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How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

I have two monitors and if I put one tab of the browser on one monitor and another private tab in another it splits them into two instances in the taskbar but sometimes I don’t open them in the same order or have to close and reopen one, which then can put them in the wrong order. I can’t organize them because moving one moves both. I haven’t found an option in Windows to enable this yet.

On XP I downloaded a third-party program to order the taskbar but is there a setting in Windows 7 to enable this or what do you recommend as a third-party app to do this? Thanks.

Replies (9) 

Thank you for reaching out to us at Microsoft Community Forum.

How exactly have you set up multiple monitors (Extended or Duplicate)?

Windows Task bar automatically splits the browser Windows into two instances as the two Windows are on different screens.

To change how programs and buttons appear on the taskbar

Open Taskbar and Start Menu Properties by clicking the Start button How to select multiple windows on the taskbar, clicking Control Panel , clicking Appearance and Personalization , and then clicking Taskbar and Start Menu .

Under Taskbar appearance , select one of the options from the Taskbar buttons list:

Always combine, hide labels

Combine when taskbar is full

Never combine

To use small icons, select the Use small icons check box. To use large icons, clear the check box.

Click OK .

Note:

You can select Never Combine as this will allow you to move the browser Window Separately on multiple screens.

For more information please check the articles provided below:

Do let us know if that helps. Feel free to post on Microsoft Community in case you have any issues/queries while working with Windows.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

Nearly all Windows 10 apps let you open multiple windows. You can even run multiple instances of most apps, and those instances can have their own settings. It’s a convenient way to sign in to multiple accounts at once in the apps you use.

New App Windows vs. New App Instances

Many apps can have multiple windows. Those windows let you view different files and other content. For example, you could have two Chrome browser windows open. These windows will generally share the same settings.

A new app instance is different from app windows. In a new instance, your app runs from scratch. This means you can use different user accounts and settings in each app instance.

Some apps like Google Chrome and Firefox let you use different accounts without running multiple app instances. This is possible using the user profiles feature built into these apps.

How to Open Multiple Windows of an App

There are several ways to open a new window in your apps on your PC. Some of these ways are to:

Use a Keyboard Shortcut

One easy way to launch a new window in your apps is to use a keyboard shortcut. This might not work in all apps, but there’s no harm in giving it a try.

While at least one window of an app is open, press Ctrl+N on your keyboard. This should open a new window.

Use the Start Menu

You can relaunch your app from the Start menu to open a new window. To do this, launch the “Start” menu, search for your app, then click your app in the results.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

Use the Taskbar

You can open a new window right from the taskbar, too. To do this, right-click your running app in the taskbar and click the app name.

For example, if you right-clicked the Google Chrome icon in the taskbar, select “Google Chrome” from the context menu.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

Use a Taskbar Keyboard Shortcut

An easy way to launch a new app window from the taskbar without right-clicking your app is to use a keyboard shortcut.

Hold down the “Shift” key on your keyboard and click your app in the taskbar. Your new app window will now open.

How to Open Multiple Instances of an App with Different Settings

If you want to use different accounts and settings in the same app on your PC, you need to open a new instance of your app.

Windows 10 lets you do this by running the app as a different user. To do this, you must have at least one more user account on your PC. If you don’t have one, create a new local user account on your Windows computer.

Then, if your app’s shortcut is on your desktop, right-click the shortcut and select “Run as different user.”

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

If your app’s shortcut is not on your desktop, open the “Start” menu, search for your app, right-click your app in the results, and select “Open file location.” If this still shows a shortcut for your app, right-click that shortcut and select “Open file location” again.

Your aim is to get to the executable file for your app.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

When you find the app, right-click it and select “Run as different user.”

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

You now need to enter the username and password for the new account you just created on your PC. Then, click “OK.”

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

This new instance is completely isolated from your main instance. Any changes you make in this instance won’t reflect in the main instance of the app.

Bonus: Try the App’s Web Version

Many apps have online versions that you can access with your web browsers. These web apps are treated differently from native apps, which means that you can use accounts and options that are different from your native apps in these web apps.

For example, to sign in to multiple Skype accounts at once, you could sign in to one account in the Skype desktop application and sign in to another account on Skype’s website.

Skype, Slack, Outlook, and many other popular apps have web versions available.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

If you use any private apps on your PC, did you know that you can password-protect apps in Windows 10? This is a neat way to keep your apps from other users.

James Walker | April 2, 2021 October 8, 2019 | How-To

To cascade or stack application windows:

  1. Right-click your taskbar.
  2. Select “Cascade windows” or “Show windows stacked”.

Applies to

Windows 10’s most commonly used window management function is Snap, which lets you drag apps to the corners of your display to “snap” them side-by-side. However, the operating system also comes with a couple of other options, Stack and Cascade, which can be more helpful when you’re working with a large number of apps.

