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How to reduce crime in your neighborhood

Last Updated: August 25, 2020 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Saul Jaeger, MS. Saul Jaeger is a Police Officer and Captain of the Mountain View, California Police Department (MVPD). Saul has over 17 years of experience as a patrol officer, field training officer, traffic officer, detective, hostage negotiator, and as the traffic unit’s sergeant and Public Information Officer for the MVPD. At the MVPD, in addition to commanding the Field Operations Division, Saul has also led the Communications Center (dispatch) and the Crisis Negotiation Team. He earned an MS in Emergency Services Management from the California State University, Long Beach in 2008 and a BS in Administration of Justice from the University of Phoenix in 2006. He also earned a Corporate Innovation LEAD Certificate from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business in 2018.

There are 13 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

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Crime exists in flux all over the globe. Though it may seem overwhelming, there are things you can do to manage crime in your community. You do not need to feel powerless against criminals. By taking action, you make positive changes in your neighborhood.

Crime Increase

While we don’t like to talk about it – or even think about it – crime is on the increase in America, and throughout the world. The number of burglars, muggers, auto thieves, robbers, purse snatchers, etc., is growing at an alarming rate. Now you, as a resident, working with neighbors can help reduce the crime rate.

By organizing and/or joining a neighborhood program in which you and your neighbors get together to learn how to protect yourselves, your family, your home and your property. Working together, you can get the criminals off your block and out of your area.

There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors better, and working with them you can reduce crime, develop a more united community, provide an avenue of communications between police and citizens, establish on-going crime prevention techniques in your neighborhood, and renew citizen interest in community activity.

Neighborhood Crime Watches

“Neighborhood Crime Watches” are set up to help you do this. it is a joint effort between private citizens and local police. The local police support the forming of crime watch groups and provide recommendations on how to properly run a crime watch. Such programs have been started all over the country. Maybe one already exists in your community.

These organizations don’t require frequent meetings (once a month or so). They don’t ask anyone to take personal risks to prevent crime. They leave the responsibility for catching criminals where it belongs – with the police. This is NOT a “vigilante” group.

These groups gather citizens together to learn crime prevention from local authorities. You cooperate with your neighbors to report suspicious activities in the neighborhood, to keep an eye on homes when the resident is away, and to keep everyone in the area mindful of the standard precautions for property and self that should always be taken. Criminals avoid neighborhoods where such groups exist.

Through cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, some of the things you will learn:

  1. What to do in an emergency.
  2. How to best identify a suspicious person.
  3. How to identify a vehicle being used in a suspected criminal activity.
  4. Signs to watch out for before entering a house or apartment that may be in the process of being burglarized.
  5. What to do in case of injury.
  6. What to do about suspicious people loitering on your street.
  7. How to identify stolen merchandise.
  8. How to recognize auto theft in progress.
  9. How to protect your house or apartment.
  10. How to recognize a burglary in progress.
  11. How to protect yourself and family – and much more.

It’s easy to get your group started. All you have to do is contact your neighbors and arrange a date, place and time for the first meeting. Hold the meetings at your home or that of a neighbor. Try to plan a time that is convenient to most of your neighbors – preferably in the evening.

Then call the North Miami Beach Police department. We will be happy to give your group informal lectures, free literature and in many instances, window stickers, etc. Remember, police officers can’t be everywhere. Your cooperation with them is for the benefit of you, your family, your neighbors and your neighborhood.

How To Reduce Crime In Your Neighborhood

While we don’t like to talk about it – or even think about it – crime is on the increase in North America, and throughout the world. The number of burglars, muggers, auto thieves, robbers, purse snatchers, etc., is growing at an alarming rate. Now you, as a resident, working with neighbors can help reduce the crime rate.

How? By organizing and/or joining a neighborhood program in which you and your neighbors get together to learn how to protect yourselves, your family, your home and your property. Working together, you can get the criminals off your block and out of your area.

There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors better, and working with them you can reduce crime, develop a more united community, provide an avenue of communications between police and citizens, establish on-going crime prevention techniques in your neighborhood, and renew citizen interest in community activity.

“Citizens Safety Projects” are set up to help you do this. It is a joint effort between private citizens and local police. Such programs have been started all over. Maybe one already exists in your community.

These organizations don’t require frequent meetings (once a month or so). They don’t ask anyone to take personal risks to prevent crime. They leave the responsibility for catching criminals where it belongs – with the police. This is NOT a “vigilante” group.

These groups gather citizens together to learn crime prevention from local authorities. You cooperate with your neighbors to report suspicious activities in the neighborhood, to keep an eye on homes when the resident is away, and to keep everyone in the area mindful of the standard precautions for property and self that should always be taken. Criminals avoid neighborhoods where such groups exist.

Through cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, some of the things you will learn – and all free – are:

  1. What to do in an emergency.
  2. How to best identify a suspicious person.
  3. How to identify a vehicle being used in a suspected criminal activity.
  4. Signs to watch out for before entering a house or apartment that may be in the process of being burglarized.
  5. What to do in case of injury.
  6. What to do about suspicious people loitering on your street.
  7. How to identify stolen merchandise.
  8. How to recognize auto theft in progress.
  9. How to protect your house or apartment.
  10. How to recognize a burglary in progress.
  11. How to protect yourself and family – and much more.

It’s easy to get your group started. All you have to do is contact your neighbors and arrange a date, place and time for the first meeting. Hold the meetings at your home or that of a neighbor. Try to plan a time that is convenient to most of your neighbors – preferably in the evening.

Then call your local police department. They will be happy to give your group informal lectures, free literature – and in many instances, window stickers and ID cards. Remember, police officers can’t be everywhere. Your cooperation with them is for the benefit of you, your family, your neighbors and your neighborhood.

Prevent crime in your neighborhood and want to make a few new friends and add crime fighting to your dream superhero status?

Fortunately, when it comes to preventing crime and increasing the quality of life in your neighborhood, there are easy steps you can take to make a big impact. With many law enforcement agencies cutting costs or working harder, it’s more important than ever for homeowners to work together and be alert. (No tights are required, and a cape is optional.)

From preventing vandalism, break-ins, auto theft or mailbox robberies, working with other home and business owners can go a long way in improving your area and keeping it safe. What better time than summer to gather neighbors and make plans?

Beyond arming your home’s security system, keeping your doors locked, and being aware of suspicious activities in your area, there are simple actions you can take to prevent crime:

  • Help keep your neighborhood clean and orderly
  • Meet and stay connected to local law enforcement
  • Raise awareness and increase communications with your neighbors
  • If your home alarm system includes video cameras, use them to monitor suspicious activity, such as people going door-to-door, looking for easy entry
  • Homeowners who use an alarm monitoring company should prominently display their security yard signs, which are proven deterrents to crime

Five easy steps for starting a Neighborhood Watch Program

  • Recruit and organize as many neighbors as possible
  • Contact your local law enforcement agency and schedule a meeting
  • Discuss community concerns and develop an action plan
  • Create a communication plan
  • Take action by holding meetings and events

When planning, you’ll want to keep in mind that the Neighborhood Watch program is based on crime prevention that stresses education and common sense. It teaches citizens how to help themselves and focuses on awareness. For your safety as well as others, the program does not advocate members taking action beyond reporting observations. Community members should only serve as extra eyes and ears and report suspicious activities to law enforcement.

High-tech crime fighting incorporates social media

While the roots of Neighborhood Watch can be traced back to the days of Colonial settlements, when night watchmen patrolled streets, today’s program and other crime-fighting efforts incorporate social media and other fun technology platforms. Larger alarm monitoring companies often send their customers alerts of suspicious activity via email, Facebook, phone or mail. All of which you can share with your neighbors! You also can create a free Neighborhood Watch website for your group, provided by Neighborhood Link, or employ the Nextdoor app, used by more than 62,000 neighborhoods across the United States. Need inspiration? Check out what groups around the country are doing.

