Categories
Device

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

With the Task Scheduler, you can schedule Windows restart or reboot in just a few clicks. Here’s the step-by-step guide on Windows scheduled restart.

If you run your system all day every day, having the ability to restart on schedule is very useful. When running the computer all day long, it is highly possible that there will be performance degradation over time due to any number of reasons like the number of running applications, clutter, temp files, etc. In those cases, restarting the system occasionally will help run the system smoothly. For example, you can configure Windows to restart automatically at midnight to install updates. That way, you don’t have to worry about abrupt restart or remembering to restart the system outside active hours.

So, in this quick and simple guide, let me show the steps to use the task scheduler to restart Windows computer automatically at specific times.

Note: Along with Windows 10, the steps shown below will work in Windows 7 and 8.

Steps to Schedule Restart Windows

To restart Windows automatically, we can use the task scheduler. So, follow the steps listed below to schedule restart Windows.

  1. Press the Windows key to open the Start menu.
  2. Type “Task Scheduler” in the bottom search field.
  3. Click on the “Task Scheduler” result in the Start menu.
  4. After opening the task scheduler, click on the “Create task” option.
    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10
  5. Type a name in the Name field. The name can be anything you want. Just make sure it is descriptive.
    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10
  6. Go to the “Triggers” tab and click “New” to create a new trigger.
    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10
  7. Select “On a schedule” from the first drop-down menu.
  8. Select “Daily” radio option and set the time you want.
  9. To recur every day, type “1” in the “Recur every” field.
  10. Click “Ok“.
    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10
  11. Go to the “Actions” tab and click “New“.
    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10
  12. Select “Start a program” from the first dropdown menu.
  13. Type “%SystemRoot%\system32\shutdown.exe” in the Program/Script field.
  14. Type “-r -f -t 10” in the arguments field.
  15. Click “Ok“.
    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10
  16. (Optional) Go to the “Conditions” tab and select the “Start the task only if the computer is idle” checkbox. That way, the system will only restart if it is idle. i.e, not doing anything. Click “Ok“.
    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10
  17. You will see the newly created task in the task scheduler.
    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

That is it. You’ve created a scheduled task to automatically restart Windows. From now on, Windows will reboot itself as per the task configuration. Right before restarting, it will show a little message giving any active users a chance to save the work.

As you can see, it is pretty easy to do a scheduled restart using the task scheduler tool in Windows. If you want to, you can also display a popup message using a task scheduler right before restarting the system.

Disable Automatic Restart

When you no longer need the scheduled restart task, you can disable it to prevent an automatic restart. To do that, find the task in the task scheduler, right-click on it and select the “Disable” option. If you really want to, you can delete the task by selecting the “Delete” option.

That is all. I hope that helps. If you are stuck or need some help, comment below and I will try to help as much as possible. If you like this article, check out how to startup programs with the task scheduler.

How to Reboot (or Shutdown) Your Computer Automatically Every Day

Some of you like to shut down your computer every day. Some of you don’t. But rebooting your computer often does increase its performance. Have you ever noticed, in most cases, that a freshly rebooted PC seems to run better than one that’s been running (like mine) for a couple of weeks without rebooting?

If you reboot your computer daily, you’ll like this tip because we’re going to show you how to do that automatically. And if you want to automatically shut down your computer every day at a certain time, we’ll show you how to do that as well.

Let’s get started…

1. Press the Windows Key + R to open a Run box.
2. In the Run box type taskschd.msc and press Enter
3. When Task Scheduler opens click on “Action” > “Create basic task”

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10
4. In the next dialog give your task a name. If you’re going to reboot your PC daily, name it something like AutoReboot. If you’re going to automatically shut down your PC daily, call it something like AutoShutDown. Then click “Next”.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

5. The next dialog is called “Task Trigger”.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Here you can select how often you want your task to run. Since this tip shows you how to auto reboot or auto-shutdown your PC daily, we’re going to leave it set to its default, which is “Daily”. Then click “Next”

In the next dialog, you can choose the time you want your computer to auto reboot or auto shutdown. In this example, I’m going to auto-reboot my computer at 2:30 AM every day.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

After you’ve entered the time, click “Next”

Next, you tell Task Scheduler what you want to do.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

The default is “Start a program” and that’s exactly what we want, so just click “Next”.

Now things get a little more interesting.

In the next dialog, we are going to tell Task Scheduler what program we want to run.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Under “Program/script” enter the following (or copy & paste it)

C:\Windows\System32\shutdown.exe

Next to Add arguments, enter the following if you want to restart your computer daily (note the spacing, it’s important):

/r /f /t 0

If you want to automatically shut down your computer type (and note the spacing, it’s important):

/s /f /t 0

You’re almost done… in the next dialog, review the information and make sure it’s what you want — and if it is, click “Finish”.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

That’s all there is to it. You’re done.

Oh, and one more thing…

In case you want to know what the arguments /r /f /t 0 and /s /f /t 0 mean. here you go…

/r /f /t0
r=restart f=force any open programs to close and t= time 0 = zero seconds (the time before the task is executed).

s/ /f /t0
s=shutdown f=force any open programs to close and t= time 0 = zero seconds.

Lori Kaufman is a technology expert with 25 years of experience. She’s been a senior technical writer, worked as a programmer, and has even run her own multi-location business. Read more.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

You’re working on an important document when Windows updates itself and informs you it’s going to reboot. Instead of getting mad and shouting at your computer that you can’t reboot yet, you can now schedule a more convenient time for the computer to reboot after updates.

Update: As of the Anniversary Update, this feature has been removed. The new Active Hours feature is now the closest thing to scheduling updates in Windows 10.

Windows 10 now allows you to specify a time for the computer to reboot after updates are installed to finish the installation. To schedule a restart for updates, click the Start menu icon and select “Settings” on the Start menu.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

On the “Settings” screen, click “Update & Security”.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

The “Windows Update” screen displays by default. If you have updates available, Windows will start downloading them and preparing to install. Click the “Advanced options” link. The update process will continue even though you are leaving the main “Windows Update” screen.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

On the “Advanced Options” screen, select “Notify to schedule restart” from the drop-down list at the top of the screen.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Click the left arrow button in the upper-left corner of the screen to return to the “Windows Update” screen.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

You are notified that a restart has been scheduled and options are provided for you to schedule a time for the restart to happen. The first option provides a suggested time to restart the machine to finish installing the update. To specify a different time and date, select the “Select a restart time” option and specify a “Time” and “Day”. For the “Time”, click the box, hover your mouse over each part of the time (hour, minutes, and AM/PM) and scroll through the options until you reach what you want.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

There should also be a “Restart Now” link you can click to restart the machine now to finish the updates immediately.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

If you’re in the middle of getting things done, having Windows 10 restart and update at strange times doesn’t help. Make it restart when you want it to.

Windows 10 will automatically download updates. And if it requires a restart to complete the installation it can restart at odd times. When Windows decides it should restart, it might not be a convenient time for you.

So here’s a look at how to make Windows 10 restart on your schedule.

Stop Automatic Windows Update Installs in Windows 10

If you prefer to have control over what your computer is doing, you’ll want to stop Windows from automatically installing updates. To do it, go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update > Advanced options.

Under “Choose how updates are installed” section change the option from Automatic (recommended) to Notify to schedule restart.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Schedule Windows 10 Update Restarts

After updates have downloaded, you will see options to restart your computer to install the updates. Windows will suggest a time when you usually don’t use your PC. But you can change it to whatever works best for you. Just check Select a restart time.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Then you can change it to the time you want that fits your schedule.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

You can also select the day you want it to restart. It only allows up to seven days to restart, but that should be plenty of time for most home users.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Also, keep in mind that you want to make sure to schedule the restart to occur when your computer is on. And, depending on the update, it could take a good amount of time to complete, so make sure your PC or other Windows 10 device is plugged in.

Of course, if you just want to get your system updated right away, save anything you’re working on, and select the Restart now button — especially for Critical updates, or out-of-cycle updates that patch zero-day exploits.

A Windows restart while working is annoying. So this is a nice feature to have since you can schedule the exact time and day for a restart.

You’re working on an important document when Windows updates itself and informs you it’s going to reboot. Instead of getting mad and shouting at your computer that you can’t reboot yet, you can now schedule a more convenient time for the computer to reboot after updates.

Windows 10 now allows you to specify a time for the computer to reboot after updates are installed to finish the installation. To schedule a restart for updates, click the Start menu icon and select “Settings” on the Start menu. On the “Settings” screen, click “Update & Security”.

The “Windows Update” screen displays by default. If you have updates available, Windows will start downloading them and preparing to install. Click the “Advanced options” link. The update process will continue even though you are leaving the main “Windows Update” screen. On the “Advanced Options” screen, select “Notify to schedule restart” from the drop-down list at the top of the screen. Click the left arrow button in the upper-left corner of the screen to return to the “Windows Update” screen.

You are notified that a restart has been scheduled and options are provided for you to schedule a time for the restart to happen. The first option provides a suggested time to restart the machine to finish installing the update. To specify a different time and date, select the “Select a restart time” option and specify a “Time” and “Day”. For the “Time”, click the box, hover your mouse over each part of the time (hour, minutes, and AM/PM) and scroll through the options until you reach what you want. There should also be a “Restart Now” link you can click to restart the machine now to finish the updates immediately.