You can find Stack and Cascade by right-clicking your taskbar. You’ll see the two options as “Cascade windows” and “Show windows stacked”. Click the function you’d like to use.

Cascading windows

The cascade function repositions your windows so that each one is slightly nested inside another, like a stack of cards. This is intended to help you quickly identify all your open apps by looking at their titlebars. You can rapidly minimise or close apps using the titlebar buttons.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

In Windows 10, Cascade is perhaps less useful than it once was. Its functionality has been largely replaced by the Task View interface, which gives you an overview of all your apps while providing a preview of each.

Stacking windows

Stacked windows appear as a vertical stack of apps. Like Cascade, it’s unlikely you’ll be using this one often. Users of monitors in portrait orientation will find Stack helpful though, as it enables you to make the most of your vertical pixels.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

A separate option in the taskbar right-click menu, “Show windows side by side,” is similar to stack but works on the horizontal axis. It automatically arranges all your open apps so they’re visible as columns across your monitor. It feels like Snap but with support for more than two apps.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

Whether you use these features is entirely up-to-you. They’ve been a component of the Windows desktop for decades and remain available in Windows 10. While Cascade is now largely redundant, Stack gives you a window tiling solution that’s somewhere between Snap and the new FancyZones app.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

As an internet marketer, I am constantly opening up new applications all day long. It’s a bad habit I can’t seem to get away from. When you are multitasking non-stop, the last thing you want to do is close a tab and be prompted to save something you don’t need. Here is a quick tutorial on how to end multiple processes in task manager.

I realize this is not really a marketing tutorial, but this is a great productivity tutorial for anyone multitasking on their computer all day long. The less clicking the better!

Multiple Processes in Task Manager

So just how bad does it get? Well, maybe I am worst than most, but here is a screenshot from one days worth of work. As you can see I have more paint windows open than you can even count. Why? Well, a lot of times I take screenshots for blog posts and quickly save them out in paint. I also will throw them in Affinity Designer if they require more work done.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbarMultiple processes running

Yes, it is pretty bad I know. The problem? Well, I never need to save any of these as I have uploaded them to a blog somewhere, so I simply need to close all of them. The problem is that when you go to close paint, it prompts you to save your changes. This means I would have to literally click twice through 100+ windows just to close all of them.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbarSave prompt in paint

So the only option is to end multiple processes in task manager at once or restart my computer, which is definitely not an option.

How to End Multiple Processes in Task Manager

The default task manager in Windows, unfortunately, doesn’t let you select multiple processes. But there are a couple options when it comes to ending multiple processes with task manager. You can install a program or do it from the command prompt. I will show you both.

Option 1 – End Multiple Processes With Program

The very first way to easily end multiple processes in task manager is to download the free Process Hacker program. Be very careful with other applications that claim to do this. Many of them are a couple years old, require Java, and have adware in them. Also, a lot of older ones I tried also didn’t scale correctly on my high-resolution laptop.

Simply install Process Hacker and run it. You can then easily sort the applications by name, and select all of them, in this case mspaint.exe, and click “Terminate.” This will close all of them down in an instant, without prompting you to save.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbarTerminate multiple processes with Process Hacker

Option 2 – End Multiple Processes From Command Prompt

Your other option, and the way I prefer is to do it from the command prompt. I prefer this method because I like to keep my computer clean, no matter how safe the program is. If I can do it just as easy without an application, I will do it that way.

Step 1

Open up command prompt on your computer by pressing the start button, typing “CMD,” and pressing enter.

Step 2

Type in the following command and press enter. Obviously, you will need to use the actual process name. In my example, it is mspaint.exe. But this will work with any application.

This will immediately end all processes with that name, as seen below. You can also stack the commands if you have multiple applications you want to close.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbarSUCCESS: The process “mspaint.exe” with PID has been terminated.

You can also go one step further and create a shortcut to run this automatically. To do this, right-click on your desktop, go to “New,” and click on “Shortcut.”

How to select multiple windows on the taskbarNew shortcut in Windows

Type in the following command from above and click “Next.”

How to select multiple windows on the taskbarCreate shortcut to kill process

Then name your shortcut and click “Finish.”

How to select multiple windows on the taskbarName shortcut

You will then have a shortcut on your desktop in which you can double click at any time and it will run the command to terminate the processes. You can also pin this to your taskbar or start menu if you want.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbarScript to end multiple processes in task manager

Summary

As you can see there are some easy ways to end multiple processes in task manager. I prefer the second option, as I can just double click a shortcut and don’t need to install any programs. This is something I use every day, so hopefully, it will come in handy for you as well.

