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How to share iwork documents from icloud

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Apple’s iCloud is not just to store backups or photos and videos; it also allows you to be productive. The iWork is a bundle of apps consisting of Numbers, Keynote, and Pages that comes in super handy to create documents while you are on the go. But what if you need to export iWork files to other devices? Thankfully, iCloud also allows you to export or save your iWork documents.

If you are new to the iCloud and iWork mechanism, this post with a step-by-step guide will help you. Just go through it and follow the steps.

iWork for iCloud Tip: Export or Save iWork Documents from iCloud

Within iWork for iCloud, there are a few things that can come in handy when you want to make iWork documents more flexible to use.

For starters, Apple lets you download whatever document you are working on in iWork for iCloud. And that’s nice because the export option is one of the most important things needed for anyone who’s working on docs. Be it Pages or Numbers or Keynote, you can export them all.

To export, follow the steps:

Step #1. Go to iCloud.com and login with your Apple ID.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Step #2. Click on Pages or Numbers or Keynote to open documents within that particular iWork app.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Step #3. You will be shown a list of documents within the iWork app you selected at step #2.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Step #4. Right click on the document you want to export and click on “Download a copy.”

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Step #5. Depending on the iWork app you are working on, you’ll be presented with multiple file format to select for exporting the file.

Click on the format you want to export.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Now it will create a file for download and automatically save it in the Downloads folder.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Signing off…

iWork for iCloud can also be used a PDF converter, just in case if you wish to. Also, it supports exporting the file in Microsoft-compatible formats, which is useful if you have to send the document over email to a non-Mac user. Whatever may be the use case, iWork is certainly useful to create documents quickly while you are on the go.

Related articles:

Give it a try and do share your feedback with us in the comment below.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

If you’re using Pages, Keynote, or Numbers on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac you can easily share anything you create via Apple’s online service, iCloud. The best part about sharing iWork documents via iCloud is that the person you share with doesn’t need an iOS device or Mac to open or even collaborate on the documents with you. All they need is a web browser.

How to share your Pages, Keynote, and Numbers files from iPhone and iPad

  1. Open the file in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote on your iPhone or iPad that you’d like to share.
  2. Tap on the Share button in the upper right hand corner.
  3. Choose Share Link via iCloud from the drop down menu.
  4. Tap on the method you’d like to use in order to share it.
  5. iWork automatically inserts the iCloud link for you. Type anything else you’d like to add and send your message.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

How to share your Pages, Keynote, and Numbers files from your Mac

  1. Open the file in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote on your Mac that you’d like to share.
  2. In the top menubar, click on the Share button.
  3. Choose the option for Share Link via iCloud.
  4. Tap on the option you’d like to use in order to share the file link.
  5. iWork will automatically insert the link. Type anything else you’d like to tell the person receiving the document and send it.

How to share iwork documents from icloudHow to share iwork documents from icloud

That’s it! The person you’ve sent the link needs only open it in a browser in order to view and edit the spreadsheet.

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You can use Pages, Numbers, and Keynote to create documents with your friends, family, or co-workers, Here’s how to get started.

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When you want to collaborate with someone on a document or project, Apple’s iCloud.com offers collaboration features that can make it easy to work with others. Whether you just want friends or colleagues to make comments on your documents, or whether you are creating documents with others, you can use Apple’s iWork apps (Pages, Numbers, and Keynote) and iCloud.com to streamline this process.

Here’s a look at how you can collaborate with iCloud.com, the features it offers, and what’s missing.

Getting documents into the cloud

When you create iWork documents, you can store them on iCloud Drive. Once your documents are in the cloud, you can share them with others on iCloud.com. To use iCloud Drive, you need at least iOS 8 or OS X Mavericks.

On a Mac, you turn on iCloud Drive in System Preferences > iCloud. On iOS, it’s in Settings > iCloud. Once you have enabled iCloud Drive, you can store documents you create with the iWork apps, as well as other apps that support that feature. (Only iOS apps and OS X apps sold through the Mac App Store can use this feature.)

