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Wednesday, 21 January 2015

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding? Step by Step

Implantation bleeding may be an early sign of pregnancy for approximately 1/3 of all women who conceive. The fertilized egg travels down the Fallopian tube and into the uterus, where it implants into the uterine lining. When it does, the tissue that forms around the egg, known as the trophoblast, may damage some of the mother’s blood vessels in the uterus, resulting in a small amount of blood leaking from the cervix and down the vagina. Learning how to recognize implantation bleeding may be an early clue for some women that pregnancy has begun.

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Method One of Two:
Recognizing the Signs
Recognize Implantation Bleeding Step 1 Version 3.jpg
1Consider the timing. This type of bleeding during pregnancy usually occurs 6 to 12 days after conception–close to the time when the next menstrual cycle is expected. Ask yourself when was the last time you had sex. If more than a month or two has passed, then it’s unlikely that what you’re seeing is implantation bleeding.[1]
Since implantation bleeding may be confused with the normal menstrual cycle, some women are surprised to discover their pregnancy is a month further along than they originally estimated.
Once the pregnancy is confirmed at a doctor’s office, the physician can use other testing to determine the correct gestational age of the fetus, particularly if implantation bleeding has left some question about when the last real menstrual cycle occurred.
Recognize Implantation Bleeding Step 2 Version 4.jpg
2Examine the color and quantity of the bleeding. This will help to distinguish between pregnancy implantation and the start of a regular menstrual cycle. Implantation bleeding does not usually resemble bleeding during a normal period. It will be lighter, and of lower quantity. Sometimes, implantation bleeding can just be spotting for a few hours, or even a single spot.[2]
Implantation bleeding typically consists of a discharge with a pink or brownish tint. It is often darker than period blood because it takes time for the blood to travel from the uterine wall through the vagina.
The amount of bleeding is relatively light, and will only last a couple of days. For some women, the flow will resemble a very light period, which is why confusion between the 2 occasionally occurs. The majority of women find that menstrual blood is more of a red color and will become heavier within a day or two.
Recognize Implantation Bleeding Step 3 Version 4.jpg
3See if you’re having cramps. Pregnancy bleeding from implantation may include some mild cramping as the egg implants and the uterus is changing to accommodate the embryo. However, cramping with implantation bleeding is usually much lighter than what women might experience with a regular period. The tricky thing is that the symptoms of early pregnancy are similar to the symptoms you may feel right before your period.[3]
If the abdominal cramping continues to increase, it could indicate a regular period or problem with the pregnancy, such as an ectopic pregnancy. In some cases, the pain might be associated with a completely different medical condition, such as appendicitis or a bladder infection.
Any pain that does not appear to be from your normal period and does not subside on its own within a couple days should be checked by a doctor. Patients that have pain that continues to intensify, or patients that develop other symptoms like fever, chills or heavy bleeding, should see their doctor as soon as possible.
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Method Two of Two:
Looking for Other Symptoms
Recognize Implantation Bleeding Step 4 Version 3.jpg
1See if you’re feeling nauseous. Morning sickness is a very real thing. Many expectant mothers feel morning sickness during the early part of the day; it’s a feeling of nausea and an aversion to smells that previously had no effect on you, such as the smell of strong coffee. You may even be vomiting in the morning, which will be a sign that something is up.
Recognize Implantation Bleeding Step 5 Version 2.jpg
2Check for soreness in your breasts. Sore and tender breasts are a common symptom of pregnancy. Throughout your pregnancy, your breasts will get larger and your nipples may darken and grow. However, sore breasts are also a sign that you’re about to get your period.[4]
Recognize Implantation Bleeding Step 6 Version 3.jpg
3See if you’re fatigued. Many women are also fatigued during the first trimester of their pregnancy. If you’re feeling unusually tired while getting plenty of rest and not feeling overly burdened for any reason, then your pregnancy may be the cause.[5]
Recognize Implantation Bleeding Step 7 Version 2.jpg
4See if your bathroom habits change. If you’re urinating a lot more frequently without any reason you can think of, or if you’re suddenly constipated while previously not having any trouble with your bowels, then you may be pregnant.
Recognize Implantation Bleeding Step 8 Version 3.jpg
5Be on the lookout for mood swings. Pregnancy comes with some serious hormonal changes that can have a major impact on your mood. You could be crying one minute and then feeling ridiculously happy the next minute for next to no reason. See if you’re suddenly sobbing while watching a corny movie or seeing a sad story on the news. Of course, again, mood swings are also a pre-menstrual symptom.
Recognize Implantation Bleeding Step 9 Version 3.jpg
6See if you’re feeling dizzy. If you’re suddenly getting dizzy when you stand up quickly, walk up stairs, or just for no reason at all, then you may be pregnant.
Recognize Implantation Bleeding Step 10 Version 2.jpg
7Go see a doctor. You may experience a number of these symptoms and can still not be pregnant. The best way to know if you’re pregnant and if what you see on your underwear is really implantation bleeding is to leave it to the health care professional. Make an appointment with your doctor, at your local hospital or clinic.
You can also start by taking a home pregnancy test, but you have a better chance of getting accurate results if you go to a doctor or a clinic.
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Tips
Some home pregnancy tests are not an accurate predictor of pregnancy until the day after a missed period, so read the packages carefully. If the implantation bleeding occurs prior to this time, you may have to wait a few days to find out if the bleeding really was due to pregnancy implantation or another cause.
Bleeding is also a sign of cervical cancer. If you are over 30, a pap test will rule out this serious possibility.

One of the early pregnancy signs is implantation bleeding and this will happen for about one-third of all women who get pregnant. This is actually a lesser known symptom. Keep reading to know more as this article will look at how to recognize implantation bleeding or period.

Although it is not noticeable at all times, this type of bleeding might take place when a fertilized egg is implanted into the uterine wall or lining.

The egg will implant itself six to twelve days after being fertilized by a sperm and traveling down from the fallopian tube and then into the uterus. While this is happening, a very small part of the uterine lining might be released or disturbed.

This small percentage of blood might appear as bleeding or spotting. If you learn how to recognize the sign of implantation bleeding, then you will have an early clue that pregnancy has started.

Implantation Bleeding or Period – How to recognize what do you have

Look at the timing. As mentioned above, this type of bleeding usually occurs during pregnancy about six to twelve days after conception, which is near to the time of your expected menstrual cycle.

Check when you had sex last. If the time is over one or two months, then it is not likely that you are seeing implantation bleeding.

Implantation bleeding can be confused with the regular menstrual cycle, so some women discover that their pregnancy is one month further along than the original estimated time.

If you cannot visit the doctor to confirm a pregnancy, other testing can be done to determine the right gestational age of your fetus.

Examine the quantity and color of the bleeding. When you do this, it can help you to distinguish between the start of a normal menstrual cycle and implantation bleeding.

The implantation bleeding doesn’t generally resemble the bleeding that occurs in a normal period as it’s lighter in color and low in quantity. At times, this bleeding can be just a single spot or spotting for several hours.

Typically, implantation bleeding comes with a brownish tint or pink discharge. It’s often darker in color when compared to period blood since it takes some time to travel from the wall of the uterus to the vagina. This bleeding is also relatively light and you will only experience it for a couple of days.

In some cases, the flow of blood resembles a very light period. For most women, the menstrual blood color has a more red shade and it will flow heavier within one or two days.

See if you are having cramps. Implantation bleeding is frequently accompanied by mild to moderate cramping as the embryo is invading the uterine wall. Cramping is actually common in this type of bleeding and it might happen as early as 7 days prior to a missed period.

The cramps can differ in severity, some women experience similar ones to menstrual cramps or feel like their period is starting.

As you can imagine, these symptoms can be tricky as early pregnancy signs are similar to what you might feel immediately before your period. In the event that abdominal cramps continue to intensify, it could be a regular period or a pregnancy problem like an ectopic pregnancy.

There are also instances when the pain may be linked to a totally different medical condition like a bladder infection or appendicitis.

Confirming the Symptoms

if you believe that you are experiencing implantation bleeding, You should wait for at least a day after your period is due before taking a pregnancy test.

This type of bleeding can take place very early in your cycle and you might not have sufficient pregnancy hormone to get back a positive test. It is always a good idea to do a follow-up test at the doctor after getting a positive pregnancy result.