I would love to hear your thoughts. Do your applications stack up as fast as mine?

The Windows 10 taskbar houses frequently used apps as well as those that are currently in use, but it includes a few handy customization options to help improve your workflow.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

The Windows taskbar is a handy place for storing frequently used apps as well as those that are currently open. But you can tweak the taskbar to make it work the way you want. You can move it to other sides of the screen, automatically hide it when you don’t need it, or change the size of the icons. Let’s check out how.

Pin Apps to the Taskbar

The first thing you should know how to do is pin an app to the taskbar. You can do this from the Start menu, Start screen, or the Apps list. Click the Start button and right-click on any app icon or tile. Select More > Pin to Taskbar to lock the app to the Windows taskbar.

Move the Taskbar

By default, the taskbar appears at the bottom of the screen, but it can be moved to the top or either side of the screen. To do this manually, click on any empty area of the taskbar and drag it to your preferred location.

If you’d rather let Windows do the moving for you, right-click on any empty area of the taskbar and click “Taskbar settings” from the pop-up menu. Scroll down the taskbar settings screen to the entry for “Taskbar location on screen.” Click the drop-down box and set the location for left, top, right, or bottom.

Don’t leave the Taskbar settings screen just yet; there are several more tweaks we can make here.

Hide the Taskbar

Let’s say you want the taskbar to remain hidden unless you move your mouse to its location. If you’re using your Windows device in desktop mode, turn on the option at the top of the Taskbar settings screen that says “Automatically hide the taskbar in desktop mode.”

If you’re in tablet mode, turn on the option that says “Automatically hide the taskbar in tablet mode.” Your taskbar will vanish and only reappear when you move your mouse cursor and hover over the location of the bar.

Adjust Icon Size

Now let’s say you want to squeeze more icons onto the taskbar. Turn on the option for “Use small taskbar buttons,” and the existing icons shrink in size. If the icons are too small, go back to the Taskbar settings screen and turn off this option to return them to their larger size.

View Desktop

The small section of the Windows Taskbar in the lower-right corner of the screen is known as the “Show Desktop” button. If you click the button, it offers you a quick way to switch back and forth between the desktop and all open windows.

With some apps and windows open, click the Show Desktop button. Your desktop appears. Click the Show desktop button again and all the windows you had open will reappear in the foreground.

Peek at the Desktop

Do you want to sneak a peek at your desktop without closing or minimizing all your open windows? Open the Taskbar settings windows and turn on the option for “Use Peek to preview the desktop when you move your mouse to the Show Desktop button at the end of the taskbar.”

Now you can move your mouse to the lower-right corner of the screen, and by hovering over the Show Desktop button, your desktop should appear. Move your mouse cursor away from that spot, and your desktop goes back into hiding.

Resize Taskbar

Okay, now let’s say you have so many icons nestled on the taskbar that there’s barely room for them on a single row. You can resize the taskbar to make it grow taller. Just grab the top border of the taskbar and drag it up until it takes up two rows.

If you decide to get rid of most of the icons, you can reduce the height of the taskbar back to a single row by dragging down the top border again.

You can also take precautions so you don’t accidentally resize the taskbar. At the Taskbar settings screen, turn on the “Lock the taskbar” option. Now you won’t be able to resize it unless you turn this option off again.

Declutter the Taskbar

Here’s another way to control how icons fit on the taskbar. Scroll down the Taskbar settings screen until you see the section for “Combine taskbar buttons.” Click on the drop-down box beneath, and you’ll see three options available. These options determine how your taskbar handles multiple instances of the same application.

The “Always, hide labels” option means Windows will always combine multiple open files from a single application, such as File Explorer windows or Word documents, into one taskbar button. This option also hides the labels or names that would otherwise appear next to each icon. Hover over the button of an application with multiple windows open to see how this option works.

Windows normally displays a separate icon in the taskbar for each open window of the same application. However, if you choose the “When taskbar is full” option, it will wait until the taskbar is full before condensing these separate buttons into one.

If you prefer to keep these open windows separate, choosing the “Never” option will make sure multiple open windows are never combined, no matter how full the taskbar gets.

Show Badges in the Taskbar

Similar to Live Tiles, badges serve to display notifications for a specific application, such as new messages for Mail or updates for the Weather app. You can control the visibility of these badges from the Taskbar settings screen.

Turn this feature on by activating the switch under “Show badges on taskbar buttons.” Icons in the Windows taskbar will now function as badges.

