Categories
Device

How to safely share passwords with family members

All of your family’s passwords — organized, secure, and at your fingertips — for only $4/month.

Password sharing made easy

Store and share passwords for medical accounts, entertainment, and credit cards. Organize them into folders by family member or type of account so everyone has the access they need.

How to safely share passwords with family members

Protect your family’s passwords

  • LastPass monitors your family’s email addresses continuously for involvement in data breaches.
  • Put your mind at ease knowing LastPass is protecting you – even when you aren’t logged in.
  • Get alerts when your family’s sensitive information is compromised so you can update passwords immediately.

Buy Now

Big family savings

  • Secure your entire family — your spouse, parents, kids and more — for only $4/month.
  • Add up to 5 other users to your LastPass Families account so everyone can easily store and share passwords.

Buy Now

Digital contingency plan

  • Make your accounts safely available to another LastPass user of your choice using the Emergency Access feature.
  • Prepare for the future and ensure you’re never locked out in unexpected situations.

Built on a solid foundation

Access on All Devices

Once you save a password in LastPass, it will instantly be accessible on all your devices. No more remembering long, complicated passwords while at home or on the go.

Dark web monitoring

Get alerts if your family’s personal information has been leaked or stolen.

Quick setup

Easily invite family members via email. They can set up their LastPass account and start sharing immediately.

People love LastPass

“I love that LastPass makes it easy to share and update passwords with various family members. The whole family is able to use it without trouble.”

“My husband and I both have LastPass accounts and we absolutely love the ability to share a folder for things like shopping and banking accounts we have in common. Thank you!”

“I use it privately at work and at home and got my parents to switch from handwritten notes to LastPass.”

The school year is over and everyone is relaxing into a less stressful routine but don’t let that be an excuse to skimp on your family’s online security. Now that everyone has a bit more time on their hands, take this opportunity to introduce good habits like strong passwords and a secure place to store them, such as a password manager like LastPass. These will come in handy when the school year starts back up again and the new logins start rolling in.

Think about the last time you were asked, “What’s the password for…?” It probably wasn’t long ago and you were likely frustrated by the question. Did you know that there’s a way to share passwords easily with family members so you never hear that question again? Enter LastPass Families, the best way to manage your family’s digital life.

With LastPass Families, everyone gets their own vault to store all of their personal sites and items privately. Plus, you can quickly and safely share passwords and information, like cable logins, social security numbers, Wi-Fi, and more. Now is the time to get your family up and running with a password manager, before the craziness of the school year starts up again. Here’s how to get start with LastPass Families:

#1 Start by creating your account

If you don’t already have one, create a LastPass Families account. You can get started with a free 30-day trial. With Families, you’ll receive 5 additional licenses for family members so you can invite you spouse, kids, in-laws – anyone that you need to share passwords and personal information with on a regular basis, or for those just-in-case scenarios.

#2 Add sites and personal information

You won’t see how much time LastPass saves you unless you add your logins to your vault. If you’re already using a browser to save passwords, you can export them and save them to LastPass. Or you can let LastPass follow you as you browse the web to log into sites, and it will prompt you to save those sites. However, don’t forget about non-login information, such as your Wi-Fi password, everyone’s social security numbers, health insurance numbers, and more.

#3 Share what needs to be shared

Now that you’ve got a bunch of items in LastPass, you probably want to share some of them – like the WiFi password or cable login. You can share items individually, or create a folder of items you’d like to share. You might do that to share certain items only with your spouse or in-laws, and create another for items that everyone has access to. And your personal items in your vault will always remain accessible only to you.

These three steps will get your family on the path to fewer password frustrations and a more secure digital presence. Get started today with a free 30-day trial of LastPass Families.

All of your family’s passwords — organized, secure, and at your fingertips — for only $4/month.

Password sharing made easy

Store and share passwords for medical accounts, entertainment, and credit cards. Organize them into folders by family member or type of account so everyone has the access they need.

How to safely share passwords with family members

Protect your family’s passwords

  • LastPass monitors your family’s email addresses continuously for involvement in data breaches.
  • Put your mind at ease knowing LastPass is protecting you – even when you aren’t logged in.
  • Get alerts when your family’s sensitive information is compromised so you can update passwords immediately.

Buy Now

Big family savings

  • Secure your entire family — your spouse, parents, kids and more — for only $4/month.
  • Add up to 5 other users to your LastPass Families account so everyone can easily store and share passwords.