When You Should Be Concerned About Implantation Bleeding

As a pregnant woman, you should be worried about heavy, very red bleeding that contains clots or maybe comes with severe discomfort or cramps. Implantation bleeding might take place after artificial insemination as well. If the bleeding continues you should contact your doctor as early as possible.

It also recommended for you to consult a doctor if the bleeding is causing an uneasy feeling or if you have any questions or concerns. You should also get checked out by your doctor if you are feeling any pain that you might not experience during your normal period and is not subsiding on its own after a couple of days.

Aside from those things, you should contact your doctor if have other symptoms such as chills, fever or heavy bleeding.

Approximately 20 to 30% of pregnancies have bleeding during the early stages [1]. If you think that you are pregnant and you are experiencing light spotting or bleeding, it could be a normal healthy pregnancy sign.

Implantation bleeding may be an early sign of pregnancy for approximately 1/3 of all women who conceive. The fertilized egg travels down the Fallopian tube and into the uterus, where it implants into the uterine lining. When it does, the tissue that forms around the egg, known as the trophoblast, may damage some of the mother’s blood vessels in the uterus, resulting in a small amount of blood leaking from the cervix and down the vagina. Learning how to recognize implantation bleeding may be an early clue for some women that pregnancy has begun.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

Method 1: Recognizing the Signs

Consider the timing. This type of bleeding during pregnancy usually occurs 6 to 12 days after conception–close to the time when the next menstrual cycle is expected. Ask yourself when was the last time you had s e x. If more than a month or two has passed, then it’s unlikely that what you’re seeing is implantation bleeding.

  • Since implantation bleeding may be confused with the normal menstrual cycle, some women are surprised to discover their pregnancy is a month further along than they originally estimated.
  • Once the pregnancy is confirmed at a doctor’s office, the physician can use other testing to determine the correct gestational age of the fetus, particularly if implantation bleeding has left some question about when the last real menstrual cycle occurred.

Examine the color and quantity of the bleeding.

This will help to distinguish between pregnancy implantation and the start of a regular menstrual cycle. Implantation bleeding does not usually resemble bleeding during a normal period. It will be lighter, and of lower quantity. Sometimes, implantation bleeding can just be spotting for a few hours, or even a single spot.

  • Implantation bleeding typically consists of a discharge with a pink or brownish tint. It is often darker than period blood because it takes time for the blood to travel from the uterine wall through the vagina.
  • The amount of bleeding is relatively light, and will only last a couple of days. For some women, the flow will resemble a very light period, which is why confusion between the 2 occasionally occurs. The majority of women find that menstrual blood is more of a red color and will become heavier within a day or two.

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Implantation cramping may be an early sign of pregnancy. Understanding the causes and key differences between implantation cramps and period cramps will help people to recognize them.

Implantation cramping is a type of pain sometimes experienced when a fertilized egg attaches itself to the lining of the uterus. This process is called implantation. Cramping sometimes occurs when this happens, but it does not always cause pain.

Anyone experiencing implantation cramps should avoid taking some anti-inflammatory medications, such as aspirin. This is because taking anti-inflammatory medicines around the time of conception might increase the risk of miscarriage, according to a 2003 study.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

Share on Pinterest Cramping sometimes occurs when a fertilised egg attaches itself to the uterus lining.

Implantation cramps are not the same as period or menstrual cramps.

Menstrual cramps happen during a period, which occurs approximately once every 28 days, so long as there is no pregnancy.

Menstrual cramps happen when the uterus contracts to expel its lining.

Substances called prostaglandins trigger the uterine muscles to contract.

Prostaglandins are associated with pain and inflammation. This process may cause cramping.

Not everyone gets implantation cramps and bleeding when they first become pregnant.

One-quarter of participants in a 2010 study reported bleeding in their first trimester. Only 8 percent of those had heavy bleeding.

28 percent of those that had spotting and light bleeding also reported pain. 54 percent of those with heavy bleeding also experienced pain.

Not everyone has cramps during implantation. And for those that do, the cramps may be mild or moderate.

Some describe the sensation as:

  • pricking
  • pulling
  • tingling feeling

This can help differentiate it from a menstrual cramp.

It is unusual to have intense cramping pain during implantation, so anyone who experiences painful cramping between periods should be assessed by a doctor.

Implantation tends to happen 6 to 12 days after ovulation when pregnancy occurs. This is about the same time that a person would usually expect a period to start.

If an egg has been fertilized, the body prepares the uterus lining to receive and protect the egg.

Some light bleeding or spotting may accompany implantation cramping. This is called implantation bleeding and is lighter than a regular period.

Implantation cramping or bleeding may be an early sign of pregnancy.

It is easy to mistake period cramping or a light period for symptoms of implantation.

Because of the similarity of symptoms between menstruation and implantation, it helps to know the other early signs of pregnancy.

Other early signs of pregnancy include:

  • swollen, tender, heavier, or fuller breasts
  • extreme tiredness
  • feeling sick or vomiting
  • food aversions or cravings
  • headaches
  • constipation
  • mood swings
  • feeling tearful
  • dizziness or faintness
  • raised body temperature
  • missed period

If someone thinks they are pregnant, it is a good idea to take a home pregnancy test. A good time to do this is 1 to 2 weeks after noticing the early signs of pregnancy. Pregnancy tests are available to buy in supermarkets, health stores, and online.

If a fertilized egg has implanted into the uterus wall, the body will already have started to form the placenta. In this situation, the pregnancy hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), begins to rise.

Around 2 weeks after implantation, hCG levels will be high enough for a pregnancy test to be positive.

If the pregnancy test is positive, the next step is to make an appointment with a doctor. The doctor can confirm whether the home test is correct.

Anyone who already knows they are pregnant and is experiencing heavy bleeding or cramping should speak to a doctor. These symptoms may indicate a problem with the pregnancy.

Sometimes, individuals who are not pregnant may experience painful cramping or bleeding in between periods. If this occurs, it is a good idea to discuss the issue with a doctor.

Implantation cramping and light bleeding may be an early sign of pregnancy. It is easy to mistake these symptoms as menstrual cramping or light bleeding.

For this reason, it is important to recognize the other early signs of pregnancy. However, these symptoms alone do not prove a pregnancy. Taking a home pregnancy test and having the results verified by a doctor is the best way to confirm pregnancy.

Once a pregnancy is confirmed, individuals can consider the option of continuing with the pregnancy. A person can discuss all options with a doctor.

Last medically reviewed on January 19, 2020

After you have your preconception health in order, it is time to take the plunge! Along with questions about using an ovulation calendar, and how often to have intercourse, you may wonder how to recognize an implantation bleeding.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

What is an implantation bleeding, actually?

If an egg is fertilized after ovulation, that zygote’s next step is making the journey to the uterus from the fallopian tube. There, it will start to nestle in a thick bed of tissues lining the whole womb. This lining, called the endometrium, consists of blood and tissues, forms a suitable “bed” for the developing zygote. The process of implantation can, it will come as no surprise, cause some bleeding inside the womb (see a nerd’s guide to getting pregnant for detailed info about the actual conception process). This bleeding will be sometimes be expelled from the body in the form if a few drops of old, brown looking blood. That is what we call an implantation bleeding.

What it looks like

The earliest time at which a fertilized egg can implant is around seven days following ovulation, and does conception. Another way to describe the timing would be around a week before you expect your period, in most women. Since the origin of this bleeding is the uterus, you can’t expect to notice an implantation bleeding right at that time the blood will take a few days to travel down to the vagina. You may spot a few drops of old, brown or dark red blood (though it won’t even look much like blood, usually), when you wipe after the toilet, or just in your underwear.

Basically, those who have an implantation bleeding will notice it a while before they would have their period. You can tell implantation bleeding and menstruation apart in two weeks. First, implantation bleeding comes earlier. This will only help you if you have fairly regular periods. Secondly, a period normally starts off with quite heavy bleeding and continues for days. A few drops of blood and then clear cervical mucus makes it clear that you are not experiencing a menstrual period.

Women who don’t know what an implantation bleeding is may wonder if they are having a really weird period, or if they may be having a miscarriage. An implantation bleeding is, meanwhile, completely normal. Not every newly pregnant woman will experience or spot one, but this small bleeding between your ovulation and the time you would have had your menstrual period is actually quite a big gift. It is, after all, the first indication that you may be expecting a baby!

And if you don’t have an implantation bleeding?