  • Consider linking with an existing organization, such as a citizens’ association, community development office, tenants’ association, or housing authority.
  • Ask people who stay home often to be “window watchers” and report any unusual activities in the neighborhood.
  • Translate crime and drug prevention materials into other languages needed by non-English speakers in your community.
  • Sponsor a crime prevention fair at a church, temple, community center or school.
  • Hold cleanups to beautify the area, and ask neighbors to turn on outdoor lights at night.
  • Work with businesses to repair storefronts, clean up streets, and create jobs for youth.

Attending a summer parade, hosting a cookout, or discussing lawn care tips with your neighbors? Add crime prevention to the conversation and make a positive difference in your town today.

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How to Reduce Crime in Your NeighborhoodThis is a followup to the “Neighborhood Watch to Prevent Crime” post.

Remember, police officers can’t be everywhere. Your cooperation with them is for the benefit of you, your family, your neighbors and your neighborhood.

There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors better, and working with them you can reduce crime, develop a more united community, provide an avenue of communications between police and citizens, establish on-going crime prevention techniques in your neighborhood, and renew citizen interest in community activity.

“Citizens Safety Projects” are set up to help you do this. it is a joint effort between private citizens and local police. such programs have been started all over the country. Maybe one already exists in your community.
These organizations don’t require frequent meetings (once a month or so). They don’t ask anyone to take personal risks to prevent crime. They leave the responsibility for catching criminals where it belongs – with the police.

This is NOT a “vigilante” group!

These groups gather citizens together to learn crime prevention from local authorities. You cooperate with your neighbors to report suspicious activities in the neighborhood, to keep an eye on homes when the resident is away, and to keep everyone in the area mindful of the standard precautions for property and self that should always be taken. Criminals avoid neighborhoods where such groups exist.

What You Will Learn

Through cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, some of the things you will learn – and all free – are:

  1. What to do in an emergency.
  2. How to best identify a suspicious person.
  3. How to identify a vehicle being used in a suspected criminal activity.
  4. Signs to watch out for before entering a house or apartment that may be in the process of being burglarized.
  5. What to do in case of injury.
  6. What to do about suspicious people loitering on your street.
  7. How to identify stolen merchandise.
  8. How to recognize auto theft in progress.
  9. How to protect your house or apartment.
  10. How to recognize a burglary in progress.
  11. How to protect yourself and family – and much more.

It’s easy to get your group started. All you have to do is contact your neighbors and arrange a date, place and time for the first meeting. Hold the meetings at your home or that of a neighbor. Try to plan a time that is convenient to most of your neighbors – preferably in the evening.

Then call your local police department. They will be happy to give your group informal lectures, free literature – and in many instances, window stickers and I.D. cards.

By organizing and/or joining a neighborhood program in which you and your neighbors get together to learn how to protect yourselves, your family, your home and your property. Working together, you can get the criminals off your block and out of your area.

Preventing violence in your community is a challenge but each of us can do something about it.

Let’s help each other build neighborhoods where kids, teens, and adults can feel safe from crimes.

Here are some of the ways that could help your neighborhood to fight crime.

Install CCTV

Install CCTV cameras inside and outside of your home to record and monitor any criminal activity. It can help in the apprehension of criminals when you capture the crime on video.

When you leave, lock your doors and windows and leave a sign that you have cameras rolling in your house— criminals hate cameras.

Improve Street Lighting

The need for more efficient street lighting is an important service that each city government should provide.

Improving environmental measures by placing brighter lights in poorly lit areas can help reduce crime because dimly lit neighborhoods make it easy for criminals to operate unnoticed.

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

Engage in Community Watch

Talk with your neighbors and learn the normal happenings at their homes.

When you know your neighbors and you know the people who belong in your neighborhood, you will also know if something is wrong. If a criminal enters one of your neighbors’ homes, you will never think twice.

Keep in Mind the Impact of Illegal Drugs

Illicit drug abuse doesn’t only affect individuals but also their families, friends, and the society.

The use of illegal drugs can increase the chances of being in dangerous situations and compromise the safety of self and others such as committing serious crimes unknowingly. It’s important to ensure that everyone in your community is educated about drugs’ negative impact.

Observe Gun Safety

The presence of illegal firearms in homes can increase the risk of violence but there are some people keeping them to protect themselves.

If you keep firearms at home, make sure you legally own them. Also, make sure that everyone else at home is fully trained in firearms safety and that the weapon is safely stored or unloaded.

Educate Everyone

Help children and everyone to learn about the consequences of violence. Letting them lay out their thoughts about violence can help them learn how to think through this and other issues.

Additionally, educate children and everyone on how to handle conflicts and problems without using force. Teach children, in particular, that bullying is wrong; help them learn to say no to bullies.

Strengthen the Community

Violence anywhere in the community can affect all. Establish community standards and policies that reject violence and other crimes.

While we don’t like to talk about it – or even think about it – crime is on the increase in America, and throughout the world. The number of burglars, muggers, auto thieves, robbers, purse snatchers, etc., is growing at an alarming rate. Now you, as a resident, working with neighbors can help reduce the crime rate.
How? By organizing and/or joining a neighborhood program in which you and your neighbors get together to learn how to protect yourselves, your family, your home and your property. Working together, you can get the criminals off your block and out of your area.
There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors .

organizations don’t require frequent meetings (once a month or so). They don’t ask anyone to take personal risks to prevent crime. They leave the responsibility for catching criminals where it belongs – with the police. This is NOT a “vigilante” group:

These groups gather citizens together to learn crime prevention from local authorities. You cooperate with your neighbors to report suspicious activities in the neighborhood, to keep an eye on homes when the resident is away, and to keep everyone in the area mindful of the standard precautions for property and self that should always be taken. Criminals avoid neighborhoods where such groups exist.

Through cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, some of the things you will learn – and all free – are:

1. What to do in an emergency.
2. How to best identify a suspicious person.
3. How to identify a vehicle being used in a suspected
criminal activity.
4. Signs to watch out for before entering a .

There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors better, and working with them you can reduce crime, develop a more united community, provide an avenue of communications between police and citizens, establish on-going crime prevention techniques in your neighborhood, and renew citizen interest in community activity. “Citizens Safety Projects” are set up to help you do this. It is a joint effort between private citizens and local police. Such programs have been started all over the country. Maybe one already exists in your community.

These organizations don’t require frequent meetings (once a month or so). They don’t ask anyone to take personal risks to prevent crime. They leave the responsibility for catching criminals where it belongs – with the police. This is NOT a “vigilante” group!

These groups gather citizens together to learn crime prevention from local authorities. You cooperate with your neighbors to report suspicious activities in the neighborhood to keep an eye on homes when the resident is away, and to keep everyone in the area mindful of the standard precautions for property and self that should always be taken. Criminals avoid neighborhoods where such groups exist.

Through cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, some of the things you will learn – and all free – are:

  1. What to do in an emergency.
  2. How to best identify a suspicious person.
  3. How to identify a vehicle being used in a suspected criminal activity.
  4. Signs to watch out for before entering a house or apartment that may be in the process of being burglarized.
  5. What to do in case of injury.
  6. What to do about suspicious people loitering on your street.
  7. How to identify stolen merchandise.
  8. How to recognize auto theft in progress.
  9. How to protect your house or apartment.
  10. How to recognize a burglary in progress.
  11. How to protect yourself and family – and much more.

