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How to respect the american flag

When I was a little girl, I used to call the American flag the “Pledge-a-llegiance.” My grandfather and I would spend countless road trips seeing who could count the most flags. I don’t remember exactly when I learned the “Pledge of Allegiance” or “The Star-Spangled Banner,” but I know that from early on I was taught that the flag, its pledge, and the anthem of my country were to be respected because of the things they represent.

I can say, in all honesty, in my younger years, I didn’t understand why it was so important to place my hand over my heart when pledging to the flag, but I understood if my parents and grandparents told me to, there had to be a good reason. Little did I know that 20 years or so down the road, I would get a rude awakening that would forever change the way I viewed the flag and all it entails.

How to Respect the American Flag

On the evening of April 8, 2003, I received word that a friend of mine, PFC Jason M. Meyer, was killed in action in Baghdad. A key figure in my group of friends during my teenage years — someone I’d only interacted with months prior to his death — was gone. He was taken too soon. Jason made the brave choice to sacrifice his time and freedom to enlist in the Army, so he could join thousands of other men and women to defend the rights and freedoms we enjoy as Americans.

For this to happen once in my circle of friends was heartwrenching, but in August of 2010, we were devastated by the loss of yet another close friend — 1LT Todd W. Lambka was killed in action in Afghanistan. Getting the phone call about Todd’s death was harder this time. I just kept repeating the word no, refusing to believe it was happening again.

I have heard stories from people about losing friends and family members during the Vietnam War and Operation Desert Storm, but I never thought once about being personally affected by war. The two friends I have lost have become my main reasons why I respect the flag, and why I will instill such pride and respect for the flag and our country in my own children.

My husband also serves in the United States Coast Guard and although his time out at sea is coming to a close in a few years, I am so grateful for the sacrifices he has made to his country. The sacrifices made by the members of the military are made for no other reason than providing protection and defense of the rights and freedoms that are a privilege to Americans.

The other day, a friend of mine remarked that she didn’t think young children understood what it meant to pledge allegiance to something. In a way, I see her point. For some it’s just a matter of going through the motions because “that’s the way we’ve always done it.”

While I don’t always agree with our government and those who are in charge of making the decisions, I feel like I’m pledging to the ideals for which America was created — a hopeful pledge if you will — for a government of the people, by the people and for the people.

When I taught my children “The Star-Spangled Banner,” I went through it line by line and told them what it meant in terms they could understand. When randomly asked, my kids might not remember the reasons why, but my hope is that they will appreciate and acknowledge that the basic ideals are worthy of their respect.

Here are two simple rules I teach my children to follow:

  1. The flag should never touch the ground. To me, it’s a matter of reverence. It is a symbol of freedom and represents the thousands of lives of those who made the ultimate sacrifice so that I can live free. It’s truly the very LEAST thing I can do to make sure it flies free.
  2. When the pledge is being recited, or if we are singing the national anthem (which happens to be my 4-year-old’s favorite song), it’s respectful to place your hand over your heart. To me, placing my hand over my heart during those times is done out of respect for the unalienable rights our country was founded on — life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. I love my country and am grateful for those who made it what it is.

By no means is respecting the flag a political thing. You can love your country without loving its leadership. It also goes back to those who have gone before us — it’s the least I can do to pay respect to the lives lost in the name of America and the freedoms we enjoy.

I used to think that reverence for the flag and the symbols of our freedom was just a given. I now know that not everyone feels this way. It’s an important core value that we teach here in our home. I guess that just goes to show how amazing this country truly is — we have the freedom to have such different views on things. However, it is important to stop and remember who is responsible for that freedom and why we have it today.

The National Flag Code was adopted by the National Flag Conference to provide guidance for the care and display of the American flag on June 14, 1923. It was not until December 22, 1942, that Congress enacted a federal law based on the National Flag Code. Although it does not impose criminal penalties, it does serve as a guide for treating the American flag with the respect that it deserves.

The Flag Code, in part, sets out the following guidelines.

• The flag should never be stored, fastened or displayed in any manner that would allow it to be easily damaged, torn or soiled.
• The flag should never be used as a covering for windows, beds, desks, platforms or any other decoration.
• The flag should never be used as a ceiling covering.
• The flag should never be used as advertising on items including napkins, boxes, or other items that are designed for temporary use.
• The flag should never be used as a decoration on costumes or athletic uniforms. Its image may be used on the uniforms of members of patriotic organizations, military personnel, fireman and policeman.
• The flag should never be defaced by writing or attaching marks, letters, words, numbers or drawings of any kind.
• The flag should never be used to hold, carry, deliver anything.

American Flag Maintenance

• The American flag should never be carried flag or horizontally. It should always be aloft and fall free.
• When lowering the flag, it should never tough any other object, including the ground, the floor, water or any merchandise.
• When storing the flag, it should be folded ceremoniously.
• The flag should be mended and cleaned as needed.
• When the flag has become tattered and worn and is not longer a fit symbol of the United States, it should be burned in a dignified manner.

Once your flag becomes serviceable, you may want to consider contacting the American Legion Post in your local area. Generally, on or around Flag Day, June 14th of each year, that organization conducts a dignified flag burning ceremony for the benefit of the community member that have flags that need to be retired. Additional organizations that conduct ceremonial flag burning include Boy and Girl Scout Troops and Cub Scout Packs.

The National Flag Code contains guidelines for every aspect of using, caring for and displaying the American flag. In future blogs, we will be providing more information on the proper way to display your flag, whether in or attached to your home or from a flagpole that is installed in your yard.

Flagpoles Etc. has been dedicated to manufacturing and selling flags, flagpoles and accessories for over 25 years. We are a family owned business that has become the go to experts in our industry for individuals and businesses. If you have any questions or have a specific topic you would like to read about in our future blogs, please feel free to comment on our Facebook or Google+ page, send us a tweet, or contact us using the link on our website. We look forward to hearing from you!

Five ways to show the flag respect, along with who enforces the US Flag Code and what happens if you break it.

The US Flag Code sets forth a number of proper ways to handle and display the American flag. Each guideline is meant as a way of showing the flag the utmost respect. President Franklin D. Roosevelt said it best with this key point from the flag code: “The American flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing.”

How to Respect the American Flag

Here are five basic ways you can show the stars and stripes the respect it deserves.

#1. Don’t let the flag touch the ground. You should always make sure you are carrying the flag high enough so it doesn’t touch or drag on the ground. But if it does, you don’t necessarily need to burn it. Burning flags is meant for those that are in such a condition that renders them unable to fly.

#2. Always fly the American flag higher than all other flags. If any other flags are displayed on the same pole, make sure Old Glory is the highest up.

#3. Don’t fly the US flag at night without a proper light to illuminate it. For guidelines that are more specific and how to fly the flag in rough weather, check out THIS blog post.

#4. Can the flag be flow upside down? Short answer, no. However, an upside-down flag is a symbol of extreme distress and you can fly the union facing down in situations of life or death.

#5. The flag should never be attached to a ceiling or used as a ceiling cover. If you have one on your ceiling, you should take it down.

Who enforces the US Flag Code? Technically, nobody ensures everyone is following the rules properly. The Code is a bunch of rules and traditional customs that don’t carry the weight of the law. Congress did attempt to create criminal penalties for burning American flags, but was unfortunately overruled by the Supreme Court in 1989 and 1990.

