Time, CNET, PCMag, and several other publications. He’s the author of two tech books–one on Windows and another on LinkedIn.

    I have a huge iTunes library of music and videos on my home network that I can access from my iPhone and iPad. But I don’t use Apple’s Home Sharing. So how do I access my library?

    With the debut of iOS 8.4 last week, which brought with it the new Apple Music service, Apple disabled music streaming via its Home Sharing service . That means all the people who used Home Sharing to stream music to their iPhones and iPads are now out of luck. On Monday, Apple iTunes vice president Eddy Cue tweeted that Home Sharing should return with the release of iOS 9 , due out in September. But there are other ways to play songs and videos from your iTunes library on your mobile device, and they don’t require any solutions from Apple.

    Quite simply, I use file browser apps that can connect to my iTunes library over my home network. Such apps can connect to a computer or an NAS (network-attached storage) device on my network, giving me full access to all the files on that device, including those from my iTunes library. And these apps aren’t just for iOS devices. You’ll find them for Android devices, so I can access my iTunes content from my Android tablet as well.

    You’ll find plenty of file browser apps in Apple’s App Store and Google Play. Just run a search for file browsers and look for ones that allow you to access PCs or NAS devices on your home network.

    As one example, the app I use on my iPhone and iPad is called FileBrowser. Though it costs $5.99, I’ve found it one of the best of its kind. You simply set up remote access to your computer or NAS over your home network. After setup, just tap the name of the computer or NAS, and FileBrower shows you all of the network shares and folders on the device. From there, you can just drill down to the share that houses your iTunes library. You can then browse through all of the folders that contain your songs. Tap the name of the tune you want to play, and that’s it. FileBrowser can even play the song in a mini music player, so you can pause, move ahead, move back and shuffle your music lineup.

    On the Android side, I use a free app called ES File Explorer File Manager, which works similarly to FileBrowser. You set up remote access to the computer or NAS that stores your iTunes library. You then connect to the share or folder that houses your library and drill down until you reach your music collection. Tap the name of a particular song, and it starts playing. You can also call up a music player that displays album art and lets you pause, play, move ahead, move back and shuffle your music.

    With the help of apps like FileBrowser and ES File Explorer File Manager, you don’t need to rely on Apple to access your iTunes library from any mobile device, be it iOS or Android.

    You like music. Maybe you’ve been downloading music for years. You might have even gone through the arduous process of digitizing your CDs and cassette tapes. They now reside on your computer. You’d like to stream them. But how?

    The Yamaha MusicCast Controller app doesn’t discriminate between streaming sources. Whether it’s one of the nation’s most popular streaming services or music you have stored on your device or on a local network, you can share it with every room of your house. Want to know how? Read on.

    The Server Button

    The purpose of the “Server” button in MusicCast Controller (shown on the right) is to allow you to access music files that you have downloaded or backed up. Those files are usually located in a particular folder on a hard drive — either one inside your computer or an external storage device like a thumb drive. With MusicCast, you can play those files back in any or all rooms in your multi-room home audio system.

    Don’t touch that Server button just yet, though! Before MusicCast can see this content, you need to activate a feature on your computer called media file sharing.

    Media File Sharing

    There are several methods for accessing your music depending on how your network is set up. For instance, if your router has a USB port configured as a NAS (Network Attached Storage) input, you’re ahead of the game. Simply connect a high capacity USB thumb drive or hard drive with all your music stored on it (or as much as you can fit on the drive). Touching the “Server” button in MusicCast Controller will give you access to all the music stored on the drive.

    If that feature is not available on your router, you can add a dedicated NAS server to your network. Here’s how to activate media sharing on a PC that’s running Windows 10:

    1. First, you’ll need to turn on the sharing function of your PC. From the search bar, type “Control Panel”:

    2. From the icon view, navigate to the “Network and Sharing Center”:

    3. Select “Change advanced sharing settings”:

    4. Click on “All Networks”:

    5. Click “Choose media streaming options”:

    6. Click on the “Turn on media streaming” button, then hit OK:

    7. Type in a name for your media library, then use the tick boxes to decide which devices will have access to the media stored on your PC’s music folder. Finally, hit OK:

    8. Finally, close out all windows. MusicCast Controller can now see the music stored in your Music media folder.

    For more ways to enjoy music at home, check out these blog articles:

    Click here for more information about Yamaha MusicCast.

