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How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

If you have a Microsoft Exchange account, you can look up the schedule of someone in your organization.

The easiest way to see someone’s schedule is to start a meeting invitation. After reviewing the person’s schedule, you can close the meeting invitation without sending it.

Click Calendar in the Navigation Bar, and then click Meeting on the Home tab.

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

If you have more than one account in Outlook, on the From menu, select the Exchange account for the organization that you want.

On the To line of the new meeting, type the name or email address of the person whose schedule you want to look up.

Select their name from the Directory section of the search.

In the Starts field, enter the day for which you want to check the schedule.

On the Organizer Meeting tab, click Scheduling.

A calendar appears that shows the free/busy times for the organizer and the person on the To line.

To show all the hours in the day—not just the hours of your work day—clear the Show work hours only check box.

To delete the meeting without sending a meeting request, close the meeting window and choose Discard Invitation.

When you look up other people’s schedules, the information you see reflects how they have set their free/busy status for each calendar event. If someone has a meeting on his or her calendar set to Show As “Free,” you will not see that meeting in the calendar window.

This procedure instructs you to set up a meeting invitation. However, you can then delete the invitation without sending it.

On the Home tab, click New, and then click Meeting.

In the To box, type the name or address of the person whose schedule you want to look up.

If you have more than one account in Outlook, on the From menu, select the Exchange account for the organization that you want.

In the Starts field of the meeting, enter the day for which you want to check the schedule.

Click the Scheduling Assistant tab, which is located under the date and time text boxes.

A calendar appears that indicates the free/busy times for the person in the To box.

To show all the hours in the day — not just the hours of your work day — clear the Show work hours only check box.

To delete the event without sending it, close the meeting window.

Tip: When you look up someone else’s schedule, the information that you see reflects how they have set their free/busy status for each event. If someone has marked a meeting status as “Free,” you will not see that meeting on their calendar.

If you have a Microsoft Exchange account, you can look up the schedule of someone in your organization.

The easiest way to see someone’s schedule is to start a meeting invitation. After reviewing the person’s schedule, you can close the meeting invitation without sending it.

Click Calendar in the Navigation Bar, and then click Meeting on the Home tab.

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

If you have more than one account in Outlook, on the From menu, select the Exchange account for the organization that you want.

On the To line of the new meeting, type the name or email address of the person whose schedule you want to look up.

Select their name from the Directory section of the search.

In the Starts field, enter the day for which you want to check the schedule.

On the Organizer Meeting tab, click Scheduling.

A calendar appears that shows the free/busy times for the organizer and the person on the To line.

To show all the hours in the day—not just the hours of your work day—clear the Show work hours only check box.

To delete the meeting without sending a meeting request, close the meeting window and choose Discard Invitation.

When you look up other people’s schedules, the information you see reflects how they have set their free/busy status for each calendar event. If someone has a meeting on his or her calendar set to Show As “Free,” you will not see that meeting in the calendar window.

This procedure instructs you to set up a meeting invitation. However, you can then delete the invitation without sending it.

On the Home tab, click New, and then click Meeting.

In the To box, type the name or address of the person whose schedule you want to look up.

If you have more than one account in Outlook, on the From menu, select the Exchange account for the organization that you want.

In the Starts field of the meeting, enter the day for which you want to check the schedule.

Click the Scheduling Assistant tab, which is located under the date and time text boxes.

A calendar appears that indicates the free/busy times for the person in the To box.

To show all the hours in the day — not just the hours of your work day — clear the Show work hours only check box.

To delete the event without sending it, close the meeting window.

Tip: When you look up someone else’s schedule, the information that you see reflects how they have set their free/busy status for each event. If someone has marked a meeting status as “Free,” you will not see that meeting on their calendar.

There are two ways to send automatic out-of-office replies. The way you use depends on the type of email account you have.

Click File, then select the image below that matches your version of Outlook.

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

If you see the Automatic Replies button, follow the steps to set up an automatic reply.

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

If you don’t see the Automatic Replies button, follow the steps to use rules to send an out of office message.

Set up an automatic reply

Select File > Automatic Replies.

Note: For Outlook 2007 choose Tools > Out of Office Assistant.

In the Automatic Replies box, select Send automatic replies.

Optionally, set a date range for your automatic replies. This will turn off automatic replies at the date and time you enter for the end time. Otherwise, you’ll need to turn off automatic replies manually.

Note: If you don’t see Automatic Replies, use Rules and Alerts to set up your out-of-office message.

On the Inside My Organization tab, type the response that you want to send to teammates or colleagues while you are out of the office.

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

Note: Sending automatic replies to anyone outside my organization will send your automatic reply to every email, including newsletters, advertisements, and potentially, junk email. If you want to send automatic replies to those outside your organization, we recommend choosing My contacts only.

Select OK to save your settings.