It’s easy to get your group started. All you have to do is contact your neighbors and arrange a date, place and time for the first meeting. Hold the meetings at your home or that of a neighbor. Try to plan a time that is convenient to most of your neighbors – preferably in the evening.

How To Reduce Crime In Your Neighborhood

While we don’t like to talk about it – or even think about it – crime is on the increase in North America, and throughout the world. The number of burglars, muggers, auto thieves, robbers, purse snatchers, etc., is growing at an alarming rate. Now you, as a resident, working with neighbors can help reduce the crime rate.

How? By organizing and/or joining a neighborhood program in which you and your neighbors get together to learn how to protect yourselves, your family, your home and your property. Working together, you can get the criminals off your block and out of your area.

There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors better, and working with them you can reduce crime, develop a more united community, provide an avenue of communications between police and citizens, establish on-going crime prevention techniques in your neighborhood, and renew citizen interest in community activity.

“Citizens Safety Projects” are set up to help you do this. It is a joint effort between private citizens and local police. Such programs have been started all over. Maybe one already exists in your community.

These organizations don’t require frequent meetings (once a month or so). They don’t ask anyone to take personal risks to prevent crime. They leave the responsibility for catching criminals where it belongs – with the police. This is NOT a “vigilante” group:

These groups gather citizens together to learn crime prevention from local authorities. You cooperate with your neighbors to report suspicious activities in the neighborhood, to keep an eye on homes when the resident is away, and to keep everyone in the area mindful of the standard precautions for property and self that should always be taken. Criminals avoid neighborhoods where such groups exist.

Through cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, some of the things you will learn – and all free – are:

  1. What to do in an emergency.
  2. How to best identify a suspicious person.
  3. How to identify a vehicle being used in a suspected criminal activity.
  4. Signs to watch out for before entering a house or apartment that may be in the process of being burglarized.
  5. What to do in case of injury.
  6. What to do about suspicious people loitering on your street.
  7. How to identify stolen merchandise.
  8. How to recognize auto theft in progress.
  9. How to protect your house or apartment.
  10. How to recognize a burglary in progress.
  11. How to protect yourself and family – and much more.

It’s easy to get your group started. All you have to do is contact your neighbors and arrange a date, place and time for the first meeting. Hold the meetings at your home or that of a neighbor. Try to plan a time that is convenient to most of your neighbors – preferably in the evening.

Then call your local police department. They will be happy to give your group informal lectures, free literature – and in many instances, window stickers and ID cards. Remember, police officers can’t be everywhere. Your cooperation with them is for the benefit of you, your family, your neighbors and your neighborhood.

While we don’t like to talk about it – or even think about it – crime is on the increase in the United States and throughout the world. The number of violent and property crimes, including robberies, burglaries, larcenies, auto theft, purse snatching and other crimes is growing. But you, as a resident of Indianapolis, working along with your neighbors, IMPD and other City agencies can help reduce crime and its consequences in our communities.

WHAT TO DO…?
1 – Organize or join a neighborhood Crime Watch Group in which you and your neighbors get together to learn how to protect yourselves, your family, your home and your property. Working together, you can get the criminals off your block and out of your community.

2 – Work in groups, support your community.
There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors better, and working with them you can reduce crime, develop a more united community, provide an avenue of communications between police and citizens, establish on-going crime prevention techniques in your neighborhood, and renew citizen interest in community activity.

3 – Join Community Safety Projects.
They are set up to help you do this. It is a joint effort between private citizens and local police. Such programs have been started all over the country. Maybe one already exists in your community. These organizations don’t require frequent meetings (once a month or less). They don’t ask anyone to take personal risks to prevent crime. They leave the responsibility for catching criminals where it belongs – with the police. This is not a “vigilante” group: These groups gather citizens together to learn crime prevention from local authorities. You cooperate with your neighbors to report suspicious activities in the neighborhood, to keep an eye on homes when the resident is away, and to keep everyone in the area mindful of the standard precautions for property and self that should always be taken. Criminals avoid neighborhoods where such groups exist.

4 – Learn what you need to know.
Through cooperation with IMPD and other local agencies, some of the things you will learn are:
• What to do in an emergency.
• How to best identify a suspicious person.
• How to identify a vehicle being used in a suspected criminal activity.
• Signs to watch out for before entering a house or apartment that may be in the process of being burglarized.
• What to do in case of injury.
• What to do about suspicious people loitering on your street.
• How to identify stolen merchandise.
• How to recognize auto theft in progress.
• How to protect your house or apartment.
• How to recognize a burglary in progress.
• How to protect yourself and family – and much more.

While we don’t like to talk about it – or even think about it – crime is on the increase in the United States, and throughout the world. The number of burglars, muggers, auto thieves, robbers, purse snatchers and other crimes is growing at an alarming rate. Now you, as a resident, working with neighbors and law enforcement can help reduce the crime rate.

1 – Organize and/or join a neighborhood Crime Watch program in which you and your neighbors get together to learn how to protect yourselves, your family, your home and your property. Working together, you can get the criminals off your block and out of your area.

2 – Stay in groups. There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors better, and working with them you can reduce crime, develop a more united community, provide an avenue of communications between police and citizens, establish on-going crime prevention techniques in your neighborhood, and renew citizen interest in community activity.

3 – Use the “Citizens Safety Projects”. They are set up to help you do this. It is a joint effort between private citizens and local police. Such programs have been started all over the country. Maybe one already exists in your community. These organizations don’t require frequent meetings (once a month or so). They don’t ask anyone to take personal risks to prevent crime. They leave the responsibility for catching criminals where it belongs – with the police. This is not a “vigilante” group: These groups gather citizens together to learn crime prevention from local authorities. You cooperate with your neighbors to report suspicious activities in the neighborhood, to keep an eye on homes when the resident is away, and to keep everyone in the area mindful of the standard precautions for property and self that should always be taken. Criminals avoid neighborhoods where such groups exist.

4 – Learn what you need to know. Through cooperation with IMPD and other local law enforcement agencies, some of the things you will learn – and all free – are:
• What to do in an emergency.
• How to best identify a suspicious person.
• How to identify a vehicle being used in a suspected criminal activity.
• Signs to watch out for before entering a house or apartment that may be in the process of being burglarized.
• What to do in case of injury.
• What to do about suspicious people loitering on your street.
• How to identify stolen merchandise.
• How to recognize auto theft in progress.
• How to protect your house or apartment.
• How to recognize a burglary in progress.
• How to protect yourself and family – and much more.

5 – All you have to do is contact your neighbors and set a couple of possible dates and/or times, and a place for the first meeting. These meetings could be held at your home or that of a neighbor; a church, school, or even at a coffee shop if they allow it. Try to plan a time that is convenient to most of your neighbors – preferably in the evening (after 5:30pm). Once you have the details please contact me with the information at: [email protected] or through a Nextdoor message; I will meet with your group to go over the basics of the Crime Watch Program, basic crime prevention, home security tips, reporting crime and community building.

6 – Remember, police officers can’t be everywhere. Your cooperation with law enforcement is for the benefit of you, your family, your neighbors and your community.

GERARDO BECERRA
Crime Watch Coordinator – North District
Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department
Department of Public Safety

605 E Westfield Boulevard, Suite 100
Indianapolis, IN 46220

Office: (317) 327-3781

“No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. ”
Aesop.

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While we don’t like to talk about it – or even think about it – crime is on the increase in America, and throughout the world. The number of burglars, muggers, auto thieves, robbers, purse snatchers, etc., is growing at an alarming rate. Now you, as a resident, working with neighbors can help reduce the crime rate.

