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How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

When writing a document that is divided into sections or chapters, it is not unusual to have each new chapter or section start on an odd-numbered page. Word makes it very easy to accommodate this need when you are creating a document. You control this through the use of sections. All you need to do is create a new document section whenever you want to start a new chapter in your document. Follow these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point where you want the new chapter or section to begin.
  2. Display the Layout tab of the ribbon (Word 2016 or a later version) or the Page Layout tab (earlier versions of Word.)
  3. In the Page Setup group, click Breaks and then click Odd Page. The section break appears in your document.

Anything that is typed immediately after the section break will appear on an odd-numbered page when printed. If necessary, Word will insert a blank page between information in the previous section and the information in the new section to achieve this directive.

If you already have your document divided into sections (you have already inserted section breaks, in other words), you can make sure that a section will start on an odd-numbered page by following these steps:

  1. Place the insertion point in the section that you want to start on an odd-numbered page.
  2. Display the Layout tab of the ribbon (Word 2016 or a later version) or Page Layout (earlier versions of Word.)
  3. Click the small icon at the bottom-right of the Page Setup group. Word displays the Page Setup dialog box.
  4. Make sure the Layout tab is selected. (See Figure 1.)

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

Figure 1. The Layout tab of the page Setup dialog box.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (8725) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Starting a New Section on an Odd Page Number.

Author Bio

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. Learn more about Allen.

Go to Insert > Header or Footer > Edit Header or Edit Footer.

Select Different First Page.

Note: Different first page can be applied to the first page of any section in your document, not just the very first page.

In the header or footer area, you should see a label on the first page that says First Page Header. Select the page number and press Delete.

Select Close Header and Footer or press Esc to exit.

Tip: If you want your second page to start at 1 rather than 2, go to Insert > Page Number > Format Page Numbers, and set Start at under Page Numbering to 0, rather than 1.

Start page numbering on Page 3 – double-sided printing

If the first page of your document is a cover page, the second page is a table of contents, and you want the third page to show “Page 1”, see Start page numbering on Page 3 – double-sided printing.

Choose the scenario that most closely matches what you want to do:

You don’t want a page number to appear on your title page, but you want the second page to show “Page 2.”

Go to Insert > Header or Footer > Edit Header or Edit Footer.

Select Different First Page.

Note: Different first page can be applied to the first page of any section in your document, not just the very first page.

In the header or footer area, you should see a label on the first page that says First Page Header. Select the page number to highlight it and press Delete.

Select Close Header and Footer or press Esc to exit.

Start page numbering on Page 3 – double-sided printing

If the first page of your document is a cover page, the second page is a table of contents, and you want the third page to show “Page 1”, see Start page numbering on Page 3 – double-sided printing.

Remove the page number from the first page

Go to Insert > Header & Footer.

SelectOptions on the right side, and then select Different First Page.

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

Select Options again, and then select Remove Page Numbers.

To see your page numbers and confirm deletion of the number from the first page, go to View > Reading View.

If all page numbers are deleted, go to Insert > Header & Footer and select Other Pages on the left side,. Go to Insert > Page Number and choose a number placement.

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

For more info on page numbers, see Page numbering in Word.

See also

Pre-numbered blank document templates with no page number on the first page:

In books, chapters usually begin on the right, odd-numbered pages. If you’re formatting your manuscript for publication, don’t spend any time adding extra page breaks to force this to happen. Later edits may break this alignment. Use Odd Section Breaks instead.

Odd Section Breaks force the content to the top of a new page. And, like a Next Page Section Break, they also ensure that the content always starts on the right side of facing pages.

When you insert an Odd Page Section Break at the beginning of a book chapter, the chapter always starts on the odd, right side page.

To create theis page break, choose PAGE LAYOUT > BREAKS > ODD PAGE from the drop-down list.

One thing to note is that, as you scroll through your document, you WON’T SEE the blank pages this technique creates. You can only tell by watching the page numbers in the Status Bar at the bottom of the window! When you scroll through your Print Preview, though, you’ll see all the blanks.

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

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How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013For the complete collection of time-saving tips and tricks, buy my book, Microsoft Word 2010 Tips & Tricks. Available in eBook, iBook, Multi-touch, and paperback versions.

About Alicia Katz Pollock

With a Masters in Teaching from Tufts University, a QuickBooks®️ Online Advanced Certification and more than 30 years’ experience in the tech industry, Alicia is passionate about finding creative, practical solutions to complex and everyday tech problems. She also loves a good laugh!

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

Comments

3 Comments

Hi, Alicia, thanks for your description. But I have some issues, when there are other format pages. For example: The whole document is A4 format and you force all the chapters to start at the odd pages, but in between you insert A3 landscape, A4 landscape pages and just with one side filled (I mean when inserting A3 format page I filled with graphs only one side, when printing doublesided), how then page numbering is behaving?

But where to you put it? At the bottom of the preceding page or the top of the Chapter page? If you put it at the top of the Chapter page the page moves and created a new blank page … The trick is where do you put it? And if you’re working on sections for each chapter, and you have chosen in the Page Layout Section break “New Page” and different Odd/Even, do you need to also use this? I’m having a heck of a time with a book that has a chapter, then a summary, which doesn’t have to start on an odd page, but it has to be on it’s OWN page, then the next chapter, which DOES have to start on an odd page. And, finally, I assume you want to put the ODD Page BREAK on the bottom of the EVEN page to force the next page correct? Hope you can help. DOn’t know how old this is.

If you want to just go to the top of the next page, whether odd or even, just use a regular Page Break at the end of the previous material, not a Section Break. If you use Odd Page Break on an even page, it will just go to the next page. If you use it at the end of an odd page, it will leave the even page blank and start the next content on the next odd page. This is disconcerting to look at, because you may not actually SEE the blank odd page, except in certain views.