While an implantation bleeding also sometimes called implantation spotting because it is really a small amount of blood is healthy and normal, only a minority of women who have just become pregnant ever notice one. Approximately one in five pregnancies will start with the mom noticing implantation spotting. That leaves plenty of women who never had an implantation bleeding! It may be something you would like to watch out for if you are trying to get pregnant, but it is not “required” in any way.

Ovulation bleeding

Don’t confuse an implantation bleeding an ovulation bleeding, which some women also experience regularly. An ovulation bleeding is probably caused by a small bleeding inside the ovaries after a follicle is released. This bleeding will occur around the time of ovulation and is sometimes accompanied by a mild feeling of pain. If you are only just ovulating, the spotting obviously cannot be caused by a fertilized egg implanting; keep on waiting patiently and watching out for an implantation bleeding and other pregnancy signs over the next few weeks.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

One in three women have implantation bleeding. Between the first and second week of gestation they detect a slight loss of blood that happens when the embryo nests in the wall of the uterus. This may be one of the first obvious signs of pregnancy.

It can also be a time of real distress for those who wish to have a baby, as it can be mistaken for the start of the next period.

June is the month of infertility and from the blog of IVF-Spain we want to help clear up the doubts about this important topic for those who are looking for pregnancy, either with the help of medicine and an IVF or without it.

What is implantation bleeding?

During the first weeks of pregnancy the uterus is very irrigated. When the embryo adheres to the endometrium, which has thickened to receive the embryo, some blood vessels may break, causing slight vaginal bleeding.

Not all pregnant women have implantation bleeding and, if they have had it, it does not have to be repeated in all their pregnancies.

This can be a source of anxiety and stress for those who are anxious to have a baby, since it can be confused with the start of the next period.

When does implantation bleeding occur?

The egg meets the sperm in the fallopian tube and fertilization occurs, and together they begin their journey to the uterus. Then a process of cell division begins until they become a blastocyst (day 5-6 of fertilization). Once in the uterus, and for pregnancy to occur, the embryo must implant in the endometrium of the future mother.

This process takes approximately ten to fourteen days after conception, so that this small bleeding can be confused with the start of menstruation.

How do you differentiate between implantation bleeding and menstruation?

As we have already mentioned in this article, since implantation bleeding can occur during the first weeks of pregnancy, it is not strange that it can be confused with the beginning of the next period.

Although it is difficult to differentiate by date, there are other factors that can help us easily identify that it is bleeding due to the correct implantation of the embryo in the wall of the uterus.

One aspect to evaluate is the quantity. The bleeding that occurs when the embryo adheres to the uterine wall is lighter than that of menstruation. It can be from a drop to a light bleeding. It is true that the amount at the beginning of menstruation is usually light. However, it will increase as the days go by.

The colour can also help us identify one bleeding from another. Usually the blood from a implantation is darker, unlike the bright red that usually appears during the period.

Compared to menstruation, the duration of bleeding is shorter. While menstruation increases the amount of bleeding as the days go by, implantation may last a few hours or no more than three days. Another key factor is the texture, which tends to be more fluid and lighter.

The truth is that every woman is unique and so are her symptoms and the bleeding she experiences during each period. That is why it is important to look at other types of symptoms that may indicate the beginning of a pregnancy.

Pregnancy symptoms such as: breast sensitivity, nausea at certain times, tiredness or the constant need to go to the bathroom, may be giving us a clue that we have achieved the desired pregnancy.

How to get the confirmation that you are really pregnant?

The easiest way is to take a urine pregnancy test. The drawback is that it can be a little early to get a positive result. This type of test takes longer to detect the levels of the hormone hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin), so if it is not carried out at the right time, a false negative can be obtained even though the embryo has implanted.

To be able to do a urine pregnancy test properly, you must wait until you have had your period for a few days.

The hormone hCG, also known as Beta-hCG, is secreted by the embryo when it implants in the uterus. Measuring the levels of Beta-hCG is a reliable indicator of whether a pregnancy has been achieved.

In assisted reproduction centres such as IVF-Spain, ten days after the transfer of the embryo to the patient, the levels of the hCG hormone are measured with a blood test. In order for us to confirm that the pregnancy is progressing favourably, the levels of the hormone will grow exponentially during the first trimester.

That period, between the transfer of the embryo or the insemination until the result is obtained, is usually the most difficult time for patients within a fertility treatment. It is a life-changing blood test.

How should you act if you have a bleed?

If you have undergone fertility treatment, the first thing we recommend is to continue with the medication and contact our patient care team so that one of our fertility doctors can assess that everything is going normally and tell you the steps to follow.

On the other hand, if you have not undergone any treatment and if you have any doubts, the best thing to do is to consult your gynaecologist so that he can assess what type of bleeding it is.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

Implantation bleeding. What is it and how to recognize it?

Although it may initially cause some concern, implantation bleeding may actually be one of the first signs of pregnancy. This slight bleeding often alerts women who are trying to get pregnant because it can often be mistaken for a period.

Here at our fertility clinic we have prepared this post to explain what implantation bleeding consists of, what it is due to and how we can recognize it. Being informed and knowing how to “listen” to our body is the best way to avoid worrying ourselves.

What is Implantation bleeding?

Implantation bleeding is light bleeding that occurs 10 -14 days after conception. This slight bleeding is actually common, 3 out of 10 women experience it and does not imply that there is any risk in pregnancy.

However, let’s clarify that not all women will experience implantation bleeding or spotting, in fact, it’s possible that the same woman does not experience it in all her pregnancies.

Why does Implantation bleeding happen?

Implantation bleeding occurs when the embryo attaches to the wall of the uterus. We will briefly explain this process:

  • Fertilization occurs when the sperm enters the ovum giving rise to the zygote, in approximately 72 hours, the zygote becomes morula (the zygote segmentation) and about 4-5 days later it becomes a blastocyst.
  • The blastocyst will travel from the fallopian tubes to the uterus, where it will adhere to the endometrium, the mucous membrane that covers the inside of the uterus, and will remain there for the rest of the pregnancy. It is what we know as embryonic implantation.
  • Embryo implantation is essential for the development of the embryo because it allows it to receive oxygen and it provides the necessary nutrients during the first stage of pregnancy.
  • During this adhesion process, a slight tearing of the endometrium and the rupture of some blood vessels usually occurs. This involves a slight loss of blood, which in a couple of days can cause slight bleeding, which we call implantation bleeding.

Implantation bleeding sometimes does not occur or goes unnoticed, but in some women it is more evident. Many women are alarmed when they see it, thinking that they are spotting because something is not going well or mistaking it for a period. But implantation bleeding is not a bad sign, it may be one of the first signs of pregnancy and it is harmless to our health.

Therefore, here from Clínica Fertia we want to give you some tips that can help you identify implantation bleeding and differentiate it from menstruation.

How to recognize Implantation bleeding.

It is very common for implantation bleeding to be confused with a period. The differences are, on many occasions, subtle, so it is important to pay special attention to these four aspects:

  • The colour: Implantation bleeding usually has darker, brown tones instead of intense reds, and this difference can be seen with the naked eye.
  • The amount : the flow should be considerably less than that produced during menstruation. Sometimes it is very short with only a few drops or a small blood stain.
  • The density : Implantation bleeding is usually lighter and more diluted than menstruation.
  • The duration : It usually lasts between 1 and 3 days. It is usually shorter than a regular period and never lasts more than 5 days.

During implantation bleeding, if a pregnancy test is done, the result may not be reliable, as it is usually too early to detect the pregnancy hormone or chorionic gonadotropin (hCG).

During these days it is always advisable to pay special attention to your body. Many women also observe other signs that can help to identify whether or not they are pregnant such as hypersensitivity in the breasts, nausea, fatigue, tiredness, headache, increased basal temperature. These may be some of the first symptoms of pregnancy.

If the bleeding lasts more than 4-5 days, if it is abundant and accompanied by severe abdominal pain, it is advisable to go to the clinic.

If you are in waiting for a process of IVF, ICSI, egg donation, ROPA method or any other reproduction treatment we want to send you a reassuring message. It is important not to obsess over the symptoms since, although it is true that some may coincide with the first symptoms of pregnancy, many of them are caused by the medication itself.

Try to relax and enjoy the process until the day of your Beta. And remember that if you need to, you can call the clinic to clarify any concerns or to ask questions regarding the medication and your symptoms.