    Access your collection on desktop and mobile

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    What to Know

    • Add your external source under Settings > Local Files > Show Local Files > Show songs from.
    • You can’t truly upload music to Spotify; instead, you’re telling Spotify to watch specific folders for selected music from other sources.

    This article explains how to have Spotify recognize and find your music from external sources.

    The local music transfer feature only works on Spotify Premium subscriptions. You can add music in MP3, MP4, or AAC format.

    How to Add Songs to Spotify

    To clarify what you’re doing here, you’re not actually uploading music in the sense that you’re sending it to Spotify’s servers. Instead, you’re adding your local music to directories on a desktop machine to Spotify, at which point it will include that content when it displays your collection.

    Once Spotify is watching these folders, it will automatically make new songs you place into those folders available within the application.

    Click your user menu in the upper-right corner of the app window.

    Select Settings.

    Scroll down to the Local Files section and turn the Show Local Files toggle on.

    A new section, Show songs from will now appear just below the toggle switch.

    Click the Add a Source button to select a directory. Spotify will scan this directory and all of its sub-directories for supported music and playlist files, which will then appear in your Spotify library.

    Repeat Step 5 as desired, if you have music in several different directories.

    How to Download Local Spotify Music for Offline Listening on Other Devices

    In addition to being able to play your local music on the machine where it’s stored, you can also transfer it to other mobile devices signed into the same Spotify account.

    The following steps will work on Spotify-supported versions of both iOS and Android, as well as Windows and macOS.

    First, all the songs you want to transfer need to be included in a playlist. An easy way to get all your music on your mobile device is to create a playlist that contains every song.

    Now, start Spotify on your other device, and make sure you’re on the same local network as the machine where the music is stored.

    Desktop and Android users can skip this step. If you’re on an iOS device, you’ll need to go to the Settings screen and scroll down to the Local Files section. Tap the Enable sync from desktop button.

    You should see the Playlist(s) containing the local files among your other playlists. You may be able to identify them because you’re listed as the ‘artist’ (congratulations!). Click on one of them to open it.

    Like the Playlists from Spotify’s catalog, there will be a Download toggle button.

    Turning this toggle switch on will download the playlist, and all the songs it contains, to your device.

    If you’re not connected to the same network as the machine where the music’s stored, the playlist will still download, but the songs won’t be downloaded until you do hook up to the same network.

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    If you’re an audiophile who loves to collect digital albums and songs, you know the struggle that comes with finding a media server that you like and trust enough to use for storing your music. That struggle becomes even more real when you find a free service you like, but it suddenly starts charging for using the server, leaving you in a lurch.

    That was the dilemma faced by one of Kim’s callers recently. The listener owned thousands of digital song copies but didn’t want to store them on one of the free services — only to have to move them again if and when the service started charging.

    So, Kim advised him to set up a NAS with Plex instead. Plex is a popular, user-friendly media server software option, and you can set it up pretty easily to help store your music files. Here’s how.

    What is a NAS? Or Plex?

    Before we get started, let’s talk about what a NAS is. A NAS, or network-attached storage, is an intelligent storage device that you connect to your home or office network to store files. You can use it to store documents, images, videos, or — you guessed it — music, which is what we’re using it for in this scenario.

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    That may sound a lot like a USB drive, but the NAS is different than your typical USB because you can use a web browser or mobile apps to access files and use certain services provided by the NAS via the Internet. In other words, it can be just like Spotify, except you’re running it with your own media — not a streaming service.

    Plex, on the other hand, is the media server that you’ll use to stream the music that you store on your NAS. Plex stores all your media — podcasts, music, web shows, etc. — and makes it easy to access your files on any device.

    You’ll need Plex to set up and run your own personal media server — which is where you’ll house all of your own stuff. There are a ton of different NAS devices available for sale, but not all of them will support Plex. However, if you want to stream and store your audio files, this component is essential.

    Which NAS should I buy?

    In order to use the NAS with Plex, you’ll have to invest in one of the supported Plex NAS devices, which you can purchase from a ton of different sites, including Amazon.

    If you want to run your server on the NAS itself, you’ll need to choose a NAS that meets a few basic criteria. It will need to:

    • Be a brand and model with an x86 CPU and have a CPU fast enough to transcode the type of media you want to watch, on the types of clients you want to watch it on, or
    • Be a supported ARM model

    There are tons of different devices available for purchase, but if you’re looking for a top of the line NAS that can be purchased online, we recommend the Western Digital My Cloud or the Netgear ReadyNAS.