How? By organizing and/or joining a neighborhood program in which you and your neighbors get together to learn how to protect yourselves, your family, your home and your property. Working together, you can get the criminals off your block and out of your area.

There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors better, and working with them you can reduce crime, develop a more united community, provide an avenue of communications between police and citizens, establish on-going crime prevention techniques in your neighborhood, and renew citizen interest in community activity.

“Citizens Safety Projects” are set up to help you do this. It is a joint effort between private citizens and local police. Such programs have been started all over the country. Maybe one already exists in your community.

These organizations don’t require frequent meetings (once a month or so). They don’t ask anyone to take personal risks to prevent crime. They leave the responsibility for catching criminals where it belongs – with the police. This is NOT a “vigilante” group:

These groups gather citizens together to learn crime prevention from local authorities. You cooperate with your neighbors to report suspicious activities in the neighborhood, to keep an eye on homes when the resident is away, and to keep everyone in the area mindful of the standard precautions for property and self that should always be taken. Criminals avoid neighborhoods where such groups exist.

Through cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, some of the things you will learn – and all free – are:

1. What to do in an emergency.
2. How to best identify a suspicious person.
3. How to identify a vehicle being used in a suspected criminal activity.
4. Signs to watch out for before entering a house or apartment that may be in the process of being burglarized.
5. What to do in case of injury.
6. What to do about suspicious people loitering on your street.
7. How to identify stolen merchandise.
8. How to recognize auto theft in progress.
9. How to protect your house or apartment.
10. How to recognize a burglary in progress.
11. How to protect yourself and family – and much more.

It’s easy to get your group started. All you have to do is contact your neighbors and arrange a date, place and time for the first meeting. Hold the meetings at your home or that of a neighbor. Try to plan a time that is convenient to most of your neighbors – preferably in the evening.

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

Do You Live in a High or Low Crime Neighborhood?

It is most likely you will know the answer to that question.

Many of us know before we move in if the neighborhood we are moving to is a relatively safe one, or not. However, some of us might have bought a home in a neighborhood a long time ago and this neighborhood was known as a safe neighborhood yet as time went by, this changed! Some neighborhoods took a dive after the last big recession in 2008 and never recovered. Other neighborhoods are simply overrun by gangs and the violence gangs bring with them.

In the Myrtle Beach area and on the Grand Strand, certain areas, towns and neighborhoods definitely have a higher crime rate than others.

But don’t be fooled by the word ‘safe’; even the ‘safest neighborhood‘ isn’t immune to crime!

Crime Happens Everywhere!

Crime happens everywhere.

Crime happens everywhere and you can’t always prevent it.

Yet sometimes you can prevent crime from happening or reduce the overall crime rate in your community and that’s what we’ll be talking about in this article.

Can I Really Help Reduce the Crime Rate in My Neighborhood? Is It Really this Simple?

Today we’ll be giving you just three ways to start because you have to start somewhere, right?

Every single action you as an individual make, will have a ripple effect on your neighbors and so on. One person needs to start and many will follow. Small changes can make big impact.

Will you be the one who will take initiative?

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

Here Are Three Ways To Help Reduce Crime in your Neighborhood

1. Get To Know and Work Alongside Your Neighbors For Improvement

What this means is that getting involved with (or starting) community events is step one, followed closely by step two; starting some sort of neighborhood watch, neighborhood patrol program or even a neighborhood advocacy group. Through activities, neighborhoods can (re)build social control and increase citizen accountability for the actions of residents and their children. Take advantage of “safety in numbers” to hold group activities to show you are determined to drive out crime and drugs.

2. Deny Criminals Access To Public Spaces In Your Neighborhood

Work together to keep playgrounds, parks, yards, alleys, ball fields and streets clear of criminals. Do this by forming a task force to patrol these areas after dark and by reporting suspicious activity not only to police, but also to all citizens in your neighborhood; when the community is involved in watching out for each other, less crime happens. Signs that warn criminals of safety patrols and neighborhood watches help prevent some of these crime from taking place!

3. Report Vandalism Immediately and Clean It Up Quickly

When vandalism happens report, report, report! You want the police involved because you want these crimes solved fast. You do not want repeat offenders, correct? The next step after reporting vandalism is to get together with your community, your neighbors and clean it up. Leaving it be just isn’t an option if you want it to stop. Reporting and cleaning up vandalism signals a few things to the criminals involved. First, that you have noticed the vandalism. Second; that you are serious about stopping it. Third; that you have pride in your neighborhood and vandalism isn’t going to stop it.

Security Cameras Deter Crime and Help Solve Crimes

We have to mention, of course, that installing security cameras in public spaces is a huge step you can take in deterring criminals! Security cameras installed at ball fields, parks, playgrounds and on streets help solve crimes. As for your own home, a security system can do a lot for peace of mind! 24/7 monitoring will make you be and feel so much safer.

Let us know if we can help you come up with a plan for your neighborhood!

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While we don’t like to talk about it—or even think about it—crime is on the increase in America, and throughout the world. The number of burglars, muggers, auto thieves, robbers, purse snatchers, etc. is growing at an alarming rate. Now you, as a resident, working with neighbors can help reduce the crime rate.How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

How? By organizing and/or joining a neighborhood program in which you and your neighbors get together to learn how to protect yourselves, your families, your homes, and your property. Working together, you can get the criminals off your block and out of your area.

There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors better, and working with them you can reduce crime, develop a more united community, provide an avenue of communications between police and citizens, establish on-going crime prevention techniques in your neighborhood, and renew citizen interest in community activity.

“Citizen Safety Projects” are set up to help you do this. It is a joint effort between private citizens and local police. Such programs have been started all over the country. Maybe one already exists in your community.

These organizations don’t require frequent meetings (once a month or so). They don’t ask anyone to take personal risks to prevent crime. They leave the responsibility for catching criminals where it belongs—with the police. This is not a “vigilante” group!

These groups gather citizens together to learn crime prevention from local authorities. You cooperate with your neighbors to report suspicious activities in the neighborhood, to keep an eye on homes when the resident is away, and to keep everyone in the area mindful of the standard precautions for property and self that should always be taken. Criminals avoid neighborhoods where such groups exist.

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

Through cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, some of the things you will learn—and all free—are:

1.What to do in an emergency.

2.How to best identify a suspicious person.

3.How to identify a vehicle being used in a suspected criminal activity.

4.Signs to watch out for before entering a house or apartment that may be in the process of being burglarized.

5.What to do in case of injury.

6.What to do about suspicious people loitering on your street.

7.How to identify stolen merchandise.

8.How to recognize an auto theft in progress.

9.How to protect your house or apartment.

10.How to recognize a burglary in progress.

11.How to protect yourself and your family …and much more.

It’s easy to get your group started. All you have to do is contact your neighbors and arrange a date, place and time for the first meeting. Hold the meetings at your home or that of a neighbor. Try to plan a time that is convenient to most of your neighbors— preferably in the evening.How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

Then call your local police department. They will be happy to give your group informal lectures, free literature—and in many instances, window stickers and ID cards. Remember, police officers can’t be everywhere. Your cooperation with them is for the benefit of you, your family, your neighbors and your neighborhood.

When it comes to the safety of your family and your neighborhood, a combined team effort with your community is the best way to go. Working with your neighbors, you can help prevent crime and create a safer community. Our security experts are sharing their top neighborhood safety tips to help you learn how to improve your neighborhood security.

#1. Get to Know Your Neighbors
The first thing you can do to improve your neighborhood safety is to simply get to know your immediate neighbors. Make sure to share contact information and perhaps give a spare key to a trusted neighbor.

