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How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Marshall is a writer with experience in the data storage industry. He worked at Synology, and most recently as CMO and technical staff writer at StorageReview. He’s currently an API/Software Technical Writer based in Tokyo, Japan, runs VGKAMI and ITEnterpriser, and spends what little free time he has learning Japanese. Read more.

As a matter of good practice, you should always safely remove your USB drive on your Windows PC. Otherwise, the data on your USB may become corrupt. Not sure how to safely remove your USB? Here are five ways.

Use the System Tray

The most common way to safely eject your USB drive is by way of the System Tray. In the System Tray, click the “Up Arrow” icon to expand the menu. Next, double-click the “USB” icon.

In the sub-menu that appears, select the “Eject ” option. The text that appears will depend on which type of USB you’re using.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

You can now safely remove your USB.

Use File Explorer

If you happen to be working in File Explorer, there’s an option for you to remove your USB. In the left-hand pane in File Explorer, find and right-click your USB device. In the context menu that appears, select “Eject.”

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Use the Settings App

There are a ton of different things you can do from the Settings app, including removing your USB drive. First, press “Windows+I” to open the Settings app. Once open, select “Bluetooth & Devices” in the left-hand pane.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

On the next screen, click the “Devices” option near the top of the window.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Next, in the “Other Devices” group, click the three vertical dots next to your USB drive and then select “Remove Device” from the one-option context menu.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

It’s now safe to remove your USB device.

Use Disk Management

You can also safely remove your USB from Disk Management. Open Disk Management by right-clicking the Windows icon to open the Power User menu. Then, select “Disk management from the menu.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Next, locate the drive you want to eject (in this case, your USB). Right-click it and then select “Eject” from the context menu.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

You’re now able to remove your USB.

Use Windows Terminal

If you have no GUI (such as in a Hyper-V server), or if you simply want to feel like a hacker, you can remove the USB from Windows Terminal. Open Windows Terminal and then run this command:

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

A new terminal will open and you’ll be in the C:\WINDOWS\system32\diskpart.exe file path. Before you go removing the drive, you’ll need to know its volume number. To do so, run this command:

A list of volumes will appear. First, find your USB drive under “Label,” and then note its volume number under the “Volume ###” column. In our case, that’s Volume 3.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

You’ll now need to select the volume number of your USB. To do so, run the select volume command. In our example, we’d run:

A message will appear saying you’ve selected the volume.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

With the USB’s volume selected, run this command to eject it:

You’ll receive a message stating you’ve successfully removed the drive letter or mount point, and dismounted and offline the volume. In other words, you can now safely remove the USB drive.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

There you have it. With so many different ways to safely eject your USB drive, there’s really no reason you should ever risk data corruption by removing it when you shouldn’t. But, if you want to save a few clicks and some time, there’s a way to never have to “safely remove’ your drive again.

Marshall is a writer with experience in the data storage industry. He worked at Synology, and most recently as CMO and technical staff writer at StorageReview. He’s currently an API/Software Technical Writer based in Tokyo, Japan, runs VGKAMI and ITEnterpriser, and spends what little free time he has learning Japanese. Read more.

As a matter of good practice, you should always safely remove your USB drive on your Windows PC. Otherwise, the data on your USB may become corrupt. Not sure how to safely remove your USB? Here are five ways.

Use the System Tray

The most common way to safely eject your USB drive is by way of the System Tray. In the System Tray, click the “Up Arrow” icon to expand the menu. Next, double-click the “USB” icon.

In the sub-menu that appears, select the “Eject ” option. The text that appears will depend on which type of USB you’re using.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

You can now safely remove your USB.

Use File Explorer

If you happen to be working in File Explorer, there’s an option for you to remove your USB. In the left-hand pane in File Explorer, find and right-click your USB device. In the context menu that appears, select “Eject.”

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Use the Settings App

There are a ton of different things you can do from the Settings app, including removing your USB drive. First, press “Windows+I” to open the Settings app. Once open, select “Bluetooth & Devices” in the left-hand pane.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

On the next screen, click the “Devices” option near the top of the window.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Next, in the “Other Devices” group, click the three vertical dots next to your USB drive and then select “Remove Device” from the one-option context menu.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

It’s now safe to remove your USB device.

Use Disk Management

You can also safely remove your USB from Disk Management. Open Disk Management by right-clicking the Windows icon to open the Power User menu. Then, select “Disk management from the menu.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Next, locate the drive you want to eject (in this case, your USB). Right-click it and then select “Eject” from the context menu.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

You’re now able to remove your USB.

Use Windows Terminal

If you have no GUI (such as in a Hyper-V server), or if you simply want to feel like a hacker, you can remove the USB from Windows Terminal. Open Windows Terminal and then run this command:

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

A new terminal will open and you’ll be in the C:\WINDOWS\system32\diskpart.exe file path. Before you go removing the drive, you’ll need to know its volume number. To do so, run this command:

A list of volumes will appear. First, find your USB drive under “Label,” and then note its volume number under the “Volume ###” column. In our case, that’s Volume 3.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

You’ll now need to select the volume number of your USB. To do so, run the select volume command. In our example, we’d run:

A message will appear saying you’ve selected the volume.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

With the USB’s volume selected, run this command to eject it:

You’ll receive a message stating you’ve successfully removed the drive letter or mount point, and dismounted and offline the volume. In other words, you can now safely remove the USB drive.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

There you have it. With so many different ways to safely eject your USB drive, there’s really no reason you should ever risk data corruption by removing it when you shouldn’t. But, if you want to save a few clicks and some time, there’s a way to never have to “safely remove’ your drive again.

Taylor Gibb is a professional software developer with nearly a decade of experience. He served as Microsoft Regional Director in South Africa for two years and has received multiple Microsoft MVP (Most Valued Professional) awards. He currently works in R&D at Derivco International. Read more.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

If you are one of those people who don’t safely remove their USB Devices just because you’re lazy, here’s a neat trick to do it from the context menu on your desktop. Even if you are not lazy and just forget, the icon will serve as a mental reminder. So let’s take a look.