However, be wary of state laws; many have their own regarding US and state flags. In fact, Montana has the strictest policies for anyone caught defacing Old Glory. A fine in Montana can reach $50,000 or a jail term can stretch to up to 10 years.

Have you seen someone improperly display the American flag? What did you do?

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How to: Respect the American Flag

Posted by Alana D. on 27th Sep 2017

Respect

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Is it possible those showing disrespect to the flag just need to be educated about the symbolism?

A protester holds an American flag while protesting a grand jury decided not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in Oakland, Calif.

The Fourth of July. The most American of days. If you left your home or scrolled your social media accounts, you undoubtedly saw disrespect towards the American flag. It isn’t a new expression of speech, but it is certainly more widespread today than in years past. So the question arises: how can you make people respect the flag?

First, let’s look at what the flag represents. Is it possible those showing disrespect to the flag just need to be educated about the symbolism? In a book about the flag published by the House of Representatives, it says in relevant part, “the star is a symbol of the heavens and the divine goal to which man has aspired from time immemorial; the stripe is symbolic of the rays of light emanating from the sun.” The flag’s colors had no specific symbolism or meaning when the flag was adopted in 1777, however, the Great Seal of the United States did have meanings for those same colors. “The colors of the pales (the vertical stripes) are those used in the flag of the United States of America; White signifies purity and innocence, Red, hardiness & valour, and Blue, the color of the Chief (the broad band above the stripes) signifies vigilance, perseverance & justice.”

So there we have it: purity, innocence, hardiness, valour, vigilance, perseverance, and justice.

Do the actions committed under the flag today match this symbolism?

Does a pure country run torture camps or turn a blind eye when its allies do?

Does an innocent nation intentionally foster a civil war in which millions of civilians are killed or displaced for political and economic gain?

Does a hardy country turn away those seeking help because it is too difficult?

Does a valorous nation conduct a drone strike program in which 90% of those killed are “collateral damage”?

Do vigilant citizens let the government run amok, or should they monitor government overreach the way the Founding Fathers intended?

Does the country display the perseverance to forge ahead through danger and terror, or does it let the fear generated by a tiny minority of extremists control its foreign policy?

Is there true justice when the nation has the largest inmate population on the planet and law enforcement kills an unarmed person 10% of the time they kill someone?

It’s time to face the horrid truth. Vast quantities of Americans no longer respect the American flag because the ideas it is meant to symbolize are lost. If you started reading this in hopes of restoring respect for the flag, it’s probably your fault. Blind respect for the flag accompanied by apathy as the things it represents are destroyed has rendered the flag meaningless. It has become nothing more than a sports team bumper sticker. It’s something to show what side you’re on and help you root for the home team, while simultaneously betraying everything it was supposed to stand for.

A pickup truck with a rear window decorated in the theme of the American flag and Statue of Liberty, sits in the parking lot in Manchester, N.H. (AP/David Goldman)

If you read the litany above and found a way to force it out of your mind, you are the problem. It’s not the punk burning the flag. It’s you, the person who claims to respect it while supporting the actions above. The college kid with the lighter may be destroying a physical flag, but you destroyed the idea of it. Which is worse? Who is really unamerican?

When the flag was first hoisted, the country didn’t live up to the symbolism. Genocide, slavery, and injustice followed it everywhere it went as the nation spread from sea to shining sea. Even with that start, the symbolism as outlined was a goal worth pursuing. It was worth the fight.

Now, when people ask for justice, the flag-waving American responds with the hashtag of #BlueLivesMatter. When refugees flee US bombs falling on a country ripped apart by a civil war instigated by the US, the country shows no valor or hardiness. It shows fear and hatred.

Your blind obedience to the state and the refusal to think about the symbolism of the flag disrespected it long before the first drop of gasoline touched it. You more than disrespected it, you killed it. The person who considers themselves a good American torched the meaning of the flag when they stopped questioning the government the way the Founding Fathers intended and when they stopped aspiring to the symbolism.

Certainly, in the comments section under wherever this article is posted, someone will mention those who fought, bled, and died for the flag. I know more combat veterans than most. None have ever told me they fought for the flag or apple pie. When the bullets started flying, they fought for their friends. Those who were really hardcore fought for the mission. It should also be noted that, on the off chance someone knows a person who truly did fight and die for a piece of cloth, recently a teenager died because he mistakenly believed he could beat a train to the crossing.

The point is: just because someone died for something they believed in doesn’t make it true. Rather than address the injustice of this soldier dying due to a mistake, you will attempt to politicize his death and allow more soldiers to die in the next war we shouldn’t be involved in.

If you want to restore respect for the American flag, it’s very simple. Make it something worthy of respect and stop treating it like a pom-pom at a football game.

Is it possible those showing disrespect to the flag just need to be educated about the symbolism?

A protester holds an American flag while protesting a grand jury decided not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in Oakland, Calif.

The Fourth of July. The most American of days. If you left your home or scrolled your social media accounts, you undoubtedly saw disrespect towards the American flag. It isn’t a new expression of speech, but it is certainly more widespread today than in years past. So the question arises: how can you make people respect the flag?

First, let’s look at what the flag represents. Is it possible those showing disrespect to the flag just need to be educated about the symbolism? In a book about the flag published by the House of Representatives, it says in relevant part, “the star is a symbol of the heavens and the divine goal to which man has aspired from time immemorial; the stripe is symbolic of the rays of light emanating from the sun.” The flag’s colors had no specific symbolism or meaning when the flag was adopted in 1777, however, the Great Seal of the United States did have meanings for those same colors. “The colors of the pales (the vertical stripes) are those used in the flag of the United States of America; White signifies purity and innocence, Red, hardiness & valour, and Blue, the color of the Chief (the broad band above the stripes) signifies vigilance, perseverance & justice.”

So there we have it: purity, innocence, hardiness, valour, vigilance, perseverance, and justice.

Do the actions committed under the flag today match this symbolism?

Does a pure country run torture camps or turn a blind eye when its allies do?

Does an innocent nation intentionally foster a civil war in which millions of civilians are killed or displaced for political and economic gain?

Does a hardy country turn away those seeking help because it is too difficult?

Does a valorous nation conduct a drone strike program in which 90% of those killed are “collateral damage”?

Do vigilant citizens let the government run amok, or should they monitor government overreach the way the Founding Fathers intended?

Does the country display the perseverance to forge ahead through danger and terror, or does it let the fear generated by a tiny minority of extremists control its foreign policy?

Is there true justice when the nation has the largest inmate population on the planet and law enforcement kills an unarmed person 10% of the time they kill someone?

It’s time to face the horrid truth. Vast quantities of Americans no longer respect the American flag because the ideas it is meant to symbolize are lost. If you started reading this in hopes of restoring respect for the flag, it’s probably your fault. Blind respect for the flag accompanied by apathy as the things it represents are destroyed has rendered the flag meaningless. It has become nothing more than a sports team bumper sticker. It’s something to show what side you’re on and help you root for the home team, while simultaneously betraying everything it was supposed to stand for.