Knowing your neighbors and their routines can be beneficial to helping you all watch out for each other. For example, if you know approximately when your neighbors go to work and come home, what friends or family are often around, you can better assist with identifying any suspicious activity around their home (and yours).

Merely being aware of who is in your neighborhood goes a long way to helping keep everyone safe. If something is out of the ordinary, you can contact each other. Meeting and sharing information with your neighbors is one of the most effective neighborhood security tips.

#2. Let Your Neighbors Know When You Go Out of Town
Your home is more vulnerable when you aren’t there, so if you’re heading out of town, let your neighbors know. Not only can they keep an eye on your home, but they can help prevent a break-in by keeping up appearances such as collecting the mail.

#3. Form or Join the Neighborhood Watch
A great way to know what’s going on in your community is to join the local neighborhood watch group. If your neighborhood doesn’t have one, perhaps you can organize one. Leverage social media and create a local community group everyone can access and share updates. Whether you choose Facebook or join Nextdoor, a digital group helps everyone stay informed and connected. To learn more on how to prevent crime in your neighborhood by setting up a neighborhood watch group visit the National Neighborhood Watch organization.

#4. Install a Visible Home Security System
Burglars are less likely to break into homes with visible security systems. [1] Protect your home and encourage neighbors to do the same by installing a DIY home security system. If your security system includes motion-activity lighting or an alarm it can further help deter intruders.

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

#5. Maintain Appearances
Overgrown yards provide hiding spaces for burglars and create the appearance that no one is around which can make your home an easy target. Maintain your yard and encourage neighbors to do the same to show potential criminals that people are active in the community and reduce hiding spots.

#6. Teach Your Children Safety Tips
Keeping your home and neighborhood secure is one thing, but you can also take a few steps to keep you and your neighbor’s kids safe. If you’re new to the neighborhood, walk around with your kids to help them to be familiar with the area. You can also set boundaries for where they can go giving them some freedom to explore within reason.

#7. Spend Time Outside in Your Neighborhood
If a lot of people are outside the neighborhood is likely to be less inviting to burglars as there are more people to see them, especially as most burglaries occur during the day. Spending time outside is also a great way to get to know your neighbors (back to tip #1). Working in the yard, walking your dogs, organizing walks, or the kids playing outside can help everyone get to know each other, show potential burglars the community is active, and keep an eye out collectively for suspicious activity.

#8. Close Your Blinds at Night
At night with the lights on and blinds open can make your home a fishbowl for someone to peer into. If you leave your blinds open potential burglars can easily ‘case’ your home and get an understanding of your habits. A good neighborhood safety tip everyone can practice is to close all blinds and windows at night.

Improving your neighborhood security doesn’t require significant time investments. Working together as a team can create a safe, secure and wonderful place to live.

External news articles from the Wisconsin DNR – Division of Forestry

Can trees reduce aggression, violence and crime? Multiple studies say, “Yes!” October is domestic violence awareness month. Let trees be part of the solution. Levels of aggression and violence have been shown to be significantly lower among individuals who have some nearby nature outside their apartments than among their counterparts who live in barren conditions. Surveys exploring these results show residents with green views report using reasoning more often in conflicts with their children rather than violence. They also report less use of physical violence in conflicts with partners compared to those living in buildings without trees.

There is a strong relationship between higher levels of tree canopy and lower levels of crime, regardless of socioeconomic factors. In New Haven, Connecticut a 10% increase in tree canopy was associated with a 14% decrease in property crimes and a 15% decrease in violent crime. Similar results were found in Baltimore, with a 12% drop in all outdoor crimes for each 10% increase in tree canopy. In Chicago, an old rail corridor turned tree-lined trail had the unexpected result of a rapid decrease in the local crime rate. A public housing development, also in Chicago, had 48% fewer property crimes and 56% fewer violent crimes in or around buildings with more greenspace.

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

Urban greening can be used to create more defensible, safer outdoor spaces. Visibility is a key factor. Areas with larger trees and more open space are generally deemed safer than areas with dense vegetation (small trees and large shrubs.) Trees equate to a potential economic value of $928 million in reduced costs of crime for victims and property owners per year. For more information and links to published research, visit public safety in the Vibrant Cities Lab and Nature’s Riches: The Health and Financial Benefits of Nearby Nature.

Home | Blog | 5 Ways to Help Reduce Neighborhood Crime in an HOA

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

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Safety is one of the attributes that makes HOA living attractive to residents. Not only does a safe community give its residents peace of mind, it also increases the financial worth of the overall community. With that in mind, taking steps to reduce and prevent neighborhood crime should be a top priority for an HOA. Security precautions like good lighting, clear signage, strategically-placed cameras, locks on common areas, gates, electronic access cards instead of keys, and hired security guards can help make an HOA more safe.

Here are five major ways that an HOA can help reduce and prevent crime in their community.

1. Well-Lit Areas

Not only does ample outdoor lighting at night help prevent accidental trip and fall injuries, it also helps to deter criminal activity. Most crimes are committed in poorly-lit areas where the criminals can better avoid being seen or caught in the act.

2. Clear Signage

Signs can be used throughout the community to communicate rules and guidelines regarding designated parking areas, use of amenities, noise restrictions and other important information for residents and visitors. Signs can also include information on who to call to report suspicious behavior in the community. Having this information posted clearly throughout the community also reduces misunderstandings, reduces unsafe activities, and makes it easier for the association to take action when an infraction has occurred.

3. Strategically-Placed Cameras

Just the mere presence of security cameras can help deter criminal activity. Residents typically don’t want to be recorded everywhere they go, but the HOA can place cameras in strategic areas of the community to help keep everyone safer. Parking areas, laundry or gym facilities and other areas where residents or their property may be vulnerable to theft or other crimes are great places to add additional security through the installation of cameras.

4. Locking Everything Up

Common areas such as laundry facilities, mailrooms, pools, workout facilities and clubhouses should always kept locked. Residents should have access via a key, or an electronic access system. Signs can also be placed around the community as a reminder to residents and guests to always keep cars and homes locked, which may also serve as a deterrent to criminals. Many crimes are committed out of convenience, so removing the convenience is an easy way to reduce the amount of crime.

5. Security Guards

Having a security guard present in the community is a great deterrent to crime, as well as a great relief for residents. A security guard can offer quick response to suspicious activity, and their mere presence is a deterrent to criminals. Residents can feel safe leaving their home for work or travel, as well as when walking through the community after dark when they know there is a security guard patrolling the community.

About Scott Litman Insurance Agency

At Scott Litman Insurance Agency, we are dedicated to protecting HOA’s like yours. We have a unique understanding of the industry and the common risk exposures that you face in your daily operations. In fact, we find that 90% of the policies we review are missing coverages that violate the Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions (CC&R), exposing the board, HOA and management to lawsuits– which is why our comprehensive policies are tailored to meet your specific needs at competitive prices. For more information about our products, contact our experts today at (818) 879-5980 ext. 201, or fill out our online form.

Safety experts agree that the best way to deal with crime in the home is to take every step possible to prevent it from happening to you. Every person should know – at the very least – basic yet important crime prevention tips that will keep you and your family more safe and secure.As explained in greater detail in this section, law enforcement and security experts will tell you from years of statistics and experience – criminals will almost always look for the easiest possible targets. While no one can be guarantee 100% that no one will break into your home, these tips will definitely reduce the likelihood significantly.