The Safely Remove Hardware Dialog Method

This method will bring up the Safely Remove Hardware dialog box, from there you can choose which USB device you wish to eject. If you are looking to eject a specific USB drive take a look at the next section.

Press Win+R to bring up a run box and type regedit to open the registry.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

When the registry is open, navigate to

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Right click on the shell key and create a new key called Safely Remove Hardware.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Once the new key is created, create a new string value, and call it Icon.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Double click on the icon string, in the Value data field type the following:

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Now right click on the Safely Remove Hardware key that you just created and create another key, this time name the key command.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Once the new key has been created select it to open see the keys values.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

This key will have a value called Default, double click on it to edit it, in the Value data field type

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

That’s all there is to it if you want the Safely Remove Hardware dialog to appear.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Ejecting a Specific USB Drive

If you are looking to eject a drive with a specific name or drive letter then this method is better suited for you.

Head over to the developers website and grab a copy of the latest version of USB Disk Ejector.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Extract the file somewhere (for illustration we’ll extract to the root of the C:\ drive), then right click on the file, select properties, and click the unblock button in the bottom right hand corner of the dialog.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Press Win+R to bring up a run box and type regedit to open the registry.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

When the registry is open navigate to:

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Right click on the shell key and create a new key called Safely Remove USB.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Once the new key is created create a new string value, and call it Icon.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Double click on the icon string and in the Value data field type the following:

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Now right click on the Safely Remove USB key that you just created and create another key, this time name the key command.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Once the new key has been created select it to open see the keys values.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

This key will have a value called Default, double click on it to edit it. Here we have a few options, which ever method below suites you best should be typed into the Value data field.

Note: Remember to replace the name or drive letter in the following example to the name or drive letter of YOUR USB device.

We can either eject a USB with a certain name by typing.

C:\usb_disk_eject /removename “Memorex USB”

We could also eject a USB with a certain driver letter, in my case drive G.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

That’s all there is to it.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

If you rather prefer to be a keyboard ninja you could always assign a hotkey or create a shortcut to do the same thing.

As a best practice, you should always safely remove the USB drive from your Windows PC. Otherwise, the data on your USB may get corrupted. Not sure how to safely remove your USB? Here are five ways.

Tabla de contenido

How to safely remove a drive in Windows 10

Use the system tray

The most common way to safely eject your usb drive it is through the system tray. In the system tray, click the “Up Arrow” icon to expand the menu. Next, double click the “USB” icon.

In the submenu that appears, select the option “Eject “. The text that appears will depend on the type of USB you are using.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Now you can safely remove your USB.

Do you really need to safely remove USB flash drives?

Use File Explorer

If you’re working in File Explorer, there’s an option for you to remove your USB. In the left pane of File Explorer, find and right-click your USB device. In the context menu that appears, select “Eject”.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Use the settings app

There are a bunch of different things you can do from the Settings app, including removing your USB drive. First, press “Windows + I” to open the Settings app. Once open, select “Bluetooth & Devices” from the left panel.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

On the next screen, click the “Devices” option near the top of the window.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Next, in the “Other Devices” group, click the three vertical dots next to your USB drive, and then select “Remove Device” from an option’s context menu.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

It is now safe to remove your USB device.

13 ways to open the Windows 10 Settings app

Use disk management

You can also safely remove your USB from Disk Management. Open Disk Management by right-clicking on the Windows icon to open the Power User menu. Then select “Disk Management” from the menu.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Next, find the drive you want to eject (in this case, your USB). Right click and then select “Eject” from the context menu.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Now you can remove your USB.

Use windows terminal

If you don’t have a GUI (like on a Hyper-V server), or if you just want to feel like a hacker, you can remove the USB from the Windows Terminal. Open Windows Terminal and then run this command:

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

A new terminal will open and you will be in the C:WINDOWSsystem32diskpart.exe File route. Before you remove the drive, you’ll need to know its volume number. To do so, run this command:

A list of volumes will appear. First, find your USB drive under “Label” and then write down its volume number in the “Volume ###” column. In our case, that is Volume 3.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

You will now need to select the volume number of your USB. To do so, run the select volume domain. In our example we would execute:

A message will appear saying that you have selected the volume.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

With the USB volume selected, run this command to eject it:

You will receive a message indicating that you have successfully removed the drive letter or mount point, and have unmounted and disconnected the volume. In other words, now you can safely remove the USB drive.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

There you go. With so many different ways to safely eject your USB drive, there’s really no reason why you should risk damaging data by removing it when you shouldn’t. But, if you want to save a few clicks and some time, there is a way to not have to “safely remove” your drive again.

How to never “safely remove” a USB drive in Windows 10

By Sarah | Follow | Last Updated January 16, 2020

Summary :

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

In Windows, there is actually a Safe Eject option used to help you remove your external drive from computer safely. But some users don’t use it; instead, they plug out the drive from computer directly when they think all the files have been transferred or saved. Is this harmful?

Everyone knows there will be an icon showing up in the bottom right corner of computer screen after a USB device had been connected. This is actually a sign to identify that the connection is successful. Then, you’re advised to safely remove USB device when you don’t need to use it anymore.

Can’t Safely Remove USB Device

The right things to do to unplug a USB device:

  • Find the icon in taskbar.
  • Right click on the icon and locate the USB device.
  • Click to eject USB device.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Sometimes, you can remove the USB device successfully after doing so and see the Safe To Remove Hardware message. At this time, you can unplug the drive from computer without worrying.

Problem Ejecting USB Mass Storage Device

Yet, there are still some cases in which you’re not allowed to remove the USB device safely from the computer at present. You’ll see the Problem Ejecting USB Mass Storage Device error message, which indicates that the USB drive is still in use.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

At this time, you have two choices.

  1. Do as the system suggests: close any programs or windows that might be using the device and then try again.
  2. Unplug the USB device from computer forcibly.