By default, you get 5GB free storage on iCloud, which you can use to store your documents, photos, email, and iOS device backups. If you plan to use iCloud Drive a lot, consider upgrading to a more capacious plan. For example, you can boost your storage to 50GB for $1 a month, and you can get as much as 1TB of iCloud storage (that’s $10 a month).

When you create documents in iWork apps on iOS, you have to save them to iCloud; when you create a document in an iWork app on OS X, you can choose to save it locally or in iCloud Drive. You probably don’t need to save all the documents you create on your Mac in the cloud; save those that you want to share, or that you want to be able to access on other devices.

Sharing documents

Once you’ve saved a document on iCloud Drive, you can share it with a friend or colleague. In Pages, Numbers, or Keynote, choose Share > Share Link via iCloud, or click the Share button in the toolbar. You can choose to allow the person you share the document with to edit the document, or, if you only want them to see the document and not make changes, choose Read Only from the Permissions menu. You can protect the document by clicking Add Password and setting a password; you’ll need to communicate that to the other person securely. (The best way may be over the telephone or FaceTime.)

Next, choose how to invite the other person to access your document. You can do this via Mail, Messages, Twitter, Facebook, or other means, or you can just copy a link and send it yourself. You might want to do the latter if you communicate with others via Slack or a similar collaboration tool. Click Share Document, and enter the email address, or other information needed, to share it.

Send out an invitation to share a document.

When your collaborator receives a link to a document, they click it to view the document on iCloud.com. They don’t need an iCloud account and they can access the document in any web browser, even on Windows or Android. They enter their name (so you can follow the changes they make) and can edit your document if you’ve allowed them to do so. If not, they can simply view it.

Working together

If you’ve allowed a collaborator to edit your document, then the changes they make update in the app you’re using if you have the document open. For example, if you’ve created a spreadsheet in Numbers and a colleague edits it on the web, your document updates automatically. This doesn’t happen in real time, but takes a few seconds for changes to appear.

It’s better to make changes in the iCloud.com web interface. You’ll see a cursor when a collaborator is editing a document and if you click the user icon in the iCloud.com toolbar you can click on a user’s name and see which sections they’ve changed. However, once changes are made, you can’t see the exact changes. If you click a user’s name in the user popup, you may see the section they edited—this isn’t always the case—but not their exact changes.

I’ve clicked on Rob G in the user popover, and I see a small badge over the bar chart, but I can’t see exactly what that user changed.

Sometimes, two or more people will make changes at the same time. Or you’ll make a change locally in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote and a collaborator will make an edit on iCloud.com. When this happens, you will both see a dialog saying that the documents are out of sync, and the users who are invited to edit the document will be prevented from editing anything. It’s up to the document’s owner to decide which version to keep—you can keep both, if you want, to review them later—but, again, you can’t compare the changes. You only see the date and time of the versions and where they were updated (iCloud.com or a specific computer). It’s best for the document’s creator and owner to ensure that people don’t simultaneously edit documents, which, of course, limits the usefulness of this feature.

If changes are made by more than one person, you’ll be alerted, either in the app (here, Pages), or in the web interface on iCloud.com.

You can browse a version history—click the Tools icon (the wrench), and then choose Browse All Versions—but you can only restore different versions entirely, not view them to compare them with your original or final document. If you’re used to change tracking in Microsoft Office apps or ever Google Docs, you’ll be disappointed by the way this feature works with iWork apps.

You can, however, browse versions on a Mac. In your iWork application with a shared document open, choose File > Revert to > Browse All Versions. You’ll see your current version to the left, and older versions to the right. These may be different versions containing only your additions and edits or versions edited on iCloud.com. You can navigate through these versions as you would when viewing locally-saved versions. Some of these versions may be in the cloud; in this case, they display a cloud icon followed by the text Load This Version. Click the text to download and view the version, and then compare it to your final document. You can restore any of these versions, or note changes made and then apply them to your document.

You can browse versions on a Mac and compare them, but charges aren’t tracked or highlighted.