    The Western Digital My Cloud makes it easy to store all of your media files and you can access them from virtually anywhere via the MyCloud app. What’s cool about this device is that it plugs directly into your Wi-Fi router, so you can upload, share, or access your music and other audio files from anywhere that you have an Internet connection.

    The Netgear ReadyNAS, on the other hand, is super easy to use and access, comes with five levels of data protection, all-inclusive data backup and recovery, and it allows you to create your own cloud to securely store and access your files.

    The Asustor AS6404T is another solid option. This NAS device comes with 1.5GHz Quad-Core processor and 8GB DDR3 RAM, and the Asustor EZ-Connect allows you to connect to your NAS remotely from any computer or mobile phone. Plus, the Asustor EZ-Sync turns your NAS into a real-time file syncing personal cloud space, and the automatic backup means you won’t lose your files if you crash.

    How to set up your music server

    If you have the NAS device in hand, you’ll need to follow the instructions on your NAS device to plug it in or connect to the right place.

    Once that’s done, you can basically use any machine running Windows 10 or Mac OSX to run the media server as is, but if you want to stream your files to your mobile device, you’ll have to pay for Plex, which can be purchased in annual, monthly, or lifetime subscriptions.

    It’s probably wise to start out with a monthly subscription to see how you like it. If you end up a fan of Plex, you can always switch over to the lifetime plan.

    From there, you’ll need to install Plex Media Server on your device to use it. To install the Plex Media Server:

    1. Download and run the installer on the computer (or compatible NAS device or NVIDIA SHIELD) where all your media is stored and managed in movies, TV shows, home videos, music and photo libraries.
    2. The very first time the server runs, it should launch a browser to sign you in (or create a new account) and start the Setup Wizard.
    3. Once the Plex server is fully installed on your device, you’ll have the option to scan your PC or NAS directories for your media. You can add media libraries by type of content and let Plex do the rest — cataloging, adding artwork and info — it’s all automatic. You won’t have to worry about configuring your firewall or anything, as plex takes care of that on the back end.
    4. From there, install and open the Plex app on virtually any device — smartphone, tablet, smart TV, streaming device, game console, personal computer, or any browser. (You may also need to download the apps that work with your device specifically.)

    Google Play makes it easy to discover millions of songs, instantly, from any device.

    With All Access, you can enjoy unlimited listening to millions of songs, create custom radio and skip as much as you want. Start your free 30-day trial and then pay only $9.99 a month.

    Choose your service

    All Access

    $9.99/month

    Standard

    Locker and Store—Free

    Enjoy unlimited listening to millions of songs

    Create personalized radio from any song or artist

    Listen to radio with unlimited skips

    Get smart recommendations based on your tastes

    Store up to 50,000 of your own songs in your locker

    Access your music anywhere without syncing

    Experience music without ads

    Buy new music on Google Play (20M+ songs)

    All Access

    $9.99/month

    Enjoy unlimited listening to millions of songs

    Create personalized radio from any song or artist

    Listen to radio with unlimited skips

    Get smart recommendations based on your tastes

    Store up to 50,000 of your own songs in your locker

    Access your music anywhere without syncing

    Experience music without ads

    Buy new music on Google Play (20M+ songs)

    Standard

    Locker and Store—Free

    Store up to 50,000 of your own songs in your locker

    Access your music anywhere without syncing

    Experience music without ads

    Buy new music on Google Play (20M+ songs)

    Enjoy unlimited music

    There’s a world of music ready for you to discover. Listen to any song, album or artist on All Access, whenever you want. It’s easier than ever to find new favorites. Explore millions of songs by genre, including charts, new releases, staff picks and smart recommendations based on your tastes. Add any album to your library, with a click or a touch, and listen online or offline.

    Custom radio with unlimited skips

    Create a new station based on any artist, album or song. Explore the full list of songs in your station, skip ahead, see what’s next, re-order the songs any way you like and create stations using newly discovered songs. Add these new songs to a playlist, give them a “thumbs up” or share with friends. You can even enjoy stations that blend the best of your music library and ours.