Here comes the question: do you really need to safely eject USB device? Now, I will discuss it.

Do You Really Need Safe Eject

The Safe Eject option provided by Windows systems is designed especially for the removal process; it can help to safeguard against something going wrong with the USB drive. To be more specific, this function will flush all the active writes to disk and it will:

  • Alert open programs the accessibility of the USB drive and its contents.
  • Warn users when there’s something hasn’t been saved properly.

Obviously, there are a lot of benefits if you choose to safely eject the USB drives. It is actually a simple task that only requires a few clicks and takes a few seconds.

In contrast, if you choose to unplug the drive directly from computer when you have finished using it, you may find yourself in the following awkward situations when you connect it again to computer:

As a result, I recommend that you do remember to safely remove USB device, instead of unplugging it forcibly.

Safely Remove Hardware

By defauly, the Windows operating system will optimize the USB device for a Quick removal (Disables the write caching on the device and in Windows, but you can disconnect the device safely without using the Safely Remove Hardware notification icon). In this way, you are able to disconnect the device safely without using the Safely Remove Hardware notification icon.

But, you are allowed to access and change this removal policy from the device manager by doing the following things:

  1. Find This PC icon and right click on it.
  2. Choose Manage from the context menu.
  3. Find and select Device Manager from the left-hand panel.
  4. Find and expand the Disk drives from the right-hand panel.
  5. Right click on the target USB drive.
  6. Choose Properties from the pop-up menu.
  7. Shift to Policies
  8. Then, you can check Better performance (Enables write caching in Windows, but you must use the Safely Remove Hardware notification icon to disconnect the device safely).
  9. Click on the OK button to confirm.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

If you’re not satisfied with the Better performance option, you can change it back to Quick removal anytime you want.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Position: Columnist

Sarah has been working as an editor at MiniTool since she graduated from university. Sarah aims at helping users with their computer problems such as disk errors and data loss. She feels a sense of accomplishment to see that users get their issues fixed relying on her articles. Besides, she likes to make friends and listen to music after work.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

When finished using a USB flash drive or pen drive connected to your computer, don’t pull it out of the USB port. Instead, eject it using the eject option provided by your OS (operating system).

The steps on this page can also be used to safely eject other devices connected to a computer via USB, including a mobile phone, tablet, or external hard drive.

When you eject a flash drive, you’re telling the operating system that the drive is about to be disconnected. The operating system completes any read or write operations on the drive and unmounts it from the computer.

If you don’t eject a USB flash drive before disconnecting it, data on the drive could become corrupt, because the operating system was using the drive when disconnected. For this reason, it’s best to always eject your USB drive before physically disconnecting it from your USB port.

The Windows, macOS X, Linux, and Chrome OS operating systems each provide a safe method to eject a flash drive.

  • Eject a USB drive in Windows.
  • Eject a USB drive in macOS.
  • Eject a USB drive in Linux.
  • Eject a USB drive in Chrome OS.

Eject a USB drive in Windows

Using the notification area

  1. In the Notification Area of the taskbar, click the up arrow to view the items in the systray. Then, right-click the Eject Mediaicon.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

  1. A menu lists the removable media you can eject. Click the name of your USB flash drive. In this example, the option to eject the USB flash drive is named “Eject Cruzer Glide.”

After clicking the eject option, wait for a message stating it is safe to remove the hardware before pulling the flash drive out of your computer.

Using File Explorer

  1. Open File Explorer by pressing Windows key + E .
  2. On the left, click This PC.
  3. On the right, right-click your USB flash drive.
  4. Select Eject.

Eject a USB drive in macOS

With Command+E keyboard shortcut

  1. Locate the USB flash drive on your desktop. Click it once to select it.
  2. On your keyboard, press Command + E to eject the flash drive.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

In Finder

  1. Open the Finder utility. On the left, locate your USB flash drive under Devices.
  2. Click the eject icon (⏏) to the right of the flash drive.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Using Trash

  1. Locate the USB flash drive on your desktop.
  2. Drag-and-drop the USB flash drive into the trash bin icon. When you start dragging a removable disk, such as your USB flash drive, the Trash turns to an eject (⏏) icon. When you drop the disk on the eject icon, the disk is ejected. No data is deleted using the Trash icon this way.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

You can now safely remove the USB flash drive from your computer.

Eject a USB drive in Linux

In a Linux operating system, you can eject a USB flash drive in your file manager, or in the command line shell.

File manager example: Nautilus

In this example, we eject a USB flash drive using Nautilus, the default file manager in Ubuntu. Nautilus is a lot like the Windows File Explorer. (Your file manager may be different if you’re using another Linux OS.)

Open a new Nautilus window by clicking the shortcut on your dock. It looks like a file cabinet, labeled Files.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Or, click Activities (on the left side of your taskbar). In the search box, type Files or Nautilus. In the search results, click the Files icon.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Or, open a terminal ( Ctrl + Alt + T ), type nautilus, and press Enter .

In the Nautilus file manager window, you see your USB flash drive listed on the left. Click the eject icon () next to the disk name.

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

Your disk is removed from the list, and a notification informs you that it’s safe to remove the USB flash drive.

Ejecting from the Linux shell

In every Linux operating system, the administrator can eject a mounted USB flash drive with the eject command, specifying the device name of the USB flash drive.

For example, if your USB flash drive is mounted as the device name /dev/sdc, and you’re a sudoer (administrator rights), you can eject it with the following command.

Here, the sudo command means “run the following command as administrator.” When you press Enter , you are prompted for your password.

When the command runs, all pending I/O operations for the specified device are forced to complete immediately, as if you’d run the sync command. Then, the device is unmounted, as if you’d run umount.

If the eject is successful, the command displays no output. You can safely disconnect your USB flash drive.

Determining your flash drive’s device name

If you’re not sure of the device name for your USB flash drive, you can list it with parted.

The device name of your USB flash drive is /dev/sdx, where x is a lowercase letter az.