WHY CHOOSE WISECLEANER?

Try before you buy with a free trial – and even after your purchase, you’re still covered by our 60-day, no-risk guarantee.

Secure Online Payment

We value your privacy and protect your financial and personal data, support several safe methods of payment.

7 X 24 SUPPORT SERVICE

Knowledgeable representatives available to assist you through email response within 24 hours.

    tutorial by Ciprian Adrian Rusen published on 04/16/2019

Windows 10 Home users do not have much control over what updates are pushed to their PCs by Microsoft. However, users can choose when to reboot their computers or devices to install the pending operating system updates. In the newer versions of Windows 10, there is a small yet helpful feature named Active hours, that controls when Windows 10 reboots and updates itself for installing updates. Read on to see how to configure the schedule for Windows 10 updates installing and rebooting your PC:

NOTE: The features shared in this article apply to Windows 10 October 2018 Update.

How to schedule Windows 10 updates by setting Active Hours

The first thing you must do is open the Settings app. A quick way to do that is to click or tap on the Settings icon from the Start Menu or to press Windows + I on the keyboard. In the Settings app, click or tap the Update & Security category.

If not already selected, click or tap Windows Update in the column on the left. On the right side, you see all the settings that govern how Windows 10 updates itself. Amongst them, you also find an option called “Change active hours.” Click or tap on it.

Windows 10 displays a dialog in which you are told that you can “set active hours to let us [Microsoft] know when you typically use this device. We [Microsoft] won’t automatically restart it during active hours, and we won’t restart without checking if you’re using it.”

This means that you can set the time frame in which you usually work on your Windows 10 computer or device, and the operating system is not going to interrupt you during that time by doing an unexpected system reboot to install updates. This feature is called Active hours. You can choose any start time and end time, as long as there is not a difference bigger than 18 hours between them. When done, click or tap Save to apply your schedule.

From now on, Windows 10 is not going to install updates that require a reboot and restart your PC during the Active hours that you have set.

How to restart for updating Windows 10 only after you’ve done all your work

Although configuring Active hours is useful for daily activities, there may be times when you have got a tight deadline to meet, and you must work after hours. In such situations, restarting your computer to update Windows 10 would be even more unproductive than on other days. That is why Windows 10 also gives you the option to configure it so that it never restarts your PC for updates, without asking for your approval first. To do that, in the Windows Update section from the Settings app, click or tap Advanced options.

You get access to different options that you can configure. To make sure that Windows 10 never restarts for updates without asking first, turn On the switch that says “Show a notification when your PC requires a restart to finish updating,” in the Update notifications section.

That’s it! Now Windows 10 is going to update itself respecting the schedule that you have set for Active hours, and it is not going to reboot without notifying you first.

Do you like how the new Windows 10 updates schedule works?

The Active hours feature gives you control over how Windows 10 updates itself on your PC. Although Microsoft does not let users completely disable the Windows 10 updates, at least there is a way to choose when they get installed. If you want more control, you can also delay or pause updates, in select Windows 10 editions such as Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise. Is that enough? Are you happy with the options you have for scheduling updates in Windows 10? Comment below, and share your perspective.

Active hours let Windows know when you’re typically at your PC. We’ll use that info to schedule updates and restarts when you’re not using the PC. Here are two ways to set active hours in Windows 11:

To have Windows automatically adjust active hours based on your device’s activity:

Select Start > Settings > Windows Update > Advanced options > Active hours.

Next to Adjust active hours, select Automatically.

To select your own active hours:

Select Start > Settings > Windows Update > Advanced options > Active hours.

Next to Adjust active hours, select Manually.

Choose the start time and end time for your active hours.

Active hours let Windows know when you’re typically at your PC. We’ll use that info to schedule updates and restarts when you’re not using the PC. Here are two ways to set active hours in Windows 10:

To have Windows automatically adjust active hours based on your device’s activity (for the Windows 10 May 2019 Update, version 1903, or later):

Select Start > Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update , then select Change active hours.

Turn on Automatically adjust active hours for this device based on activity.

To select your own active hours:

Select Start > Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update , then select Change active hours.

Next to your current active hours, select Change. Then choose the start time and end time for active hours.

By Stella | Follow | Last Updated May 17, 2022

Summary :

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Do you know how to manage updates like pausing the updates for a period or scheduling a restart to finish the installation in Windows 11 or Windows 10? In this post, MiniTool Software will show the answers you want to know.

Windows allows you to change when and how to install the latest updates to make your computer run smoothly and securely. For example, you can pause Windows Update for some days if you don’t want to install the update immediately. You can also schedule a restart for the Windows update so that the update installation will not interfere with your work. Here in this post, we will show you how to manage updates in Windows 11/10.

How to Manage Updates in Windows 11?

How to Pause Windows 11 Update for 1 Week?

If you think your device is not ready for the updates that have arrived, you can choose to temporarily pause these updates for 7 days in Windows 11. It is very simple to do this:

Step 1: Click Start, then go to Settings > Windows Update.

Step 2: Click the Pause for a week button next to Pause updates. Then, Windows Update will not check for updates within 7 days. When the pause limit reaches, you will need to install the latest updates before you can pause Windows 11 updates again using this method.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

How to Resume Windows 11 Updates?

If you want to continue receiving updates before the pause limit reaches, you can just click the Resume updates button in Windows Updates. Then, Windows Update will begin to check for updates and list the available updates. You can click the Download and install button to install all the updates on your device. You can also click the Install button next to your desired update to install only that update.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

How to Schedule a Restart for a Windows 11 Update?

You need to restart your computer to finish an update installation and you will receive a restart prompt by default. While you are busy with work using your computer, you don’t want to be interrupted by a computer restart. If so, you can schedule a more convenient time for installing the update.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Step 1: If the prompt is still there, you can click the Pick a time button to continue. However, if you have missed that prompt, you can go to Start > Settings > Windows Update, then click the Schedule the restart link to select a restart time that is convenient for you. On the other hand, you can set active hours to make sure your machine only restarts for installing updates when you’re not using your PC. This setting will be applied to all updates in Windows 11.

How to Manage Updates in Windows 10?

The ways to manage updates in Windows 10 are similar to the operations in Windows 11. There are only a few differences. For example, you can pause Windows 10 updates for up to 35 days. Here is how to manage updates in Windows 10.

How to Pause Windows 10 Update?

For Windows 10 version 1903 (or later), Windows 10 Pro version 1809, or Windows 10 Enterprise version 1809:

Step 1: Go to Start > Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update.

Step 2: Click Pause updates for 7 days.

Step 3: If you need to pause updates for more days, you can click Advanced options and select a suitable date from the drop-down menu under Pause until.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

How to Resume Windows 10 Updates?

To continue getting updates in Windows 10 before reaching the limit date, you can just click the Resume updates button in Windows Update.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

How to Schedule a Restart for a Windows 10 Update?

You also need to restart your device to complete the whole update installation. If you don’t want it to disturb your work, you can schedule a restart as per your time.

Step 1: Go to Start > Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update.

Step 2: Click Schedule the restart and select a proper time to restart your computer.

Likewise, you can also set active hours in Windows 10 to schedule restart time for all updates.

These are the methods to manage updates on your Windows 11/10 computer. Should you have any other related issues, you can let us know in the comments.1

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Linkedin
  • Reddit

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Position: Columnist

Stella has been working in MiniTool Software as an English Editor for more than 4 years. Her articles mainly cover the fields of data recovery including storage media data recovery and phone data recovery, YouTube videos download, partition management, and video conversions.

Categories

In this tutorial, you will learn how to schedule your computer to reboot at a certain time using the task scheduler. This can be a one-time reboot or a recurring reboot. So these are the steps.

STEP 1

Press win + r to get the run box. Then type taskschd.msc and press enter

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

STEP 2

This will launch Task Scheduler. Right-click on the Task Scheduler Library and select New Folder.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Name the new folder as Schedule Reboot or anything you like and click OK.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

STEP 3

Expand Task Scheduler Library and select the Schedule Reboot folder. Then right-click on it and select Create Basic Task.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

When you select Create Basic Task, it will open a wizard. Name it Reboot and click Next.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

The Trigger section lets you decide when your task needs to be run. You can schedule reboot daily, one time, weekly, etc. Select daily and click next.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Specify the time at which you want to run the reboot and click Next.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

In the Action section, select Start a program and click Next.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Type shutdown /r in program/script field and click Next.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Windows may prompt a message box asking for permission. Click yes.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Click Finish to complete the task.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

That’s it. This option available on Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7 and Windows XP.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Windows 10 will let you schedule the exact time and day that works best for you to have your computer restart to finish installing the Windows updates.

Microsoft has made Windows Updates happen automatically through several years of different versions of Windows. This is to make sure you have the latest security, stability, and feature updates without having to think about it.

However, you do think about it when you computer suddenly restarts when you’re right in the middle of getting things done. Or maybe while you’re in the middle of an important TPS report, walk away from the computer to grab a snack, and come back and see your data was lost because it restarted.