A pickup truck with a rear window decorated in the theme of the American flag and Statue of Liberty, sits in the parking lot in Manchester, N.H. (AP/David Goldman)

If you read the litany above and found a way to force it out of your mind, you are the problem. It’s not the punk burning the flag. It’s you, the person who claims to respect it while supporting the actions above. The college kid with the lighter may be destroying a physical flag, but you destroyed the idea of it. Which is worse? Who is really unamerican?

When the flag was first hoisted, the country didn’t live up to the symbolism. Genocide, slavery, and injustice followed it everywhere it went as the nation spread from sea to shining sea. Even with that start, the symbolism as outlined was a goal worth pursuing. It was worth the fight.

Now, when people ask for justice, the flag-waving American responds with the hashtag of #BlueLivesMatter. When refugees flee US bombs falling on a country ripped apart by a civil war instigated by the US, the country shows no valor or hardiness. It shows fear and hatred.

Your blind obedience to the state and the refusal to think about the symbolism of the flag disrespected it long before the first drop of gasoline touched it. You more than disrespected it, you killed it. The person who considers themselves a good American torched the meaning of the flag when they stopped questioning the government the way the Founding Fathers intended and when they stopped aspiring to the symbolism.

Certainly, in the comments section under wherever this article is posted, someone will mention those who fought, bled, and died for the flag. I know more combat veterans than most. None have ever told me they fought for the flag or apple pie. When the bullets started flying, they fought for their friends. Those who were really hardcore fought for the mission. It should also be noted that, on the off chance someone knows a person who truly did fight and die for a piece of cloth, recently a teenager died because he mistakenly believed he could beat a train to the crossing.

The point is: just because someone died for something they believed in doesn’t make it true. Rather than address the injustice of this soldier dying due to a mistake, you will attempt to politicize his death and allow more soldiers to die in the next war we shouldn’t be involved in.

If you want to restore respect for the American flag, it’s very simple. Make it something worthy of respect and stop treating it like a pom-pom at a football game.

How to Respect the American Flag

The care and display guidelines for the American flag can be quite confusing, creating situations that cause etiquette faux pas. It can be quite confusing if you didn’t learn it in school or you came from another country.

In fact, many people from the United States are unsure of how to treat the flag. Either they forgot what they learned in school, or they were never taught.

It is important to learn a few facts that can help clear up some of the confusion. Most of the guidelines are easy to follow. The basic idea of following proper protocol with the flag is to show respect for the country and for those who sacrificed their lives for freedom.

During a July Fourth celebration, respect for the flag is much more important than the fireworks. Honor those who made this celebration possible by showing them how much you appreciate what they’ve done.

Flag Design

The American flag is designed with thirteen horizontal alternating red and white stripes and a blue rectangle in the top left corner with fifty white stars. The stripes represent the original colonies, and the stars symbolize the fifty states.

Government Rules for Flags

The U.S. government has a set of rules for manufacturing, using, and disposing of the flag. However, these are specifically for flags made or used by the government. Other flags created for personal or commercial use do not have to abide by these stringent restrictions.

Even so, proper etiquette dictates respect for the flag, regardless of use.

Displaying the American Flag

When displaying the flag, there should be light on it at all times. This includes sunlight or another source of light. This is the reason outdoor flags are raised at many government institutions at sunrise and lowered at sunset. When lowering the flag, it should never be allowed to touch the ground, floor, or anything beneath it.

If you display the American flag with another flag on the same pole, the U.S. flag should be above the other flag. When flying the U.S. flag with flags from other countries, each flag should have its own pole, and the flags must be positioned at equal height.

When displaying an American flag, it should be right side up. When in motion, the union part of the flag should lead. That means that the blue rectangle with the stars should go ahead of the stripes. When the flag is hung, the blue section with the stars should always be on the upper lefthand side.

An American flag made by or for the government should never be worn or used for advertising purposes. This simply means that you should not repurpose a federal flag for anything else. You may have an article of clothing with a flag motif or use a flag design when advertising a product, service, or business.

Repair and Disposal of Flag

When the flag needs repair, it should be mended and restored to its original condition. However, if it is no longer possible, it should be burned with dignity or properly folded and sent to the American Legion, Boy Scouts, or Girl Scouts. These organizations perform proper retirement ceremonies for old flags.

American Flag at Half-Staff

There are certain days that a flag should be flown at half-staff (also called half-mast when referring to flags on ships or flags flown on naval bases). The flag should be quickly raised to the top of the pole and then lowered to the halfway point. When lowering the flag at the end of the day, it should be raised to the top of the pole and then lowered to the bottom.

When to fly the American flag at half-mast:

  • Memorial Day – Last Monday in May
  • National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day – July 27
  • For thirty days after the death of a president – both current and former
  • For ten days after the death of a vice-president, speaker of the house, or chief justice
  • The days between the death and burial of a Supreme Court judge, former vice-president, state or territory governor, or military department secretary

Etiquette of the Salute, Pledge of Allegiance, and National Anthem

The American flag must be respected at all times. This includes times when it is saluted, during the Pledge of Allegiance, and while listening to or singing the National Anthem. The flag should be faced during all of these events.

When reciting the Pledge of Allegiance or singing the National Anthem, it is traditional to stand erect with your hand over your heart. If you are wearing a hat or cap, it’s considered most respectful to remove it. Military personnel should give the proper salute as dictated by military policy.

How to Respect the American Flag

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How to Respect the American Flag

  • By Chelsea B. Sheasley Correspondent

Feeling the urge to unfurl your Old Glory for Independence Day?

Uncle Sam would be proud. But for the casual American flag owner, striking the right balance between patriotic and polite can be tough. No one wants to go the way of Home and Gardens TV and apologize for suggesting an American flag can be a bright and festive table runner, as it did last month.

The American flag “represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing,” according to US Flag Code. Many people consider it sacred, and abide by the Flag Code, approved by President Franklin Roosevelt on June 22, 1942, for rules on proper handling of the flag.

If you don’t know the ins and outs of flag code, or wonder if you’ll really be punished for breaking the rules, read on for a primer on how to fly the American flag without offense.

All answers in quotes are from the US Flag Code.

How to Respect the American Flag

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Can I fly my flag at night?

“It is the universal custom to display the flag only from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs in the open. However, when a patriotic effect is desired, the flag may be displayed 24 hours a day if properly illuminated during the hours of darkness.”

If my flag touches the ground, do I really need to burn it?

“The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.

Must the American flag be higher than all other flags?

“No other flag or pennant should be placed above or, if on the same level, to the right of the flag of the United States of America, except during church services conducted by naval chaplains at sea, when the church pennant may be flown above the flag during church services for the personnel of the Navy.

When flags of two or more nations are displayed, they are to be flown from separate staffs of the same height. The flags should be of approximately equal size. International usage forbids the display of the flag of one nation above that of another nation in time of peace.”

Can the flag ever be flown upside down?

“The flag should never be displayed with union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.”

What if it’s raining?

“The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather is inclement, except when an all weather flag is displayed.”

The flag would look great on my ceiling! Can I do that?

“The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling.”

I’ve seen some cute flag crafts on Pinterest. Are they appropriate?

“The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, holding, carrying, or delivering anything. The flag . should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for temporary use and discard.”

Who says I need to follow these rules?