List your mounted devices by running parted -l as root, or with sudo:

How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

In this example, disk /dev/sdb is our USB flash drive, so the eject command would be:

Do you know what is the API, or sequence of API calls that windows uses to accomplish the “Eject” function which is available on the shell context menu for removable volumes?

So far I’ve tried two things:

using CM_Request_Device_Eject, I enumerate the removable disks (using the SetupDiXXX APIs), find the one that I’m interested in, walk the device manager hierarchy (using CM_XXX APIs) and finally call CM_Request_Device_Eject on the devInst of the device I’m interesed in. This works in the sense that it does remove the volumes from My Computer and makes the device “safe to remove” (ready to be removed) but it is not the same as the shell context menu “Eject” function. The way I know this is because the device that I’m trying to eject is supposed to do something when it is ejected and that something is not happening when I do the eject using CM_Request_Device_Eject .

using DeviceIoControl with the IOCTL_STORAGE_EJECT_MEDIA control code. The sequence of events is:

  • obtain a handle to the volume I’m interested in using CreateFile as suggested in the documentation
  • try to lock the volume with FSCTL_LOCK_VOLUME
  • try to dismount it using FSCTL_DISMOUNT_VOLUME
  • disable the prevent storage media removal using IOCTL_STORAGE_MEDIA_REMOVAL
  • and finally execute the IOCTL_STORAGE_EJECT_MEDIA function.

This doesn’t work at all. Each one of the DeviceIoControl calls fails with ERROR_IVALID_FUNCTION (0x00000001). I don’t know why the calls fail. I’ve verified that other calls to DeviceIoControl work fine for the same file handle (such as IOCTL_STORAGE_GET_DEVICE_NUMBER)

Finally, my development machine is running Windows 7 x64, and in order to get the second method to work I’ve tried running my application with Administrator privileges and that did not change anything.

EDIT

Eventually, I found out where I was making a mistake with approach #2. It turns out that for some reason I was not setting the desired access correctly when opening the handle to the volume using CreateFile . The correct access mode is GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE and I was passing 0. After correcting my error I was able to successfully eject the device using DeviceIoControl – IOCTL_STORAGE_EJECT_MEDIA , as well as with method #1, using CM_Request_Device_Eject .

And it turns out that method #2 is indeed the method used by the shell context menu’s “Eject” function. Using this method the device reacts correctly.

Eject buttons are usually right beside the drive door. Some PCs have eject keys on the keyboard, usually near volume controls. Look for key with an upward-pointing triangle with a horizontal line underneath.

Where is the eject icon on Windows 10?

If you can’t find the Safely Remove Hardware icon, press and hold (or right-click) the taskbar and select Taskbar settings . Under Notification Area, choose Select which icons appear on the taskbar. Scroll to Windows Explorer: Safely Remove Hardware and Eject Media and turn it on.

How do I eject a disc in Windows 10?

Right-click or press and hold on the drive that you want to remove and, in the menu that opens, choose Eject. If everything went well, you see a notification that it is Safe To Remove Hardware. Unplug the device that you no longer want to use on your Windows 10 PC, and you are done.

Where is the eject button on my Computer?

The Eject key is usually located near the volume controls and is marked by a triangle pointing up with a line underneath. In Windows, search for and open File Explorer. In the Computer window, select the icon for the disc drive that is stuck, right-click the icon, and then click Eject.

What is the shortcut key to eject CD?

Pressing CTRL+SHIFT+O will activate the “Open CDROM” shortcut and will open the door of your CD-ROM. Pressing CTRL+SHIFT+C will activate the “Close CDROM”shortcut and will close the door of your CD-ROM.

Why is my USB not showing up?

What do you do when your USB drive is not showing up? This can be caused by several different things such as a damaged or dead USB flash drive, outdated software and drivers, partition issues, wrong file system, and device conflicts.

How do I force eject a disc?

Eject the disc within the Operating System

  1. Press the Windows key + E to open Windows Explorer or File Explorer.
  2. Click on Computer or My PC on the left pane of the window.
  3. Right-click on the CD/DVD/Blu-ray drive icon and select Eject.

How do I eject a disk without the button?

To do so, right-click on the optical disc drive icon inside “My Computer” and select “Eject” from the context menu. The tray will come out, and you can put the disc inside and then close it again manually.

Can’t eject hard drive says in use?

Eject the USB in Device Manager

Navigate to Start -> Control Panel -> Hardware and Sound -> Device Manager. Click Disk Drives. All the storage devices that are connected to your PC will be displayed. Right-click the device that has the problem to eject, and then select Uninstall.

How do I eject a USB from my laptop?

How to Remove USB External Storage from Your Laptop

  1. Locate the Safely Remove Hardware icon on the system tray. The icon is different for Windows Vista and Windows XP. …
  2. Click the Safely Remove Hardware icon. …
  3. Click the device you want to remove. …
  4. Unplug or remove the device.

How do I eject a disc from my laptop?

Click Computer to enter Windows Explorer (or press Windows key + E on the keyboard to open Windows Explorer). From there, right-click the DVD drive icon. Select Eject.

How do I eject a USB from Windows?

Locate your external storage device’s icon on the desktop. Drag the icon to the Trash bin, which will change to an Eject icon. Alternatively, hold the “Ctrl” key and left-click your mouse on the external drive’s icon. Click Eject on the pop-up menu.

Why CD drive is not opening?

Try shutting down or configuring any software programs that create discs or monitor the disc drive. If the door still does not open, insert the end of a straightened paper clip into the manual eject hole on the front of the drive. Close all programs and shut down the computer.

Dear Lifehacker,
Some of my computers (like my Mac) are always warning me about disconnecting flash drives without ejecting, while Windows doesn’t seem to have a problem—in fact, my external USB drive doesn’t even have an eject option. Does this mean it’s safe? How do I know when I actually need to eject a drive?