Turn off automatic out-of-office replies

When Outlook is setup to send automatic replies, you’ll see a message under the ribbon with this information. Select Turn off to disable automatic out-of-office replies. If you want to modify the dates for your automatic reply or the message sent, use the steps above to modify your settings.

Note: For Outlook 2007, to turn off out-of-office replies, select Tools > Out of Office Assistant and uncheck the Send Out of Office auto-replies checkbox.

Update your Automatic Replies on the Outlook mobile app

You can update your Automatic Replies from Outlook for iOS or Outlook for Android. Click here to get the app and manage your Automatic Replies on the go.

Troubleshooting: I don’t see Automatic Replies

If you don’t see Automatic Replies after selecting File, you’re probably using a Gmail, Yahoo, or other POP or IMAP account that doesn’t support the Outlook Automatic Replies feature. You can setup a rule that will reply to incoming messages, but only if you leave Outlook running. For more information, see use rules to send an out of office message.

I have a mailbox which I have delegated full access to myself and my colleague. I see it my listing on the left in Outlook, but he does not.

Is there a limit to the number of delegates to a mailbox? If not, then why would he not be able to see the delegated mailbox?

Any help would be appreciated.

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10 Replies

From my experience I have seen delegated mailboxes in Office 365 show up immediately and I have seen it take 3 – 4 hours. Other times they have not shown up until the user closes, and reopens, Outlook.

Has your colleague tried all of this?

Da_Schmoo

Has he rebooted and not just closed/opened Outlook. That seems to be the only way I’ve seen to force it to “refresh” what it has access to besides just sitting around and waiting.

CCB-IT

Thanks for replying so quickly!

Yes, we have tried:

-Adding the delegated mailbox under Mailboxes/Open additional mailboxes.

-Removing the delegation in Office 365, closing Outlook, and the re-open Outlook, then add the delegation again.

Yes, I agree with you- sometimes it takes time or it could be almost instant.

I thought maybe there was a limit to the number of delegates to a mailbox, but I don’t think 2 will cause any issue.

I don’t know about a limit but I am a delegate on 3 mailboxes without any issues and each appear in my Outlook. If your colleague goes into Office 365, can he open the additional mailboxes? What I have found is that until he can open them in Office 365 they will not appear in a desktop Outlook client

CCB-IT

We rebooted the machine, and the account has not appeared. We went to his Office 365 account online, and went to additional mailboxes. He was able to enter the mailbox with no issues. The folders still do not appear in this Outlook client.

What is the difference between a delegated mailbox and a shared mailbox? When would we use a shared mailbox? Is there any benefits to using one or another?

NomaMitch

If I remember correctly, a shared mailbox has no user account attached to it, making it more secure.

Da_Schmoo

Shared mailbox has no user tied to it and does not require a license. Each user accessing it does.

No Archiving features nor litigation hold features available.

2GB mailbox size limit. I don’t know if that has been increased but that’s where it was earlier this year.

Da_Schmoo wrote:

Shared mailbox has no user tied to it and does not require a license. Each user accessing it does.

No Archiving features nor litigation hold features available.

2GB mailbox size limit. I don’t know if that has been increased but that’s where it was earlier this year.

I might have the answer for you. Try using powershell to do the following (let me know if you need more info on using PowerShell with O365).

Add yourself as a delegate and be sure to include the switch to turn on Auto-Mapping. Auto-Mapping is the feature that puts delegated mailboxes into the mailbox list. You can actually use powershell to enable/disable this auto-mapping feature on a per mailbox, per user basis. Normally automapping is on by default, so no guarantees this is your problem, but it’s something you could try.

I agree with others though. Do make sure you give it at least an hour to apply. I do also know that you can have more than 2 delegated mailboxes in Outlook, so that wouldn’t be the problem (unless there’s something underlying that I don’t know of).

From your boss? From someone on the same level as your boss? From a customer? etc?

For me as a software engineer, to answer after hours work email is an automatic HELL NO! Unless I'm running my own business I see no reason to answer an email until the next business day.

Almost never. I leave my work life at work and like you said it can wait till the next business day.

Always. My work email is also on my phone and home outlook. If someone else is working on something after hours, the least I can do is answer questions if they have any. It's not stressful at all, in my opinion.

I don't have work email on my phone, but I was bored last night and checked from my laptop. My co-worker had a code review request out, and since I wasn't doing anything else I looked it over and gave my feedback.

At my current gig more of my co-workers work past 6pm, which is my normal quitting time. Responding to an email at 8 will sometimes get them unblocked. While I think it's nuts to be working that late, their choices are their own.

I don't do it every night, and I don't feel I have to, but it doesn't hurt to spend 5 minutes on email some evenings when it's not taking away from anything else.