This was especially a problem with Windows XP SP2, but in Windows 7 the issue was alleviated a bit by popping up a reminder letting you know there needs to be a restart, which you can set to remind you to do a restart up to four hours later. But it will keep nagging you until the restart is done. And Windows 8 gives you two days before the restart is required, and will usually do it automatically when your computer has been idle for some time.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Windows 10 will allow you to schedule the exact time and day that works best for you to restart to finish installing the updates.

To set this up, go to Settings > Update & Recovery. Then under Windows Update, select Check for Update, and if there is an update available, it will be downloaded and installed.

If one of the updates requires a restart to complete, you’ll see “A restart has been scheduled” section where you can select the restart time. Just select the time and day that works best for you to have it restart.

Automatic Windows Update restarts has always been an annoyance in Windows one way or another, but with the latest version of the OS, you will be in control. This is just one of the minor improvements coming to the new desktop OS…it’s the little things that make a big difference.

Previous Post
Next Post
Tip / Trick

In the effort of uniting the traditional desktop and Modern UI, Windows 10 build 9926 makes some significant changes to the familiar desktop. The new Settings app is a great example. There is basically no more Control Panel; Microsoft’s trying to merge all Control Panel items into the Settings app. One of them is Windows Update. Besides the completely UI overhaul, this important feature now get a new setting that allows you to manually schedule the time to restart your device in order to apply the updates.

First of all, you may want to know that, in build 9926, Windows Update is completely integrated in the Setting app with a new user interface. All of its settings also can be set in this new UI. However, you can open Windows Update simply by typing “Update” into the search box on the Taskbar then hit the first result. To manually schedule a restart for updating, you can do the followings.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

  • In the Settings\Update window, click “Advanced Options.”
  • Then you’ll see the first option is about how you’d like to restart your device. Hit the drop-down menu and choose “Notify to schedule restart.” By selecting this, Windows Update will ask you to schedule a specific time to restart whenever there is an available update.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

  • If you leave the option at “Automatic,” Windows Update will automatically restart your device. However, it will also display an option for you to set a restart time when an update is ready as shown in the figure below.

If you have a pending Windows 10 Update that requires a restart, you can delay the restart – and therefore the update – for up to six days. Keep in mind, this does not prevent the update from installing if you manually restart your computer. It just delays the automatic restart. But still it gives you a choice.

If you a Windows 10 Update pending a restart here’s how you can delay the restart and hence the update on Windows 10 Home version.

Open Settings (Windows key + i or right-click the start button and click “Settings”).

In settings click on Updates & security.

If you have a Windows Update pending a restart, you’ll see a notice like this:

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Click on “Schedule the restart” and you’ll see the following dialog .

Turn on the switch under “We’ll restart to finish installing updates when you tell us to…”

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Click on the the down arrow in under Pick a day (see above) and select a day you want Windows to restart and install the updates. Next, click on the time shown and you’ll be able to set a time you want Windows to restart your computer to install the updates. When you’re done you’ll see the time and date Windows will restart to install your pending updates.

If you want more control over Windows rebooting your computer, set active hours. Once you’ve set active hours, Windows will not restart your PC automatically and will not restart your PC without checking to see if you’re using it.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

To set Active Hours, click on Active Hours under Windows Update (see below). You can choose a beginning and ending time for active hours. The maximum number of hours you can set “active” is 18.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

And while you’re in the Windows Update dialog, click on Advanced options for more control over Windows updates and timing. You can choose whether or not to have Windows update install updates for other Microsoft products, Automatically download updates over metered connections, and “We’ll show you a reminder when we’re going to restart. If you want to see more notifications about restarting, turn this on.”

If you want to be notified before Windows restarts your computer – so you have a chance to schedule the restart – make sure you turn the switch on under “We’ll show you a reminder…”

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Windows 10 Home does not give you nearly the control over Windows Update that Windows 10 Professional does, but it does give you some if you know where to look.

2 thoughts on “ How to Delay Windows Update Restarts On Windows 10 Home ”

I will take that six days of trying to push back the updates until some of the smoke clears. Microsoft is not going to make a mess out of my computer if I can help it just to see what happens, and then go back to the drawing board telling everyone how hard they work while we are dealing with this mess at home. They are pulling to many bad updates that should have never got out the door. Things happen and I get that but to many computer sites that have been on the net for a long time are also calling Microsoft out and they should. They are saying the same as Cloudeight six months is just too soon and it is showing.

I paid good money for my machine and I’m not a beta tester for Microsoft …

I thought this was interesting and may help if you think you need to delay.

This article explains how to use the Automatic Updates feature in Windows Server 2003, in Windows XP, and in Windows 2000.

Applies to:  Windows 10 – all editions, Windows Server 2012 R2
Original KB number: В 327838

Summary

If you’re logged on as an administrator, the Automatic Updates feature in Windows notifies you when critical updates are available for your computer. There’s a new Automatic Updates feature that you can use to specify the schedule that Windows follows to install updates on your computer. This article describes how to install this new Automatic Updates feature in Windows XP and in Windows 2000 and how to use it to schedule automatic updates.

This new Automatic Updates feature is included with Windows Server 2003.

For additional information about how to configure other Automatic Updates settings in Windows XP, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

306525 How to configure and use Automatic Updates in Windows XP

Update the Automatic Updates feature (Windows XP and Windows 2000 only)

If you use Automatic Updates, the feature may have been automatically updated on your computer. To make sure that the new feature is installed, use the procedure that is described in the Schedule Automatic Updates section of this article to confirm that the Automatically download the updates, and install them on the schedule that I specify option is available on your computer.

To use the new Automatic Updates feature, install the following updates:

Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1). For additional information about how to obtain SP1, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
322389 How to obtain the latest Windows XP service pack

You must restart your computer after you install this update. Automatic Updates does not download any updates until you have configured it to do so. If Automatic Updates is not configured in 24 hours after you install it, either the network administrator or the user who is logged on locally as an administrator is prompted to configure it.

Schedule automatic updates

To modify Automatic Updates settings, you must be logged on as an administrator or a member of the Administrators group. If your computer is connected to a network, network policy settings may prevent you from completing this procedure.

In Windows Server 2003 and in Windows XP

To configure a schedule for Automatic Updates:

  1. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click System.
  2. On the Automatic Updates tab, click Automatically download the updates, and install them on the schedule that I specify.
  3. Click to select the day and time that you want to download and install updates.

When critical updates are detected, Automatic Updates automatically downloads these updates in the background while you’re connected to the Internet. After the download is complete, Automatic Updates waits until the scheduled day and time to install the updates. On the scheduled day and time, all local users receive the following message that has a five-minute countdown timer:

Windows is ready to begin installing the updates available for your computer.

Do you want Windows to install the updates now?

(Windows will restarts your computer if no action is taken within 5:00 minutes)

If you’re logged on as an administrator, when you receive this message, you can either click Yes to install the updates or click No to have Automatic Updates install the updates at the next scheduled day and time. If you don’t take any action in five minutes, Windows automatically installs the updates.

You may have to restart your computer to complete the update installation.

In Windows 2000

  1. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Automatic Updates.
  2. Click Automatically download the updates, and install them on the schedule that I specify.
  3. Click to select the day and time that you want to download and install updates.

When critical updates are detected, Automatic Updates automatically downloads these updates in the background while you’re connected to the Internet. After the download is complete, Automatic Updates waits until the scheduled day and time to install the updates. On the scheduled day and time, all local users receive the following message that has a five-minute countdown timer:

Windows is ready to begin installing the updates available for your computer.

Do you want Windows to install the updates now?

(Windows will restart your computer if no action is taken within 5:00 minutes)

If you’re logged on as an administrator, when you receive this message, you can either click Yes to install the updates or click No to have Automatic Updates install the updates at the next scheduled day and time. If you don’t take any action in five minutes, Windows automatically installs the updates.

You may have to restart your computer to complete the update installation.

References

For additional information about how to use Automatic Updates, view the following articles:

For more information about Software Update Services, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
What’s new in Windows 10 deployment

I have a script that reboots computers each night – works fine.

I have windows 10 1903 that is authorized in wsus.

When the Update is applied to some computers, they reboot at night, but they do not apply the windows update. When I log into the machine, it says that it is awaiting a reboot to apply the update.

What can I add to my shutdown in order to tell it that if there is a windows update waiting, apply the update and reboot, or reboot and update?

Ohhhh, Ok, I understand.

So if I were to use

Then it should apply the updates where needed?

9 Replies

  • check 1249 Best Answers
  • thumb_up 2803 Helpful Votes

shutdown.exe is not poweshell

  • check 475 Best Answers
  • thumb_up 747 Helpful Votes

Reboot those computers which are pending to reboot

if you make good use of windows update GPO settings you don’t need to try these

My apologies, my reboot actually comes from a group / GPO scheduled task.

The task runs shutdown /r /f as an action.

Is there a way to attach the powershell PSWindowsUpdate to a scheduled task.

I would need to use an “if” condition (If there are windows updates waiting then apply the update and reboot, otherwise just reboot).

And again, I apologize for my mistake in my original post.