If you are trying to get pregnant, we recommend that you come to Clínica Fertia and make a preconception consultation, especially if you suffer from any type of illness such as diabetes, hypertension, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, or if you have had any complications in previous pregnancies.

In this first preconception consultation our team will check your general health status and give you some guidelines to improve your chances of getting pregnant and avoid any risks and possible complications.

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions or queries, we are always here to help you.

Implantation bleeding can be one of the early signs of pregnancy, something that happens to about a third of every woman who conceives. If you notice light bleeding that looks like small, brown, or pink spots and you think you could be pregnant, you might be experiencing implantation bleeding. A fertilized egg might have travelled down to the fallopian tube and inside the uterus to implant itself in the uterine lining. If this happens, the tissue that develops around the egg might damage some of the blood vessels inside the uterus and cause a small amount of blood to leak from the cervix and go down to the vagina.

How to Recognize Implementation bleeding

You can start by examining the quantity and color of the bleeding as this will help you to distinguish between the start of your regular menstrual cycle and pregnancy implantation. Implantation bleeding is usually lighter in color and is of lower quantity. There are times when it’s continuous spotting for several hours or just a single spot.

Typically implantation bleeding consists of a brownish or pink tint discharge. It’s usually lighter than menstrual blood since it takes time to travel from out of the uterine wall through to the vagina. It’s relatively light bleeding that only lasts for a couple of days. In some cases, the flow resembles a very light period and this is the reason why the two are confused. Most women have menstrual blood that is redder in color and becomes heavier in one or two days.

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Consider the timing of the bleeding. During pregnancy this type of bleeding normally occurs six to twelve days after conception, closer to the time when you expect the next menstrual cycle. If over one or two months has passed since the last time when you had sex then it is unlikely for you to have implantation bleeding.

As mentioned before, implantation bleeding can be confused with a normal period and some women have discovered that they are pregnant for a month more than what was estimated originally.

Cramps could indicate that you have implantation bleeding. Pregnancy bleeding that comes from implantation might include mild cramping because the egg is implanted and the uterus changes to house the embryo. But, cramping with this bleeding is normally much lighter than what you would experience with regular periods. If abdominal cramping increases continuously it could be a regular period or some pregnancy problem. In some instances, the pain may be associated with a medical condition that is completely different.

Be sure to get any pain checked out by a doctor if it does not seem to be associated with your normal period and is not subsiding on its own after a couple of days. You should also see your doctor as soon as possible if the pain continues to exaggerate or if you have developed other symptoms such as chills, fever, or heavy bleeding.

Here are some other symptoms to look for:

Nauseous feeling: Most expectant mothers experience morning sickness in the early part of their day. It is a nausea feeling and a dislike for smells which had no previous effect on you, like the scent of your favorite perfume. You might even start to vomit in the morning, a sure sign that something is going on.

Feelings of fatigue: Most women are fatigued in the first trimester of pregnancy. Your pregnancy might cause you to feel unusually tired when you are getting a lot of rest and feels overly burdened for no reason.

Check for any soreness in the breasts: It is common for women to have tender and sore breasts during pregnancy. If you are expecting, your breasts are going to get larger and the nipples might grow and darken. However, you could also have sore breasts if you are about to have your period.

Dizzy feeling: You might be pregnant if you are getting dizzy suddenly after standing up quickly, walking up-stairs or for absolutely no reason at all.

Mood swings: Pregnant women experiences serious hormonal changes which can impact their mood significantly. You could find yourself feeling extremely happy one minute and crying the next for no reason. You might also start to sob suddenly whilst watching corny movies or seeing news with sad stories. Of course, keep in mind that mood swings are a pre-menstrual symptom as well.

Change in bathroom habits: You might be pregnant if you are urinating more frequently or you are suddenly constipated without having any problems with your bowels.

Last but not least, you should see a doctor if you are experiencing most of these symptoms and still believe that you are not pregnant. A healthcare professional is the right person to tell if what you are experiencing is implantation bleeding. You can make an appointment to see your doctor or go to your local clinic or hospital. Aside from that, you could take a pregnancy test at home, but remember that you are more likely to get accurate results at the doctor.

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Question: I had frozen embryo transfer on 17/08/16. So far there is no spotting of blood. I did home pregnancy test on 22/08/16 it came out negative. Iam much worried. Iam 40yrs old. Having diabetes and thyroid. But my diabetes is under control.please let me know for any possibility of implantation. I got slightly muscle cramps. And often back pain.

I have not tried embryo transfer already this is first time

Brief Answer:
There is possibility of implantation

I understand your concerns.

It is early to test for pregnancy.

I suggest you do serum beta hCG blood test after August 31. Urine pregnancy test can only be done after September 5.

There is possibility of pregnancy.

Let me know if you need anymore help.

Whether compulsorily there should be blood spotting for implantation. Doctor has told me to take HCG injection today. Already Iam taking porgy XXXXXXX duphaston, ova care,folic tab and vaginal progesterone gel.it is a frozen embryo of 20 days. Whether that will be a concern for implantation.please let me know

Awaiting for your reply.doctor has advised me to inject HCG injection today. I did but due to curiosity I tested my urine again it showed me negative. Iam worried

Brief Answer:
No concern for implantation

Implantation bleeding is not seen by everyone.

I don’t see any concern for implantation.

It’s very early to test for pregnancy.

Continue Medicines. Let me know if you need anymore help.

Answered by
Dr. Mahesh Koregol

Practicing since : 2000

Answered : 3801 Questions

The User accepted the expert’s answer

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  • Plan b or implantation bleeding
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Brief Answer: There is possibility of implantation Detailed Answer: Hi, I understand your concerns. It is early to test for pregnancy. I suggest you do serum beta hCG blood test after August 31. Urine pregnancy test can only be done after September 5. There is possibility of pregnancy. Let me know if you need anymore help. Regards

Brief Answer:
Due to I-pill.

Detailed Answer:
Hello,
Thanks for trusting us with your health concern.
The brownish spotting that you are having is due to the effect of I-pill. It si not an implantation bleeding which is seen near the time of your periods. You can take primolut N 5 mg twice a day for 5 days to regulate your periods.
Please feel free to discuss further. I will be glad to answer the follow up queries that you have.
Wishing you good health.
Regards.
Dr. Rakhi Tayal.
For future query, you can directly approach me through my profile URL http://bit.ly/Dr-Rakhi-Tayal

Brief Answer:
It is a withdrawal bleeding due to pill.

Detailed Answer:
The bleeding you have now is a withdrawal bleeding due to the pill. This is not an implantation bleeding and does not rule out a pregnancy. Your next periods may be delayed. The next normal periods will confirm the absence of pregnancy.
Regards.

Brief Answer:
Details below.

Detailed Answer:
The bleeding usually stops in 4-5 days. If it does not stop then do consult your gynecologist for proper hormonal treatment. Your periods are likely to be delayed by a week. It is difficult to predict your next periods date after taking an I-pill. It is not likely to be on fixed date. The medicine can only be suggested after a direct examination and your compatibility with the various hormones.
regards.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

IMPLANTATION BLEEDING AND HOW TO RECOGNIZE IT
Many inexperience young women mistakes implantation bleeding to be miscarriage at the early stages of their pregnancy. #WaCHAG-Ghana will like to throw some light on what implantation bleeding is all about and how to manage it. Implantation bleeding may be an early sign of pregnancy for approximately 1/3 of all women who conceive. The fertilized egg travels down the Fallopian tube and into the uterus, where it implants into the uterine lining. When it does, the tissue that forms around the egg, known as the trophoblast, may damage some of the mother’s blood vessels in the uterus, resulting in a small amount of blood leaking from the cervix and down the vagina. Learning how to recognize implantation bleeding may be an early clue for some women that pregnancy has begun.

Method One of Two:
Recognizing the Signs
1. Consider the timing. This type of bleeding during pregnancy usually occurs 6 to 12 days after conception–close to the time when the next menstrual cycle is expected. Ask yourself when was the last time you had sex. If more than a month or two has passed, then it’s unlikely that what you’re seeing is implantation bleeding. Since implantation bleeding may be confused with the normal menstrual cycle, some women are surprised to discover their pregnancy is a month further along than they originally estimated. Once the pregnancy is confirmed at a doctor’s office, the physician can use other testing to determine the correct gestational age of the fetus, particularly if implantation bleeding has left some question about when the last real menstrual cycle occurred.