    Store your collection, free

    Bring up to 50,000 songs from your computer to Google Play for free with Music Manager. It’s a simple desktop application that scans your iTunesВ® library or any music folder on your computer and matches your collection with what’s on Google Play, instantly adding the matched tracks to your music library. If you have music that’s not available on Google Play, Music Manager will upload it too. Once you’ve added your collection, you can listen instantly on Android, your iPhone and the web. Sign up for Standard or All Access

    Hello music, goodbye sync

    Google Play keeps your music library updated automatically across devices. When you buy a new album on your phone, it’s ready for listening on your tablet. When you upload a song from your computer, it’s there on your phone. Whether you find new music on Google Play or add it from your existing library, it’s available across all your devices. You’ll never have to plug in a cable to transfer music again.

    Listen online or offline

    When you add new music to your Google Play music library, it’s instantly available for listening on Android and the web. And if you’re going to be offline, say on a long flight or a subway commute, you can choose music to store on your device with the Google Play Music app.

    Share what you love

    Don’t keep good music to yourself. Share a free play of the songs and albums you’ve purchased on Google Play with your friends on Google+. They can share their purchases with you too. Forget the name of that song shared with you last week? No problem, you can find all of the music shared with you in your ‘Shared with me’ auto playlist.

    • You can upload local music from your computer onto Spotify by going through the Settings menu.
    • Spotify Premium subscribers can listen to their uploaded music in the Spotify mobile app too.
    • If you want to upload your music to Spotify so others can stream it, you’ll need to go through a distribution service.
    • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

    Spotify has more than 70 million songs in its streaming catalog, but there are many millions of songs that aren’t on the platform.

    If you have songs on your computer that aren’t streaming on Spotify, you can upload them to Spotify and listen to them there. And if you sync your computer with the Spotify mobile app, you can take those songs on-the-go too.

    And of course, if you’re a musician or recording artist, you can upload your songs to Spotify’s catalog too so everyone can listen to them. It just takes a bit more work.

    Here’s how to upload music from your computer to Spotify, and then sync it with the mobile app.

    How to upload local music to Spotify on a computer

    You’ll have to do this using the Spotify desktop app, which is available for free on both Mac and PC.

    1. Open Spotify on your computer and click your account name in the top-right corner, then click Settings.

    2. Scroll down to the Local Files heading and toggle on Show Local Files.

    3. A new menu titled Show songs from will appear. If your local songs are in one of the default folders that Spotify offers, toggle it on — otherwise, click Add a source and pick the folder on your computer that the songs are in. Doing this will upload every audio file in that folder to Spotify.

    4. Restart the Spotify app. Once re-opened, click Your Library in the top-left.

    5. On the page that opens, you’ll find a playlist called Local Files. Click this to open a list of all the songs that you’ve uploaded to Spotify.

    You can play these songs right away or move them into other playlists like normal Spotify songs. You just can’t add them to your Liked Songs list.

    So now you have the songs on your computer uploaded to your computer’s Spotify app. Let’s get those songs onto your phone too.

    How to upload local music to Spotify on a phone

    The steps to listen to your uploaded music in the Spotify mobile app are pretty similar for both iPhone and Android users.

    Before you do anything, make sure that you’re a Spotify Premium member. Only Premium members can stream local music in the mobile app.

    You’ll also want to add all of your local music to a playlist, other than the default Local Files playlist. You can’t open that default playlist in the mobile app, so doing this will make your songs visible.

    And lastly, if you’re using an iPhone, you need to enable local files on your phone first. Open Spotify and tap Home in the bottom-left corner, and then the gear icon in the top-right to open the app’s settings. Then tap Local Files and toggle on the Local audio files option.

    Once you’ve got everything set up:

    1. Connect your iPhone or Android to the same Wi-Fi network as the computer where you uploaded the songs. If your computer is using ethernet, temporarily connect it to Wi-Fi.

    2. Open the Spotify app and head to the playlist where you put your local songs.

    3. Under the playlist’s name, tap the download icon. It looks like a downward-pointing arrow.

    Once you tap download, Spotify will save every song in the playlist onto your phone — including the ones you uploaded. Feel free to move them into other playlists just like normal songs.

    The songs will stay on your phone until you tap the download icon again to delete them.

    How to upload music onto Spotify so others can stream it

    The steps we’ve outlined help you upload music, but only you can listen to it. If you want to add music to Spotify’s catalog so everyone can stream it (and you can make money from it), there’s a different process.

    To get your music on Spotify, you need to work with a distribution company. Every company has a slightly different process, but it usually involves paying a fee and then giving them the masters of your music.

    Once you’ve got your songs on Spotify, most distributors will take a portion of the money you make for themselves.