All computers in my groups need to rebooted each night; regardless of weather it has updates to apply or not.

Parts 3, 4, and 5 deal with the Windows as a Service (WaaS) setup.

Approve and relax as your systems will just update overnight.

  • check 244 Best Answers
  • thumb_up 864 Helpful Votes

Part of the issue is that shut down is not the same as restart, especially for applying updates. If your computer needs to apply updates, and you manually shut down (Start > shut down), the updates will not apply. The system wants a restart to apply the updates.

Ohhhh, Ok, I understand.

So if I were to use

Then it should apply the updates where needed?

  • check 244 Best Answers
  • thumb_up 864 Helpful Votes

Ohhhh, Ok, I understand.

So if I were to use

Then it should apply the updates where needed?

Yes, that should accomplish what you want.

I get an authentication error (security filtering), but I’ll figure that out.

Again Thank You

This topic has been locked by an administrator and is no longer open for commenting.

To continue this discussion, please ask a new question.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Geek Pride, Towel Day, & the Glorious 25th of May

DKIM enabled –> Mail go to spam folder when sent to own address.

Hi,We use exchange online. We have a third party developer that uses are own EOL to sent mails from a mailadres to its own. So from address X to address X. A colleague of mine activated DKIM. Everything works fine except that mails sent from X.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Best way to handle multiple HDMI inputs for our training room

So I am looking for some help to figure out the best way, and the simplest way to handle multiple devices without having to deal with messing with multiple cables,So the setup is a large room where the layout changes constantly, but there is the following.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Spark! Pro Series – 24 May 2022

Today in History: 24 May 1830 – “Mary Had A Little Lamb” by Sarah Josepha Hale is first published by Boston firm Marsh, Capen & Lyon 1844 – Samuel Morse taps out “What hath God wrought” in the world’s first tel.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Snap! Cobolt Strike, liquid-cooled GPUs, SolarWinds, exploring Mars, & more

Your daily dose of tech news, in brief. You need to hear this. Fake Windows exploits target infosec community with Cobalt Strike Researchers uncovered a malware campaign targeting the infoSec community with fake Proof-Of-Concept (POC) to deli.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Windows Updates are some of the most important updates you can run – and it can be painful when your computer automatically restarts to install updates while you’re working. But – what if you could change your settings so your updates run while you’re sleeping?

Change Your Sleep Settings

Your sleep settings determine when your computer chooses to stay on or go on standby. These are usually set to make sure you don’t waste battery if you’re not around, but if your computer is plugged in, your computer can stay on all night.
1. Click the Start button in the bottom left corner of the screen.
2. Type sleep and select Power & Sleep Settings .
3. Click the drop-down sleep list to configure the settings to:
When plugged in, PC goes to sleep: Never
4. Close the window.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Change Your Active Hours

Now that you’ve changed your sleep settings, let’s schedule your updates using Active Hours. In Windows 10, Microsoft automatically downloads your updates and restarts your computer to install them, but with Active Hours, you can automatically set the times you do NOT want it to update.
1 . Click the Start Button, search for settings and open the Settings app . Select Update & security > Windows Updates .
2. Click Active Hours at the bottom of the Windows Update screen.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Make sure to choose hours that you will be using your computer and do not want the updates to be installed. Pretty easy, right?!

Windows Pro & Enterprise

Unfortunately if your Windows runs Pro or Enterprise, you can only pause the updates for a period of time. We don’t recommend doing this, unless you plan on manually running the updates later. You can read more about this here.

Here’s how to control software and driver updates in Windows 10 so they don’t occur at inappropriate times.

How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

Remember how Windows always seemed to interrupt what you were doing by insisting on installing an update and then rebooting your computer? Well, those interruptions are a thing of the past, at least if you’re running Windows 10. Microsoft has smartly changed the update process in its latest OS so you have control over when your PC reboots following the installation of an update.

Thanks to a feature called Active Hours (Opens in a new window) , you can schedule specific times when your computer restarts after an update. These can be times when your computer is on but when you’re not using it, hence avoiding any incessant prompts to reboot. You can even delay non-security related updates for weeks or months if necessary to avoid the dreaded reboot. Let’s see how this works.

Click on the Start button > Settings > Update & security > Windows Update. Click on the link to “Change active hours.”

In the Active Hours pane, you’ll see start and end times.

Select the times when you’ll be using your computer, so Windows knows not to reboot your PC during those times. You can set your Active Hours up to a maximum of 12 hours, leaving the other 12 hours in a day for Windows to restart. But even during off-hours, Windows checks to make sure you’re not using your computer before rebooting. After you’ve set your hours, click on the checkmark at the bottom of the Start or End time window, depending on which one you changed, then click on the Save button.

Of course, you will need to keep your computer on during inactive hours for it to reboot following an update. But there’s a way around that as well. If a reboot is scheduled, you can create a hole within your Active Hours during which your PC can restart. To do this, click on the link for “Restart options.”

In the window to “Use a custom restart time,” turn the switch to “On” and select a specific day and time during which the PC can reboot. For example, you may want to schedule your lunch time for the reboot, a viable option since your PC will be on but you won’t be working at it (hopefully). Note that this option is available only if an update has been installed and your PC is waiting to reboot.

Next go back to the Windows Update screen and click on Advanced options.

There, you’ll find three options you may want to enable.

  • Give me updates for other Microsoft products when I update Windows” will provide updates to Microsoft Office and other non-Windows Microsoft applications.
  • Defer feature updates” prolongs non-security related updates for as long as several months. The upside is that you can wait indefinitely for such an update to be installed, so this option may be appropriate for a server. The downside is that any new features added to Windows 10 won’t show up on your PC.
  • Use my sign in info to automatically finish setting up my device after an update” automatically logs you into Windows if a specific update needs to relaunch the OS in order to complete.

Finally, click on the link to “Choose how updates are delivered.”

If this option is enabled, your PC can send and receive updates to and from other PCs in addition to getting them from Microsoft itself. You can choose to share such updates only with other PCs on your network or with PCs on the Internet as well.

For more, check out these other Windows 10 tutorials:

Get Our Best Stories!

Sign up for What’s New Now to get our top stories delivered to your inbox every morning.

This newsletter may contain advertising, deals, or affiliate links. Subscribing to a newsletter indicates your consent to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. You may unsubscribe from the newsletters at any time.

Your subscription has been confirmed. Keep an eye on your inbox!

On Windows 10, one of the most annoying features is the system’s ability to restart your computer to apply updates automatically when you’re actively using it, which could cause the loss of unsaved work and precious time when working on a deadline.

Although there’s not an option in the Settings app to disable updates entirely, Windows 10 ships with “active hours,” which is a feature meant to make updates less intrusive by letting you specify the time you’ll be working on your computer. This means that if an update is pending, the reboot will occur outside the active hours.

Also, starting with version 1903, Windows 10 introduces a new option that allows the system to configure active hours automatically based on your activities.

In this Windows 10 guide, we walk you through the steps to configure active hours on your device to prevent sudden reboots in the middle of your work to apply updates.

How to enable active hours on Windows 10

Starting with Windows 10 version 1903, there are two ways to enable active hours. You can allow the system to configure active hours automatically based on your activities, or you can set a specific time range manually.

Enabling automatic active hours

To enable automatic active hours on Windows 10, use these steps:

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Click on Update & Security.
  3. Click on Windows Update.

Click the Change active hours option.

Turn on the Automatically adjust active hours for this device based on activity toggle switch.

Once you complete these steps, Windows 10 will analyze how you use the device, and it’ll configure the active hours automatically. Also, this means that as your screen time schedule changes, the active hours will adjust accordingly.

Configuring custom active hours

To configure active hours manually on your device to prevent sudden restarts, use these steps:

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Click on Update & Security.
  3. Click on Windows Update.

Click the Change active hours option.

Click the Change option.

Specify the time range you usually use your device.

Quick tip: The maximum amount of time you can set is 18 hours. If you specify a range that’s more than that, it’ll be marked as invalid.

  • Click the Save button.
  • After you complete the steps, if an update is pending, the computer will only restart outside the active hours you specified, preventing interruptions while you’re working.

    How to reschedule automatic restart on Windows 10

    To schedule a restart to apply an update outside of the active hours schedule, use these steps:

    1. Open Settings.
    2. Click on Update & Security.
    3. Click on Windows Update.

    Click on** Schedule the restart** option. (Option available only when a reboot is pending to apply an update.)

    Schedule a time and date to postpone the restart (up to seven days in the future).

    Once you complete the steps, the device won’t reboot to apply updates after the schedule you specified.

    Using the Local Group Policy Editor or Registry, you can also specify a new default schedule for auto-restart when an update is pending, and you can check these instructions to use these options.

    More Windows 10 resources

    For more helpful articles, coverage, and answers to common questions about Windows 10, visit the following resources:

    The must-play Xbox games releasing in 2022 and beyond

    What’s coming to Xbox Series X, Xbox Series S, and Xbox One in the future? Here are the biggest and brightest games we’re looking forward to.

    System Shock remake is ‘largely complete,’ says Nightdive Studios

    Nightdive Studios has been working on the System Shock remake since 2016, and according to the studio, it’s finally almost complete.