2. Examine the color and quantity of the bleeding. This will help to distinguish between pregnancy implantation and the start of a regular menstrual cycle. Implantation bleeding does not usually resemble bleeding during a normal period. It will be lighter, and of lower quantity. Sometimes, implantation bleeding can just be spotting for a few hours, or even a single spot. Implantation bleeding typically consists of a discharge with a pink or brownish tint. It is often darker than period blood because it takes time for the blood to travel from the uterine wall through the vagina. The amount of bleeding is relatively light, and will only last a couple of days. For some women, the flow will resemble a very
light period, which is why confusion between the 2 occasionally occurs. The
majority of women find that menstrual blood is more of a red color and will
become heavier within a day or two.

3. See if you’re having cramps. Pregnancy bleeding from implantation may include some mild cramping as the egg implants and the uterus is changing to accommodate the embryo. However, cramping with implantation bleeding is usually much lighter than what women might experience with a regular period.
The tricky thing is that the symptoms of early pregnancy are similar to the symptoms you may feel right before your period. If the abdominal cramping continues to increase, it could indicate a regular period or problem with the pregnancy, such as an ectopic pregnancy. In some cases, the pain might be associated with a completely different medical condition, such as appendicitis or a bladder infection. Any pain that does not appear to be from your normal period and does not subside on its own within a couple days should be checked by a doctor. Patients that have pain that continues to intensify, or patients that develop other symptoms like fever, chills or heavy bleeding, should see their doctor as soon as possible.

Method Two of Two:
Looking for Other Symptoms

1. See if you’re feeling nauseous. Morning sickness is a very real thing. Many expectant mothers feel morning sickness during the early part of the day; it’s a feeling of nausea and an aversion to smells that previously had no effect on you, such as the smell of strong coffee. You may even be vomiting in the morning, which will be a sign that something is up.

2. Check for soreness in your breasts. Sore and tender breasts are a common symptom of pregnancy. Throughout your pregnancy, your breasts will get larger and your nipples may darken and grow. However, sore breasts are also a sign that you’re about to get your period.

3. See if you’re fatigued. Many women are also fatigued during the first trimester of their pregnancy. If you’re feeling unusually tired while getting plenty of rest and not feeling overly burdened for any reason, then your pregnancy may be the cause.

4. See if your bathroom habits change. If you’re urinating a lot more frequently without any reason you can think of, or if you’re suddenly constipated while previously not having any trouble with your bowels, then you may be pregnant.

5. Be on the lookout for mood swings. Pregnancy comes with some serious hormonal changes that can have a major impact on your mood. You could be crying one minute and then feeling ridiculously happy the next minute for next to no reason. See if you’re suddenly sobbing while watching a corny movie or
seeing a sad story on the news. Of course, again, mood swings are also a pre-menstrual symptom.

6. See if you’re feeling dizzy. If you’re suddenly getting dizzy when you stand up quickly, walk up stairs, or just for no reason at all, then you may be pregnant.

7. Go see a doctor. You may experience a number of these symptoms and can still not be pregnant. The best way to know if you’re pregnant and if what you see on your underwear is really implantation bleeding is to leave it to the health care professional. Make an appointment with your doctor, at your local hospital or clinic. You can also start by taking a home pregnancy test, but you have a better chance of getting accurate results if you go to a doctor or a clinic.

Contact us; www.wachagghana.org twitter handle: @wachagghana

Although it may sound a bit strange, bleeding can also be a symptom of pregnancy, and this is referred to as ‘implantation bleeding’. Implantation bleeding is not common, but many women have concerns about it. In fact, one-third of pregnant women would experience implantation bleeding. It is an early sign of pregnancy, and usually not dangerous and does not require treatment.

Implantation bleeding usually happens six to twelve days after conception, and you may mistake it for your regular period. When the bleeding occurs around the same timing as that of a woman’s menstrual period, it can cause confusion too.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

Therefore, through this article, know more on implantation bleeding, and how you could differentiate it from your normal period.

When Does Implantation Bleeding Occur?

About six to twelve days after conception, when the sperm meets the egg, it develops into an embryo, and this embryo travels to the uterus and implants itself into the lining of the uterus. At times, when the embryo attaches to the uterus wall, it causes a little bleeding, as the movement may break down some blood vessels within the uterus wall. However, this doesn’t cause any problems to the developing baby.

Few other reasons for the bleeding to occur could be due to irritation in the cervix following the gynaecologist’s examination, irritation or tear following intercourse, heavy lifting or exercise, or vaginal infection.

How To Recognise Implantation Bleeding?

Implantation bleeding is one of the earliest symptoms of pregnancy. To recognize implantation bleeding, check if you have any of the following symptoms along with pinkish or brownish spotting. But, it does not guarantee that the spotting is always associated with pregnancy. It is just an easily identifiable indication.

• Lighter than normal bleeding

• Light cramping, usually less than that of a normal period

• Bleeding lasts for only a few hours to a day or two

How Is Implantation Bleeding Different From Normal Period?

Most of the symptoms mentioned above, such as cramps and mood swings, are also associated with pre-menstrual symptoms, and therefore, implantation bleeding may be mistaken as an early period. But, here are some key differences between an implantation bleeding and a normal period.

– Colour of bleeding

When you have a normal period, the colour of blood is usually bright to dark red. But, in the case of implantation bleeding, it is typically dark brown or light pink.

– Duration of bleeding

The duration of a normal period is anywhere between three to seven days. But, in case of implantation bleeding the bleeding may last for just a couple of hours to a maximum of 3 full days.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

– Clotting

While some women experience a great deal of clotting during menstruation, some do not see much at all. However, implantation bleeding does not present with any clots.

– Quantity of bleeding

While most women have their pads and tampons full during their normal periods, in case of implantation bleeding, it is only spotting or a light flow and not a full flow. Typically, it is a little brown or pink discharge. It could be intermittent, or a constant light flow.

What Are The Concerns?

Generally, implantation bleeding is not a cause of concern to the developing baby. Monitor the colour, consistency and frequency of bleeding, as your doctor may ask for these as a part of the diagnosis.

However, if you experience bleeding or spotting for more than a few days after your missed period, it may not be implantation bleeding.

Although implantation bleeding is not something to worry about, and 50 per cent of women who experience spotting/bleeding, go on to have a healthy pregnancy, extended or heavy bleeding during a pregnancy may be a cause of concern. This is because extended bleeding could be a sign of something more serious such as molar pregnancy (a rare benign tumour that develops within the uterus) or miscarriage.

Therefore, during your pregnancy, make sure that you discuss with your doctor about any spotting or bleeding issues that you may have. At any point in time during your pregnancy, if you experience heavy bleeding, you should contact your doctor immediately and seek emergency care.

In case you experience nausea, dizziness or abdominal pain along with bleeding, it may be a sign of ectopic pregnancy (when the embryo implants outside the uterus) too. So keep your doctor informed right away.

Implantation bleeding and miscarriage are not linked in any way. But, if you think you have had a lighter menstrual period than usual, it may be better to do the pregnancy test one week later. This will confirm your pregnancy and will help in the calculation of your due date correctly.

But, heavy bleeding (more than your usual period) is a cause of concern, and if you had heavy bleeding, or if it is accompanied by chills or cramps, contact your doctor immediately.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

Trying to tell if you’re pregnant can be tricky at the best of times, and implantation bleeding doesn’t help. The symptoms are often similar to your period, so it’s sometimes difficult to spot the difference. Implantation bleeding isn’t something to worry about, and it doesn’t require medical treatment, but it’s good to rule out any other causes of bleeding in early pregnancy.

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What is implantation bleeding?

Implantation bleeding occurs when a fertilised egg embeds itself in the lining of the uterus, so it can start growing. It’s a completely normal part of early pregnancy, but can be a bit alarming if you’re not expecting it, or disheartening if you’re trying to get pregnant and mistake it for your period.

It’s fairly common – about 20-30% of women will experience it during early pregnancy. You’re more likely to bleed if it’s your first pregnancy, as with subsequent pregnancies your uterus is more used to the process.

When does implantation bleeding occur?

It occurs at the beginning of pregnancy, normally between 10 to 14 days after conception.

How long does implantation bleeding last?

As bleeding only happens while the fertilised egg attaches itself to the uterine wall, it won’t last long – maybe only a couple of hours, or at most 1-2 days. The flow will be light and possibly inconsistent, and there are normally no clots.

What does implantation bleeding look like?