Technically, you don’t have to, at least under federal law. The US Flag Code is a compilation of traditional rules and customs for use of the flag, first based on guidelines from the National Flag Conference in Washington ,D.C. on June 14, 1923, and does not carry the weight of law.

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Congress attempted to create criminal penalties for burning or defacing the flag, but was overruled by the US Supreme Court in 1989 and 1990.

But watch out for state law. Nearly all states have their own flag laws on the books, and several include fines and/or jail time for burning, trampling, or defacing the flag. Montana residents face the stiffest penalties: A person convicted of showing contempt for the US flag or Montana state flag can face a fine of up to $50,000 and a jail term up to 10 years, according to the First Amendment Center.

How to Respect the American Flag

Hello class and welcome to my rant/lecture on “Respecting the Flag of the United States of America”. Before we start, I want you to know that this is in no way a post belittling anyone, nor is my intention to insult you or your intelligence. This is merely an educational experience.

If you don’t have your reading material, you can find it here: https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/4/8

So what IS the U.S. Flag Code? Simply put, it’s the federal law that establishes advisory rules for the display and care of the American Flag. While it is a federal law, the penalty for not following these rules is not enforced, however these are the “official” rules for respecting the flag, as dictated by the United States government.

Now, a lot of the memes and complaints you hear about the flag being disrespected often come up when people are protesting. It came up a few years back when Colin Kapernick knelt during the National Anthem, and it’s coming up now as Black Americans March upon our streets to protest the unnecessary murders of our fellow Americans by police. But it’s funny that we hone in on flag burning or stomping, because while I agree these are disrespectful to our flag, they’re FAR less common than the everyday disrespect the flag is shown that NOBODY talks about. What are these disrespects? Let’s first look at subsection B of the U.S. Code § 8. Respect for Flag.

“The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise.”

Now, this bit is more hearsay, I don’t have photographic proof, but I’m sure plenty of you have witnessed this as well. Let’s take a look at 4th of July Parades. Celebrating our country’s founding is all well and good, as the floats and police march on down, music playing. Kids sit on parent’s shoulders holding cheap little American Flags (made in China, most likely, but again, hearsay).

How many of those flags do you think wind up on the ground? How many do you think wind up in the TRASH? According to subsection k, “The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.”

So dropping these flags (even by accident) is incredibly disrespectful to the flag and what it represents, and by throwing them away in the trash, well… I don’t think I even need to go there.

Next, subsection c. It reads as followed, “The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free.”

I take you back to 2015 to, yet again, the most American day of the year, Independence Day. You don’t need to read this article, just look at the first picture.

Notice anything? Maybe a giant American flag being carried flat and horizontally?

How to Respect the American Flag

It is out of character for me to weigh in on anything controversial. While I have my opinions, and they are strong ones too; I don’t like to offend others. The older I’ve gotten, the more I realize that everyone has their own opinions, and they are completely entitled to them. Moreover, we don’t have to agree on everything to be friends; in fact, many of my friends have different views than I. The bottom line with me is, I don’t share my opinions because I’d much rather find common ground and be friends than not.

But…..and you knew there was a but coming…..it does bother me when the American Flag is disrespected and athletes choose to kneel during the National Anthem. To me, the American Flag and the National Anthem represent the courage and sacrifice of the men and women that defend our country and freedom and equality for all. Apparently I’m not alone because I found a couple coaches out there that weighed in on the recent debate:
How to Respect the American Flag
http://www.breitbart.com/video/2016/03/08/watch-virginia-tech-basketball-coach-teaches-players-to-respect-the-national-anthem/

While I was working on this post, I found an article that shared other ways to disrespect the American Flag. Even though I knew that it should never be used as clothing, bedding, or drapery, I didn’t know it should never be used for advertising purposes. Below is a link to article that you might find interesting:

Here’s another interesting piece of information, A Cleaner World cleans American Flags for free – every day. Remember, one of the ways to honor the American Flag and our country is to keep our country’s colors looking solid and strong. Regularly cleaning your outdoor American Flag will cause it to both last longer and maintain its vivid colors longer than those that are not properly cared for. If your flag needs some special attention, drop it by one of our locations, and we will consider it an honor to clean it for you – free of charge.

Here’s what the code actually says.

Sep 25, 2017, 9:49 am

Unless you were literally living on a different plane of existence this weekend (which, kudos to you, if you were), you could not have missed President Donald Trump‘s three-day-long tirade against NFL players who have taken a knee during the national anthem to protest police brutality.

Trump’s repeated argument is that players who do so are disrespecting the American flag.

The issue of kneeling has nothing to do with race. It is about respect for our Country, Flag and National Anthem. NFL must respect this!

But what does it really mean to disrespect the flag? One man on Twitter broke it down by going line-by-line through the U.S. code regarding the flag and… you might be surprised by what really disrespects Old Glory.

Since “disrespecting the flag” is still the narrative being used, this courtesy of the US Flag Code Chapter 10: Respect for flag

— koopington g. mcbeardface vii (@koopa_kinte) September 23, 2017

Turns out it’s not NFL players disrespecting the flag, but organizations.

US Flag Code: Chapter 10.176C

“The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free.” pic.twitter.com/a9niowcX5f

— koopington g. mcbeardface vii (@koopa_kinte) September 23, 2017

It’s also a lot of patriotic Americans.

“The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery.” pic.twitter.com/z3rywoKDtO

— koopington g. mcbeardface vii (@koopa_kinte) September 23, 2017

Who love to drink Budweiser.

US Flag Code Chapter 10.176I

“The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever.” pic.twitter.com/OMNzTurFaD

— koopington g. mcbeardface vii (@koopa_kinte) September 23, 2017

And decorate their home in red-white-and-blue paraphernalia.

US Flag Code Chapter 10.176I (pt 2)

“It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like…” pic.twitter.com/xHG3sypUrA

— koopington g. mcbeardface vii (@koopa_kinte) September 23, 2017

Most Fourth of July barbeques are extremely disrespectful.

US Flag Code Chapter 10.176I (pt3)

“…or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or anything that is designed for temporary use and discard.” pic.twitter.com/WVvQVjD6qG

— koopington g. mcbeardface vii (@koopa_kinte) September 23, 2017

College football is out of the question.

US Flag Code Chapter 10.176J

“No part of the flag should ever be used as a costume or athletic uniform.” pic.twitter.com/7R8sZmqcp1

— koopington g. mcbeardface vii (@koopa_kinte) September 23, 2017

But what about kneeling? Well…

Not covered in the “Respect for Flag” section; standing/kneeling/sitting. That’s considered a conduct violation, not disrespectful.

— koopington g. mcbeardface vii (@koopa_kinte) September 23, 2017

Nothing in the Flag Code explicit states you have to stand, just that you “should.” All the things I listed were outlined as disrespectful.

— koopington g. mcbeardface vii (@koopa_kinte) September 23, 2017

And as for the men and women in service who may be offended by players’ behavior…

A 3rd Generation Vet

— koopington g. mcbeardface vii (@koopa_kinte) September 23, 2017

One might say that should settle things, but… we doubt it.