    Join us LIVE for the Windows Central Video Podcast today at 1:30PM ET

    We’re LIVE with the Windows Central Video Podcast today at 1:30pm ET, make sure you’re there!

    Check out these must-have Windows apps for Super Bowl LVI

    Super Bowl LVI is finally here. To make sure you get the best experience for the big game, make sure to grab these apps for Windows 11 and Windows 10.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    You love how your Windows 10 quietly identifies the latest updates and starts running them in the background, right? But you probably hate just as much when all of a sudden, right when you were in the middle of something important, your device restarts. It just finished some important updates. Don’t worry we’ll be explaining on how to disable automatic restart on Windows 10 in this article.

    Here’s what you should know. Windows 10 is the most complex OS that Microsoft released so far. One of the reasons why it performs so well is the fact that it receives constant updates, almost on a weekly basis. Important fixes are introduced, useful patches are implemented, the system installs it automatically and then, it has to reboot, for the changes to take effect. Thus many people don’t like the automatic reboot process and want to know the process for Windows 10 disable automatic restart.

    But you don’t want to have to wait every time Windows tells you to wait. It can run the updates and just postpone the restart, so you won’t have to postpone your work. In this article, we’re going to show you how to disable automatic reboot after updates installation in Windows 10.

    Want to get rid of this problem but don’t feel comfortable with Windows 10 disable automatic restart? We have something extra for you. We are also going to show you how to configure this annoying auto-reboot option without turning it off.

    Method #1 – Turn off automatic reboot from the Settings App

    This method will actually let you to set a schedule for when you allow auto-reboot and for when you want to block the reboot Windows process. Otherwise said, you will select some active hours. Outside of those active hours, the device should be able to automatically reboot after the updates.

    For this:

    1. Go to Settings;
    2. Identify and click on Update and security;
    3. Identify and click on Active Hours;
    4. Edit the Start time and End time fields for the time frame when you want to block the auto-reboot.

    Important:

    If the restart process has already been scheduled, after the last step from above, you should click on the Restart Options link and edit the Time and Day fields. That way, you will be scheduling the restart for a time convenient to you for the disable automatic restart.

    Method #2 – Disable automatic reboot from the Task Scheduler

    Again, if updates were installed and you want to get the Windows 10 disable automatic restart, you can go to the Task Scheduler and then:

    1. Follow the path: Task Scheduler Library > Microsoft > Windows > Update Orchestrator;
    2. Identify and right-click to the task labeled as Reboot;
    3. From the context menu that will show up, select the option Disable.

    Method #3 – Disable automatic reboot from the Group Policy

    The Group Policy editor can serve for many useful purposes and Windows 10 disable automatic restart is one of them. Here’s what you need to do:

    1. Launch the Run box by simultaneously pressing the Windows key and the R key from your keyboard;
    2. In the newly opened box type in msc;
    3. Press Enter or hit the OK button to launch the Local Group Policy Editor;
    4. Follow the path: Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Update;
    5. On the right-hand panel, identify the setting that says “No auto restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates installations” and right-click on it;
    6. From the context menu that will show up, select the option Enabled.
    7. Click OK for the changes to take place.

    Method #4 – Disable automatic reboot from the Registry Editor

    There are numerous Windows tweaks that you can do from both the Group Policy and the Registry editors. This method of disabling automatic reboot after updates installation should work flawlessly with all Windows 10 editions, so here are the steps to implement disable automatic restart:

    1. Launch the Run box by simultaneously pressing the Windows key and the R key from your keyboard;
    2. In the newly opened box type in regedit;
    3. Press Enter or hit the OK button to launch the Registry Editor;
    4. Follow the path: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > SOFTWARE > Policies > Microsoft > Windows > WindowsUpdate > AU;
    5. If you don’t find an AU key, you will simply have to create it inside the WindowsUpdate folder;
    6. Create a DWORD-32 new value;
    7. Edit the newly created value and name it NoAutoRebootWithLoggedOnUsers;
    8. Double-click on the newly created value to edit it and type in 1;
    9. Click OK for the changes to take effect.

    Following these steps, you will get the chance to decide whether you want to:

    • Update and restart
    • Update and shut down

    If you enjoyed what you’ve learned, tell us in the comments below what method would you prefer most and why!

    It is possible to enable Update Restart Notifications in Windows 10. When enabled, the operating system will keep you informed about scheduled restart times. Notifications will be shown more frequently so you won’t forget when the operating system reboots your PC.

    To Enable Update Restart Notifications in Windows 10, follow the instructions below.

    Open Settings and go to Update & recovery -> Windows Update.

    There, click the link Restart options on the right. The following page will appear:

    Enable the option Show more notifications as shown above and you are done.

    Windows 10 is known to auto restart your PC when it installs updates. If the user does not restart the operating system for a certain period of time, Windows 10 starts showing warnings that the PC will be restarted at a specific time. Eventually, it restarts it on its own even if the user is in the middle of something important. Many users find this behavior unpleasant. Having advanced notifications enabled will allow you to save your work and plan your restart.

    The user can also configure the feature “Active Hours”. Active hours is a special period of time during which you are expected to be using your PC or phone. No updates will be installed, and no restarts will be scheduled during those hours. If the user sets active hours, for example, between 10 AM and 3 PM, Windows Update will not disturb the user during that period. Only between 3 PM to 10 AM, Windows Update will perform its regular maintenance and downloads, install updates and restart.

    Finally, you can permanently stop Windows 10 reboots after installing updates. Follow the instructions given in the article, “How to permanently stop Windows 10 reboots after installing updates”. Alternatively, you may want to disable Windows Update completely.

    Winaero greatly relies on your support. You can help the site keep bringing you interesting and useful content and software by using these options:

    If you like this article, please share it using the buttons below. It won’t take a lot from you, but it will help us grow. Thanks for your support!

    Author: Sergey Tkachenko

    Sergey Tkachenko is a software developer who started Winaero back in 2011. On this blog, Sergey is writing about everything connected to Microsoft, Windows and popular software. Follow him on Telegram, Twitter, and YouTube. View all posts by Sergey Tkachenko

    Windows Admin Center is a locally deployed, browser-based app for managing Windows servers, clusters, hyper-converged infrastructure, as well as Windows 10 PCs. It is a free product and is ready to use in production. When prompted with an error when trying to access WAC from other browsers saying the site is not secure. See the following links for “How to setup Windows Admin Center, “How to install Chocolatey” and “How to install, upgrade and uninstall software with Chocolatey“. You may also be interested in Winglet, which is also a Windows Package manager “Winglet”. See how to install Winglet and how to install applications with Winglet CLI.

    • On Windows 10, it uses port 6516 by default, but the option to use a different port is possible. You can have a shortcut created and let Windows Admin Center manage your Trusted Hosts.
    • Windows Server, Windows Admin Center is installed as a network service. You must specify the port that the service listens on, and it requires a certificate for HTTPS. Here I am using the default https port (443).

    See links for more info on how to install Windows Admin Center (WAC).
    – Windows Admin Center (WAC) Deployment.
    – How to install Windows Admin Center (WAC) in an unattended mode using a self-signed certificate

    To use the update functionality, access the WAC via the url or locally,
    – Click on the Server and Under Tools
    – Select Updates

    Here you have two (2) restart options which are
    On how to test network connection to the Windows Admin Center (WAC) Gateway, see the link https://techdirectarchive.com/2019/12/18/how-to-test-network-connection-to-the-windows-admin-center-wac-gateway/

    • Restart immediately and
    • Schedule Restart.

    Testing the capabilities of schedule restart
    – You can search the update catalog for more info on this update you are trying to install http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=KB4534273

    Click on install update to continue. After successful restart, notifications will pop-up showing updates were successfully installed. This will start the searching for updates and when found, it will install.
    From the Admin Center (You can see the progress bar).

    Note : On the desktop where the updates are installed, you will get a push notification displayed on the screen showing updates are being installed.

    Also from the settings windows, this change can also be viewed as shown below.

    This update will also be shown via the settings window after completion on the Server as shown below. Here you can see the updates have been installed and are pending restart based on the time I have scheduled.

    When this completes, it will prompt you with the notification that *You are up to date*.

    From the WAC console, you can also see the notification displayed.

    Note: If you have updates applied already from WSUS or pulled directly from Microsoft, One way you can test this install update function is to uninstall updates and re-install to test this functionality. For known issues , see the following link.

    I hope you found this blog post helpful. If you have any questions, please let me know in the comment session.

    If you want to feel totally assured that Windows 10 won’t restart your computer and install updates while you’re busy working, you’ll be pleased to know about the Active Hours feature that Microsoft has added in the Anniversary Update (rolling out on Tuesday, August 2). Mind you, Windows 10 is already pretty good about understanding when your PC is in use, so as not to disrupt your activities with an update. In my experience, most Windows restarts are scheduled for early in the morning when you’re not likely to be using your PC. You can also schedule the update to be installed at a specific time. Even so, Microsoft is giving users even more control over the update process.