Sincerely,
Concerned About Corruption

This is one of those questions that has a short answer and a long answer. The short answer is this: you should probably always eject a drive before removing it, even if the context menu doesn’t have an eject option. Mac and Linux will always provide you a way to eject a drive, but like you said, Sometimes Windows doesn’t have an obvious “Eject” button for certain drives. On Windows, click the “Safely Remove Hardware” icon in the system tray, choose your drive from the list, and then remove it once it notifies you of its safe removal.

Now, the long answer: In Windows, you can sometimes remove a flash drive without ejecting. Here’s a bit more information on how computers deal with USB drives.

Why Computers Want You to Eject Drives

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Obviously, yanking out a drive while it’s being written to could corrupt the data. However, even if the drive isn’t actively being written to, you could still corrupt the data. By default, most operating systems use what’s called write caching to get better performance out of your computer. When you write a file to another drive—like a flash drive—the OS waits to actually perform those actions until it has a number of requests to fulfill, and then it fulfills them all at once (this is more common when writing small files). When you hit that eject button, it tells your OS to flush the cache—that is, make sure all pending actions have been performed—so you can safely unplug the drive without any data corruption.

Why Windows Doesn’t Bug You to Do It

Mac and Linux use write caching on pretty much all drives, and will let you eject any drive through your file manager. Windows, however, is a bit more mysterious on this front. It actually disables this write cache feature for drives it sees as “removable”, because it knows people are likely to yank them out without ejecting (though you can still eject them by right-clicking on them and pressing “Eject”). As such, disabling this feature on removable drives decreases the chance of data corruption. It keeps the cache enabled on non-removable drives, though—and sometimes it recognizes external USB drives as not removable, which is why your USB drive doesn’t have an eject button. Paradoxically, it’s also why you need to eject that drive: since Windows doesn’t see it as removable, it’s enabled the write cache for it, increasing the chance of data corruption.

You can edit the write cache settings for any drive from the Device Manager. Just expand the Disk Drives section, right click on the drive you want to edit, and hit Properties. Go to the Policies tab, and click the “Quick Removal” radio button to disable the cache (or click “Better Performance” to enable the write cache).

Why You Should Probably Manually Eject All Your USB Drives Anyway

So, unlike OS X and Linux, Windows has a few precautions in place for preventing data loss. However, the write cache isn’t the only thing that can cause data loss. Have you ever tried to eject a drive and gotten a “file is in use” error? Sometimes there’s something going on in the background you don’t know about, or sometimes a program is just being silly and has still locked a file on the drive even if it isn’t using it. If you were to yank it out during one of these situations, you could still cause data loss. Ejecting it will warn you of the situation, and let you close the program in question (or use something like previously mentioned Unlocker to unlock the in-use file).

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Infopackets Reader Beth R. writes:

I am using Windows 7 and the USB ‘Safely remove hardware’ icon in my tray bar seems to have disappeared. I understand that USB drives need to be ‘safely removed’ or they can corrupt, which I would like to avoid. What can I do to fix the USB ‘Safely remove hardware’ so it comes back? “

There are a few things you can try in order to fix the USB “Safely remove hardware” icon – I’ll explain a few approaches below.

The fix below will work on Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8 and 10.

How to Fix: USB ‘Safely remove hardware’ icon missing

  1. The first thing you will want to do is make sure that the USB “Safely remove hardware” hasn’t been hidden from your task bar. To do so: right click the task bar at the bottom of the screen and select “Properties”. In Windows 10 Creators Update, the option will be labeled as “Taskbar Settings” instead of “Properties”.

A new window will appear; under the heading “Notification area”, click the “Customize” button (in Windows XP, Vista, 7 and 8) or the option that says “Select which icons appear in the taskbar” in Windows 10. Next, scroll through the list until you see: “Windows Explorer / Safely Eject Hardware and Remove Media” and select “Show icon and notifications” for Windows XP, Vista, 7, and 8; for Windows 10, select the slider to “on”. At this point you can insert a USB thumb drive and see if the USB “Safely remove hardware” icon appears in the tray bar. If it does not, proceed to the next step.
If the icon isn’t appearing the task bar, another way around this issue is to create a link on the desktop which will initiate the USB “Safely remove hardware” window. I was able to find a PowerShell script that does exactly this – all you need to do is cut and paste it into PowerShell to make a shortcut on your desktop. Note that this method will not work for Windows XP users. To get started, click Start, then type in “powershell” (no quotes); wait for “PowerShell” to appear in the list, then right click it and select “Run as Administrator”. Highlight the text below using your mouse:

$AppLocation = “C:\Windows\System32\rundll32.exe”
$WshShell = New-Object -ComObject WScript.Shell
$Shortcut = $WshShell.CreateShortcut(“$Home\Desktop\USB Hardware.lnk”)
$Shortcut.TargetPath = $AppLocation
$Shortcut.Arguments =”shell32.dll,Control_RunDLL hotplug.dll”
$Shortcut.IconLocation = “hotplug.dll,0”
$Shortcut.Description =”Device Removal”
$Shortcut.WorkingDirectory =”C:\Windows\System32″
$Shortcut.Save()
echo “this is a dummy line”

Right click the above text and select “Copy” from the dialogue menu. Next, go to the PowerShell command prompt and right click in the middle of the window. The text you copied above should be output to the command line. Minimize all windows and then look on your desktop. You should see a new icon with the title “USB Hardware”. Double click it and it will bring up the USB “Safely remove hardware” window. If for some reason you don’t see the USB “Safely remove hardware” window, proceed to Step #3 below.

  • Sometimes Windows can go corrupt which can cause certain parts of Windows – including the USB “Safely remove hardware” feature – from appearing. In this case you can always try a third party utility to help you safely remove USB hardware from your computer, such as “Hotswap”. There are other utilities available that do the same thing, but this one seemed to me to provide very similar functionality to the original USB “Safely remove hardware” window.
  • I hope that helps! If you still can’t get it working, you are welcome to contact me for additional support described next.