David Covucci

David Covucci is the Layer 8 editor at the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the web. His work has appeared in Vice, the Huffington Post, Jezebel, Gothamist, and other publications. He is particularly interested in hearing any tips you have. Reach out at [email protected]

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How to Respect the American Flag

This July 4th lots of people will be flying the American flag to show their appreciation for our country’s history and freedoms. If you fly a flag it will inevitably become worn and tattered and leave you with the dilemma of how to dispose of it.

When to Retire

Are you unsure about whether your flag needs to be retired? According to the Flag Code, “when [a flag] is in such a condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, [it] should be destroyed in a dignified way…”. The American Legion’s ‘Top Ten’ Flag Myths can help you decide. For example, you can continue to use a flag that has touched the ground or covered a casket.

Ceremonial Burning, Dignified but…Safe?How to Respect the American Flag

American flags can be retired through a ceremonial burning. Many organizations such as American Legion, local VFWs, and Boy Scout Troops accept flags for burning and will properly retire your flag. However, burning synthetic flags, such as nylon, creates hazardous fumes which are harmful to human health and the environment. It’s become a bit of a quandary for scout troops and veterans organizations alike.

Keep in mind, the traditional method was suggested in 1923 when synthetic fabrics were very uncommon. Some municipalities have gone so far as to ban the burning of synthetic flags out of concern for air quality. Fortunately, as the Boy Scouts of America notes, there are other respectful ways to dispose of your flag.

Recycle Your Flag

As the Flag Code states that flags must be “destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning” other methods can be used. Nylon flags can be mailed to American Flags Express, Inc. for recycling. There is a fee to cover the cost of sorting, storing, and transporting to a fabric recycler. The company explains that virtually all of the nylon fiber can be converted into virgin grade nylon material that can be made into a new flag.

Advanced Disposal provides a seasonal flag retirement collection at its facilities. They send cotton flags to the American Legion and nylon flags to a recycler. “Respectfully retiring the American flag is a great way to show our appreciation of the ‘stars and stripes’ and all it stands for,” says Advanced Disposal CEO Richard Burke. Mailing a flag for retirement, including a note stating such, is an option as well. Note: The collection runs June 1st-September 11th each year.

How to Respect the American Flag

Photos from Advanced Disposal.

DIY Retirement

No one person or agency is authorized with retiring American flags – so consider a dignified DIY retirement. The Boy Scouts suggest cutting apart your flag, such that you do not cut through the blue field of stars (symbolically maintaining the union). Once cut apart, it ceases to be a flag.How to Respect the American Flag

Here’s their recommended method:

  1. Stretch out the corners of the flag.
  2. Cut the flag in half, vertically — do not cut into the blue star field.
  3. Place the two halves together and cut in half, horizontally.
  4. You will have four pieces of flag, one being the blue star field and the other three red and white stripes.
  5. Put the flag in a container and dispose of it properly.

If you live near a Goodwill, bring the fabric scraps of your former flag for their textile recycling program. If recycling is not available, then disposal in the trash is acceptable since the scraps are no longer considered a flag.

Additional Local Flag Collections

If you live in or near DuPage County there are a few more options for disposing of your worn flag. In the fall and spring, many towns host Recycling Extravaganzas. Often scouts or a veteran’s organization attend to collect flags for retirement. Be sure to check each event’s collection list before packing up. You can also check with local boy scout troops.

Make It Last

Before you jump up out of your seat to retire your flag, consider how you can make it last longer. Annin Flagmakers, the oldest manufacturer of flags in the U.S., reminds us that often our flags just need cleaning and repair. Not only does it show respect for the flag but also for the resources used to make your flag. One should only consider retirement when a flag becomes damaged beyond repair.

Here are some quick tips to increase the longevity of your flag:

Buy high quality. Higher quality materials and craftsmanship add up for a longer lasting flag. Buy American-made to further show your patriotism and reduce the environmental footprint of your flag.

Take it down. Flying a flag 24/7 can cause a lot of wear & tear. Consider taking your flag down at the end of every day or during severe weather.

Get it cleaned. Depending on the material, your flag may be washed at home or dry cleaned (look for an eco-friendly cleaner!) Some cleaners provide the service for free.

Repair it. Can a flag be repaired? Yes indeed! The main concern is to maintain the dimensions of the flag. Some flag companies include repair services for large flags. This seamstress loves the challenge.

Donate it. For unneeded flags in good condition, find a friend or organization to donate it to. If donating, be sure to properly fold the flag and place it in a bag.

How to Respect the American Flag

This July 4th lots of people will be flying the American flag to show their appreciation for our country’s history and freedoms. If you fly a flag it will inevitably become worn and tattered and leave you with the dilemma of how to dispose of it.

When to Retire

Are you unsure about whether your flag needs to be retired? According to the Flag Code, “when [a flag] is in such a condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, [it] should be destroyed in a dignified way…”. The American Legion’s ‘Top Ten’ Flag Myths can help you decide. For example, you can continue to use a flag that has touched the ground or covered a casket.

Ceremonial Burning, Dignified but…Safe?How to Respect the American Flag

American flags can be retired through a ceremonial burning. Many organizations such as American Legion, local VFWs, and Boy Scout Troops accept flags for burning and will properly retire your flag. However, burning synthetic flags, such as nylon, creates hazardous fumes which are harmful to human health and the environment. It’s become a bit of a quandary for scout troops and veterans organizations alike.

Keep in mind, the traditional method was suggested in 1923 when synthetic fabrics were very uncommon. Some municipalities have gone so far as to ban the burning of synthetic flags out of concern for air quality. Fortunately, as the Boy Scouts of America notes, there are other respectful ways to dispose of your flag.

Recycle Your Flag

As the Flag Code states that flags must be “destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning” other methods can be used. Nylon flags can be mailed to American Flags Express, Inc. for recycling. There is a fee to cover the cost of sorting, storing, and transporting to a fabric recycler. The company explains that virtually all of the nylon fiber can be converted into virgin grade nylon material that can be made into a new flag.

Advanced Disposal provides a seasonal flag retirement collection at its facilities. They send cotton flags to the American Legion and nylon flags to a recycler. “Respectfully retiring the American flag is a great way to show our appreciation of the ‘stars and stripes’ and all it stands for,” says Advanced Disposal CEO Richard Burke. Mailing a flag for retirement, including a note stating such, is an option as well. Note: The collection runs June 1st-September 11th each year.

How to Respect the American Flag

Photos from Advanced Disposal.

DIY Retirement

No one person or agency is authorized with retiring American flags – so consider a dignified DIY retirement. The Boy Scouts suggest cutting apart your flag, such that you do not cut through the blue field of stars (symbolically maintaining the union). Once cut apart, it ceases to be a flag.How to Respect the American Flag

Here’s their recommended method:

  1. Stretch out the corners of the flag.
  2. Cut the flag in half, vertically — do not cut into the blue star field.
  3. Place the two halves together and cut in half, horizontally.
  4. You will have four pieces of flag, one being the blue star field and the other three red and white stripes.
  5. Put the flag in a container and dispose of it properly.

If you live near a Goodwill, bring the fabric scraps of your former flag for their textile recycling program. If recycling is not available, then disposal in the trash is acceptable since the scraps are no longer considered a flag.

Additional Local Flag Collections

If you live in or near DuPage County there are a few more options for disposing of your worn flag. In the fall and spring, many towns host Recycling Extravaganzas. Often scouts or a veteran’s organization attend to collect flags for retirement. Be sure to check each event’s collection list before packing up. You can also check with local boy scout troops.