    There are dozens of different distribution companies that help artists get on Spotify. Most independent artists recommend sites like Distrokid and Tunecore, and Spotify keeps their own list of “preferred” companies.

    If you’re interested in uploading original music to Spotify, start looking for a distributor.

    Here are your options for buying and listening to digital music.

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    Buying and listening to digital music has never been easier. Whether you’d prefer to stream music or own digital files that live on your computer, the options are plenty.

    Downloading digital music through services like iTunes or Amazon offer a more permanent route to music ownership, while streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music get straight to the point with access to a massive library for a flat monthly subscription.

    There are good arguments for both, but it really comes down to preference. Here we cover some of the pros and cons and details of each to help you decide how to get your music.

    Digital Media Stores

    If you prefer to build up and own a physical music collection—like in the good old days when you would go to a record store and buy a CD or vinyl record—then maybe you’d also prefer to use a online digital media store. These services provide a platform for buying and downloading music, movies, and other content that you can keep on your device and store however you please.

    This means that, in addition to storing music on your computer, you can sync it to your iPhone, iPod, MP3 player, or PMP. Digital music ownership also means you can rip your own CDs using a software media player (like iTunes or Windows Media Player), allowing you to build a more physical version of your music library.

    However, this type of ownership comes with a few risks. Just like with CDs and records, you can lose or damage the devices your music is stored on. Not all a la carte services allow you to re-download purchased tracks. It’s a good idea to have a disaster recovery plan, like an external hard drive or online storage service, to help keep your files backed up. All this could take a lot of time if you have a large music library, but you’ll always own the music you’ve purchased, and there’s no need for a monthly subscription to keep it.

    Streaming Music Services

    Streaming music may be the more flexible and potentially affordable way to enjoy digital music. The drawback is that you don’t own any of the music you have access to. This type of digital music service typically offers a monthly (or yearly) subscription rate to access a smorgasbord of tracks covering every genre you can imagine.

    Many streaming music services offer mobile solutions so you can listen to the same content on your phone, tablet, or in-car entertainment system. There’s also no need to worry about hard drive space, as music is stored in the cloud. (Most streaming services allow you to download music to your device so you can listen without internet access, which consumes storage space while still denying you ownership of the media.)

    With playlists and “favorites,” you can organize the music you listen just as you would with a media player like iTunes. There’s no need to worry about converting audio formats, MP3 tagging, or syncing to your iPod, making the music listening experience a lot simpler. You’ll also steer clear of storage disasters like losing or damaging an external hard drive full of music. If you like discovering new music rather than building up a library of oldies, then streaming services are a smart solution. Just remember that you’ll never actually own the music you listen to; when your subscription ends, so does your access to music.

    Daisy Raines

    Apr 27, 2022 • Filed to: iPhone Data Transfer Solutions • Proven solutions

    I have now got most of my music on iTunes. My wife now wants to put some playlists onto her MP3 player. Anybody knows how to do it?— From Apple Support Community.

    Sometimes you need to transfer your music from one music player to another. You may want to change your music player or simply share it with another device. This is no issue if it is another music player, but if you want to transfer music from an Apple iPod to a non-Apple MP3 player, the process isn’t so direct as just copying and pasting or dragging and dropping. However, there are certain ways you can do this. Here are two ways to achieve this – one uses iTunes, while another uses Wondershare Dr.Fone – Phone Manager (iOS). You may want to share music from an iPod to some other MP3 player. Step by step instructions are provided for how to do this.

    • Part 1. Transfer iPod Music to Another MP3 Player with Dr.Fone – Phone Manager (iOS)
    • Part 2. Transfer iPod Music to Another MP3 Player with iTunes

    Part 1. Transfer iPod Music to Another MP3 Player with Dr.Fone – Phone Manager (iOS)

    What you will need:

    – Two USB Cables to plug in your iPod and your MP3 player to your PC

    – The iPod from which you wish to transfer music

    – The MP3 Player to which you wish to transfer music

    – Wondershare Dr.Fone – Phone Manager (iOS)

    Simple steps to transfer your music from iPod to another MP3 player easily with Dr.Fone – Phone Manager (iOS)

    It’s easy with Wondershare, a few steps will ensure that the process is completed. It is one of the most efficient tools available for transfer of files from iPod to MP3 player, and from one iDevice to any other iDevice. It can also help you transfer to and from Windows. So first, you need to download and install Wondershare Dr.Fone – Phone Manager (iOS). You can opt to try the free version, or download the pro version. The free version has a certain limitation on transfers, while the pro version doesn’t limit transfers. Wondershare Dr.Fone – Phone Manager (iOS) helps to transfer music to any of your devices easily, with just a few clicks. It also helps you do a whole lot more, from transferring all types of media, from TV shows to movies to even audio books, photos, contacts, messages and so on. You can create your own playlist and the software has been designed keeping Apple devices solely in mind.