While iWork’s collaboration features are interesting, their weaknesses make them useful only for the most basic editing and changes. iCloud.com really needs proper change tracking for these collaboration features to be fully usable. They’re a great way to let someone view a document, especially if they don’t have a Mac, but the lack of actual change tracking means that you won’t see enough precise information about edits.

Senior contributor Kirk McElhearn (@mcelhearn) writes The Ask the iTunes Guy column and writes about Macs, music and more on his blog Kirkville. He’s also the author of Take Control of iTunes 12: The FAQ.

Most Apple device users store their data on iCloud. As a comprehensive cloud platform, iCloud backs up and synchronizes all the user data starting from emails, calendars, photos, iWork application data, and even App and Health data. While iCloud might be an ideal solution for individual users who need limited features, businesses often prefer Office 365/ Microsoft 365 plans for advanced features and services. With Microsoft 365 subscriptions, businesses can consolidate control of user access and devices, and empower users with powerful tools and features. In this article, let us explore how to migrate from iCloud to Office 365/ Microsoft 365.

How to Export Apple Mail to Office 365?

The first challenge of migrating from iCloud to Office 365 is to move emails from iCloud emails to Office 365. Here is how you can transfer emails to Office 365/ Microsoft 365 mailboxes from iCloud email.

  • If you are using a Mac machine, launch the Apple Mail email client.
  • Choose the mailbox (or mailboxes), select Malbox>Export Mailbox.
  • Choose an existing folder or create a new folder to export the .mbox packages.
  • Convert the .mbox files into .pst files and import the files into Office 365/ Microsoft 365 mailboxes using Outlook.

How to Transfer iCloud Contacts to Office 365?

iCloud contacts can be exported as vCard (.vcf) files, and then be imported into the new Office 365 mailboxes.

  • Navigate to Contacts after logging in to your iCloud account.
  • Select the gear icon at the bottom and click on Select All if you need to export all the contacts.
  • Choose the Export vCard option from the same menu to export them to a .vcf file.
  • Convert the .vcf file into a .csv file and import the contents into the Office 365 mailboxes using Outlook.

How to Transfer iCloud Calendar Items to Office 365?

The CalDAV internet standards used by iCloud Calendar is not yet supported by Outlook for Mac. The workaround is to use Outlook on the web (Outlook Web Access) for synchronizing iCloud Calendar items with Outlook, to simplify export to Office 365.

  • Log in to the iCloud account from a web browser.
  • Select the calendar that has to be exported and click on the Share Calendar icon.
  • Enable the Public Calendar option for it and copy the URL.
  • Log in to Outlook on the web and add it to the Calendar subscription.
  • Now you can export the newly added shared calendar as a PST file that can be imported into an Office 365/ Microsoft 365 mailbox.

How to Convert iWork Files to Office 365?

Files created using Pages, Numbers, and Keynote have to be converted to formats that are compatible with Word, Excel, and PowerPoint respectively. While it is possible to save files in Microsoft Office compatible formats while creating them or convert them at a later stage, users can upload the files to iCloud, save it in an appropriate format, and download it. However, there could be formatting issues after the conversion.

Apps4Rent Can Help With iCloud to Office 365/ Microsoft 365 Migration

The most straightforward method to transfer photos, videos, mail, calendar, files, and other data from iCloud to Office 365 is by importing them into a Windows computer using iCloud for Windows and exporting to Office 365 accounts. However, with this method, users have to retain their iCloud mail as they will continue to receive emails in the mailbox and will need Windows machines for the transfer. Also, the process is cumbersome for migrating several users from iCloud to Microsoft 365/ Office 365, when a business needs to use a single tenant. As a Tier 1 Microsoft CSP, Apps4Rent can help you migrate user accounts from iCloud to Office 365. Alternatively, we can provision Azure Windows Virtual Desktops that can be used with Macs to facilitate the migration, if you cannot use Windows machines. Contact our Microsoft certified experts available 24/7 via phone, chat, and email for Office 365 migration assistance.

The iWork Mac apps have been updated to support collaboration via shared iCloud Drive folders, and other new features.