Make It Last

Before you jump up out of your seat to retire your flag, consider how you can make it last longer. Annin Flagmakers, the oldest manufacturer of flags in the U.S., reminds us that often our flags just need cleaning and repair. Not only does it show respect for the flag but also for the resources used to make your flag. One should only consider retirement when a flag becomes damaged beyond repair.

Here are some quick tips to increase the longevity of your flag:

Buy high quality. Higher quality materials and craftsmanship add up for a longer lasting flag. Buy American-made to further show your patriotism and reduce the environmental footprint of your flag.

Take it down. Flying a flag 24/7 can cause a lot of wear & tear. Consider taking your flag down at the end of every day or during severe weather.

Get it cleaned. Depending on the material, your flag may be washed at home or dry cleaned (look for an eco-friendly cleaner!) Some cleaners provide the service for free.

Repair it. Can a flag be repaired? Yes indeed! The main concern is to maintain the dimensions of the flag. Some flag companies include repair services for large flags. This seamstress loves the challenge.

Donate it. For unneeded flags in good condition, find a friend or organization to donate it to. If donating, be sure to properly fold the flag and place it in a bag.

Where sports and politics mix……. unfortunately

So this flag display is OK?

Throughout the NFL player anthem protest, many opponents have voiced their belief that these players are disrespecting the American flag?

Apparently, most people haven’t actually read the rules/laws of exactly what disrespecting the flag means.

So who is really disrespecting our flag?

Please take a look at the following link from Cornell Law School:

Here are a couple of highlights that people should pay very close attention to:

(d) The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery

(i) The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for temporary use and discard. Advertising signs should not be fastened to a staff or halyard from which the flag is flown.

Does anyone really care about how the American Flag should truly be displayed. That answer is a resounding NO NO NO NO. It appears that people are using the players protest to promote their own political agendas. Yep, politics.

I wish people would stop being hypocrites about the NFL player protests. It’s never been about disrespecting the flag, ever. If people were so concerned about the American Flag, why did they wait until now to start protesting?

Because racism is a far bigger issue in our country than people want to acknowledge.

As the first note of the National Anthem is played, we as military families are used to stopping immediately and honoring the flag and the National Anthem.

It is cultural for us in many ways. But beyond being on a military base or post, standing and honoring the anthem is for most Americans, a time-honored tradition that we hold very dearly. Old Glory is held with great affection and love, for most, and we cling to it, and honor our flag and the National Anthem.

But, we live in a culture where there are those who kneel and rebel against the flag and the National Anthem. What then is the best way to show honor, respect and reverence? That can be directly answered with, flag/anthem etiquette and protocol. But before we can take on that, let’s visit the question… For all that are able-bodied, “Is Not Standing Ever Okay?”

Because of all that our flag stands for, and the freedom it signifies, ironically, it allows for the freedom to kneel, as the anthem is played. And as the red, white and blue blows briskly in the wind, people can protest the flag in this way. Simply stated, we do not live in communist China and every person has the right to stand or not stand, to kneel, sit or roll over should they choose.

Of course, the debate is not over whether someone has the right, but rather is this the right way to protest. When not showing proper respect to our nation’s greatest symbol of freedom, is that showing a level of disrespect to those who have sacrificed so much for that very freedom to protest in that way?

Or take it one step further, is one symbolically stepping, rather dancing on the graves of those who paid the ultimate sacrifice with their lives so that protests like this can be done freely and without recourse? Could it be that the offense is so great to those who have served and especially those lost in battle and their families, those without limbs, or cognitive ability, that there must be a more respectful way to protest social injustice?

No one would rationally argue that the right to protest should be taken away, rather weigh the damage, and specifically weigh the collateral damage to protest in this way. Could it be that we should respect the message, but the method is completely and outrightly offensive to most Americans? Especially to those in uniform, or those who have ever worn a uniform, in service to our great country. So, for me, the answer to this question is simple, and one that every person is free to answer.

But for me, “No, it is never okay.”

Our nation has certainly faced far greater challenges than NFL players who refuse to stand. And, we have faced and defeated formidable foes and enemies throughout our nation’s history.

I believe strongly that these protests do not cause us to waiver, but rather cause our patriotism to run deeper and stronger as Americans. We stand a little taller and remain standing a little longer after the anthem is played. We sing a little louder and prouder. Even possibly, we find a tear welling in the corner of our eye, as we humbly and solemnly honor all those who have sacrificed for every freedom we enjoy in this imperfect, yet greatest nation in all of history, The United States of America.

So, protest as you chose, you have that right, but do it with full knowledge that the blood of every veteran runs through the red stripes of that flag, and that their courage and valor runs through those 50, blue-encased white stars, and that their pure sacrifice is in every white stripe perfectly placed on that flag…the flag of the United Stated of America.

“The red, white and starry blue is freedom’s shield and hope.” John Philip Sousa

Simple Flag Etiquette

Care

  • Every precaution should be embraced to keep our flag from becoming, tattered, torn, soiled or damaged.
  • When holding the flag, do your very best to keep it from brushing against other objects.
  • Dry clean flags. If for some reason it gets wet, dry flat and do not fold or roll the flag during this process.
  • It is acceptable to trim or repair edges and resew stripes if flag is in overall good condition.

Saluting our Flag

  • When a flag passes by in a parade, civilians, place your right hand over your heart.
  • Men and women (civilians) with caps and hats, remove hat and hold it in your right hand over your heart.
  • Men and women in uniform should give an appropriate formal salute.

Displaying the Flag

(Outdoors)

  • It is considered acceptable to fly the flag from sunrise to sunset
  • It may be flown at night as long as it is appropriately illuminated.
  • The flag should be unfurled and raised at a moderate pace, and lowered slowly and ceremoniously.
  • In poor or inclement weather, the flag should not be flown.
  • On an angled staff, the flag projects horizontally or angled from a building, windowsill, balcony, etc. The blue union starts should be at the peak of the staff, except when at half-staff.

(Indoors)

  • The flag of the United States of America always has the place of honor and should always be to the right of the speaker.
  • The flag should be at the center and at the highest point when with a grouping of flags.
  • When displayed against a wall either vertically or horizontally, the flag’s union stars should be at the top, to the flag’s own right, and those viewing or observing to their left.

Pledge of Allegiance and National Anthem

In 2007, Congress highlighted protocol for the pledge and national anthem in 36 USC 301.

  • Every abled person should stand, regardless of age, face the flag and place their right hand over their heart for the entire allegiance and anthem.
  • If moving to your seat or in motion as the anthem begins, stop and follow the above guidelines.
  • When another country’s anthem is played, it is played first, before the National Anthem. Stand respectfully, but do not salute in any way.