    Active Hours lets you specifiy a specific block of time every day when it is forbidden for your PC to restart and install updates. Before you ask, yes, I did test to see what would happen if I set my Active Hours from 8:00 a.m. to 7:59 a.m. Nope, it wouldn’t let me do it. The feature only lets you block up to 12 hours per day, which means you can’t use Active Hours as a workaround to defeat Windows Update.

    Active Hours

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    Start by clicking on Change active hours.

    To set your active hours, click on Start > Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update. When you get there, on the main portion of the app’s screen, click Change active hours, which is under the Update settings subheading.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    A blue screen will appear with a start and end time. By default, Active Hours are set for 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.. To change at, simply click on either the start or end time (or both) and change them to the times you want.

    In my example, I made my active hours from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (remember, 12 hours is the maximum). After you’ve selected the block of time you want click Save, and you’re done.

    That’s all there is to Active Hours. You can now use your PC with the knowledge that updates will never be installed during that time.

    I’m currently working on updating any of my users who are on Windows 10 1511 to a newer version since that one is out of support, but I’m running into a bit of an issue. I have the 1703 Feature Update approved in WSUS with a deadline set to make sure the computers install the update.

    The problem is that as far as I can tell, there’s no way to script a day to reboot the computer automatically. When I open Settings and go to Windows Update, it tells me that a reboot is scheduled for later in the week. I can manually adjust the schedule here, but since I have many users who need this update, I’d ideally like to have a way to set that schedule remotely so I can force the reboot to happen on a certain night.

    I’ve tried using PDQ Deploy to send the normal shutdown /r command, but that one doesn’t install the Feature Update. It just reboots the computer, and the update is still waiting to be installed at the time scheduled in Settings after the PC boots back up.

    Has anyone else experienced this? Is there a way to force this update to install on a certain night? Any help is appreciated!

    Enter to win a a “Don’t Panic” inspired embroidered hand towel

    9 Replies

    I don’t have an answer for your specific question BUT have you tested this update? We did EXACTLY what you are doing as far as updating from 1511 (which worked reasonably well in our environment) to 1703 and now it’s a bit of a nightmare.

    Windows 10 1703 seems to have issues on all computers that have Office 2010 or 2013 installed. I can replicate these issues right down to a clean install of windows and the only application installed is Office 2010. There are a number of threads with similar experiences.

    I just wanted to give you a heads up in case you are heading for trouble.

    What sort of issues? I’m running 1703 myself currently with Office 2010, upgraded through WSUS, and it’s running perfect for me.

    You can configure your automatic updates through GPO and add a script to restart at whatever time you want it to happen. First, disable the auto restart for Scheduled Auto Updates. Go to your GPO Editor > Computer Configuration >Policies > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Update. Enable “No auto-restart for scheduled Automatic Update installations”

    I would like to think your computers are in containers in your AD and you already modified the GPO that contains the WSUS information. so, to reboot the computers in a specific OU, you can create a task through the GPO. Go to your GPO Editor > Computer Configuration > Preferences > Control Panel Settings > Scheduled tasks >
    Create your task and use the command

    Your argument should be: -r -t 120 -c “Your computer will restart in two minutes” and run as admin. You can change the grace time to restart (-t is seconds, so 120 here is 2 minutes). Adjust accordingly, force the GPO if there are no app installations specified that would require restart, or wait for the GPO to be auto applied.

    The problem with that is that when I reboot using shutdown.exe /r, the Feature Update isn’t installed. This works for normal Windows Updates, but not the 1703 upgrade.

    I don’t think there is a way to invoke the install updates and restart/shutdown option from the shutdown command. Found this with a quick google search. I’ve never used this so try at your own risk.

    What sort of issues? I’m running 1703 myself currently with Office 2010, upgraded through WSUS, and it’s running perfect for me.

    Here’s one of the threads. Have you tried creating a new profile? Out of 30 computers that we upgraded all but one has experienced similar issues. Typically everything appeared normal after the upgrade until the user started working. In the case of the Office 2010 machines those users universal complaint was they could not install a printer from our print server using a short name. They also had some issues with notepad. When we tried to blow away their profile and recreate it that is when the computer lost it’s mind (on every single machine).

    Mine in fact was the only one that did not have an issue (of course it was the machine I tested the upgrade on). As it turned out mine started having some interesting issues as well but I can’t necessarily point at 1703 for that).

    The machines with 2013 on them had a different issue that is too lengthy to describe here without getting off topic but EVERY machine with Office 2013 has the same problem.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    Microsoft releases constant updates to improve stability, squash bugs, and fix security issues. Updates are good for the most part, and you should always keep your machine up to date. However, one thing that bothers some Windows 10 users is that it automatically restarts the system to install updates.

    The benefit of this is that no matter the user, the system stays up to date with all the security fixes in place. On the downside, it can be a bit annoying for power users.

    To deal with that, Microsoft introduced a new feature in Windows 10 called Active Hours. When enabled, Windows will not auto-restart itself for up to eighteen hours, depending on your configuration. If you think this is not enough time, then you can further extend the auto-restart schedule as shown below.

    Using Group Policy Editor

    The easiest way to change the auto-restart schedule is to use the Group Policy Editor available to all Windows 10 Pro users.

    1. Open Group Policy Editor by searching for “gpedit.msc” in the Start menu. Once opened, go to “Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Update.”

    2. On the right panel find and double-click on the “Specify deadline before auto-restart for update installation” policy.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    3. In the policy properties window select the “Enabled” option, choose the number of days (maximum of fourteen) under the Options section and click “OK” to save the changes.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    As per the policy info, you can only extend the auto-restart schedule up to fourteen days. So even though the policy option lets you choose up to thirty days, Windows will only defer auto-restart for fourteen days.

    Additionally, for the policy to work, the “Always automatically restart at scheduled time” and “No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates installations” policies should not be enabled, meaning both these policies should either be disabled or set to “Not Configured.” You can find both these policies at the same place as the policy we just modified.

    To make the changes take effect, restart your system. To revert back, simply disable the policy.

    Using Windows Registry

    If you are a Windows 10 Home user, the only way to configure the auto-restart schedule is to use the Windows Registry. In the Registry we need to create a key and a couple of values. To be on the safe side, back up the Registry before proceeding.

    1. First, search for “regedit” in the Start menu, right-click on it and select “Run as administrator.” In the registry editor copy and paste the below path in the address bar and press Enter.

    2. We need to create a new key. To do that, right-click on the Windows key and select “New -> Key.” Name the key “WindowsUpdate.” If you already have the key, proceed to the next step.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    3. Right-click on the right panel and select “New -> DWORD (32-bit) Value.” Name the value “SetAutoRestartDeadline.”

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    4. Double-click on the value and set Value Data as “1.”

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    5. Just like before, create another DWORD value and name it “AutoRestartDeadlinePeriodInDays.”

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    6. Double-click on the value, select “Decimal” under the Base section, enter the number of days you want to delay auto restart and click “OK” to save the changes. Similar to the Group Policy method, you can only extend the update auto restart for up to fourteen days.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    Now, restart your computer to make the registry changes take effect. If you ever want to revert back, just delete the value we just created, or change the value data of “SetAutoRestartDeadline” to “0.”

    Comment below sharing your thoughts and experiences regarding using the above method to prevent Windows from auto-restarting to install updates as long as possible.

    Our latest tutorials delivered straight to your inbox

    windows update 03

    Microsoft Windows provides its own patch management solution referred to as Windows Update. Having a proper grip of these updates is paramount for your production workflow as they often start automatically during business hours resulting in downtime. With PowerShell cmdlets, you can automate Windows updates, saving you effort and time. With the right patch management solution, you can enhance your system by testing or installing the latest software updates and patches. Patches are temporary fixes for existing issues between full-scale software releases. If patch management is effectively performed, you can promptly address vulnerabilities of your system and mitigate any potential threats. Kindly refer to these related guides: How to update PowerShellGet and Package Management, and how to install and update PowerShell version 7 on Windows and Linux, Important Areas to Master on WSUS, Configuring WSUS Email Notification to Work With Office365, Configuring WSUS Email Notification to Work With Office365 – IIS SMTP Relay Server and how to configure SSL between WSUS servers (Upstream and Downstream Servers).

    More on PSWindowsUpdate

    To make the Windows patch management process smooth and easy as discussed above, you can use the PSWindowsUpdate module. This module is publicly available and can be downloaded for free from the PowerShell Gallery. The main requirement is that a computer needs to run Windows OS versions starting from Vista or Windows Server 2008. Also, you need to have PowerShell 2.0 or later. With PSWindowsUpdate, you can identify if any Windows updates are available for your computer. Moreover, this module allows you to centrally manage Windows updates across various Windows servers and workstations. This way, you can remotely control which updates are installed, removed, or hidden.

    Note: This module is not installed by default on Windows Servers and when installed it contains a set of functions to check, download and install updates from PowerShell. First, download the PSWindowsUpdateModule:

    Screenshot 2022 03 23 at 20.56.02

    Screenshot 2022 03 23 at 20.57.54

    Next, install the PSWindowsUpdateModule. To have the module installed in PowerShell 5 and above, use the cmdlets below. You may be interested in this guide as well.