Buy Now

Digital contingency plan

  • Make your accounts safely available to another LastPass user of your choice using the Emergency Access feature.
  • Prepare for the future and ensure you’re never locked out in unexpected situations.

Built on a solid foundation

Access on All Devices

Once you save a password in LastPass, it will instantly be accessible on all your devices. No more remembering long, complicated passwords while at home or on the go.

Dark web monitoring

Get alerts if your family’s personal information has been leaked or stolen.

Quick setup

Easily invite family members via email. They can set up their LastPass account and start sharing immediately.

People love LastPass

“I love that LastPass makes it easy to share and update passwords with various family members. The whole family is able to use it without trouble.”

“My husband and I both have LastPass accounts and we absolutely love the ability to share a folder for things like shopping and banking accounts we have in common. Thank you!”

“I use it privately at work and at home and got my parents to switch from handwritten notes to LastPass.”

Occasionally, you need to share a password with someone. Maybe it’s a shared office-wide password, your family’s Amazon login, or maybe you just want to share a Netflix account with your roommate. Rather than sharing it over email, you can more seamlessly and securely share passwords in just a few clicks with LastPass—and even prevent the person on the receiving end from ever seeing the password itself.

Obviously, both you and your friend need to be using LastPass to share passwords via LastPass, but as we’ve talked about many times before , it’s just about the easiest, most secure way to deal with passwords on the internet (so if you aren’t using it, you probably should be). Assuming you both have accounts, it only takes a few seconds to share a password with someone. Here’s how it works:

The Easy, Any-Browser, Any-OS Password Solution

Whenever we talk passwords, we always preach the same thing: Use strong, difficult-to-remember…

  1. Open up your LastPass vault by clicking the LastPass button in your browser and choosing “My LastPass Vault”. If you aren’t on a computer with LastPass installed (but you have a LastPass account), you can access your online vault instead .
  2. Find the site who’s password you want to share, and click the “Share” link on the right-hand side of the row.
  3. Type your friend’s email address in the box at the top of the Share window. You should use the email address that they use to log into LastPass. You can choose to “share” the password with them, which lets them log in but hides the actual password, or “give” them the password, which allows them to read the password and then use it outside of LastPass, if they prefer.
  4. Once you share the password with them, they’ll receive an email letting them know. They can then log into their LastPass vault to see it in a new folder called “Pending Shares”. If they accept, they’ll then be able to log into that site using LastPass as normal.

If the original user deletes the shared password, it’ll also be removed from the sharee’s vault. In addition, if the original user makes any changes to the password, he or she will have to manually re-share the password unless they are a LastPass Premium user, in which case they can check a box on the Share page to automatically push all changes to the sharees.

Note: While this is a great way to securely share passwords, it’s important to note that the “share” feature—the one that lets you give someone access without seeing the password—isn’t 100% secure. LastPass explains:

Savvy end users could potentially access the password if they capture it using advanced techniques during the login process, but LastPass will never be able to access this data because it has been encrypted using their public key. It is also possible to obtain shared passwords using another password manager. LastPass recommends that you ensure that you’ve used a generated password specific to this site you’re sharing, and not sharing any passwords that you’re uncomfortable with the recipient obtaining.

So, while it’s a good way to keep the password mostly hidden, it’s still not advisable to share a password with someone you don’t trust, or for a site that contains particularly sensitive information (like your email). Still, for a lot of situations, this is just about the easiest way to share your password with someone without sending it over email or text message. Hit the link below to read more.

You’ve probably heard that you should never share passwords. And as a general rule, that’s good advice to follow. Passwords are the keys that unlock access to everything we do online, so you want to be smart about keeping them safe and private.

But the reality is that we often need to share passwords with spouses, family, friends, coworkers, business partners, caretakers, and others. So when faced with the need to share passwords, here’s some tips on how to share them securely with the help of LastPass.

Why would you share passwords?

It goes without saying that you only want to share passwords with people you trust, and to minimize any risk when you do. There are several reasons why you might need to share passwords, including:

  • Shared video streaming and other entertainment accounts, like a shared family Netflix, iTunes or Hulu account
  • Paying bills or the mortgage
  • Managing joint bank accounts or credit cards
  • Ordering through shared shopping accounts like Amazon Prime or Peapod
  • Online health portals for managing family doctor’s appointments and records
  • Digital storage in Google Drive or Dropbox for family photos or documents
  • A WiFi password shared among a family or roommates

And there are countless other scenarios where you might need to share passwords with others. The way we live and work nowadays means it’s likely inevitable we will all need to share a password with someone at some point.