Pretty much my arrangement as well. If my coworkers are pushing to finish something then I'll definitely help them out. I've had to cash in a few favors like that myself. Only if I was the one trying to get something done, did I find it stressful.

At my last job I was always on the clock. I was also being paid so there's that argument. It increased my stress levels and I was tired and irritated almost all the time.

At my current job I don't even have access to my e-mail on my phone so I only know I get an e-mail when I get in.

My boss is responding to e-mails and redmine issues while on vacation which annoys me because he'll come back from vacation unrested.

Not unless I know there's a deployment or something going on.

Had a conversation with my coworkers the other day at lunch. All the business analysts say they check their email from home, all the developers say they don't haha.

I usually check my email once or twice in the evening and in the morning before I head to work. I'll answer something if it's not going to take forever. I don't really mind.

I will agree with some of the responses for answering after hours emails. Other than getting paid, working late/deployments, and on call are the only reasons I'll look at my emails during after hours.

Other than that I leave my work at work until the following business day. Less stress for me and it sets a precedence.

I specifically keep my work email and my home email open on my work laptop (paid for by work) and home laptops respectively, and keep the two separate. This is important because I'm working from home/remotely (mainly hotel rooms) for now (no office yet, maybe in a few weeks), so there has to be a clear concept of "at work" and not.

However, I do have both on my cell phone and will check it and reply to things that seem sufficiently important so long as there's a good working relationship/respect for my time.

(Since I moved from contractor to full-time, I also can't charge for hours worked any more, so that changes my willingness to do work outside of "work hours" too, although for something I'm particularly interested in I'll contribute hours here and there or time-shift.)

During my 8-hour working days, I work on a software app (my actual job) for about 6.5-7.5 hours, with good productivity and quality as attested by my supervisor. The rest goes for meetings, having issues (technical and otherwise), rest room visits, stretching and short walks near my desk . etc. Is this considered normal and acceptable, or I have absolutely to work the full 8 hours, and any time I spend on doing anything else other than working on the app, I am accountable for it, and could be questioned about it at anytime (which is something I wouldn’t like) I am asking because recently my manager said in a group meeting that we expect you (as a group) to work on the app close to 8 hours, which is kind of vague to me. What is considered "close to 8 hours"? I am hesitant to have this conversation with my supervisor, because I expect her to tell me the same thing my manager said in the group meeting.

10 Answers 10

From the 8-hour working days, I work on a software app (my actual job) between 6.5-7.5 hours, with good productivity and quality as attested by my supervisor. The rest goes for meetings, having issues (technical and otherwise), rest room visits, stretching and short walks near my desk . etc.

An 8-hour working day should include whatever your employer wants you to do during those hours (within the reasonable range of duties described in your contract of course):

  • That definitely includes any meetings – you wouldn’t go to those meetings on your personal time otherwise.
  • Having technical issues is normal if you’re working with technology, and it would be unreasonable for an employer to have you work overtime because your laptop suddenly died. You’re most likely expected to seek technical support as soon as possible to get back to work once those issues are resolved.
  • As for things like restroom visits, lunch breaks, stretching, etc., this would normally be considered part of a healthy workplace culture, and as long as you’re not attracting your superior’s attention by the amount of time you spend away from your keyboard, you should be fine.

Although some of the activities you’ve brought up may or may not be included in your working hours (e.g. some workplaces would consider a lunch break to be outside of working hours), expecting a software developer to spend 8 hours a day just writing code is unreasonable. If you’re starting to get reprimanded for the number of restroom breaks you take during the day then you know you’re in a toxic environment and should start finding your way out. By all means discuss this topic with your supervisor, as some details would be specific to your workplace, but keep an eye on unreasonable requests.

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

I will assume you are hired to work 8 hours a day.

That means you should "work" 8 hours a day, where "work" is basically whatever you boss says. If that’s program the app, then you program the app. If it’s a meeting, then you go to the meeting.

In most civilized countries, normal routine of living applies to jobs, too: you can take bathroom breaks, you can get something to drink, you can stretch and walk the hallway. In my country, this is protected and even required. The company can get into trouble if you don’t take a 5 minutes paid break for every hour spent in front of a screen. But it has to be in line with what you would normally do. Having a quick coffee is fine, spending 30 minutes on making the perfect cappuccino is not. Eating a pre-made sandwich at your desk might be fine, actually having a full meal in the canteen is not. Bigger breaks are actually "breaks", normally unpaid and normally do not count towards your 8 hours worked.

The accepted normal is that out of a 8 hour work day you get 6 hours of productive work done on average. The rest is phone calls, emails, meetings, talking to someone else about their problem with their work and finally all the small breaks like coffee or restroom.