Read through the tips and advice of experts in how to burglar proof your home to avoid being the victim of a robbery or theft. The information here about basic crime prevention techniques will be very effective in making your home unappealing to any burglar. For example- by doing a few simple things such as keeping exterior lights on at night, making sure there aren’t tall bushes that someone can hide behind, keeping all of your doors locked and installing safety windows, you can turn your house from a target into something a predator will not want to even attempt breaking into. There is also good information about how adding a burglar alarm or even simple home security devices can give you extra security that deter a criminal from choosing you as their next victim.

You can also work with your neighbors to keep each other safe. For instance, a neighborhood watch group is a great way to show everyone that they are being watched and will not have an easy time on your block. You can put up signs that indicate you have people watching for suspicious behavior.We recommend that you contact your local police department for more information.

Read below for more information.

How to Reduce Crime in Your NeighborhoodThis is a followup to the “Neighborhood Watch to Prevent Crime” post.

Remember, police officers can’t be everywhere. Your cooperation with them is for the benefit of you, your family, your neighbors and your neighborhood.

There’s safety in numbers and power through working with a group. You’ll get to know your neighbors better, and working with them you can reduce crime, develop a more united community, provide an avenue of communications between police and citizens, establish on-going crime prevention techniques in your neighborhood, and renew citizen interest in community activity.

When figuring out ways to pick the right burglar alarm, take the time to consider all the vital factors.

Budget
The amount of money you have to invest is a major component in just what kind of device you should buy. There are many various alarm systems and services offered, so you don’t necessarily have to choose a model you cannot afford because some “specialist” declares it to be the one you need. Talk to alarm firms and Continue reading “Choosing the Right Alarm” →

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

High Crime Rates Steal from Your Wallet

Of course, a high crime rate makes you feel personally vulnerable, but do you realize how much it can affect your personal finances? Burglars don’t have to physically steal your stuff to cost you money. Think losses from theft, falling real estate values, and higher insurance premiums.

Insurers look closely at crime rates when calculating premiums, drilling down from state to city to neighborhood, even street-by-street crime statistics. For example, homeowners in Glendale, AZ pay the highest insurance rates in the state due to the city’s high crime rate as compared to the rest of Arizona.

Crime rates influence car insurance costs, homeowner’s insurance premiums, renter’s insurance, and even housing costs. As crime goes up, home values tend to drop; as insurance costs increase, landlords may raise rents to cover the extra expense.

Look before you leap into a lease or purchase agreement.

How to Check Neighborhood Crime Rates

The local police or sheriff department should be your first stop for current crime information. Many departments post the information online. If you need more information, check out these three online services.

  • Crime Reports. Use this free service to search actual law enforcement crime records for over 1,000 departments. Enter your search – ZIP code or street address – to see incidents located on a map of the area. Click on each to view specifics like date and offense.
  • Spot Crime. This free service allows you to search for incidents by ZIP code or street address. Incidents are shown on a map with specifics available as well. You can also register to receive email or SMS alerts to crimes reported in your area.
  • Neighborhood Scout requires a paid subscription to access full information. The free version allows you to access violent and property crime rates in an area and compare them to state and national averages. The free version doesn’t list individual incidents. Additional benefits with a subscription include demographic information about the neighborhood. It’s more of a holistic neighborhood information tool than simple crime reporting.

Neighborhood crime rates matter: they can turn your dream home or apartment into a nightmare. Check them before you move, and take steps to reduce your risk.

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

How to Increase Your Security – Wherever You Live

Crime rates are important, but, for most people, budget and job location are the main considerations when looking for a place. Once you have a list of likely homes/apartments, evaluate each to determine how welcoming it is to burglars.

A home security system helps protects your personal safety, property, and bank balance. Depending on your home’s location and features, consider some of the optional add-ons to the GetSafe Starter Kit:

  • Flood monitoring: The drip, drip, drip of a small leak can quickly equal a large repair bill for structural damage and ruined furnishings.
  • Motion detector camera: Watch what’s happening inside your home (and record it!) with your smart phone app.
  • Digital locks: Many landlords don’t routinely change locks between renters. Do you really know how many people have a key to your apartment? Our optional home automation tools work with Nest and your SmartHub.
  • Smoke alarm monitoring: Our smoke detector emits an audible alarm even if the SmartHub is disabled.
  • Monitored home security: Most insurers only offer discounts for monitored systems. Even more important, our USA-based operators are on the job 24/7. You can take a break from the phone and let us handle the security.

Even though many people associate crime mainly with urban life, rural neighborhood crime rates are higher than you might imagine. Without close neighbors, there’s nobody to hear the sound of glass breaking or notice smoke pouring out of the roof. A monitored home security system is even better than a nosy neighbor: it never sleeps or takes a vacation.

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

Everyone wants a safe and secure community to live and raise their family. We all dream of finding a place where we can enjoy backyard bar-be-ques, neighbors coming together, and children playing safely. Keeping a community safe is a team effort and there is a lot you can do as an individual homeowner to help. Here are five ways you can help keep your neighborhood safe:

  1. Get To Know Your Neighbors: This sounds so simple, but for some people it is difficult. Start by saying hello and initiating conversation when you pass them in the neighborhood. Take cookies to someone new in the neighborhood with a list of places to eat and phone numbers used regularly. Neighbors who know each other tend to be more protective of each other.
  2. Form A Neighborhood Watch: While we have all heard the term, many are not exactly sure what they do other than watch the neighborhood. It is a program that works in conjunction with police to train neighbors what to look for in suspicious behavior and volunteers patrol the neighborhood. Signs are posted in the neighborhood by law enforcement and it has been found that the signs themselves are a deterrent.
  3. Involve Law Enforcement: Once you know your neighbors, invite the local law enforcement to update you on crimes in your neighborhood and ways to prevent crime. At this time find out who has security cameras to assist the police who may find the criminal on a neighbors camera.
  4. Security Systems: Encourage your neighbors to install security systems in their homes. Often security systems will offer discounts or rebates for multiple installations in one community. These can help police identify and catch criminals before they strike again.
  5. Increased Visibility: Encourage your neighbors to keep all shrubs, bushes, and trees neatly trimmed and away from homes to decrease hiding places for burglars. If your neighbors are elderly, get together and take turns maintaining their yard as well.

Another very inexpensive way to keep the neighborhood secure is to use social media. Set up a private group for the neighborhood and invite all to sign up. There you can post live updates of incidents and crimes as they happen.

How Video Surveillance Can Support A Safe Community

Along with the neighborhood watch, a good security system will not only protect the community but will increase home values. Modern surveillance equipment is not only affordable and can be easily implemented in a neighborhood without infringing on the privacy of the resident. These new systems come with a range of features that can support safety:

  • High resolution allowing for panning and zooming in on suspicious activity
  • Battery powered for easy installation
  • Storage of recordings for review after an accident

These features are very affordable and can cover the most vulnerable areas of your neighborhood.

While some people may feel that cameras in the neighborhood may be intrusive, the benefits of having a safe neighborhood is worth discussing with your neighbors, neighborhood watch, and homeowners’ association. Many people may be very open to the idea to keep their children, possessions, and property safe.

III. How Neighborhoods Influence Delinquent and Criminal Behavior of Youth

We now know that social scientists have been intrigued by the association between neighborhood characteristics and crime rates, and how people are affected by the neighborhoods in which they live, for nearly a century. In summary, research has shown that disorganized and disadvantaged neighborhoods tend to have residents that are less bonded to one another, have limited social networks, lack resources, and tend not to engender mutual trust among one other. In such neighborhoods, residents are less willing to act as informal social control agents to rise up and deal with neighborhood problems (Sampson et al., 1997; Sampson, Morenoff, & Earls, 1999) and are thus unlikely to take action when problems such as crime or juvenile delinquency occur. Beyond crime rates, one area within the social disorganization model receiving attention at present is how neighborhood-level factors influence outcomes for children and adolescents (see Sampson, Morenoff, & Gannon-Rowley, 2002).