So how can you ensure that when you do need to share a password, you can do so securely without jeopardizing your privacy or personal assets?

Sharing passwords, the secure way

There are a few important strategies to keep in mind when sharing passwords.

Make sure any password you share is a unique, strong password.

It’s pretty common for people to use a single password, or variations of a single password, for all of their online accounts. While this certainly helps with remembering your passwords, it’s very risky from a security perspective. It makes it so much easier for hackers and opportunists to break into your online accounts.

When you need to share a password, it’s smart to use a generated password that you don’t use for any other account. Why? If for some reason that person turns out be not-so-trustworthy, you won’t have given them access to all your other online accounts and need to worry about updating your password everywhere. Or what if that person has an infected computer? If some circumstance leads to the compromise of that one password, it won’t lead to the compromise of all your passwords. Using a separate, unique password for the account will minimize any damage.

Share passwords through a password manager, where they’re encrypted.

A password manager is simply a digital service that helps you lock up and encrypt your passwords, and you only remember one master password. The password manager remembers all the rest, which makes it easy to have a different strong password for each account. A password manager like LastPass also has a secure password sharing feature built in so that you can easily send passwords in an encrypted format to someone else. You don’t have to rely on insecure methods of sharing passwords, like through email, texting, or writing them down.

Sharing a password with LastPass

Sharing a password in LastPass is easy. Due to the way the secure encryption works, both you and the person you’re sharing with need to be LastPass users. We’ll help your recipient get started if they don’t yet have an account.How to safely share passwords with family membersTo share a password, just go to your LastPass Vault and search for the item you want to share. When you hover over the website entry in your Vault, click the “Share” icon. Now enter the email address of your recipient, and just click share!How to safely share passwords with family membersNow you both have the same password syncing to your vault, and you both can access that account at any time. Any changes made to that shared item are synced automatically to the other person, too.How to safely share passwords with family membersIn the Sharing Center, you can review any sites that you’ve shared with others, or that others have shared with you. You can revoke the share at any time if you no longer want the other person to have access to a given password. You can also share passwords from the Sharing Center at any time.

Sharing multiple passwords with LastPass

What if you have several passwords you need to share with the same person, or a group of people? That’s where the LastPass Shared Folder is handy. A feature of LastPass Premium, the Shared Folder allows you to easily sync many passwords with one or more people. In your Vault, you can right-click on a folder name to share an entire folder of logins with one or more people.How to safely share passwords with family membersOr, you can open the Sharing Center, and in the “Manage Shared Folders” view you can click the Add button to create and share a new Folder.How to safely share passwords with family membersIn the vault, you can drag and drop sites or notes into a Shared Folder at any time. Any changes you make to the folder or to the items in the folder are synced automatically to everyone who was given access to the folder. Access can be revoked any time from the Sharing Center.

If you work on a team where you need lots of Shared Folders, we suggest looking into LastPass Enterprise, our password management solution for teams that has even more extensive sharing features.

Taking the pain out of password sharing

Thanks to built-in password sharing features in LastPass, password sharing doesn’t have to be a pain. The next time your spouse or roommate asks if you can remind them of the password to an account, you can just send it to them safely through LastPass. You’ll have more peace of mind knowing that your passwords are strong and encrypted, while the other person benefits from always having that shared password on hand when they need it, too.

New to LastPass? It’s free to download and get started with our secure password manager!

Share this story

  • Share this on Facebook
  • Share this on Twitter

Share All sharing options for: LastPass Families makes it easier to share passwords

How to safely share passwords with family members

Password managers like LastPass or 1Password are great for keeping track of all your passwords, but what happens if you share accounts with someone else? Say, the energy bill that you and your spouse both pay, or the Netflix account that all your children mooch off of?

LastPass Families is a new feature from LastPass designed to make that a little easier, by safely storing crucial information like passwords, bank account information, or passport numbers. You can then share them with family members as you need to. Families users will be able to quickly add or remove members to the account, as well as decide which passwords get shared with which users — so you can give your kids the cable login without also handing over your credit card information.

LastPass Families supports up to six family members, and will be a separate paid service on top of the now-free standard LastPass and paid LastPass Premium memberships. It’ll launch later this summer, and as a bonus, LastPass Premium members will get access to Families for free for six months when it does launch.