Customize the System Tray

You can choose which icons appear in the System Tray at the right corner of the screen (clock, Wi-Fi, volume, etc.). Scroll down the Taskbar settings screen to the section for “Notification Area.” Click the link for “Select which icons appear on the taskbar.”

At the “Select which icons appear on the taskbar” screen, turn on the icons that you wish to see in the System Tray and turn off the ones you want to stay hidden. If you love having everything at your fingertips, turn everything on.

You can also easily turn system icons on or off via the Taskbar settings screen. Click the “Turn system icons on or off” link.

Choose which system icons should stay in the System Tray, and which should be turned off.

  • Excel Tips
  • Excel Functions
  • Excel Formulas
  • Word Tips
  • Outlook Tips

How to show all Excel windows in taskbar?

When you use Excel 2007 and 2010, have you noticed that all of your opened Excel files are only displayed as one window in the taskbar? This will be annoying when you tried to switch among the workbooks, and if you want to close only one file, all of the opened files will be closed at once. So how could you show all Excel windows in the taskbar?

  • Reuse Anything: Add the most used or complex formulas, charts and anything else to your favorites, and quickly reuse them in the future.
  • More than 20 text features: Extract Number from Text String; Extract or Remove Part of Texts; Convert Numbers and Currencies to English Words.
  • Merge Tools : Multiple Workbooks and Sheets into One; Merge Multiple Cells/Rows/Columns Without Losing Data; Merge Duplicate Rows and Sum.
  • Split Tools : Split Data into Multiple Sheets Based on Value; One Workbook to Multiple Excel, PDF or CSV Files; One Column to Multiple Columns.
  • Paste Skipping Hidden/Filtered Rows; Count And Sum by Background Color ; Send Personalized Emails to Multiple Recipients in Bulk.
  • Super Filter: Create advanced filter schemes and apply to any sheets; Sort by week, day, frequency and more; Filter by bold, formulas, comment.
  • More than 300 powerful features; Works with Office 2007-2019 and 365; Supports all languages; Easy deploying in your enterprise or organization.

Show all Excel windows in taskbar with Excel Options

Amazing! Using Efficient Tabs in Excel Like Chrome, Firefox and Safari!
Save 50% of your time, and reduce thousands of mouse clicks for you every day!

In Excel 2007 and 2010, you need to check an option in the Excel Options to solve this task.

1. Click File > Options in Excel 2010 or click Office button > Excel Options in Excel 2007, in the Excel Options dialog box, click Advanced from the left pane, and then scroll down to Display section, and check Show all windows in the taskbar option, see screenshot:

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

2. Then click OK to close this dialog, and all the opened workbooks have been displayed in the taskbar, you can switch among them quickly, see screenshots:

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar
How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

Note: In Excel 2013, this Show all windows in the taskbar feature has been removed from the Excel Options.

Show all Excel windows in taskbar with Office tab

If you have installed Office Tab in your computer, it helps you view and edit multiple files within a single tabbed window, to know more about Office Tab and want to down load it please click here.

After installing Office Tab, open multiple workbooks, you will see all the workbooks name have been displayed within a single tabbed window as following screenshot shown:

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

And if you also want to show these windows in the taskbar, please click Office Tab > Options Center, in the Tabs for Excel Options dialog, check Display all windows in the taskbar under General & Position tab, see screenshot:

I have two monitors and if I put one tab of the browser on one monitor and another private tab in another it splits them into two instances in the taskbar but sometimes I don’t open them in the same order or have to close and reopen one, which then can put them in the wrong order. I can’t organize them because moving one moves both. I haven’t found an option in Windows to enable this yet.

On XP I downloaded a third-party program to order the taskbar but is there a setting in Windows 7 to enable this or what do you recommend as a third-party app to do this? Thanks.

Replies (9) 

Thank you for reaching out to us at Microsoft Community Forum.

How exactly have you set up multiple monitors (Extended or Duplicate)?

Windows Task bar automatically splits the browser Windows into two instances as the two Windows are on different screens.

To change how programs and buttons appear on the taskbar

Open Taskbar and Start Menu Properties by clicking the Start button How to select multiple windows on the taskbar, clicking Control Panel , clicking Appearance and Personalization , and then clicking Taskbar and Start Menu .

Under Taskbar appearance , select one of the options from the Taskbar buttons list:

Always combine, hide labels

Combine when taskbar is full

Never combine

To use small icons, select the Use small icons check box. To use large icons, clear the check box.

Click OK .

Note:

You can select Never Combine as this will allow you to move the browser Window Separately on multiple screens.

For more information please check the articles provided below:

Do let us know if that helps. Feel free to post on Microsoft Community in case you have any issues/queries while working with Windows.