    Note: To automate this installation in an unattended (silent) mode, use the command by adding the “-Force” flag as shown below

    Screenshot 2022 03 23 at 21.03.36

    To list all the modules installed, use the command below

    Next, run the command below. If the updates are not already downloaded, the command will contact the WSUS and pull the updates, have the updates installed and restart the server.

    Here is the meaning of the command.
    Get-WUInstall, Install-WindowsUpdate (alias for Get-WindowsUpdate –Install) – install updates

    Install Microsoft Updates

    For Updates directly from the Microsoft update center, use the command below. The command below might not work correctly, because of this, the “install-WindowsUpdate” is my desired choice.

    For Updates directly from the Microsoft update center, use this command below as this is proven to work!

    To have this run at a specific period of time, create a PowerShell script and create a scheduled task to automate Windows Update with the code below.

    The AcceptAll key accepts the installation of all update packages, and AutoReboot allows Windows to automatically restart after the updates are installed.

    screenshot 2020 03 25 at 21.52.19

    WSUS Updates (Windows Server Update Services) : For WSUS updates, the following commands work correctly.

    Next steps! Have your script automated
    – Create a scheduled task , see the following link below for more details. For Task Scheduled task error and success code, see the following link.

    I hope you found this blog post helpful. If you have any questions, please let me know in the comment session.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    Despite the common belief, the practice of programming a system reboot or shutdown of a client or server machine isn’t necessarily a bad thing: in some limited scenario planning a regular shutdown or reboot of the operating system could be a decent workaround to securely put the machine in a desired state – for example, to make it ready for a VM-based backup or for installing a planned update. Depending on the situation, it could even be acceptable to setup a recurrent period – once a week, for example – to issue a system reboot.

    The ideal interval, needless to say, might vary a lot depending on the features performed by our server, its service availability expectactions and other variables in play: if the server performs its activities only during daytime can probably be restarted every night without major issue, while a web server that serves sites or services troughout the world should be restarted only in exceptional circumstances. It’s also worth noting that you can often get the same benefits by recycling the Application Pools or other resource-heavy processes, as we’ll see in a short while.

    Setting up our machines to reboot at regular intervals could also be useful to ensure that the system will be able to get back on track in case of a planned reboot – such as those issued by system updates or due to unforeseen situations – service interruption, power failure, hardware failure and other more or less serious events that could always happen. Since the ability to recover after those unexpected events is the fundamental premise of any Disaster Recovery procedure, setting a reboot at regular intervals might also be a not-so-terrible way to periodically test our system against these kind of threats.

    To set up an automatic system restart, open the Control Panel (if you do not know how to do on Windows 10, read here) and open the Task Scheduler in the following way, depending on your version of Windows:

    • Windows 2000/XP, Windows Server 2003 and previous versions/builds: select the Task Scheduler (or Scheduled Tasks) icon.
    • Windows Vista, Windows 7/8/8.1/10, Windows Server 2008 and newer versions: open the Administrative Tools folder, then select the Task Schedulericon.

    Once the Task Scheduler window is open, create a new task using the Create Task action in the following way:

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10A modal window will be opened: use the General tab to setup a name and a description to the new task. Other than that, it can be useful to properly setup the following options:

    • Run whether user is logged on or not, to ensure that the task will be executed even if there are no logged-in users.
    • Run with highest privileges, to make sure that the task will be executed with administrator rights – this is required for issuing a system hutdown or a reboot.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    For further info regarding the other options, check out this MS TechNet article.

    Once done, move to the Trigger tab and click on the New button to create an execution trigger – which is, the event that will make the system run the task itself. A New Trigger modal window will then be opened, which you can use to setup such event. The most common trigger to setup here is a time-based trigger, which can be set by selecting the On a schedule option on the Begin the task dropdown list:

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10 Il trigger che abbiamo creato eseguirà l’attività ogni notte alle ore 04:00.

    For further info regarding triggers, take a look at this MS TechNet page.

    Once done, move to the Actions tab and click to the New button to setup the command to execute whenever the trigger fires.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    HaloEffect17

    • Aug 10, 2016
  • #1
  • Before the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, I used to be able to select “Notify to schedule restart” in the Windows Update settings to prevent my computer from doing a sudden restart after it finished downloading updates. It worked perfectly as I was able to hit decide when I wanted to restart my computer to complete the update.

    However, after the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, you’ll notice that this option is no longer available in the advanced update options. Go see for yourself – it’s not there, and it’s replaced with this stupid “active hours” setting that tells Windows the hours not to restart your computer for updates. Sounds good? Well. think again, you can only set 12 active hours and not the entire day.

    As you can tell, this is problematic because say I was working outside active hours while Windows was conducting updates and I had some important documents, other downloads, or windows open. I go to do something else for awhile (leaving my computer idle), and then return, only to find that my computer restarted itself and I lost everything that I had open. I find this really frustrating.

    Apparently, a handful of people on Reddit are concerned about the same issue that I have. I’d advise you to check out this link for some context.

    Does anyone here have a problem with this, too? And also, does anyone know of a fix that can prevent Windows from restarting automatically even outside of active hours? I want to be able to decide when I want my computer to restart like I was able to before the anniversary update. Thanks.

    This week is also about configuring Windows 10 devices. This week is all about scheduling a reboot on a Windows 10 device by using Microsoft Intune and Windows 10 MDM. That can be useful for scheduling reboots on for example shared devices. Simply making sure that even those type of devices get a reboot every now and then, or making sure that specific configurations or installations are getting fully applied. This can be achieved by using the Reboot CSP. In this post I’ll have a look at the available policy settings and the configuration of those policy settings. I’ll end this post by having a look at the results of the configuration.

    Available policy settings

    The Reboot CSP can be used to configure reboot settings. That CSP contains only a few policy settings and methods (nodes). The required policy setting for this post is available as a policy setting (node) in this CSP. The root node of the Reboot CSP is ./Vendor/MSFT/Reboot and the table below describes the nodes below.

    Policy Description
    RebootNow This node can be used to execute a reboot of the device. It will trigger a reboot within 5 minutes to allow the user to wrap up any active work. This method is used when triggering a Restart via the Intune console.
    Schedule/Single This node can be used to execute a reboot of the device at a scheduled date and time. Setting a null (empty) date will delete an existing schedule. The date and time value is ISO8601, and both, the date and time, are required.
    Example : 2019-10-01T22:00:00Z
    Schedule/DailyRecurrent This node can be used to execute a reboot of the device, each day, at a scheduled time starting at the configured time and date. Setting a null (empty) date will delete an existing schedule. The date and time value is ISO8601, and both, the date and time, are required.
    Example : 2019-10-02T21:00:00Z

    Configuring the policy settings

    Now let’s continue by looking at the actual configuration of the different configurable policy settings of the Reboot CSP. That means configuring a single reboot schedule and a daily recurrent reboot schedule. This can be achieved by using a custom device configuration profile. The following four steps walk through the configuration of the single reboot schedule, by using the information of above (including the example values).

    The daily recurrent reboot schedule can be achieved by following the same steps and simply adjusting the OMA-URI and the Value. The screenshots below show both configurations. Also, by using two different Data type configurations. After creating the profile, it can be assigned like any other device configuration profile.

    1. Open the Azure portal and navigate to Microsoft Intune >Device configuration >Profiles to open the Devices configuration – Profiles blade
    2. On the Devices configuration – Profiles blade, click Create profile to open the Create profile blade
    3. On the Create profile blade, provide the following information and click Create
    • Name: Provide a valid name
    • Description: (Optional) Provide a valid description
    • Platform: Windows 10 and later
    • Profile type: Custom
    • Settings: See step 4
    1. On the Custom OMA-URI Settings blade, provide the following information and click Add to open the Add row blade. On the Add row blade, provide the following information and click OK (and click OK in the Custom OMA-URI blade)
    • Name: Single reboot schedule
    • Description: (Optional) Provide a valid description
    • OMA-URI: ./Vendor/MSFT/Reboot/Schedule/Single
    • Data type: Select String
    • Value: 2019-10-01T22:00:00Z

    Note : The same configuration can be achieved by using the Date and time data type and selecting the date and time in the UI (as shown below). Keep in mind that it will translate the selected date and time to the UTC time, which in my case is currently a 2 hour difference. To remove the schedule, use 0000-00-00T00:00:00Z as a value.

      Figure 1: Configuration single reboot using date-time

    Result on the device

    After assigning the created device configuration profile(s), it’s time to have a look at the results on a device. The Reboot CSP will create a scheduled task for the configured reboot schedules (as shown below). Those scheduled tasks are available at Microsoft > Windows > EnteriseMgmt > > Reboot.

    As I’ve configured a single reboot schedule and a daily recurrent reboot schedule, the screenshot below shows a task RebootCSP daily recurrent reboot and a task RebootCSP scheduled reboot. Those tasks are used for performing the actual reboots by using deviceenroller.exe -ForcedReboot.

      Figure 5: Task Scheduler

    After successfully rebooting multiple devices, I’ve noticed the following to keep in mind:

    • The Last Run Time of the scheduled tasks never updates after a reboot, as if the scheduled task is recreated with a new Next Run Time.
    • The result of the custom device configuration profile in Microsoft Intune still shows a Remediation failed error message, while the configuration is successful.