Apple updated their Pages, Numbers, and Keynote apps on Mac to support a new iCloud Drive feature for sharing folders. When an iWork document is stored in a shared folder, they will now function as shared documents without any further action.

The feature comes on the heels of Apple releasing iOS 13.4 and macOS 10.15.4, which added the iCloud Drive folder sharing feature.

All documents within the shared iCloud Drive folder are accessible to any user added to the folder. With this new feature, documents from the iWork suite will not only be accessible by users, but editable too, with all the features of collaborated documents.

Apple’s iCloud Drive shared folders was a long awaited feature that has shown up in multiple iOS betas before finally being released.

Other updates to the iWork apps include new templates, drop caps, document backgrounds, new shapes, and new export options. Numbers specifically gained increased maximum columns and rows.

Also mentioned in the release notes is a new ability to edit shared documents offline, then populating the document when returning online.

You can find the updated iWork apps in the Mac App Store. So far, the iOS apps have yet to be updated.

AppleInsider has affiliate partnerships and may earn commission on products purchased through affiliate links. These partnerships do not influence our editorial content.

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Comments (4)

macapfel Said:

This is great! It’s been quite a pain to only can store an iWorks file in the dedicated folder for collaboration. Finally I can choose where to store a file and collaborate. Very much looking forward to this update!

DAalseth Said:

So far I don’t see an update in the Canadian store. the iOS version appeared immediately, but not the Mac version.

EDIT: N/M I just discovered that they updated automatically. (I forgot that I’d set that on my Mac.)

dysamoria Said:

This update is irrelevant to me. Since Apple doesn’t like to keep this suite up to date on older Mac OS versions (seemingly not any at all?), I cant update my iOS versions; they need to remain compatible with my desktop Mac OS versions, which are only as recent as High Sierra. I don’t even own a machine capable of going further. Apple don’t sell a machine on which I want to spend my only lump of computer-upgrade savings. or rather, they don’t sell a machine I want *that I can afford* any more.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Apple has made it possible to edit and collaborate on iWork documents in iCloud for a while now thanks to iCloud.com. With iOS 10, though, you’ll be automatically redirected to related productivity app without having to switch to a different app.

How do I get Pages, Numbers, and Keynote on my iPhone or iPad?

All three of Apple’s iWork productivity programs, Pages, Numbers, and Keynote, are available in the App Store. If you purchased your iPhone or iPad after September of 2013, you can get all three apps for free. Otherwise, they are $9.99 each, respectively.

How to save Pages, Numbers, and Keynote documents in iCloud Drive in iOS 10

Lucky for you, you don’t have to do anything to save your iWork documents in iCloud. As long as you are signed into iCloud Drive on your iPhone or iPad, your content will automatically be saved and synced across all of your devices.

How to edit Pages, Numbers, and Keynote documents in iCloud Drive in iOS 10

In order to edit Pages, Numbers, and Keynote documents in iCloud Drive in iOS 10, you will need to download the app onto your iPhone or iPad. Once it is installed on your device, you can see the related editing tools in iCloud Drive.

    Open iCloud Drive on your iPhone or iPad.

Tap the Pages, Numbers, or Keynote folder.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Tap iCloud Drive in the upper left corner of the screen to go back to iCloud Drive.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

You’ll notice that as soon as you open a document, it will automatically open in its related iWork app, complete with all of the editing tools you are familiar with.

How to create a Pages, Numbers, or Keynote document in iCloud Drive in iOS 10

Since the iWork suite of apps now fully work inside iCloud Drive in iOS 10, you can do more than just edit a document, you can create one, too.

    Open iCloud Drive on your iPhone or iPad.

Tap the Pages, Numbers, or Keynote folder.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Tap Create Document, Spreadsheet, or Presentation when the list of documents display.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

The newly created documents will sync across all of your devices and you’ll be able to edit them in iCloud Drive, at iCloud.com, or in the iWork apps on any device.

Any questions?

Do you have any questions about creating and editing iWork documents in iCloud Drive on iOS 10? Let me know in the comments and I’ll help you out.