Recent research has focused on how neighborhood structure can affect child development, specifically, how it leads adolescents to be more frequently involved with crime and delinquency. Children raised in areas of extremely low levels of socioeconomic disadvantage and inequality are at risk for developing a host of negative outcomes that can further increase their likelihood of participating in criminal activity. Children raised under such conditions are at risk for dropping out of school, lower school achievement, decreased verbal ability, and many other problems (see Leventhal & Brooks-Gunn, 2000). Although researchers have found a link between structural disadvantage of neighborhoods and negative child and adolescent outcomes, until recently the mechanisms for why these relationships exist had yet to be thoroughly explored. Various models have been put forth that may shed light on how neighborhood context can influence children’s involvement in crime and delinquency.

frameworks for linking individual behavioral outcomes for children and adolescents to the neighborhoods in which they are raised. First, they identified what they called the neighborhood institutional resource models, whereby neighborhood resources are believed to affect children and adolescents through access to resources such as parks and libraries, as well as community service centers that promote positive, healthy development. Second, they discussed the contagion model, which focuses on problem behaviors and is based on the idea that negative behaviors of peers and/or neighbors can quickly spread throughout a neighborhood, thus affecting children and adolescents. Third, they described a competition model, which suggests that neighbors compete with one another for scarce community resources, which in turn can lead to negative behaviors of children and adolescents. Fourth, they noted a relative deprivation model, which hypothesizes that neighborhood conditions and surroundings affect children and adolescents by means of their evaluation of their situation vis-a-vis others in the neighborhood. Fifth and finally, they described a collective socialization model, which suggests that neighborhoods influence children and adolescents through community social organization; control; and collective efficacy, including the presence of adult role models and social control agents who, in addition to structuring routines and opportunities in the neighborhood, supervise and monitor children and adolescents in the neighborhood.

Leventhal and Brooks-Gunn (2000) proposed three of their own potential mechanisms by which neighborhoods can influence children. These mechanisms often overlap those described by Jencks and Mayer (1990). The first mechanism is institutional resources, the availability of affordable and accessible recreational activities, medical facilities, employment, schooling, and child care for residents of the community. The second mechanism is relationships, whereby parental characteristics, such as their mental and physical health, parenting skills, and home life, affect a child. The third mechanism is norms/collective efficacy, which focuses on the supervision and monitoring of the behavior or residents within the community (mostly of youth for activities and deviant or antisocial peer group behaviors and physical risk, e.g., violence and victimization). Stressful neighborhood environments cause parents to employ parenting behaviors that adversely affect children’s behavior and learning. Prosperous neighborhoods may have more institutional resources that are conducive to child and adolescent well-being, such as learning, social, and recreational activities and quality child care and schools.

Extending beyond the somewhat overlapping neighborhood mechanisms offered by Jencks and Mayer (1990) and Leventhal and Brooks-Gunn (2000), Akers (1998) offered the social structure social learning (SSSL) model to explain the link between neighborhood social disorganization and children’s delinquent and criminal involvement. According to Akers, children and adolescents learn conforming behaviors through association with others, observation of others, and exposure to others. Similarly, this is also how children and adolescents learn to engage in criminal and delinquent behaviors. Whereas learning theory has been tested and supported through many empirical studies, far less evidence has been put forth regarding Akers’s newest formulation of how neighborhood structure and delinquency are linked through the social learning process. In putting forth the SSSL model of crime, Akers (1998) made the following proposition:

Social learning is the primary process linking social structure to individual behavior. Its main proposition is that variations in the social structure, culture, and locations of individuals and groups in the social system explain variables in crime rates, principally through their influence on differences among individuals on the social learning variables—mainly, differential association, differential reinforcement, imitation, and definitions favorable and unfavorable and other discriminative stimuli for crime. (p. 322)

Akers (1998) argued that social learning should largely mediate the link between structural and social conditions of neighborhoods and youth involvement in delinquency and violence. According to Akers, neighborhood social disorganization leads to children and adolescents engaging in delinquency by means of increased associations with delinquent peers, more positive reinforcement for engaging in delinquent behaviors, exposure to more favorable attitudes toward delinquent behavior, and more delinquent models to imitate. To this end, very few studies have empirically assessed propositions from Akers’s SSSL model, and with few exceptions (Haynie, Silver, & Teasdale, 2006) they have largely neglected how peer associations of children and adolescents can mediate the effect neighborhood conditions may have on delinquent behavior. Although Akers’s model should not be viewed as competing against these other models, it should be seen as an additional piece of the theoretical puzzle that can help us understand why children residing in disadvantaged neighborhoods are at risk for engaging in more delinquency and crime.

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How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood

This book shares how to reduce crime in your neighborhoods that makes a difference in your life and others.

It takes courage to stand up to crime and face the responsiblity of saying nothing to speaking out against the ills in our society.

Overall, I hope this book is helpful to all that are tried of staying silent and willing to take a stand.

How to Reduce Crime in Your Neighborhood danapspeaks
Joined: Sep-09-2012

Dana Pierce is a Floridian raised in Tampa, FL. Her educational background: Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Business Management at Hodges University. Also, she has a vast entrepreneurial experience in various business sectors such as: Real Estate Property, Medical Field, Affordable Housing, Law Enforcement, Government , Human Services, Banking, Media, Political Campaigns, Counseling ,Life Coaching and the Retail Industry.

School and student violence in U.S.A reached a peak in 1993, according to the National Center for Education reports. That year very serious violence is done by students like rape, sexual assault, robbery and aggravated assault. The statistics for violence formed by students at school is decreased in past years, so here is some prevention that can be helpful to prevent these kinds of crimes and violence which is shaped by school and college students.
As per research some factors that can helpful to reduce ratio of this type of crime such as teachers’ behavior, administrators, parents, community members, and even students.

Role of Schools and teacher’s
Teachers and school environment play an important role in this topic. The school and management can give training to teachers about how to create a friendly and helpful environment in the classroom and school so student are not getting involved in this type of activities. Some of the area on which we can train our teachers are classes on anger management and conflict management, how to give guidance to students who get easily affected by this type of activity, how to create cool and comfortable environment for the students to perform well in studies.

Parent and family role
Parents are the first people that kids get to know on this planet and what these parents teach or expose them too is what the kids think are the best for them. And if the environment provided by these parents is wonderful, then there is no chance of these kids indulging in violence. If parents want to see their kids not become violent or aggressive, then they can concentrate on doing the following things:

  1. Meetings with children at the regular basis.
  2. Whenever you found that there are some problems that your kid is going through, be with them and give support to your child.
  3. Do not compare your children with other same age children please.
  4. Keep track of who are in touch with your children, and which type of friend they have.

Students and classmates role
Classmates and other students can play an important role in reducing this type of activity because they are the persons who are spending more time with each other. Here is a list of some awareness that can helpful to other students to reduce student violence activity:

  1. Refuse to bring a weapon to school, refuse to carry a weapon for someone else, and refuse to keep silent about those who carry weapons.
  2. Welcome new students in school and help them in a new environment.
  3. Report any abnormal and suspicious activity to school management.
  4. Avoid alcohol and drugs.

Below is one awesome and informative infographic that gives you an abstract idea about “school violence” Infographics Credit Teaching Solutions

Learn how to protect your property and your loved ones!!

Monday, October 12, 2009

Is a Personal Alarm the Only Genuine Self Help Solution?