My implantation bleeding was like the beginning of my period but didn’t get any heavier. It lasted for three days or so. I went to the GP because I was worried, had a smear test, my boobs got bigger and I tested on day 30 – I was pregnant!

The symptoms are quite similar to ones you might get just before your menstrual period, such as:

  • A pink or brown discharge or spotting
  • Light or faint cramping
  • Mood swings
  • Headaches

As it happens right at the beginning of pregnancy, often at a similar time in your cycle to menstruation, it’s often confused with having an early period.

How can I tell if it’s implantation bleeding or my period?

Although there’s no way to be certain until you either get your period or a positive pregnancy test, there are a few differences between implantation bleeding and normal menstruation.

  • Colour – It’s usually pink or dark brown, whereas period blood tends to be bright red. This is because it takes time for the blood to move out of your uterus and into the vaginal cavity. Of course, you know your body better than anyone – and if you’ve been trying to conceive for a while, you’ll probably be an expert on your periods.
  • Duration – It doesn’t usually last for more than one or two days, and is light in flow. If the bleeding lasts longer than this, or if the flow starts to get heavier, it’s very likely to be your period.
  • Timing – It generally occurs about 10 days after ovulation, whereas menstruation occurs after 14. As such, spotting on day 22-25 of your cycle is theoretically more likely to be implantation bleeding than the beginning of menstruation. This isn’t a hard and fast rule though – sometimes your period can just turn up early, so it’s a good idea to keep track of your cycle.
  • Cramping – You might experience light cramps as a symptom of implantation bleeding, but these aren’t the same as period cramps. Menstruation cramps are usually more painful, and can get stronger over the course of your period.

I had it with my first pregnancy – about a week after ovulating and a week before I expected my period. Mine was reddish and light but more than just spotting, although I only needed pantyliners.

Mine happened about a week after my period would have been due – it lasted for one day and there was enough blood to soak through a tampon. I really thought I was starting my period, although I didn’t have any cramps.

Should I worry about implantation bleeding?

Generally speaking, it’s harmless and doesn’t need any medical treatment, but speaking to your doctor will be able to provide you with some much-needed reassurance.

If you find yourself experiencing other symptoms such as nausea, dizziness, abdominal pain or vomiting, or if you experience extended bleeding, it’s worth contacting your doctor straight away. There can be a variety of reasons for bleeding during early pregnancy, and these symptoms can be early indications of something more serious, so it’s worth getting checked out.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

When to take a pregnancy test

Current advice is to wait three days after experiencing implantation bleeding before you take a test – before that, it’s unlikely you’ll have enough of the pregnancy hormone hCG to give a positive result. If you can bear it, waiting a week is more likely to give an accurate result, but keep looking out for other early signs of pregnancy while you wait.

I remember being at work and having some pink spotting, then nothing. I was so deflated. It was only a few weeks down the line when I felt really, really exhausted, that I did a test. By that point I was five and a half weeks pregnant!

I thought it was my period starting as I also had the usual sore boobs. Then, no period. It was another week or so before I thought to do a test I think, by which time it was very clearly positive.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

If you have cramps, it’s easy to assume your period is to blame. But experiencing cramping before your period is due can actually be a sign you’re pregnant! They’re called implantation cramps, and despite the fact that most women don’t know they exist, they’re actually pretty common. Here’s what you need to know about cramping during implantation and what it really feels like.

What Is Implantation Cramping?

When an egg is fertilized, it happens in your fallopian tubes, explains G. Thomas Ruiz, MD, lead ob-gyn at MemorialCare Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, California. The fertilized egg then travels to your uterus, where it will burrow into the lining. “This could cause you to experience minor cramping or twinges in the very low, mid-abdomen,” says Julie Lamppa, APRN, CNM, a certified nurse midwife at Mayo Clinic.

When Does Implantation Cramping Occur?

Every woman is different, but implantation cramping generally occurs between day 20 and 22 from the first day of your last period if you have a 28-day cycle, Ruiz says. “You might think that your period is a little bit early,” he says. “There’s a sensation that your period is coming.”

So how long do implantation cramps last? Again, it’s variable, but usually you can expect that the cramping will last one to two days before wrapping up, Ruiz says.

What Do Implantation Cramps Feel Like?

Implantation cramps feel a lot like period cramps, says Sherry Ross, MD, an ob-gyn and women’s health expert at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. You may experience some discomfort in your pelvis that comes and goes.

Where do you feel implantation cramps?

You’ll likely feel the cramps throughout your pelvis or more in the middle of your pelvis, Ruiz says, but they shouldn’t be overly intense. You also won’t generally feel implantation cramps on one side only. “If you feel moderate to severe cramping or pain, especially if it’s located off to the side versus midline, you need to contact your provider,” Lamppa says. It could be nothing, but it could also be a sign of an early pregnancy loss or an ectopic pregnancy, which is a pregnancy that’s located outside of the uterus, usually in the fallopian tube, she says.

Implantation cramps vs. period cramps

It can be hard to distinguish between the two. “The difference between an implantation and PMS cramping is a positive pregnancy test,” Ross says. However, “in comparison to menstrual cramps, implantation cramps should be shorter in duration and not as intense,” Lamppa says. “You may not experience cramping at all—or so minimal it’s barely noticeable. This is perfectly fine. It has no bearing on the success of your pregnancy.”

How to Ease Implantation Cramps

In general, “implantation cramps are usually mild and likely won’t need intervention,” Lamppa says. But if you’re uncomfortable, there are a few things you can do to get relief:

Take a warm bath or shower. The heat can help relax your uterine muscles and ease the cramps a bit, Ruiz says.

Use a heating pad. Any kind of warm compress on your pelvis can be helpful, Lamppa says. Yes, using a heating pad during pregnancy is safe, since it won’t cause your core temperature to spike. But to be safe, make sure the heating pad is below 100 degrees Farhenheit and use it on localized areas for short periods of time, say 10 to 15 minutes.

Take an OTC pain reliever. “If you need medications, acetaminophen is likely your safest option,” Lamppa says. “It’s recommended to avoid medications such as Ibuprofen or Motrin early in pregnancy.”

Implantation cramping symptoms can also include some bleeding or spotting, which is normal, Ruiz says—but if your cramps are severe or you have really heavy bleeding, call your doctor. They may want to run some tests to see what’s going on.

Updated October 2019

Please note: The Bump and the materials and information it contains are not intended to, and do not constitute, medical or other health advice or diagnosis and should not be used as such. You should always consult with a qualified physician or health professional about your specific circumstances.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

Originally Published October 2019 on Implantation | By Korin Miller

If you have cramps, it’s easy to assume your period is to blame. But experiencing cramping before your period is due can actually be a sign you’re pregnant! They’re called implantation cramps, and despite the fact that most women don’t know they exist, they’re actually pretty common. Here’s what you need to know about cramping during implantation and what it really feels like.

What Is Implantation Cramping?

When an egg is fertilized, it happens in your fallopian tubes, explains G. Thomas Ruiz, MD, lead ob-gyn at MemorialCare Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, California. The fertilized egg then travels to your uterus, where it will burrow into the lining. “This could cause you to experience minor cramping or twinges in the very low, mid-abdomen,” says Julie Lamppa, APRN, CNM, a certified nurse midwife at Mayo Clinic.

When Does Implantation Cramping Occur?

Every woman is different, but implantation cramping generally occurs between day 20 and 22 from the first day of your last period if you have a 28-day cycle, Ruiz says. “You might think that your period is a little bit early,” he says. “There’s a sensation that your period is coming.”

So how long do implantation cramps last? Again, it’s variable, but usually you can expect that the cramping will last one to two days before wrapping up, Ruiz says.

What Do Implantation Cramps Feel Like?

Implantation cramps feel a lot like period cramps, says Sherry Ross, MD, an ob-gyn and women’s health expert at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. You may experience some discomfort in your pelvis that comes and goes.

Where do you feel implantation cramps?

You’ll likely feel the cramps throughout your pelvis or more in the middle of your pelvis, Ruiz says, but they shouldn’t be overly intense. You also won’t generally feel implantation cramps on one side only. “If you feel moderate to severe cramping or pain, especially if it’s located off to the side versus midline, you need to contact your provider,” Lamppa says. It could be nothing, but it could also be a sign of an early pregnancy loss or an ectopic pregnancy, which is a pregnancy that’s located outside of the uterus, usually in the fallopian tube, she says.