    Additional 1-on-1 Support: From Dennis

    The three methods I described above should definitely reinstate the USB “Safely remove hardware” – however, if for some reason that still doesn’t fix the problem, you are welcome to contact me for additional 1-on-1 support using my remote desktop service. Simply send me an email briefly describing the issue and I will get back to you as soon as possible.

    Got a Computer Question or Problem? Ask Dennis!

    I need more computer questions. If you have a computer question – or even a computer problem that needs fixing – please email me with your question so that I can write more articles like this one. I can’t promise I’ll respond to all the messages I receive (depending on the volume), but I’ll do my best.

    Menu path: Setup > Accessories > Safely Remove Hardware

    With this function, you can remove a hotplug storage device connected to your thin client safely without the risk of losing data. For details of how to use the function, see Using “Safely Remove Hardware” function.

    The settings for starting the function are described below.

    In the system tray, click on .

    If the system tray is not shown, e.g. in a full-screen session, you can use the session control bar. Further information can be found under Session Control Bar.

    • Session name: Name for the session
  • Start menu: If this option is enabled, the session can be launched from the start menu.
  • Application Launcher: If this option is enabled, the session can be launched with the Application Launcher.
  • Desktop: If this option is enabled, the session can be launched with a program launcher on the desktop.
  • Quick start panel: If this option is enabled, the session can be launched with the quick start panel.
  • Start menu’s system tab: If this option is enabled, the session can be launched with the start menu’s system tab.
  • Application Launcher’s system tab: If this option is enabled, the session can be launched with the Application Launcher’s system tab.
  • Desktop context menu: If this option is enabled, the session can be launched with the desktop context menu.
  • Menu folder: If you specify a folder name or a path comprising a number of folder names separated by “/”, a menu path will be created for the session. The menu path will be used in the start menu and in the desktop context menu.
  • Path in the Application Launcher: If you specify a folder name or a path comprising a number of folder names separated by “/”, a menu path will be created for the session. The menu path will be used in the Application Launcher.
  • Desktop folder: If you specify a folder name or a path comprising a number of folder names separated by “/”, a menu path will be created for the session. The menu path will be used for the program launcher on the desktop.
  • Hotkey:

    The session can be started with a hotkey. A hotkey consists of one or more modifiers and a key.

    I’m trying to fix a non-responsive USB device that’s masquerading as a virtual COM port. Manual replugging works, but there may be up to 12 of these units. Is there an API command to do the programmatic equivalent of the unplug/replug cycle?

    How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

    13 Answers 13

    What about using Devcon.exe to “remove” and then “rescan”?

    Unfortunately, there isn’t one that I know of. Physically unplugging the USB connection does specific electronic things with pullup resistors, such that the device knows it’s unplugged. I haven’t encountered a host that attempts to be able to simulate this condition without physical unplugging.

    Thought: under Device Manager, you can right-click your computer icon (top of the device tree) and “scan for changes”. I’m not 100% sure, but I think if you “eject” a USB device (software “unplug” equivalent), then Scan for Hardware Changes, it will show back up even though it never actually left the port.

    If I’m right about that, you might be able to use the Microsoft.Win32.Shell class to emulate opening Control Panel –> Administrative Tools –> Device Manager and running the context-menu item. It’s worth a shot, anyway.

    As Greg Hewgill said, I don’t think that it’s possible.

    Initiation of the whole usb startup is triggered by the usb slave (in your case your device). The usb host (the pc) can send a message to the device to tell it to shut down, but once it’s done that it’s up to the device to start back up again. The host can’t force it to.

    To make matters worse you’ll quite possibly find that the usb device is detecting the plug being inserted (by detecting the usb voltage on the power lines) to start up. This is particularly true of bus powered devices.

    It sounds like there are differences from your situation and the case of trying to unmount/remount usb drives. When the usb drive is unmounted there is no reason that it can’t stay enumerated on the pc. You’re not actually reseting the usb drive, just making it’s filesystem inactive.

    Is there a way (with out installing 3rd party software) to use powershell to eject a USB device?

    The Edge is Real: Harness its Force

    Actually just for this code on ServerFault:

    18 Replies

    I’m not sure if you can with powershell commands, but i know you can with diskpart (command line tool built into windows for managing disks)

    Type the following commands in a command prompt (or Powershell prompt)

    1. diskpart
    2. list volume
    3. select volume (Where number is the number in the list you see when you list the volumes)
    4. remove all dismount
    5. exit

    Actually just for this code on ServerFault:

    If the drive letter is going to be a constant, then this should help you out:

    If not, then there will have to be some extra logic to determine which drive letter to eject.

    There is some debate still on if you need to even eject the device first with Win7.

    Thank you that’s what I was looking for.

    This method has a side effect. If you put the usb drive back to the computer it doesn’t assign any letter to the dirve anyway. You have to do it manually over Storage management.

    there’s a way to but not this way.

    Edwin_Ekelaers: This was exactly what I was looking for actually. Thanks for sharing.

    Note that under certain circumstances you might have to alter the way i select the removable media. But that’s but a mere fiddle with this bit

    Took me a while to discover it.

    • local_offer Tagged Items
    • Stephen292
    • vitalylitovchenko

    Thanks for the tip.

    I’ve already added it to my pre-staging script. So far so good, but I’ll make sure to keep an eye out when I start moving to different models.

    You can alter the selection to work even on volume name if you have to change from drive type 2 to another one.

    Eg if you are sure your volume name from the external media is allways the same like Banana then you can select on that and eject everything with that volume name. Good luck & have fun with it.

    Thanks again for the advice.

    Still getting used to WMI calls through PS. Until recently, I’ve only done volume management through DISKPART, which can be hit and miss when trying to automate through scripting.

    $Eject = New-Object -comObject Shell.Application $Eject.NameSpace(17).ParseName($usbDrvLetter+“:”).InvokeVerb(“Eject”)

    Beware, eject is not the same as dismount.

    If you dismount a USB drive, windows remembers that its dismounted and when you put the USB drive back into the computer, you will need to manually mount the USB drive. (If you have this problem, correct it by Windows-Key -X Then Select Disk Manager select USB drive and mount it)

    In contrast if you eject the USB drive, while its mounted, then windows will remount the USB drive next time you insert it automatically.