    Dr.Fone – Phone Manager (iOS)

    Transfer MP3 From iPhone/iPad/iPod to PC without iTunes

    • Transfer, manage, export/import your music, photos, videos, contacts, SMS, Apps etc.
    • Backup your music, photos, videos, contacts, SMS, Apps etc. to computer and restore them easily.
    • Transfer music, photos, videos, contacts, messages, etc from one smartphone to another.
    • Transfer media files between iOS devices and iTunes.
    • Support all iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch models with any iOS versions.

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    Cassette tapes, CDs and even iPods all feel like distant memories of how we used to listen to music. Today, it’s all about the music you can carry or stream on your Android phone or tablet. All you need is your gadget and a set of earphones or a Bluetooth speaker to enjoy your favorite tunes.

    When it comes to Android devices, you have a lot of options for music players. Google Play Music is probably already on your phone, but you can choose from a variety of high-quality apps that will keep you rocking and rolling wherever you go.

    Some apps only reach their full potential when paired with a subscription service, but you can also choose a music player that’s geared to helping your organize and listen to the music that’s already on your tablet or smartphone. Here are some smart app options for wrangling music on Android.

    Android’s native music app

    Let’s kick this off with the app you already have: Google Play Music. This is where you can access your music library, explore top charts and new releases, and also find and listen to podcasts, including Komando On Demand.

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    Google lets you add up to 50,000 songs from your own personal music collection to Play Music, which is pretty great if you already have a big digital music library. Some users aren’t thrilled about the recommended song upload method of using Google’s Play Music app for Chrome. I have been able to successfully upload songs through my Chrome browser, so it’s worth a shot if you want to move your personal library into Play Music.

    The $9.99-per-month subscription upgrade option for Play Music gets you ad-free access to 40 million songs. There’s a lot of competition when it comes to subscription music services, with Apple Music and Spotify giving Google Play Music a run for its money. Google sweetens the deal by bundling in the YouTube Music service for ad-free music video access. If you often find yourself browsing YouTube for music, then this is a nice bonus.

    Apple Music on your Android

    You might be rocking an Android device, but maybe you’re also an Apple fan. Apple Music boasts a massive library of 50 million songs and you can get a free trial before committing to the $9.99-per-month subscription price. Apple knows the appeal of its music service reaches beyond iPhones and iPads, which is why you can get the Apple Music app for Android.

    If you’re not already a subscriber to Apple Music, you will see an offer for a free trial after you install the app and sign into your Apple account. It’s worth a tryout if you’re shopping around for a streaming music service. If you just want to listen to songs you already have on your gadget, then Google Play Music or one of the following apps are a better bet.

    A no-nonsense music player

    Musicolet is an app you’ll want to check out if you’re not looking to stream music and you just want to listen to and organize music files on your smartphone or tablet. It’s free, but it’s also ad-free, which makes it feel a bit like a unicorn.

    Musicolet can search your device for audio tracks, which you can then organize into queues. It’s fairly straightforward once you play around with it. There’s nothing fancy or flashy about this app, but its fans praise its versatility and no-nonsense approach to managing the music on their Android devices.

    Music player with equalizer, personalizations

    The Poweramp Music Player has been around for awhile, but it’s still a popular choice for Android users thanks to its advanced set of features. You can play around with an equalizer, tweak the sound, change the look of the app and view album art. If you want a lot of control over your music-listening experience, then try out Poweramp and play around with the settings and features. You can download the free trial and then consider upgrading to the $3.99 paid version if you like the app.

    Subscription music services are a fun way to find new music and listen to old classic. The free trials will give you plenty of time to decide if they’re a good fit for you. Otherwise, look to Google Play Music, Musicolet or Poweramp as solid options for managing the tunes that are on your phone or tablet.

    Of course, you’ll want a good set of earphones for this, so check out our guide to wireless headphones for Android.