Implantation cramps vs. period cramps

It can be hard to distinguish between the two. “The difference between an implantation and PMS cramping is a positive pregnancy test,” Ross says. However, “in comparison to menstrual cramps, implantation cramps should be shorter in duration and not as intense,” Lamppa says. “You may not experience cramping at all—or so minimal it’s barely noticeable. This is perfectly fine. It has no bearing on the success of your pregnancy.”

How to Ease Implantation Cramps

In general, “implantation cramps are usually mild and likely won’t need intervention,” Lamppa says. But if you’re uncomfortable, there are a few things you can do to get relief:

Take a warm bath or shower. The heat can help relax your uterine muscles and ease the cramps a bit, Ruiz says.

Use a heating pad. Any kind of warm compress on your pelvis can be helpful, Lamppa says. Yes, using a heating pad during pregnancy is safe, since it won’t cause your core temperature to spike. But to be safe, make sure the heating pad is below 100 degrees Farhenheit and use it on localized areas for short periods of time, say 10 to 15 minutes.

Take an OTC pain reliever. “If you need medications, acetaminophen is likely your safest option,” Lamppa says. “It’s recommended to avoid medications such as Ibuprofen or Motrin early in pregnancy.”

Implantation cramping symptoms can also include some bleeding or spotting, which is normal, Ruiz says—but if your cramps are severe or you have really heavy bleeding, call your doctor. They may want to run some tests to see what’s going on.

What is implantation?

Pregnancy happens when an egg is fertilized by sperm in the fallopian tubes. Once fertilized, the cells start to multiply and grow. The zygote, or fertilized egg, travels down into the uterus and becomes what’s called a morula. In the uterus, the morula becomes a blastocyst and eventually burrows into the uterine lining in a process called implantation.

Although some women report feeling cramping or pain during the implantation process, not everyone will experience this symptom. Here’s more about implantation cramping, as well as other early pregnancy signs and when you might want to take a pregnancy test.

The symptoms of early pregnancy can vary greatly from woman to woman. Some women experience mild implantation cramping several days after ovulation, while others do not.

Why might you feel cramping? To achieve pregnancy, the fertilized egg must attach to the uterine lining. Once the egg travels down the fallopian tubes and becomes a blastocyst, it begins the process of implantation in the uterus. Implanting gives the blastocyst a blood supply so that it can start growing into a fetus.

Along with cramping, you may experience what is called implantation bleeding or spotting. This usually happens 10 to 14 days after conception, around the time of your usual period. Implantation bleeding is usually much lighter than your regular menstrual period bleeding.

What other symptoms are possible?

There are many other early pregnancy symptoms you can watch for. It’s important to note that although some women may have all of these and be pregnant, the reverse is also possible. Many of these symptoms can also be caused by hormonal changes or other conditions.

Early pregnancy symptoms can include:

  • Missed period: A missed period is one of the most telltale signs of early pregnancy. If yours is relatively regular and you notice it’s late, you may be pregnant.
  • Breast tenderness: You may notice that your breasts swell or feel tender as your hormones change.
  • Moodiness: If you find yourself more emotional than usual, hormonal changes may be to blame.
  • Food aversions: You may become sensitive to different tastes or smells, especially with food.
  • Bloating: While bloating is common before starting your period, it’s also a possible sign of pregnancy. Any hormonal change can trigger bloating.
  • Nasal congestion: Hormones may make the mucous membranes in your nose swell and feel runny or stuffy. You may also experience nose bleeds.
  • Constipation: Hormonal changes can also slow your body’s digestive system down.

Implantation bleeding is light bleeding that may happen about six to 12 days after conception. It may be caused by a fertilized egg implanting in the blood-rich lining of your uterus. Implantation bleeding can be an early sign of pregnancy, but some women mistake it for menstrual blood because it may happen around the time they expect their period.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

  • What is implantation bleeding?
  • How common is implantation bleeding?
  • How can I tell if it’s implantation bleeding or my period?
  • When does implantation bleeding happen and how long does it last?
  • What other symptoms may accompany implantation bleeding?
  • Is early pregnancy bleeding ever a sign that something is wrong?

What is implantation bleeding?

Implantation bleeding is light bleeding that a small percentage of pregnant women have at about six to 12 days after fertilization. Here’s the theory behind why it happens:

After the sperm fertilizes the egg, it starts the three- or four-day trip from the fallopian tube to your uterus. During this time, it divides into hundreds of identical cells. Meanwhile, your ovaries release estrogen that causes the lining of the uterus (the endometrium) to thicken and develop more blood vessels. The uterine lining is preparing to host the quickly growing egg that will soon become an embryo.

Once the egg enters the uterus, it’s called a blastocyst, a tiny ball of several hundred cells. A day or two later, it begins burrowing into the blood-rich lining of your uterus, where it continues to grow and divide. As it burrows into the endometrium, the blastocyst may cause little blood vessels to burst, resulting in a small amount of vaginal bleeding.

How common is implantation bleeding?

By some estimates, about 15 to 25 percent of women experience implantation bleeding. Some women may think they’re having a light period when they see the spotting. They may not realize they’re pregnant.

How can I tell if it’s implantation bleeding or my period?

Here’s how to tell whether your bleeding is more likely to be implantation bleeding or your period:

  • Amount of blood. Implantation bleeding is a lot lighter than a typical period. It’s usually just a little spotting.
  • Length of time. Most women bleed for three to seven days during their period. Implantation bleeding often lasts only one to three days.
  • Color. Menstrual blood is usually bright red or dark red, but implantation bleeding tends to be a light pink, brown, or rust discharge.
  • Clotting. Many women bleed enough during their period that some of the blood clots or becomes like a gel. Implantation bleeding is too light to clot.

When does implantation bleeding happen and how long does it last?

The spotting tends to happen during the week before you would expect your period, or about six to 12 days after conception. This is around the same time a fertilized egg would be attaching itself to the uterine lining.

Unlike a regular menstrual period, implantation bleeding is usually lasts no more than a day or two. This is the amount of time it takes for the fertilized egg to become implanted into the lining of the uterus.

What other symptoms may accompany implantation bleeding?

In addition to implantation bleeding, some women also have these early pregnancy symptoms:

  • Light cramping (less than with a normal period)
  • Nausea
  • Breast tenderness
  • Lower back pain
  • Mood swings
  • Headaches

Note that these symptoms are no guarantee that you’re pregnant – they can also be signs of ovulation or PMS. Taking a home pregnancy test is the best way to find out if you’re pregnant. (Though you may have to wait a few more days to get an accurate result.)

If you do get your period instead of a positive pregnancy test, and haven’t yet scheduled a preconception visit with a midwife or doctor, now is a good time to do so.

Is early pregnancy bleeding ever a sign that something is wrong?

If you continue spotting even after a positive pregnancy test, or if you develop other symptoms (such as pelvic or abdominal pain, dizziness, or lightheadedness), call your provider immediately.

You may need an exam to make sure you don’t have an ectopic pregnancy. This happens when the fertilized egg grows outside the uterus, usually in a fallopian tube. (It’s possible to have an ectopic pregnancy even if you don’t get a positive result on a pregnancy test.)

Bleeding or cramping in early pregnancy may also be a sign of an impending miscarriage. But many women spot in the first trimester for no apparent reason and go on to have a completely normal pregnancy.

Are dealing with PMS or early signs of conception? Here’s what you need to know about common implantation symptoms, including bleeding and cramping.

Women trying to conceive pay extra attention to their body, hoping to discover symptoms of implantation. “Implantation is when a fertilized egg implants itself into the lining of the uterus and starts to construct the placenta and embryo,” says Jingwen Hou, M.D., Ph.D., an Ob-Gyn specializing in reproductive endocrinology and infertility at Kaiser Permanente in Hawaii. Implantation usually occurs one-two weeks after ovulation, and it signals the beginning of a pregnancy.

Can women tell when implantation has occurred? The short answer is no. “We don’t usually talk about symptoms of implantation. Rather, we talk about early pregnancy symptoms,” says Dr. Hou. “There is no single symptom or symptoms indicating that implantation is about to or is happening.” That said, Dr. Hou explains that some women may experience minor bleeding or spotting, which may be related to implantation. Here’s what you need to know about the most common implantation symptoms, and what they tell you about conception.