We may earn a commission for purchases using our links. Learn more.

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The new dream in computing is keeping all of your files in “the cloud,” on remote servers that you can access from anywhere at any time. Apple’s cloud-based syncing and storage service, iCloud, debuted in June 2011. Still, only since the release of OS X Mountain Lion that enough applications have started to support iCloud document syncing for this feature to be useful. Working with iCloud is fairly simple, but you need to know the ground rules if you plan to start storing your documents in the cloud.

Activate Documents & Data

If you don’t have a free iCloud account, or if you’re just starting out with it, this article will give you an overview of how to set up a new iCloud account. To store documents in the cloud—no matter which application puts its files there—you also need to activate the Documents & Data setting in the iCloud pane in System Preferences, as well as in the Settings of any iOS device you plan to use (to do so, select Settings > iCloud). Once you’ve done this, any iCloud-compatible app can store files in iCloud.

Search out compatible apps

For now, only a limited number of applications can store files in iCloud. By files, I mean documents that you create, not data that an application such as Calendar stores in the cloud. On the Mac, many of Apple’s apps do support iCloud, including Preview, TextEdit, the iWork ’09 suite (Pages, Numbers, and Keynote), and GarageBand.

Third-party apps that store documents in the cloud include text editors such as iA Writer, Byword, and Smultron; the PDF editor PDFpen; the graphics editor Pixelmator; and some others. At this point, compatible programs can produce files in Microsoft Office formats, but Microsoft Office itself doesn’t support iCloud.

Note that Apple lets only apps sold through the Mac App Store use iCloud to store documents. If your favorite productivity app is only sold directly by the developer, you’re out of luck.

Save documents to the cloud

If you’re using an application that can save documents in the cloud, doing so is fairly simple. Say you’re using TextEdit. After you’ve created a new document, press Command-S, and make sure the Where menu shows iCloud. Name the file and click Save, and the document will be sent to the cloud.

Saving a file to iCloud is easy if your favorite app supports it.

Once you’ve saved a file to the cloud, you can access it from multiple devices. Say you have a desktop Mac and a laptop; you can save any files you need on the road in iCloud and access them from either computer as long as you use the same app.

Open documents saved in the cloud

To open files you’ve saved to iCloud, press Command-O in an iCloud-savvy application, then click on the iCloud button. You’ll see something like this:

Note that in the above screenshot you see a folder. To create a folder, just drag one file on top of another, as you would with icons on an iPhone or iPad. Name the folder, and it’ll be saved on iCloud.

Move existing files to the cloud

You may have a number of files on your Mac that you’d like to put in the cloud; this is straightforward. Just open a file with an application that can put documents on iCloud, choose File > Move To, then choose iCloud from the Where menu. If you want to move a file from the cloud to your Mac, click on the Where menu and find the folder where you want to place the file. If the folder where you want to move the file isn’t in the menu, choose Other from the bottom of the menu, and navigate to the location you want.

Learn to live within one app

iCloud is a great place to store files that you need to access on multiple Macs. However, there are limits, some of which may be deal-breakers. The main problem is that files are accessible only to the applications that created them. If you create a file with TextEdit, for example, you can save that file in a number of formats, such as RTF and .doc, the Microsoft Word format. However, you can’t open those files with Word. In fact, you can’t open those files with anything other than TextEdit, at least not from iCloud.

You can, of course, move a file from iCloud to your Mac, as I explained above, and then open it with Word, but this adds an extra step. Frankly, if you need to pass files between different applications, you’re probably better off using Dropbox.

Find files that don’t appear on iOS devices

Apple’s iWork programs—Pages, Numbers, and Keynote—have iOS equivalents that let you access files you create on your Mac on your iPad or iPhone. But, the same is not the case for, say, TextEdit or Preview.

If you save a TextEdit file in the cloud, it’s in a black hole as far as iOS is concerned. When you go to your phone, for example, there’s no way you can access it—it’s in the cloud, but your iPhone doesn’t have the keys to open its container. While you can move files from the cloud to your Mac, there’s no way to do this on an iOS device. You’ll need to go back to your Mac to find your file and move it.