    Bonus: Get Kim Komando podcasts on Android

    Your Android device is also a perfect podcast machine for accessing our Komando podcasts, including Komando On Demand and Tech News Today. Just open up Google Play Music, tap on the three bars in the corner, tap on Podcasts and then search for “Kim Komando.” Tap or click here for our guide to all the Komando podcast offerings. We’ll keep you up to date on all the important tech news you need to know.

    • Android
    • Apple Music
    • Google
    • Google Play
    • music
    • phones
    • tablets

    by Carissa Morland on January 29, 2019 at 10:03 am January 29, 2019 at 10:03 am

    Video streaming subscription has surpassed physical media as a more popular choice for home entertainment, accounting for three-fourths of consumer spending in 2018. Nowadays many people don’t or rarely buy new DVDs. However, many of us may still own a big collection of old home videos, movies, and TV series on DVDs being stored on shelves, in boxes, or somewhere else in house.

    Physical DVD discs are indeed not as convenient as digital files, but they can be digitized with a software tool like open source HandBrake or more powerful WinX DVD Ripper. That kind of tool can rip DVD to cloud-friendly format so that you can save digital copies to cloud. This way you can not only save up on your local storage space, but also be able to access to your file library on various platforms as long as internet connection is available.

    HandBrake or WinX DVD Ripper

    HandBrake is free to download and use on Windows, Mac, and Linux. It can rip DVDs to MP4 and MKV within a few steps. However if you try to use HandBrake to rip read-only DVDs, you will probably end in failure. Only with the help of libdvdcss, HandBrake can rip some read-only discs. But the annoying thing is that libdvdcss doesn’t always work.

    But it is different with WinX DVD Ripper – the flagship product of Digiarty Software. This software is available to cope with both home-made and store-bought DVD discs without hassle. Ripping commercial DVDs may or may not be legal in your countries. However, it should be ok to rip your purchased DVDs offline at home for DVD backup and your own personal use.

    WinX DVD Ripper can rip your DVD collection to a wide range of file formats, far more than HandBrake offers. You can choose to digitize DVD to DVD folder or ISO image file to preserve intact DVD data or convert DVD main title only to MP4, AVI, WMV, 3GP, FLV or other mainstream video formats.

    Digitizing DVD with WinX won’t take you too much time. You probably finish ripping a DVD within 5 minutes only. This is because it adopts multiple advanced technologies to boost ripping speed, among which, Intel QSV and NVIDIA CUDA/NVENC powered level-3 hardware acceleration is particularly worth mentioning. Level-3 hardware acceleration means that the hardware is used to assist all of the three main parts of video transcoding, including decoding, processing, and encoding, instead of only one or two of them.

    Although HandBrake supports Intel QSV and NVIDIA NVENC as well, it hasn’t reached that level. Only decoding and encoding can be done on Intel hardware, and only encoding can be completed on NVIDIA ASIC hardware.

    There may be concerns that enabling hardware acceleration will lower the quality of resulting file. Is it true? No. With the development of Intel and NVIDIA graphics technology, we have seen quality improvement on hardware-assisted processing. To the naked eyes, it is hard to distinguish the difference between the image decoded and then re-encoded solely by software and that processed with the assistance of hardware. Hardware acceleration is already able to make good balance among speed, quality, and file size.

    All things considered, WinX DVD Ripper should be the better option.

    How to digitize DVDs with WinX DVD Ripper

    To begin with, we need to download and install WinX DVD Ripper Windows or Mac version on our computer. Go to the download page at: https://www.winxdvd.com/download.htm

    After this, we can move to the following steps to rip your old or new DVDs.

    Step 1. Put target DVD disc into the DVD drive of your computer and click DVD Disc button at the top right corner of WinX DVD Ripper. A small window will pop up for you to select the source DVD disc. As for DVD Disc File System Type, Just leave the default setting and hit OK.

    Step 2. Choose a desired output format profile and click OK. If you’ll archive the result file into cloud, make sure the chosen format is supported by the cloud storage service you use.

    Step 3. Enable Hardware Accelerator if you want to make use of your GPU hardware to quicken the DVD ripping speed.

    Step 4. Click RUN and it will begin ripping DVD to digital file immediately. You can check on the progress from the popup window.

    Save DVD digital copies to cloud

    There’re many choices of cloud storage services, such as Dropbox, OneDrive, Google Drive, Amazon Drive, and iCloud. They will keep your DVD digital library secure and allow you to stream them on demand to whatever cloud-compatible devices.