“When to Fly the Flag”

  • On all days that the weather permits

Special Attention to the following days:

  • New Year’s Day
  • Inauguration Day
  • Lincoln’s Birthday
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Day
  • Washington’s Birthday
  • Easter Sunday
  • Mother’s Day
  • Armed Forces Day
  • Memorial Day (Half-staff until noon)
  • Flag Day
  • Independence Day
  • Korean War Veterans’ Day
  • Labor Day
  • Patriots Day
  • Constitution Day
  • Gold Star Mothers’ Day
  • Columbus Day
  • Navy Day
  • Veteran’s Day
  • Thanksgiving Day
  • Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day
  • Christmas Day
  • Election Day
  • State and Local Holidays
  • Your State’s Birthdays
  • Other Designated Days

Let us always hold these principles dear and share these etiquette guidelines. May it always be that shining symbol of freedom and may it always have the respect that it is due and rightly deserved.

Flag Etiquette: How to Show your Respect for our Nation’s Most Beloved Symbol of Freedom

How to Respect the American FlagAt 240 years old this year, Old Glory certainly lives up to its name and we will once again have the honor of displaying our nation’s “Stars and Stripes” to commemorate the upcoming Independence Day holiday. But before you raise your red, white and blue on July 4, make sure you are up on your flag etiquette to ensure you are paying your proper respects to one of our nation’s most respected symbols.

Exterior Display Protocol

When displaying the American flag from a balcony or your home or office, it should be hung from a securely mounted staff attached to a building, with the union (or blue field containing the stars) at the peak (or top) of the staff. If you are displaying a flag suspended over a sidewalk, the flag’s stars should be farthest from the building. When displaying a flag flat against an exterior wall—vertically or horizontally—the flag’s stars should be at the flag’s own right, which is to an observer’s left.

You should always display the flag from sunrise to sunset on buildings and outdoor stationary flagstaffs. However, a flag can be displayed 24 hours a day if it is illuminated during sundown. As far as weather concerns, the flag should not be displayed on days when the weather is inclement, except if you are using an all-weather flag.

As far as adornments, it is perfectly acceptable to place a symbolic finial on your flagstaff. For example, the President, the Vice President, and many federal agencies use an eagle finial. Indoor flags are often presented with a golden fringe but, in general, it’s not a good idea to have a fringe on an outdoor flag as they deteriorate too quickly.

Remember that a flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise. However, contrary to the popular misconception, a flag need not be burned if it simply touches the ground. If the flag remains in good condition after falling to the ground by mistake, be sure to pick it up as soon as possible and rehang it. But if the flag is no longer in good condition, then it should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.

Interior Display Protocol

Just as in exterior wall use, when displaying a flag flat against an interior wall—vertically or horizontally—the flag’s stars should be at the flag’s own right, which is to an observer’s left.

If displaying a flag in a window, the stars should be uppermost to the left of the observer in the street.

When using a flag at a speaker’s platform, the flag, if displayed flat, should be hung above and behind the speaker. Inappropriate usage includes a flag being used to cover the speaker’s table or podium or being draped to cover the front of a platform.

Other uses of the Flag—both acceptable and unacceptable

Although you probably see a lot of flag apparel this time of year, it is not acceptable. According to the US Code Title 4 Chapter 1 (The Flag) states, “The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery.” However, if you still want to promote patriotism on your t-shirts or other items, it is perfectly acceptable to include items that are emblazoned with our national colors (red, white and blue).

Likewise, a flag should never be used as a decoration, such as a tablecloth or tent. The flag should also never be used for advertising or promotional purposes such as paper napkins, paper plates or any other items deemed “temporary” or “disposable.” It sends a very bad message to see these items end up in a garbage can at the end of a day celebrating our nation’s heritage. A good alternative? Simply buy party decor that has a mix of our national colors to show your patriotism. One exception to this rule is the use of mini flags that should be treated with the same respect as real flags. These are especially good for children, so they can learn how to respect our nation’s most precious symbol beginning at an early age.

Above all else, when considering proper flag etiquette, always remember to respect our flag during a public ceremony or during the playing of the National Anthem. When the flag is presented in this situation, you should face the flag and stand at attention with your right hand over your heart. At 240 years old, it’s the very least we can do to pay our respects to this most treasured symbol of patriotism and freedom.

Grade Level: Elementary (PreK-5)
Estimated Time: Varied

Lesson Overview:
Teach your students about the American Flag, including its history, what the symbols represent, and the proper way to display it. Discuss how the American Flag has played a part in recent events. Then choose one or more of the American Flag activities for wearing, sharing, or displaying.

Related National Standards from McREL:

  • Knows the history of American symbols (e.g., the eagle, the Liberty Bell, George Washington as the “father of our country,” the national flag)
  • Understands how people in the local community have displayed courage in helping the common good (e.g., volunteering in unique situations including earthquakes, floods, and fires)

Materials:

  • An American Flag
  • See Individual Activity Ideas

The American Flag

History

  • The first official national flag was approved by the Continental Congress on June 14, 1777.
  • It is widely believed, but not confirmed, that Betsy Ross sewed the first American Flag.
  • The flag had 13 stars and 13 stripes to represent the 13 original colonies.
  • The flag is nicknamed “Old Glory”. More information
  • On August 3, 1949 President Truman officially declared June 14th Flag Day.
  • After many design changes the flag currently has 50 stars. The last star was added when Hawaii became a state on July 4, 1960.

  • Its Symbols

  • The stripes represent the 13 original colonies.
  • The 50 stars represent the number of states.
  • The colors of the flag have meaning as well:
    • Red symbolizes Hardiness and Valor.
    • White symbolizes Purity and Innocence.
    • Blue represents Vigilance, Perseverance and Justice.
  • Proper Display

  • The flag should be displayed from sunrise to sunset. If the flag is displayed at night it should be illuminated.
  • Never allow the flag to touch the ground or the floor.
  • When displayed on a wall or window the blue field should be in the upper left corner.
  • The flag should be raised quickly and lowered ceremoniously.
  • The flag is often flown at half-staff to show respect for someone who has died. When flown at half-staff, the flag should be raised to the top for an instant and then lowered to the half-staff position. The flag should also be raised to the top before it is lowered at the end of the day.

  • American Flag Activities and Crafts

    1. Flag Bead Pins – Use seed beads and safety pins to make a flag or other patriotic pin.(See #’s 13,60-66;69,70)
      http://www.chatsco.com/safety_pins.htm
    2. Unity Bracelet – Combining letter beads and floss, a unity bracelet can be made to wear or to share.
      http://www.makingfriends.com/bracelet_unity.htm
    3. Make your own flag – The Teletubbies Web site offers ideas for each child to design, make, and display a flag that represents himself/herself.
      Teletubbies Flag
    4. Unity Pins – Create a patriotic pin with craft wood.
      http://www.makingfriends.com/veteransdaypins.htm
    5. American Flag Key Tag – Make an American flag with pony beads and string.
      http://www.thebeadery.com/americana_flag_keytag.htm
    6. Many Patriotic Crafts – Directions for patriotic pinwheels, wall hangings, windsocks, craft stick flags, and more.
      http://www.enchantedlearning.com/crafts/july4/

    Other Ideas

    1. Cards to kids in distress – In 2001 UNICEF accepted mail, drawings, and messages to deliver to schoolchildren in distress through the Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF program. UNICEF continutes to contribute to various causes through the Trick-or-Treat program.
      http://www.unicefusa.org/trickortreat/
    2. Share a Pin – Make pins to give to local fire fighters or police officers. Make two each – one to wear and one to share. (Idea contributed to ZOOM Responds)
    3. Quilting – Children contributed to a project called Children Covering America. Kids and schools from across the country planned to build pieces of a national quilt to commemorate the victims of the Sept. 11th national tragedy.
    4. Teach kids the Pledge of Allegiance through pictures.
      http://www.teachervision.com/lesson-plans/lesson-5926.html

    Assessment:
    Student understanding should be assessed through contribution to class discussion and activities.