LastPass is also offering early access for users who want to try out the service first, which can be signed up for on the company’s website here.

Armed with the right login credentials from generous friends and family, you could happily enjoy Netflix, Spotify, and a ton of other streaming services without spending a dime—but is all this password-sharing smart? In some cases, sharing your login info could result in you losing the service altogether. We’ve looked into the biggest names in streaming to find out the official account limits and policies, so you can avoid any unwelcome interruptions.

Netflix

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings doesn’t mind you sharing your account with the family—last year he said it was a “positive thing” and of course Netflix lets you set up profiles inside your account so everyone can have their own history and recommendations.

The company seems fairly relaxed about sharing between friends, too—it’s hard to tell the difference between your kids logging on at college and your buddies logging on from the next city—with the theory being that the limit on simultaneous streams eventually encourages everyone to get their own account anyway.

Those limits are one simultaneous stream on the basic ($7.99/month) plan, two simultaneous streams on the standard ($9.99/month) plan, and four simultaneous streams on the premium ($11.99/month) plan. There’s no official “family” plan but it’s effectively the premium one with four concurrent HD streams allowed.

Hulu

Hulu hasn’t been as open about account sharing as Netflix, but the service has recently added multi-profile support, so presumably it’s fine with you sharing your login credentials with a few carefully chosen relatives (and friends at a stretch).

However the simultaneous streaming limit is much stricter: You can only stream to one logged-in device at a time. That means if you’re enjoying Handmaid’s Tale at home, and your parents want to load up Harlots somewhere else, then either you or them are going to be out of luck.

Unofficially, it looks like two concurrent streams are allowed , just to avoid any accidental conflicts, but don’t be surprised if you’re restricted to one. As with Netflix, there’s no family plan—you have to stump up $7.99 or $11.99 a month per person, depending on how many ads you want to sit through.

HBO Go and HBO Now

HBO provides two methods of streaming shows like Game of Thrones and Westworld online. If you already have HBO through a cable subscription, you can use HBO Go. Otherwise, you can sign up for HBO Now (both options are technically only available in the US).

Thankfully both iterations of HBO are much more friendly about sharing your account info than Hulu. While HBO requests that users limit password sharing for security reasons, you can still have up to three streams occurring simultaneously. That’s regardless of location.

But definitely be wary of who you share your account with, as more than three streams happening at once can result in all streamers being kicked off HBO at the same time. After that, there’s a brief cooling off period before users can, one at a time, sign back in.

Amazon Video and Music

Those benefits include quick shipping and the like, and also Prime Video—but not the limited Prime Music, or the full-fat Amazon Music, which is treated completely separately. As far as Prime Video in Amazon Household goes, you get three simultaneous streams to three different devices, as long as those streams are all different content, though as with the music services mentioned above, purchases get referred back to a shared pool of registered cards.

Surprise, surprise, Amazon Music has its own “,””]]” href=”https://www.amazon.com/gp/dmusic/promotions/AmazonMusicUnlimitedFamily?ascsubtag=27d3ffb86e54224482f622de745a4e8f9ca5984e&tag=gizmodoamzn-20″ target=”_blank” data-amazonasin=”” data-amazontag=”gizmodoamzn-20″ data-amazonsubtag=”[t|link[p|1797530211[au|5735744982043675088[b|gizmodo[lt|text”>Family Plan for up to six users for $14.99 a month. Playlists, recommendations, and so on are all kept separate but as with Apple, Google, and Spotify, you have to put up with a shared payment method that everyone has access to. With the six users, you get six separate streams, and the option to add up to 10 authorized devices for each.

Spotify

All of the music streaming services tend to follow similar rules. Pay $9.99 a month for a premium account and you can listen to Spotify on just about any device you like, and share those credentials with just about anyone you like too, but you’re limited to one active stream at a time, Hulu-style.

Spotify does let you sync music to mobile devices and computers for offline listening, but again there’s a limit in place—you can only sync songs to three devices at any one time. Allowing even a couple of people to use the same Spotify account means you’re going to run into problems pretty regularly. One solution is Spotify Family , but you need to pay $14.99 a month for it.

That five extra dollars gets you up to six separate premium accounts for you, your kids, and even your friends, though Spotify specifies that everyone must live at the same address. If and how this rule is enforced isn’t spelled out by Spotify—of course each of the six premium members is free to log in wherever they like—but based on postings in the Spotify forums, users do occasionally get kicked out of plans.