Depending on what you need to do, a number of third-party text editors can help fill the iCloud gap. For instance, the text editors iA Writer and Byword both have both Mac and iOS versions. If you want to write on your Mac, and then switch to your iPad, either of these apps (along with some other text editors) will allow you to do this.

Access your iCloud files in the finder

While trusting your files to iCloud means trusting them to servers somewhere out in the ether, the files are also stored on your Mac. In fact, they are stored in a somewhat odd folder that seems to be permanently connected to the cloud, as long as you have Internet access.

You can see this folder from the Finder by choosing Go -> Go To Folder and then typing

/Library/Mobile Documents/ and clicking on Go. In this folder, you’ll see a number of other folders, some oddly named, but all of which contain the names of applications.

For example, in the com

TextEdit folder, you can see some of the files in the second screenshot above. If you need to access any files that are on iCloud, it’s a lot quicker to copy them from this folder than it is to open an application and move a file. You can even make a smart folder that finds all the documents in this local iCloud folder: see this hint on the Mac OS X Hints website for more.

iCloud is a great idea, and can be very useful. As long as you know what its limits are, iCloud can become an essential part of your workflow. We’d like to see more flexibility with applications, so that you could create a file in one app and then access it from another. But, for now, you just need to be aware of these limitations.

Senior contributor Kirk McElhearn (@mcelhearn) writes The Ask the iTunes Guy column and writes about Macs, music and more on his blog Kirkville. He’s also the author of Take Control of iTunes 12: The FAQ.

If you watched Apple’s latest special event, you will no doubt have heard the news about new iPads, new Macbook Pros, and even the new Mac Pro. However, amid all the hardware announcements, Apple revealed the ability to work collaboratively on iWork documents. So, how do you do that, and are there any restrictions? Here’s what I found out so far…

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Q. How to Share an iWork Document

You can share documents you created on the iPad, the Mac, or online at icloud.com in very much the same way. Just look for the new share button on the toolbar, click it, and choose to share your document. You can copy the link, or email it to someone. On the iPad you can also tweet it, post it on Facebook, or send via an iMessage. When the document is shared you will see a green triangle on the corner of the file in your document manager view.

The shared link works in most browsers, and although Safari, Chrome and IE9+ are the officially supported browsers, I did get iWork to run well enough in Firefox and even on a Samsung Series 3 Chromebook. So, it should be easy enough for students to share a link to a document with a teacher/classmate and have them make the changes they need. Apple notes, however, that to share an iWork ’09, or Microsoft document, you need to open it in iWork for iCloud beta first.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Q. How to Collaborate on an iWork Document

To collaborate on a shared document, you simply click on the link that is sent to you by the document owner. After that, you are free to work at the same time on the same document together. However, real time collaboration is a hard thing to crack with an online office suite, just ask Microsoft. Nevertheless, Apple has done a pretty good job so far.

When two people are working on an iWork document inside a web browser, the changes occur very close to real time. It is not quite as slick as Google Apps, but it’s close, and the lag is minimal enough not to be a real issue. If two people happen to be working on the same paragraph at the same time, iCloud will temporarily store both versions and ask the owner which version of the document they want to keep.

However, things are a little different when you are working between a browser and say the iOS version of an iWork app. You won’t see real time changes in this scenario, at least not yet. Instead you need to wait for iCloud to sync on the mobile device before changes are pushed to and from the web. Once iCloud syncs, the changes will be viewable on an iOS device, but sometimes I found you have to exit the app and return to it later to force an iCloud sync. Hopefully this will get snappier before too long.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Q. How to Stop Sharing an iWork Document

The time may come when you no longer want or need to have your document shared with another student or teacher. No problem. You can quickly and easily rescind sharing privileges by opening the document, and clicking on the Share icon. Then click (or tap) Stop Sharing. The link you shared previously will now no longer work, and the green sharing icon in the top right hand corner of the document will be gone. As the owner of a document, you can stop sharing from your Mac, iPad or the web.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Restrictions with iCloud Sharing