    Teaser Text
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    –>


    PBS provided nightly coverage and analysis of the terrorist attacks on the United States with “America Responds.”

    Key PBS Resources:

    Online NewsHour
    Ongoing coverage and analysis.

    TOM STREISSGUTH

    29 SEP 2017

    CLASS

    How to Respect the American Flag

    Official etiquette for the use and display of the American flag was first set down by the National Flag Code, which was adopted June 14, 1923. On Dec. 22, 1942, the rules were approved by Congress and became federal law.

    Explore this article

    • Flying the Flag
    • Carrying the Flag
    • Wearing the Flag
    • The Flag at Half-Staff
    • Emergencies
    • Banners and Signs
    • Flying the Flag at School

    1 Flying the Flag

    Fly the flag from sunrise to sunset. If displayed at night, the flag must be lighted. Don’t fly the flag on rainy days. Always place the union (the blue field) at the peak or top end of the flagstaff or flagpole.

    2 Carrying the Flag

    In a parade, carry the flag at the center of the front rank. Never allow the flag to touch the ground or drag along the ground. Never dip the flag as a show of respect to a person. Always protect the flag from possible damage. If the flag is damaged or severely worn, remove it from display and dispose of it by burning.

    3 Wearing the Flag

    Don’t wear the flag as a hat or as a piece of clothing. Don’t wear it as a team uniform or as part of a uniform. Small pins or buttons representing the flag can be worn by persons in uniform, such as police officers or military veterans.

    4 The Flag at Half-Staff

    Lower the flag to half-staff to show respect for the death of an important individual, such as a president, or solemnity for a tragic event. First raise the flag to its full height and then bring it slowly down to a position halfway up the mast or flagpole.

    5 Emergencies

    In situations of distress, signal your emergency by flying the flag upside down. This is the only occasion on which it is proper to display the flag upside down.

    6 Banners and Signs

    Don’t attach any messages, signs, symbols or caricatures to the flag, or use the flag as part of a commercial display. Never use the flag to advertise. The flag must fly above any state flags or other banners that are hoisted on the same flagstaff.

    7 Flying the Flag at School

    At school, the flag should be flown in front of the principal building. Raise the flag before classes begin in the morning and lower it at the end of the day.

    No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any person or thing. Regimental colors, State flags, and organization or institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor.

    1. The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.
    2. The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise.
    3. The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free.
    4. The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery. It should never be festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always allowed to fall free. Bunting of blue, white, and red, always arranged with the blue above, the white in the middle, and the red below, should be used for covering a speaker’s desk, draping the front of the platform, and for decoration in general.
    5. The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used, or stored in such a manner as to permit it to be easily torn, soiled, or damaged in any way.
    6. The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling.
    7. The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, design, picture, or drawing of any nature.
    8. The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, holding, carrying, or delivering anything.
    9. The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for temporary use and discard. Advertising signs should not be fastened to a staff or halyard from which the flag is flown.
    10. No part of the flag should ever be used as a costume or athletic uniform. However, a flag patch may be affixed to the uniform of military personnel, firemen, policemen, and members of patriotic organizations. The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing. Therefore, the lapel flag pin being a replica should be worn on the left lapel near the heart.
    11. The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.

    The US Flag Code lays out guidelines for how to display the American Flag correctly with respect and honor.

    When you display a flag flat against a wall, which way should the stars face? What if you are hanging that flag outside, does that make a difference? Continuing reading for advice on how to display the American flag with honor.

    What many people don’t realize is that there is a lot that goes into properly handling a flag than hoisting it up a flag pole. The US Flag Code even outlines the correct way to raise and lower a flag, along with setting it to half-staff.

    How to Respect the American Flag

    When you do want to fly your flag at half-staff, raise it all the way to the top quickly and then slowly lower it to half-staff. The flag should also be raised back to the top before being lowered all the way down at sunset. You don’t want to simply hoist it half-way and stop. For more information on the difference between half-staff and half-mast, check out this article!

    Flag etiquette is a very serious subject that people all too often don’t pay enough attention to. So many men and women have fought and given their lives to protect our flag, so we should treat it with the respect it deserves. That means always following proper flag protocol when displaying, folding and disposing of one.

    And to answer the question from earlier, when you display a flag flatly against a wall, the union (or blue field of stars) should always face to the left. This goes for whether it is hanging outside, inside… anywhere!

    For more ways to honor the flag, check out Five Ways Everyone Can Show the Flag Respect.

    How to Respect the American Flag

    The Founding Fathers of America founded this nation on beliefs of freedoms and moral values. They wanted us to have the right to choose how we practice those freedoms. Having laws restricting our rights was not what they envisioned; in fact, their philosophies are shown in the Constitution and in the Bill of Rights. That is why when it comes to the symbolism that represents America, like the flag, our Founding Fathers give us the choice to decide how we respect and honor the flag.

    Our great leaders would look at our flag today and see the invisible story it tells and all it has been through. All the wars, hardships, and losses our flag has endured is stitched into every crease and fold. Our flag, through the bad and the worse, has managed to be our light at the end of the tunnel. Our fathers would look at it and see it as a distinguished source of pride and a resemblance of the important American values every citizen holds dear. They would know that every star on our flag represents the lives lost protecting our freedoms, making us a stronger nation. The stripes are what represent our past and will improve our future; they know that. They respect every part of the flag and would hope that the America they created, fulfills every current and future American’s dream.

    Our Founding Fathers would also look at the flag from another light. A darker and sadder light. They would see what our flag has failed to do for us. They know even to this day that our flag is failing to give her citizens the American dream. The lies, deceptions, and failures that are stitched in secretly into our flag make it heavy with sorrow. They would see what they failed to set forth for our nation. Every star on our flag, representing every life lost protecting the nation, would scream “freedom isn’t free”. They know that the stripes’ past is not what an American flag should endure, especially if it risks the values of our nation. Our fathers would see the flaws of the nation they created and hope that someday it will all be a distant memory. When it becomes a distant memory, they hope that one day every American’s dream will someday come true.

    After seeing our flag for its true and deep meaning, our Founding Fathers would respect it. They do not care if you sit, stand, or kneel for the flag. They want us to see what they see in the flag. Our leaders want us to practice our freedoms and moral values with others. They want us to treat the flag with the same respect we treat others, and if we do not treat others with respect, we need to look back at history. We need to see what our flag has endured and understand what needs to be changed so the same mistakes are not repeated.

    The fathers of our nation believed every man on this earth has three unalienable rights, “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness”. They have done everything in their power to make sure we got those rights, even with all the struggles in our history. The flag has and always will represent our rights. If we want our rights to be honored, respecting the flag is the first step to getting there. The American Dream is in that flag, and so is the respect and vales of our nation.

    Sinclaire Ogof is 17 years old from Lake Ariel and attends Western Wayne High School as a senior. She is a part of many clubs including CATS Club and.