Apple Music

For $9.99 a month you can register and stream to six devices, though only one device can have a live stream at any one time—to listen simultaneously on the others you need to cache music locally.

Apple Music’s $14.99-per-month Family Plan is for six users, like Spotify, though there’s no mention of living at the same address. There is a restriction in terms of payments: any extra iTunes purchases have to go through the same debit or credit card, so if your friends are buying tracks or movies or anything else beyond the $14.99 subscription fee, then it’s going to come back to the person who is organizing the family.

That would probably mean messing around with multiple Apple IDs to share out accounts, so it may not be worth the hassle of trying to get something designed to work for families to work with friends instead. Plus, you’d technically be in breach of the terms and conditions, so you’d have no excuses if you got booted off.

Google Play Music

Finally in the list of major music streaming services we’ve got Google Play Music. You pay your $9.99 a month for premium access, which in this case gets you access from 10 devices in total, five of which can be smartphones. As with Spotify and Apple Music, you can only have one live stream at a time, but offline playlists are available.

As elsewhere, there’s a $14.99-per-month Family Plan that covers six users, each with their own stream and 10 devices. Google says invited members must be 13 or over and live in the same country as the person managing the family, and as with Apple Music all of the future Google service purchases from anyone in the group get billed to the same debit or credit card held by the family manager.

It’s not technically impossible to share Google Play Music’s Family Plan with friends, but you do have the problem of all your purchases (for apps and movies and so on) getting routed through the same card, as well as violating the terms of the plan in the first place. Creating new Google accounts is an option, though you might feel it’s easier to just get everyone to pay up for their own subscription.

  • To share your passwords with your family using Dashlane , you’ll need to connect your account to one of two membership tiers.
  • Once you’re part of a Dashlane family plan, you can use the share feature to grant access to a single login or an entire category of passwords using a member’s email.
  • Each member of the Dashlane family plan will need to have their account with Dashlane to share passwords utilizing the service.
  • Before you can share passwords with family members, you’ll need to purchase and add up to six people to a Dashlane Premium Family and Premium Family Plus plan.

Password-security app Dashlane now has two group plans, Premium Family and Premium Family Plus plans. Each allows up to six users to share passwords and login information quickly with an approved group.

One of the great things about Dashlane Premium Family and Premium Family Plus plans is that while each family member has their own Dashlane account, all passwords and login information can be shared. This way, you don’t have to chase anyone down for a Netflix password or credit card number.

For this to work, each member of your family plan will need to create an individual Dashlane account if they do not already have one.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

Apple Macbook Pro (From $1,299.00 at Apple)

Acer Chromebook 15 (From $179.99 at Walmart)

How to set up Dashlane Premium Family

1. Create an account with Dashlane if you have not already done so.

2. Go to www.dashlane.com/plans, click on “Family,” and click on the plan you wish to purchase.

3. On the next page, click “Next.”

4. Type in the email address affiliated with your Dashlane account in the blank field before clicking “Submit.” 5. You will then be prompted to type in your credit card information and complete your purchase.

6. On the next page, you will see a link that allows you to invite others to your family plan. Click “Copy link” and send it to up to five family members or friends via email or a messaging app.

7. Once you have sent out the invitation link, your family members will need to click on the link to join your family plan.

8. Your family members should type in their email address — not yours — in the blank field and click “Join Premium Family.”

How to share passwords and login information with family using Dashlane Premium Family

2. To share a specific login credential, right-click on it, and then select “Share.”

3. To share an entire category of credentials at once, click on the category you want to share, then choose “More” in the upper right corner of the category.

4. From the drop-down menu that appears, select “Share.”

5. Type in the email addresses of the users with whom you wish to share the credentials. You will also have the ability to set permission settings for each user. 6. Once you are finished, click “Send.”

When I see my friends and family (hi Mom, hi Dad!) typing passwords instead of using a password manager, I always get an uneasy feeling. But when my fellow team members at K15t Software do it, I feel especially uncomfortable – because we simply cannot compromise our company security.

After introducing 1Password, a password manager, at K15t Software a couple of years ago, it has become part of our standard toolkit. Of course, sometimes new team members need to be reminded to store all their passwords in 1Password, but as soon as they know how to access passwords in their browser and on their mobile device, they’re onboard. So, nobody at K15t Software remembers (or types) passwords anymore: except for the master password.