    As far as I know, WMI doesn’t let you eject a USB drive, only dismount it, which means you need to manually remount it if you go through WMI api. Would really like to hear if somebody knows how to EJECT the usb drive, instead of dismounting it.

    How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

    Have you noticed that when you plug in a USB drive, Windows puts a little icon in the system tray informing you that you can “safely remove” the USB drive? If you click on the option to do so, Windows will then tell you that it’s safe to remove the drive. However, what does it mean to “safely remove” a USB drive? And do we need to do it with all USB devices?

    What “Safely Remove” Does

    So why do we bother safely removing USB drives, and what happens if we don’t?

    To understand this, we have to look at how computers use files. Let’s say you have a text document on a USB stick, and you open it up on your computer via the stick. Your computer will take the document and load it into the RAM, where you can make changes to it. If you’ve ever suffered from a power cut or computer crash, you’ll know that any changes you make to the document while it’s in the RAM is lost when the computer loses power. That’s why we use the “Save” command to save our work — it’s when the PC takes what’s on the RAM and writes it to the permanent storage of our choice. In this case, it will be the USB stick.

    How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

    The thing is, saving to a physical media isn’t an instantaneous process. The computer has to write the data from the RAM to the USB stick. What do you think would happen if midway through the writing process the USB drive was removed from the computer? Due to not completing its writing process, there’s a chance the file on the USB drive would become corrupt and suffer from data loss, if not become entirely unusable! This is what the “safely remove” feature aims to avoid, by allowing the computer to finish up its write jobs before you remove the USB drive.

    In a way this is similar to if you’re hand-writing a document for someone. You begin to write the document, but mid-way through the process the person you’re writing it for says he wants the document gone and suddenly snatches it out from under your pen. Not only is the document still incomplete, but chances are it will ruin the document in the process! In a way, this is akin to what happens to documents when the USB drive is removed during a write process.

    Does Every USB Device Need to Be Safely Removed?

    So now we know the “safely remove” feature is designed to prevent data corruption by removing a USB drive during a write process. Therefore, this means that any device that doesn’t have data written directly onto it doesn’t need to be safely removed like USB drives do. If you want to disconnect peripherals such as mice, keyboards, game controllers, and WiFi adapters, you can simply unplug them whenever you like without fear of data loss. After all, there’s no data in question to be lost!

    Playing It Safe

    It can be confusing as to what “safely removing” a USB device is, but it’s actually quite simple! Now you know what it does, why it’s needed, and why it only applies to USB drives and no other USB device.

    Have you ever suffered data corruption due to removing a USB drive too quickly? Let us know below.

    Our latest tutorials delivered straight to your inbox

    Microsoft has modified the way Windows 10 handles the operation of disconnecting a USB or Thunderbolt storage device. This includes USB thumb drives, external hard drives, flash drives, and even USB data transfer connections established between PCs and smartphones.

    The change took effect with the wide deployment of Windows 10 version 1809, the October 2018 Update.

    Why does it matter?

    Until now, the default policy in all previous Windows versions when disconnecting a USB storage device was the “Better performance” setting.

    Starting with Windows 10 v1809, this became “Quick removal.” The difference between the two is significant.

    “Better performance” means that Windows manages data transfers and storage operations in a manner that improves performance. This includes caching data while it’s being transferred, opened, or in preparation for certain operations.

    This constant readiness on Windows’ part meant that any user who wanted to disconnect a USB or Thunderbolt-connected storage device had to go through the “Safely Remove Hardware” process, which meant triggering a manual Eject.

    All Windows users know the procedure.

    But with Windows 10 v1809, the default state for all USB and Thunderbolt storage devices has become “Quick removal,” which is a state where external storage devices can be disconnected without following the “Safely Remove Hardware” process.

    But there are inconveniences to switching to “Quick removal” as the default setting. The first is that Windows won’t cache disk writes anymore, meaning that data moved to an external storage device might take longer to transfer.

    Keep external storage devices as “Better performance”

    Microsoft will allow users to overwrite the default “Quick removal” state on a per-device basis.

    This is for users who are copying backups to external hard drives or those copying crucial PowerPoint slides or other business documents to a USB memory stick and may want to make sure data transfers both safely, faster, and without any potential problems .

    The procedure is as follows, but users need to be aware that once a USB/Thunderbolt storage device is set back to “Better performance,” they will also need to follow the “Safely Remove Hardware” process.

    1. Connect the device to the computer.
    2. Right-click Start, and then select File Explorer.
    3. In File Explorer, identify the letter or label that is associated with the device (for example, USB Drive (D:) in the image below).
    4. Right-click Start, and then select Disk Management.
    5. In the lower section of the Disk Management window, right-click the label of the device, and then click Properties.

    6. Select Policies, and then select the policy you want to use.

    – Last updated on September 22, 2007 by VG

    In this tutorial, we’ll tell you how to add new entries/options in context menus (right-click menu) or remove existing entries from context menus in Windows OS. The method will work for all Windows versions.

    METHOD 1: Adding New Entry in Context Menu

    STEP 1:

    Type regedit in RUN dialog box or Start searchbox and press Enter. It’ll open Registry Editor, now go to following keys:

    HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\* (for adding an option in All files context menu)
    HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory (for adding an option in folders context menu only)
    HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Drive (for adding an option in Drives context menu only)
    HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Unknown (for adding an option in unknown files context menu)

    STEP 2:

    Now under the above mentioned keys, you’ll find “Shell” and “Shellex” keys. Both keys contain various entries, which are displayed when you right-click on a file, folder or drive. We’ll use “Shell” key in this tutorial:

    • Right-click on the “Shell” key and select “New -> Key“.
    • Give it any name. Suppose we gave it name “vishal”.
    • Now in right-side pane, double-click on “Default” String value and set its value to the Label which you want to display in context menu. Like if you want to add “Winamp” in context menu, then you can give it name “Open with Winamp” or similar.
    • Now create another key under this newly created key “vishal” with the name “command” and in right-side pane set value of “Default” to the path of application. For ex, for winamp you can set its value “%programfiles%\Winamp\winamp.exe”.