Apple are new to the whole cloud sharing arena, and although this product is a great start, there are definitely some things to consider before you go live with this in the classroom. These are not necessarily the only issues, but these are the biggest ones I have found so far:

  • No sharing permissions. When you share a document you can’t set the link to be “view only”. Those in possession of the document link will always be able to edit your document. Recipients do not even need to have an iCloud account. Bear that in mind if the link gets sent around social networks, and remember what you need to know in order to stop sharing document.
  • Collaborators are anonymous. Say you shared the link with four people. You have no way of knowing exactly who is in the document with you at any one time. Google has a handle on this. Apple does not.
  • No comments or chat. The document chat window that Google has is a great way that teachers and students can instantly communicate back and forward on a given document. Even if they are not in the same document at the same time, comments can be used to leave feedback. Apple has neither of these features yet.
  • No revision history. If you are tracking changes in a document, you cannot share the link via iCloud. This is strange, because once the document has been shared with others, you will likely want to be able to check and see who did what on a given document, a la Google’s revision history. So, because iWork for iCloud does not support tracking changes, you have to turn that off on the Mac or the iPad before you can share.
  • No iPads online. If you get sent a link to a shared document and try to open it on the iPad, you will be greeted with a screen that politely informs you that you cannot be a collaborator of said document on your iPad. To edit, you need to open the link on a Mac or PC. Alternatively, you can edit a copy of the document. But if you do that, no edits will appear to the person who shared the original document with you, because it is a copy of the original document.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

Summary

Remember that this is version 1.0 of a Beta product. There will be improvements, there will be bugs, there will be changes, but right now if you are thinking about using it in the classroom with students, you need to be aware of its capabilities and its restrictions. iWork for iCloud has a huge amount of potential, and could one day offer some real competition to Google, but like the first draft of an essay, there are still a few things to work on.

The ability to create stunning documents using iWork (Pages, Keynote and Numbers) is only one of the reasons why iWork is a great tool for many home and small-to-medium-sized businesses. The ability to collaborate with others on a single document is another. This can be done with the click of a button within each app.

To share a document with someone else, simply click on the “Share” button, choose “Share Link via iCloud“, then choose the method of delivery (iMessage, email, Twitter, etc).

How to share iwork documents from icloud

That’s it! Once the link has been sent, your document will be available for anyone with that link to open, view and edit the document.

If you want a little more privacy/security enabled for your shared document, there are options for that too. To enable these options, click on the “Share” button, then choose “View Share Settings. “.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

There are two options available here: Permissions and Password.

Permissions

By default, the permissions for the file are set to allow others to view and edit the document. By changing this option to “View Only“, you are allowing the other party to view the file, but make no changes. This is a great option for those who are just sending their documents out for review. If you choose this option, you (as the document owner) will still have full edit capabilities.

Password

Setting a password for your document is a great idea in many cases, since the document can technically be accessed by anyone who has the link. If the document requires that level of security (due to confidential or sensitive information), I highly recommend sending a link to the file using one type of communication (iMessage, email, etc), and then sending the password using another (phone call, text, etc). That way, if someone does happen to pick up the link to the document, they won’t also have the password.

If you do choose to set a password for sharing your document, it will not only require others to use the password, but you will also be required to use the password each time you open the file. That’s because the file itself is now password-protected (not just a shared version). Having said that, do not forget the password.

To remove the password on a document, go back into the “View Sharing Settings. ” options, click on “Change Password“, enter the current password, and then click the “Remove Password” button. This will remove the password from the file.

How to share iwork documents from icloud

With all of that in mind, there are some drawbacks to sharing iWork files via iCloud. The biggest drawback for me is the level of real-time collaboration. This feature doesn’t work extremely well if you have two people using the file and making changes at the same time (if you need that level of real-time collaboration, you may want to consider using a solution like Google Docs). Outside of that (and considering that iWork for iCloud is still technically in Beta), I have found it to be pretty stable and feature-rich.