A personal alarm is nothing more than a glorified siren. The theory behind it is relatively simple: if someone attacks, or the likelihood of being attacked is very high, you simply switch it on and the personal security alarm will start screaming with an impressive 120 or 125 decibels. If you are lucky enough, this will draw attention and the attacker will leave you alone.

Of course it is crucial that a person alarm cannot be stopped by an attacker. This is achieved by using a hidden switch that only the person owning it knows about. It is also crucial to understand that a personal alarm only has a certain effectiveness. It will not always deter attackers. This is why non lethal weapons are commonly used in conjunction. Personal alarms and mace pepper spray make a very good combination and are also very effective in deterring attackers from pursuing their course of action.

The personal safety alarms for personal protection are not the only way in which these can be used. Child safety personal alarms have the same basic construction, but serve a very different purpose. They are usually there to ensure that if a child gets lost; his parents will be able to locate him or her in the shortest amount of time.

Another interesting application of the personal alarm is its usage in locating a person after a catastrophe, like a hurricane or earthquake. With the recent occurrence of such events it might not be too long until these will surpass in popularity the traditional personal safety alarms, pepper spray included. Obviously this would only be true for those certain areas where this sort of event has a higher probability. The technology used by this new breed of personal alarms is inspired by that used by skiers to protect against avalanches, which contain a GPS enabled beacon, and a loud siren which goes on intermittently (in order to preserve battery power). As technology will advance more still, it is quite possible that these devices will become more and more effective.

The online market for devices such as the personal alarm has seen an explosive growth in the recent years. The offer though is slightly limited. The size of the device is constantly decreasing and so are the performances, while the prices stay relatively fair. This happens as the competition is getting more fierce by the day, with more and more manufacturers joining this promising market.

Altogether a personal alarm is a useful thing to have around. In conjunction with pepper spray it decreases your chances of getting harmed greatly and in the case of a disaster it can quite literally save your life. Of course some areas are more dangerous than others. The decision to purchase ultimately belongs to you, but it does seem a sensible thing to take precautions against these events even if the odds are relatively small.

Monday, August 3, 2009

Intruder Alarms Don’t Worry Burglars!

a href=”http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_uBKjpw2tr9I/Snc4FwsMcxI/AAAAAAAAAOA/-9pWPBguSVU/s1600-h/1281fk5.jpg”>How to Reduce Crime in Your NeighborhoodProfessional Burglars claim an intruder Alarm does not put them of.A recent survey has found that intruder alarms do not present any difficulty to professional burglars; the reason is because homeowners often forget to set the intruder alarm or fails to lock their doors and windows properly. Despite the many improvements in home security systems if homeowners fail to use them properly there is little benefit achieved.

Almost half of the persistent burglars interviewed for a recent survey said they believed home security has improved over the last 10 years but they also felt that the improvements would not be enough to stop them breaking in. Only 20% of those surveyed said that a good security system was the most common reason they abandoned an attempted break-in, 40% said being disturbed by the homeowner was the main cause of them giving up a break-in attempt and 40% of those surveyed said they would be put off if there was a noisy dog on the premises.

67% of those surveyed said they always followed the same pattern of searching a house once they are broken in, normally starting in the main bedroom, because this is the usual place that valuables are hidden, they then cover the remaining bedrooms and the main living room, this has proved to be the most efficient way of finding valuable possessions. One interesting fact that emerged from research conducted with burglars currently serving jail sentences was that they consider children’s rooms to be the least profitable to search.

The average time that a housebreaking takes is as little as 20 minutes, the average age in which the first burglary was committed was 13, and two thirds of burglars prefer to work alone. Almost all professional burglars go out with the intention of committing an offence, that is to say it is planned rather than opportunistic though obviously if a ripe target presents itself they will take that opportunity to steal.

The main motivation to commit housebreaking is as one would expect money, over 80% of those surveyed cited this as their major motivation, they would search for a suitable target judging the potential value of that home by the type of car on the drive, any obviously valuable items that can be seen through the windows, the amount of cover that was provided by such things as fences or trees, the presence of an intruder alarm or dog, and signs of owner occupation.

It should be noted that most of those surveyed said that even though they were not put off by an intruder alarm they would normally move on to an easier target if one was available, also one has to take into consideration the bravado of the people being surveyed, do remember they were all convicted burglars serving time in prison at the time of the survey.

What To Do

  • Get to know your neighbors and become familiar with their routines. You’re going to be partners in watching the activities on your block.
  • Be suspicious. Report unusual or suspicious behavior to the police. Write down descriptions of the person(s) and license numbers of any vehicles involved.
  • Above all, be concerned. It’s the most effective way to reduce or prevent crime and make your neighborhood safe.
  • Establish a meeting time and place convenient to all.
  • Exchange names, home and work telephone numbers among the participants. A hand-drawn street map might also be useful.
  • Draw a diagram appropriate for your neighborhood. Each neighboring house depicted should contain the house number, occupant names, and home and work telephone numbers. The 9-1-1 emergency number should be placed prominently on the diagram.
  • Once your neighborhood watch network is established, everyone should observe these guidelines:
  • Keep a trusted neighbor informed if your house will be unoccupied for an extended period. It’s important to leave him a way of reaching you if an emergency should arise.
  • Look after your neighbor’s house when he is away, and ask him to look after yours. This includes collecting mail, newspapers and other deliveries which would indicate at a glance that no one is home.
  • Establish and attend regular neighborhood meetings with your local crime prevention officer. Find out about local crime trends and what you can do about them.
  • There is a great deal of important crime prevention information available. Become involved, and share information with your neighbors. You can be safe from crime-but only if you care enough to help one another.

Fighting Neighborhood Crime

The most effective means of reducing crime in the neighborhood is an organization of neighbors helping one another.

It’s a fact: Concerned neighbors reduce crime.

Putting into practice the time-honored ‘good neighbor’ policy is still the single most important factor in solving problems-including crime.

You can take steps to make your neighborhood a safer place to live. It costs little more than your interest and cooperation. Is it worth the investment?

This crime prevention information is brought to you by:

The National Crime Prevention Council
305 15th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005
1-202-393-7141

The State of New York
Division of Criminal Justice Services
Office of Funding & Program Assistance
Program Services & Federal Liaison Unit
Executive Park Tower, Stuyvesant Plaza
Albany, NY 12203
1-518-457-3670

There is often confusion between Homeowners Associations, Block Watch groups, and Neighborhood Associations. Each are valuable, but serve differing purposes.

Homeowners Associations
Homeowners Associations, unlike Neighborhood Associations are formal legal entities created to maintain common areas and enforce private deed restrictions. Most condominiums, town-home developments and some single-family subdivisions have homeowners associations, which are usually formed when the development is built.

Membership is mandatory for all property owners within the development, and usually fees are mandatory. Homeowners associations have the legal authority to enact and enforce maintenance and design standards in addition to those established by City ordinances. There is usually a governing board with formal by-laws which hires a property management company to handle maintenance and enforce rules.

Crime Watch
Organized by the Police Department, these neighbors volunteer their time to keep an eye on what is happening in their neighborhood. Proven to reduce crime, these groups are vital to a healthy neighborhood but are more successful if coupled with a Neighborhood Association.

“A 1998 Department of Justice survey of twelve cities nationwide found that only 11 percent of all residents have ever attended a neighborhood watch meeting to help protect themselves from crime, as compared with 14 percent who kept a weapon at home, 15 percent who owned a guard dog, and 41 percent who installed extra locks. “Participation in neighborhood watch programs almost always decays after an initial burst of enthusiasm, unless rooted in neighborhood organization of a more comprehensive sort.”
-Robert D. Putnam, Bowling Alone, 2000, p. 107

So you think that organizing a Neighborhood Association is a good idea; now what?