  • Excel Tips
  • Excel Functions
  • Excel Formulas
  • Word Tips
  • Outlook Tips

How to show all Excel windows in taskbar?

When you use Excel 2007 and 2010, have you noticed that all of your opened Excel files are only displayed as one window in the taskbar? This will be annoying when you tried to switch among the workbooks, and if you want to close only one file, all of the opened files will be closed at once. So how could you show all Excel windows in the taskbar?

  • Reuse Anything: Add the most used or complex formulas, charts and anything else to your favorites, and quickly reuse them in the future.
  • More than 20 text features: Extract Number from Text String; Extract or Remove Part of Texts; Convert Numbers and Currencies to English Words.
  • Merge Tools : Multiple Workbooks and Sheets into One; Merge Multiple Cells/Rows/Columns Without Losing Data; Merge Duplicate Rows and Sum.
  • Split Tools : Split Data into Multiple Sheets Based on Value; One Workbook to Multiple Excel, PDF or CSV Files; One Column to Multiple Columns.
  • Paste Skipping Hidden/Filtered Rows; Count And Sum by Background Color ; Send Personalized Emails to Multiple Recipients in Bulk.
  • Super Filter: Create advanced filter schemes and apply to any sheets; Sort by week, day, frequency and more; Filter by bold, formulas, comment.
  • More than 300 powerful features; Works with Office 2007-2019 and 365; Supports all languages; Easy deploying in your enterprise or organization.

Show all Excel windows in taskbar with Excel Options

Amazing! Using Efficient Tabs in Excel Like Chrome, Firefox and Safari!
Save 50% of your time, and reduce thousands of mouse clicks for you every day!

In Excel 2007 and 2010, you need to check an option in the Excel Options to solve this task.

1. Click File > Options in Excel 2010 or click Office button > Excel Options in Excel 2007, in the Excel Options dialog box, click Advanced from the left pane, and then scroll down to Display section, and check Show all windows in the taskbar option, see screenshot:

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

2. Then click OK to close this dialog, and all the opened workbooks have been displayed in the taskbar, you can switch among them quickly, see screenshots:

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar
How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

Note: In Excel 2013, this Show all windows in the taskbar feature has been removed from the Excel Options.

Show all Excel windows in taskbar with Office tab

If you have installed Office Tab in your computer, it helps you view and edit multiple files within a single tabbed window, to know more about Office Tab and want to down load it please click here.

After installing Office Tab, open multiple workbooks, you will see all the workbooks name have been displayed within a single tabbed window as following screenshot shown:

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

And if you also want to show these windows in the taskbar, please click Office Tab > Options Center, in the Tabs for Excel Options dialog, check Display all windows in the taskbar under General & Position tab, see screenshot:

Windows 10’s taskbar is an almost unchanged continuation of the design Microsoft introduced with Windows 7. By default, open windows are combined into a single icon representing their parent app.

If you’ve got just one window of an app open, you can quickly switch back to it by clicking its taskbar icon. When more than one window is open, Windows will instead display you the thumbnail strip letting you pick the window you want. If you frequently switch between apps with lots of open windows, this two-click procedure might become a little tedious.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

Using a registry hack, it’s possible to modify the behaviour here. We’ll make it so that clicking a taskbar icon always opens the last used window of that app. You’ll still be able to see and switch between all the open windows by hovering over the icon to display the thumbnail strip.

As always, you edit the registry at your own risk – this setting isn’t officially supported by Microsoft, and might stop working in the future. This technique should work on every version of Windows, from 7 onwards, but we’ll be focusing on Windows 10.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

Open the Registry Editor by searching for “regedit” in the Start menu. You’ll need to be logged in as an administrator. In the window that appears, use the tree view on the left to navigate to the following key:

If you’re using a recent version of Windows 10, the Registry Editor has an address bar at the top of the window. You can paste the key in here to quickly navigate to your destination.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

In the pane on the right, be careful not to edit any of the registry values which are displayed. Right-click the pane and select New > DWORD (32-bit) Value. Type “LastActiveClick” as the value for the new key.

How to select multiple windows on the taskbar

Now, double click the key you just selected to open the value editor. Replace the value with “1” and click OK. You’ll need to logout and back in again before the change takes effect. Open a few apps with multiple windows each, and try clicking their taskbar icons. You’ll see you immediately switch to the last open window, without displaying the thumbnail strip.

Finally, it’s worth noting this behaviour is built into Windows, although in a far-from-obvious way. Holding the control (Ctrl) key while clicking on a taskbar icon will always open the last active window, no registry hack required. If you only occasionally need this behaviour, holding the Ctrl key might be the best approach for you.