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Implantation Bleeding

“Some women may have a small amount of spotting or bleeding approximately 10 to 14 days after fertilization, and it’s presumed to be related to implantation,” says Dr. Hou. “We don’t have a good study showing how common it is, but based on different reports, implantation bleeding occurs with 10 to 30 percent of pregnancies.”

Implantation bleeding happens when the fertilized egg implants itself into the uterus, causing the uterine lining to shed from irritation. It usually lasts one to three days, and it occurs one week before your period or around the time of your normal period. Because of this, many women think they’re simply experiencing early or light menstruation. How can you tell the difference? Unlike red menstrual bleeding, implantation bleeding is usually light pink or brown. The flow should be light, and it doesn’t get heavier like a normal period.

Implantation Cramps

Dr. Hou says women may also experience minor cramps around the time of implantation – “but we are not clear if that’s related to implantation,” she says. Cramping occurs around the same time as implantation bleeding and feels similar to menstrual cramps. They typically come and go in your lower abdomen or lower back.

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Other Implantation Signs and Symptoms

According to Dr. Chloe Acevedo, an Ob-Gyn at Atlantic Medical Group Women’s Health in Westfield, NJ, other implantation symptoms include nausea, sore boobs, darkening of the areolas, fatigue, headaches, bloating, mood swings, metallic taste, and changes in appetite – although these symptoms are more closely associated with early pregnancy. What’s more, “implantation symptoms can sometimes be confused with PMS symptoms, which can be vague and nonspecific,” says Dr. Acevedo. “It is important to understand that symptoms are not diagnostic and the only way to confirm if symptoms are due to implantation or PMS is with a pregnancy test.”

Sore Boobs: The pregnancy hormone hCG, estrogen, and progesterone may make your boobs very sensitive to the touch. This happens 1-2 weeks after conception, and it’ll feel more pronounced than normal PMS soreness.

Nausea: Since your digestive system slows down after conception, some women experience nausea, constipation, and indigestion (although full-fledged morning sickness is still a few weeks away). Progesterone and hCG hormones also contribute to these issues – and so does the heightened sense of smell that many pregnant women experience.

Darkening of the Areolas: Pregnancy hormones affect nipple cells (called melanocytes) and cause them to darken.

Fatigue: As your body prepares to grow a baby, you may feel more tired than normal. You can partly blame fatigue on the rise of progesterone and increased blood production.

Headaches: Are you experiencing tension headaches even though you aren’t prone to them? Increased blood volume and surging hormones may be the culprits.

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Bloating: Unfortunately for your skin-tight jeans, rising progesterone levels can bloat your stomach – similar to what you might experience during PMS.

Mood Swings: Just like some women get emotional before their period, they might feel extra moody after implantation due to pregnancy hormones.

Metallic Taste: Thanks to rising levels of estrogen, women may notice a bitterly metallic taste in their mouths following conception, says Dr. Acevedo.

Changes in Appetite: It’s not uncommon to have a shift in your taste preferences after getting pregnant, whether you’re suddenly adverse to coffee, your favorite dessert, or something else.

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What should you do if you experience implantation symptoms? “You can take a home pregnancy test,” says Dr. Hou. But since implantation happens 1-2 weeks after ovulation, it may be too early to get an accurate reading. It’s better to wait about a week after implantation when levels of the hCG will be high enough to detect.

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

After 6-12 days when an egg has been fertilized and attached itself to the wall of the uterus, a condition known as implantation bleeding may occur. This is typically normal and happens as a result of the movement of the egg.

Implantation bleeding may be confused as menstrual period, however there many difference sign between the two.

In This Article

Signs of Implantation Bleeding

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

Implantation bleeding is known to be one of the many pregnancy signs and symptoms, which begins around some days to the next date of the menstrual cycle. A woman can clearly tell the difference by observing the common implantation bleeding signs.

Common Implantation Bleeding Signs.

  • Gentle or faint cramping (lower than a traditional interval cramp)
  • Change in mood.
  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Breast tenderness
  • Back (lower) backaches

(These can also be PMS signs or ovulation signs, so having these together with pinkish/brownish spotting doesn’t assure that it has to do with pregnancy.)

So How long does implantation bleeding lasts?

Implantation bleeding is one sort of bleeding that will happen in early pregnancy. Some doctors explain that implantation bleeding happens when an embryo attaches itself to the lining of your uterus. Nonetheless, not everybody will experience implantation bleeding or implantation spotting.

Implantation bleeding is mostly mild and quick, only a few days’ value. It normally happens between 10 and 14 days after conception, or around the time when you missed your period. Nonetheless, vaginal bleeding has been reported to happen anytime within the first eight weeks of being pregnant.

Spotting can also be frequent before your menstrual period is started.

So — is your bleeding pregnancy-related? Listed below are some extra identifiers, different early pregnancy signs to look at for, and notes on when to see a physician.

On average, implantation bleeding can last just a few hours or as long as three days. Women having their first pregnancy may bleed or spot a little bit more than those who are used to getting pregnant.

What does Implantation Bleeding Look Like?

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

Implantation bleeding could seem as mild spotting — blood that shows when you wipe — or a light, constant flow that requires a liner or mild pad. The blood could or might not be mixed with cervical mucus.

You may even see a range of implantation bleeding color depending on how lengthy the blood has taken to exit the body:

  • A fresher bleed will show as a shade of light or dark red.
  • Blood could look pink or orange if it’s blended with different vaginal discharge.
  • Older blood could look brown attributable to oxidation.

Be sure you pay attention to the color and its consistency — in addition to the frequency — of your bleeding. These are particulars you’ll need to share with your physician for analysis.

Implantation bleeding is recognized via a strategy of elimination. Which means your physician will rule out different doable causes of bleeding, such as polyps, first.

For those who are experiencing heavy implantation bleeding or clotting, see your physician straight away. This can be an indication of an early miscarriage.

Implantation bleeding or period – How do I know if I have implantation bleeding?

How to Recognize Implantation Bleeding

You can easily determine if you have implantation bleeding by simply taking note of the symptoms associated with it. Below are few implantation symptoms:

Implantation Bleeding symptoms:

These are the important variations that differentiate implantation bleeding from menstrual period:

  • Color – Both in heavy or light bleeding, most ladies are acquainted with the color of their menstrual period (often bright to darkish red). Implantation bleeding, nevertheless, is usually mild pink to darkish brown (rust-colored) in color.
  • Clotting – Some ladies may experience an excessive amount of clotting throughout their menstruation, whereas some don’t see much at all. Implantation bleeding, nevertheless, mustn’t come with any clotting.
  • Length of time – The length of ladies’ menstrual durations can vary from about three to seven days. Ladies not on contraception are likely to bleed longer, whereas girls on contraception usually bleed for a shorter time or don’t bleed much. However, Implantation bleeding ought to last anyplace from a few hours to three full days.
  • Amount – Most females are able to fill their pads and tampons throughout their durations, however with implantation bleeding, it’s totally different. The descriptor “bleeding” could be deceptive – implantation bleeding is often solely spotting or a light flow, which is different from a full flow as in menstrual period.

Sometimes, implantation bleeding is a bit of pink or brown discharge that is noticed solely when a woman wipes or simply sufficient enough to get on a panty liner. It might be intermittent or an extra fixed mild flow.

So, if bright or darkish red blood, that lasts more than three days is what you’re experiencing around the time you’re expecting your period, and is a full flow in that fills up your pads and/or tampons, it is not likely you are experiencing implantation bleeding.

Nonetheless, in case your menstruation is shorter than regular three days, you didn’t refill pads or tampons, it was extra pinkish/brownish than red, and also you had much less cramping than regular, it’s possible that you’re having implantation bleeding.

Other signs of early Pregnancy

The color and implantation bleeding consistency could fluctuate from individual to individual and from one pregnancy to the other. However, if you are doubting that you are likely to be pregnant, there are other symptoms that you can watch for.

Constant urination, tiredness, and vomiting are a few of the early pregnancy signs. Your breasts might also grow to be tender or swollen because of the hormonal modifications that happen shortly after conception.

Other pregnancy signs include:

  • cramping
  • constipation
  • bloating
  • moodiness
  • meals aversions

Early pregnancy signs aren’t all the time the most effective indicator of whether or not you’re pregnant. Some ladies could have all of those signs even after they aren’t pregnant, and others could have none of those signs though they are pregnant.

One of the crucial dependable signs is a missed menstrual period. But when your cycles are irregular, it could be hard to tell if you’ve actually missed your period.