    How to safely eject your usb devices from the desktop context menu

    That’s it. Now you’ll get the new option in context menu.

    A Few Important Points to Remember:

    1. If you add just the path in “Command“, then it’ll open the application but if you append “%1” (without quotes) in the path, then it’ll open the selected file with the application. So in case of setting the value to “%programfiles%\Winamp\winamp.exe”, set it “%programfiles%\Winamp\winamp.exe %1” and now it’ll open the file in winamp.

    2. Step 3 can be omitted and you can assign the application name directly to the new key. i.e., either set “Default” String value to the name of application or directly set the key name to application name. e.g. instead of setting the key name to “vishal”, you can directly set its name to “Winamp”, in this case leave the “Default” as it is.

    3. With the help of this tutorial, you can add application shortcuts in any filetype context menu. e.g., if you like to play with “*.txt” file context menu, then go to:

    HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\txtfile

    so you can follow this tutorial for any filetype.

    You can check out following exclusive article which contains links of several useful tutorials which will help you in adding options in files, folders, drives and Desktop context menus:

    METHOD 2: Removing Entry from Context Menu

    The same above mentioned method will apply for removing entries from context menu. You just need to go to the keys mentioned in STEP 1 and then under “Shell” or “ShellexContextMenuHandlers” keys, you’ll find sub-keys related to the option which you want to remove from context menu. Delete that sub-key and it’ll immediately remove the associated option from the context menu.

    You are here: Home » Windows 7 » How to Add or Remove Options from Context Menus in Windows

    About the author: Vishal Gupta (also known as VG) has been awarded with Microsoft MVP (Most Valuable Professional) award. He holds Masters degree in Computer Applications (MCA). He has written several tech articles for popular newspapers and magazines and has also appeared in tech shows on various TV channels.

    Comments

    NOTE: Older comments have been removed to reduce database overhead.

    Hi, can you tell me how can i customize the desktop context menu to show “New Folder” option right away at the top, instead of going through the “New” option?

    ^^ You can edit shell32.dll file to modify appearance of context menu:

    How can i open the shell32.dll? Can you indicate a program?

    A USB port is a standard cable connection interface for personal computers and consumer electronics devices. USB stands for Universal Serial Bus, an industry standard for short-distance digital data communications. USB ports allow USB devices to be connected to each other with and transfer digital data over USB cables. They can also supply electric power across the cable to devices that need it.

    Both wired and wireless versions of the USB standard exist, although only the wired version involves USB ports and cables.

    What Can You Plug Into a USB Port?

    Many types of consumer electronics support USB interfaces. These types of equipment are most commonly used for computer networking:

    For computer-to-computer file transfers without a network, USB drives are also sometimes used to copy files between devices.

    Using a USB Port

    Connect two devices directly with one USB cable by plugging each end into a USB port. (Some devices feature more than one USB port, but do not plug both ends of a cable into the same device, as this can cause electrical damage!)

    ​You may plug cables into a USB port at any time regardless of whether the devices involved are powered on or off. Follow the instructions provided with your equipment before unplugging USB cables. In some cases, unplugging a USB cable from a running device can cause damage to the device or the files being used on the computer. For this reason, it is good practice to always safely eject your USB device before physically unplugging it.

    Multiple USB devices can also be connected to each other using a USB hub. A USB hub plugs into one USB port and contains additional ports for other devices to connect subsequently. If using a USB hub, plug a separate cable into each device and connect them to the hub individually.

    Everything You Need to Know About USB Ports and Cables

    USB-A, USB-B, and USB-C Port Types

    Several major types of physical layouts exist for USB ports:

    • USB-A (Type A): The rectangular USB Type-A connector approximately 1.4 cm (9/16 in) length by 0.65 cm (1/4 in) height is typically used for wired mice and keyboards. USB sticks normally feature USB-A connectors also.
    • USB-B (Type B): Less common than type A, USB B devices are nearly square in shape and are commonly found on routers, computers, printers, and game consoles
    • Micro USB: So-called Micro USB versions of both USB-A and USB-B also exist – smaller versions than their base counterparts, popular on mobile devices. Older but now obsolete “mini USB” versions can also be found on many old devices.
    • USB Type C: With dimensions of 0.84 cm by 0.26cm, this newer standard is designed to replace both A and B with smaller ports to better support the thinner form factors of mobile devices.

    To connect a device having one kind of port per device with another type, simply use the correct type of cable with appropriate interfaces on each end. USB cables are manufactured to support all supported combinations of types and male/female options.

    Versions of USB

    USB devices and cables support multiple versions of the USB standard from version 1.1 up to the current version 3.1. USB ports feature identical physical layouts no matter the version of USB supported.

    USB Port Not Working?

    Not everything goes smoothly when you work with computers. There are a variety of reasons a USB port could suddenly stop working correctly. Check out our USB troubleshooting page for when you encounter problems.

    Alternatives to USB Ports

    USB ports are an alternative to the serial and parallel ports available on older PCs. USB ports support much faster (often 100x or greater) data transfers than serial or parallel.

    For computer networking, Ethernet ports are sometimes used instead of USB. For some types of computer peripherals, FireWire ports are also sometimes available. Both Ethernet and FireWire can offer faster performance than USB, although these interfaces do not supply any power across the wire.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    • Why is my USB port not working? In some cases, a broken connection or a software problem could be to blame. Dirty or clogged USB ports can sometimes interfere with performance as well. While a simple restart of your computer could do the trick, try these tips for cleaning and fixing USB port issues.
    • How can I play music over USB in my car without a USB port? If you have a cigarette lighter in your vehicle, repurpose your 12V socket as a USB port. You might also be interested in adding a USB connection to a car stereo.

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