    More information

    For more information about the Reboot CSP, have a look at the documentation about the Reboot CSP.

    Account Information

    Share with Your Friends

    How to schedule a Windows 10 shutdown for a specific date and time

    How to schedule a Windows 10 shutdown for a specific date and time

    Using the Windows 10’s built-in Task Scheduler, you can set up a process in which a computer will shut down automatically at a specific time.

    Image: grapestock, Getty Images/iStockphoto

    For many businesses, it’s standard operating procedure for employees to leave their workstation computers on when they leave the office. Typically, at some point later in the evening, those workstation computers will slip into sleep or hibernation mode, which reduces power consumption—at least a little. But what if a business wants to reduce power consumption even more?

    Must-read Windows coverage

    • Get Microsoft Office for Windows with this lifetime license
    • Kaspersky uncovers fileless malware inside Windows event logs
    • How to find your Windows 11 product key: 3 simple methods
    • How to enable access to god-mode in Microsoft Windows 11

    In Microsoft Windows 10, it is possible to set up a scheduled shutdown of a PC for a specific time. Theoretically, a computer that is completely shut down will consume less power and save a business considerable amounts of money, as well as reduce its carbon footprint. Arranging an after-hours shut down is accomplished with the aide of the Windows 10 Task Scheduler.

    This tutorial shows you how to use the Windows Task Scheduler to start a shutdown sequence for a Windows 10 computer at a specific time.

    SEE: Windows 10 Start menu hacks (TechRepublic Premium)

    Schedule a Windows 10 shut down for a specific date and time

    Some version of the Task Scheduler application has been part of the Windows Administrative Tool Kit from the operating system’s first release. The Windows 10 version can be accessed by typing “task scheduler” into the desktop search box and then selecting the appropriate result. As you can see in Figure A, the Task Scheduler can perform many tasks and can be a bit intimidating at first glance.

    Figure A

    Figure A

    In the left-hand navigation bar, click on the Task Scheduler Library to reveal a list of currently running tasks on your Windows 10 computer. In the example shown in Figure B, you can see tasks triggered by various events to update Adobe and Google apps, perform Dell maintenance and much more. At any one time, your PC could have dozens of potential tasks set to perform once a given event is triggered.

    Figure B

    Our scheduled shut down is classified as a basic task, so click the Create Basic Task item in the right-hand window to start the creation process (Figure C).

    Figure C

    Figure B

    Give your task a name and a description and then click the Next button to reach the Trigger screen (Figure D).

    Figure D

    Figure C

    There are several choices shown. You could run this shutdown process every day, once a week or perhaps once a month. You can also ask the Task Scheduler to wait for a specific event. For our example, we will choose daily. Click Next when you have made your choice. If you chose daily, you will then be asked to specify a starting date and a time for execution (Figure E).

    Figure E

    Figure D

    After making your choices, click the Next button to reach the Action screen (Figure F). There are three choices on this screen, but the one we will use is Start A Program.

    Figure F

    Figure E

    Click Next to move to the screen shown in Figure G. This is where the main function of our task will be entered.

    Figure G

    Figure F

    Enter “shutdown” into the script box and enter ” -s -f -t 60″ into the Add Arguments box. The arguments are part of the standard settings for the shutdown.exe program. The -s tells Windows to shut down, or you could use -r to have the PC restart instead. The -f forces running applications to close as part of the shutdown process and the -t 60 adds a 1-minute countdown. If you want to make it an immediate shutdown, change that argument to -t 0.

    Click Next to reach the Finish screen (Figure H), where you will be presented with a summary of your task and given the opportunity to have the properties dialog open for this task after you click the Finish button.

    Figure H

    Figure G

    When you are satisfied with the setting for your task, click the Finish button to save it and then close out the Task Scheduler. For our example, starting 11/12/2019 at 1:00am, our Windows 10 computer will close any running applications and shut down after a 1-minute countdown.

    Microsoft Weekly Newsletter

    Be your company’s Microsoft insider by reading these Windows and Office tips, tricks, and cheat sheets.

    With the various methods of deploying Windows 10 Feature Updates, the Feature Update Rollouts via Application Deployment does not provide restart notifications to the user and as such the device will automatically reboot if the “/noreboot” switch is not added to your batch file or if the switch is added the reboot will not happen until such time the user manually does it and then the user might be surprised to find that the Feature Update completion is done after the reboot. Configuration Manager will also only report “Success” after the reboot due to the detection method used.

    As such I have written a PowerShell script to assist with the scheduling of a reboot to finalize the Feature Update installation.

    To include the script in your Install.cmd, you can use the example below:

    start /w WindowsUpdateBox /Update /PreDownload /quiet /noreboot

    start /w WindowsUpdateBox /Update /Install /quiet /noreboot

    start /w WindowsUpdateBox /Update /Finalize /quiet /noreboot

    PowerShell -NoProfile -ExecutionPolicy Bypass -Command “& ‘.\RebootScheduleTimer.ps1′”

    You can download the PowerShell script HERE

    The script will and give the user 15 minutes (900 Seconds) to either schedule a restart or restart immediately.

    How to schedule restarts for updates in windows 10

    The script will create a scheduled task for the restart as seen below:

    Account Information

    Share with Your Friends

    How to control updates in Windows 10

    How to control updates in Windows 10

    Windows updates can be intrusive–here’s how to better manage them.

    Image: iStockphoto/Murat Göçmen

    Large organizations typically control and deploy Windows updates through various management tools. But small businesses and individual users are more apt to install updates directly on their PCs through the Windows Update feature. The problem here is that updates delivered this way sometimes try to install at the worst possible times, interrupting your workflow and focus. Fortunately, Microsoft gives you certain options to control when and how updates install on your computer.

    You can set the active hours during which time your PC won’t reboot after an update, opt to download updates over metered connections, and pause your updates for up to 35 days. With the Windows 10 May 2019 Update, you can also pause updates for up to seven days if necessary. Let’s look at the different ways you can control Windows 10 updates.

    To cover the steps here, I’m using the Windows 10 May 2019 Update, aka Windows 10 version 1903. All the options I describe are available in the previous version of Windows 10, except for the one on pausing updates for seven days. Many of the features I cover here are found only in Windows 10 Enterprise and Pro and not in Windows 10 Home.

    To view and manage your updates, open Settings and then click on the setting for Update & Security (Figure A).

    Figure A

    In the Windows Update section, click on the option to Change Active Hours. This displays the current start and end hours during which time Windows will not automatically reboot to fully install an update. To change the current active hours, click the Change link and select the new hours (Figure B). Click Save.

    Figure B

    Alternatively, you can ask Windows to automatically adjust the active hours based on when you typically use your computer. This means the active hours may change if your work schedule changes. To do this, turn on the switch to Automatically Adjust Active Hours For This Device Based On Activity (Figure C).

    Figure C

    Next, return to the main Windows Update screen to explore other options. Click on the entry for Advanced Options (Figure D).

    Figure D

    If you wish to receive updates for Microsoft Office and other Microsoft products, turn on the switch to Receive Updates For Other Microsoft Products When You Update Windows.

    If you want to be able to download updates over metered connections, such as those over a cellular network, turn on the switch to Download Updates Over Metered Connections (Extra Charges May Apply).

    Note that Windows sets cellular connections as metered by default. Wi-Fi and Ethernet networks are not set to metered, though you can set them this way if necessary. As one example, you might want to set a hotspot created through your phone as a metered connection. To do this from Settings, go to Network And Internet and then select Wi-Fi. Click on the link for Manage Known Networks. Select the network you want to set as metered and click on the Properties button. Turn on the switch to Set As Metered Connection.

    Back at the Update Options screen, you can choose to have Windows restart as soon as possible. You might do this if you’re expecting a critical update and don’t want to wait for it to completely install. To do this, turn on the switch to Restart This Device As Soon As Possible When A Restart Is Required To Install An Update.

    To be notified when your PC requires a reboot after an update, turn on the switch to Show A Notification When Your PC Requires A Restart To Finish Updating.

    Next, you can pause updates for up to 35 days. You may choose this option if you wish to avoid an upcoming update or simply don’t want any changes made to Windows for a certain period of time. Keep in mind though: You may also miss any critical updates, so you don’t want to defer updates for too long. To enable this, click on the Select Date menu and choose a specific date for when you want to resume updates (Figure E). To turn off the pausing, return to the main Windows Update screen and click on the button to Resume Updates.

    Figure E

    Next, you can defer certain types of updates for a specific number of days. In the section for Choose When Updates Are Installed, you can defer for up to eight days feature updates, such as the Windows 10 2019 Update, and quality updates such as security improvements. To set either one, click the dropdown menu for days and choose the number of days from 1 to 8 (Figure F).

    Figure F

    Finally, return to the main Windows Update screen. The Windows 10 May 2019 Update offers an additional option to pause updates. At the main screen, click on the button to Pause Updates For 7 More Days (Figure G). To resume updates before the seven days are up, click on the button to Resume Updates.

    Figure G

    Microsoft Weekly Newsletter

    Be your company’s Microsoft insider by reading these Windows and Office tips, tricks, and cheat sheets.