Even though 1Password worked well for us, we ran into a couple of problems – especially when it came to sharing team passwords, or dealing with 1Password’s Linux incompatibility. Luckily, AgileBits – the company behind 1Password – recently released 1Password for Teams, solving almost all of our problems.

In this article, I want to share how 1Password helps the K15t team manage and share passwords.

The Inevitable Shared Password

There are some general rules for creating and managing passwords in teams. One of them is: don’t share passwords. Just don’t. Once multiple people have access to the same account, it is impossible to know who exactly used it or when. Despite this, companies (including us) often have to deal with shared passwords.

Why? Because many cloud services and shopping sites don’t offer sophisticated user management, making shared passwords a necessity. Our back office team, for example, has to use a shared password for our Amazon account to manage purchases and our marketing team also has to share passwords to manage some of our social media accounts.

Before 1Password for Teams was released, we used 1Password’s vaults, storing each one in a separate Dropbox folder. To share the passwords within a certain vault, we had to share the corresponding Dropbox folder. However, this had some drawbacks:

  • When managing 1Password vaults in Dropbox folders, permissions could only be set through the Dropbox folder.
  • Shared vaults required a password, which in turn had to be shared among users.
  • After a team member had added a shared vault locally, there was no way of easily removing it. You had to revoke their viewing/writing permissions in the shared Dropbox folder and you had to physically sit down with them in front of their computer to delete the shared vault from their 1Password installation.
  • Team members could easily copy passwords from one vault into another, which lead to a lot of duplicate (and obsolete) entries. In one case, one of our team members accidentally copied all of their personal vault entries into a shared vault – ouch!
  • As everyone had writing permissions for the shared Dropbox folders, there was always a chance of having conflicting versions.
  • There was no version of 1Password for Linux users.

Thankfully, 1 Password for Teams has been released and it solves almost all of the problems mentioned above.

How to safely share passwords with family members

Organize passwords into vaults to easily manage who has access to which passwords.

1Password for Teams

Using a password manager in general is a step in the right direction. Using a password manager built for teams took us (and can take you) a step further: 1Password for Teams remains simple to use while adding fine-grained management features that enable us to collaborate better and more safely.

Once set up, 1Password is very easy to use, which is absolutely necessary if you want to get all team members onboard. For example, all it takes to log into 1Password’s web app is one shortcut: Command-\. Even on mobile devices, it’s easy to fill out a login form (Touch ID integration on iOS FTW!). The only missing piece is a proper Linux client – but at least the web UI is pretty good, allowing the few Linux users we have to copy/paste passwords into login fields.

The fine-grained permission control of 1Password for Teams makes it easy to manage shared passwords. Because of these controls, everyone on our team can now create and update passwords, or move them to the trash. However, only administrators can move items in and out of vaults, and empty the trash. This means that passwords are less likely to be lost by accident. 1Password for Teams also features a password recovery process (in case a team member loses their credentials) and an audit log that documents what changes were made by which users.

Finally, the security concept behind this tool is very sophisticated: 1Password for Teams combines an account key with a master password allowing for much stronger encryption. In order to maintain the password manager’s usability, the unencrypted account key is stored on the user’s personal device to authenticate it, while the master password is used to unlock vaults. That being said, both the account key and master password are strictly kept on the device, never being transmitted. This means that even if 1Password’s servers are compromised or someone intercepts the SSL communication, they will only be able to acquire strongly encrypted data. (This is the short version: for more details, you can also review 1Password’s Security White Paper which even convinced our IT security experts).

How to safely share passwords with family members

Not only can you store all of your passwords in 1Password, it can also generate passwords for you.

Don’t Forget the Weakest Link

Using a password manager such as 1Password for Teams allows us to safely share and manage our team’s passwords. Nonetheless, it is crucial to make the weakest link – the individual user – stronger. In order for password security to work, every team member has to use the same password manager for all passwords. It is also prudent to educate team members on how 1Password for Teams works. Security will improve if people know how to safely store the recovery kit, to separate personal passwords from work passwords, and to only sign in from trusted devices. 1Password provides a checklist you can use to educate your team. Your team members should also know the significance of a strong master password and how to choose or generate one.

Pro Tip

Choosing a strong master password is especially important. Check out AgileBits’ advice on memorizable passphrases, as well as Bruce Schneider’s article on choosing good passwords (it also explains how passwords are hacked).

Password security is paramount at a time when almost every company stores vital information and documents online. A password manager such as 1Password for Teams can help companies build a strong security infrastructure – it certainly improved ours.