Your employer has every right to demand that you work 8 hours and spend all 8 hours on things they approve of (having something to drink and bathroom breaks is something your employer has to approve of by law in most civilized countries, because not allowing it damages your health and that’s illegal). That’s in your contract. Whether they can come down on the 2 hours wasted every day with non-productive tasks is largely up to them. They want you to help your colleague. They want you to read your emails. They want you to attend those meetings. It’s just that many bosses just look at Excel sheets and not at the actual processes in their company.

The easiest way to show them that they actually want this, is to make a detailed list of what you do every day and ask them what to not do in the future. That sucks because it’s all about paper pushing, but it’s the only thing that gets people off your back that do not understand these simple things. The more passive aggressive way is to do what they say by the book and block every request for anything that is not the app and send everybody who calls you, writes you or comes by to your boss, so your boss can approve of this new task for you or explain to the person why you won’t do it. This way your boss gets swamped in people that don’t understand why you can’t "just do it quickly" and sees first hand how much it actually is that you do.

Personally, when you wrote you get to program 6.5 to 7.5 hours a day, I thought "wow, that guy is lucky". But if your boss is inexperienced or just ignorant, there is no other way but to show them what else besides programming the app you actually do.

For security and privacy reasons, it is best to use the Blind Carbon Copy (BCC) feature when sending an email message to a large number of people. When you place email addresses in the BCC field of a message, those addresses are invisible to the recipients of the email. Conversely, any email addresses that you place in the To field or the CC field are visible to everyone who receives the message.

Benefits of Using BCC

Using the BCC field to send an email message to a large group of people has a number of benefits, including:

  • The privacy of email addresses is protected in the original message. Recipients will receive the message, but won't be able to see the addresses listed in the BCC field.
  • When an email is forwarded, the addresses of everyone in the To and CC fields are also forwarded along with the message. Addresses that have been placed in the BCC field are not forwarded.
  • If you have placed a large list of recipients in the To or CC field, all of them will receive the reply. By placing recipients in the BCC field, you can help protect them against receiving unnecessary replies from anyone using the Reply All feature.
  • Many viruses and spam programs are now able to sift through mail files and address books for email addresses. Using the BCC field acts as an anti-spam precaution. It reduces the likelihood that recipients will receive a spam message or a virus from another recipient’s infected computer.

Using the BCC Field

The following sections explain how to use the BCC feature with Microsoft Outlook 2016, Outlook 2013, and Apple Mail:

Outlook 2016 and 2013

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

1. Launch Outlook. From the Outlook ribbon, click the Home tab, then New Email.

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

2. A new message window appears. From the Ribbon, click the Options tab, then BCC. The BCC field will now display in your message header.

3. In the BCC field, type the email addresses of your recipients. Type your own address in the To field.

4. After you have finished your message, click Send.

Apple Mail

1. Launch the built-in macOS email client and click New.

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

2. The New Message window will display. Click the drop-down arrow located to the left of the Subject field, then BCC Address Field. The BCC field will now display in your message header.

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

3. In the BCC field, type the email addresses of your recipients. Type your own address in the To field.

Leading reasons for a shift in working hours among employees while working from home during the coronavirus outbreak in the United States as of June 2020

Characteristic Share of respondents

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June 10 to 22, 2020

23 years and older

More than one response was possible.
Original question: “What are the reasons for the shift in work hours?”

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Share of U.S. adults during the COVID-19 outbreak by work situation April 2020

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Impacts on employee workload while working from home U.S. 2020

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Share of employees that feel stressed working from home during coronavirus U.S. 2020

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Number of meetings attended per week by on-site and remote work U.S. 2019

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

How to show your working hours to other people in outlook

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Not sure if this has been brought up as of late, but I'm curious. I got to a point where I was doing 10+ hours a week and feeling like "I can't go out this weekend because I MUST fill my brain all day with knowledge". In an attempt to have a life, I've dialed back to 3-4 hours per week. This includes studying new topics, side projects, etc. Assuming this all depends on what you're currently doing at work as well. In my current gig, I'm learning new stuff pretty much every day in the technology space I want to be in.

· 3y

None. Life is too short for it out of work. Right now I'm having a beer in the sun in my back garden.

How did you reach this point? Was it a technical burnout or you just lost interest? Do you fear that you won’t be able to keep up with the tech in the world and new trends without studying?

None. If I'm learning something for my job, I do it on the clock. My off-time is my own to enjoy spending with my family. Luckily my workplace has the same mindset.

If you are learning for your position, it's on the clock. If you are learning because you want to move up, it's off the clock. I worked as a pre and post sales consultant, all learning was on the clock because all tech knowledge was relevant. Now I am in a slower pace job and expanding is done on personal time. I am doing this on my time because I want to move up to director position. Getting MBA in IT Management and looking into relevant certifications.

As a manager now, I absolutely support learning and try to stimulate it where I can. If an employee wants to grow I'll give 50-50 on growth learning time. Half on the clock half off but this is something I do for my team not a company policy.