Different Odd/Even means that the headers and footers on the odd and even pages can be different – like putting the page numbers on the outside corners, or the book title on the even page headerss and the chapter name on the right page headers. If you’re not doing that, you don’t need Odd/Even Sections at all.

One of the formatting features of Word allows you to force your headings (if you use styles) to begin on a new page. What if you want the heading to begin on an odd-numbered page, however? You can insert section breaks that force the next section to start on an odd page, as has been discussed in other issues of WordTips. But what if you don’t want to use section breaks?

Unfortunately, there is no automatic way to start a heading on an odd page, based solely on the formatting you apply to the heading. This means you will need to insert some sort of special indicator that tells Word you want to jump to an odd page. If you don’t want to use section breaks, you can cleverly force Word to an odd page by using field codes. The following compound field will force an extra page break if the field occurs on an even page:

When you are building this field structure, make sure you replace <page break> with an actual, physical page break. You do this by following these steps:

  1. Selecting <page break> (what’s between the quotation marks) in the above field code.
  2. Display the Layout or Page Layout tabs of the ribbon, depending on which version of Word you are using.
  3. Click on the Breaks tool in the Page Setup group.
  4. Select Page from the resulting drop-down list.

When Word encounters the field, it determines the current page number and divides it by 2. If the remainder is 0 (meaning this is an even-numbered page), then the page break is inserted, thereby forcing your text to the next odd-numbered page. If the remainder is 1 (meaning this is an odd-numbered page), then nothing is inserted.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (12601) applies to Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019, and Word in Office 365. You can find a version of this tip for the older menu interface of Word here: Starting Chapters on Odd-Numbered Pages.

Author Bio

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. Learn more about Allen.

To use different page numbers or formats in different sections, create Page breaks and set page number for each.

The following shows an intro with lower case Roman numerals. You can use any other format instead.

Select between the intro and the body of the document and go to Layout > Breaks > Next Page.

Tip: To see section breaks and other formatting marks, go to Home and select Show/Hide (¶) to turn on the display of formatting marks.

In the header for the body section, deselect Link to Previous. If Link to Previous is dimmed, check to make sure a section break was created.

In the intro section select Page Number and choose a location and style. If your change only affects the first page of your section, make sure Different First Page is not selected.

To choose a format or to control the starting number, select Page Number > Format Page Numbers.

Do either or both of the following:

Select Number format to select the format for the numbering, such as a, b, c or i, ii, iii for the intro.

Under Page numbering, choose Start at and type a number that you want to start the section with. For example, restart numbering at the beginning of the body section.

Select Close Header and Footer, or double-click anywhere outside the header or footer area to exit.

The following shows an intro with lower case Roman numerals. You can use any other format instead.

Select between the intro and the body of the document and go to Layout > Breaks > Next Page.

In the header for the body section, deselect Link to Previous. If Link to Previous is dimmed, check to make sure a section break was created.

Note: Headers and footers are linked separately, so if your page number is in the header, turn off linking for headers. If your page number is in the footer, turn off linking for footers.

Go to Header & Footer > Page Number, and then click Page Number.

Choose the position and alignment of page numbers. If you don’t want a page number to appear on the first page, clear Show number on first page.

To choose a format or to control the starting number, go to Header & Footer > Page Number > Format Page Numbers.

To change the numbering style, select a different style in Number format.

To change the starting page number of the newly created section, select Start at, and then enter a number.

Select Close Header and Footer, or double-click outside of the header or footer to exit.

When writing a document that is divided into sections or chapters, it is not unusual to have each new chapter or section start on an odd-numbered page. Word makes it very easy to accommodate this need when you are creating a document. You control this through the use of sections. All you need to do is create a new document section whenever you want to start a new chapter in your document. Follow these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point where you want the new chapter or section to begin.
  2. Choose Break from the Insert menu. Word displays the Break dialog box. (See Figure 1.)

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

Figure 1. The Break dialog box.

Anything that is typed immediately after the section break will appear on an odd-numbered page when printed. If necessary, Word inserts a blank page between information in the previous section and the information in the new section to achieve this directive.

If you already have your document divided into sections (you have already inserted section breaks, in other words), you can make sure that a section will start on an odd-numbered page by following these steps:

  1. Place the insertion point in the section that you want to start on an odd-numbered page.
  2. Choose Page Setup from the File menu. Word displays the Page Setup dialog box.
  3. Make sure the Layout tab is selected. (See Figure 2.)

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

Figure 2. The Layout tab of the page Setup dialog box.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (634) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Starting a New Section on an Odd Page Number.

Author Bio

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. Learn more about Allen.

One of the formatting features of Word allows you to force your headings (if you use styles) to begin on a new page. What if you want the heading to begin on an odd-numbered page, however? You can insert section breaks that force the next section to start on an odd page, as has been discussed in other issues of WordTips. But what if you don’t want to use section breaks?

Unfortunately, there is no automatic way to start a heading on an odd page, based solely on the formatting you apply to the heading. This means you will need to insert some sort of special indicator that tells Word you want to jump to an odd page. If you don’t want to use section breaks, you can cleverly force Word to an odd page by using field codes. The following compound field will force an extra page break if the field occurs on an even page:

When you are building this field structure, make sure you replace <page break> with an actual, physical page break. When Word encounters the field, it determines the current page number and divides it by 2. If the remainder is 0 (meaning this is an even-numbered page), then the page break is inserted, thereby forcing your text to the next odd-numbered page. If the remainder is 1 (meaning this is an odd-numbered page), then nothing is inserted.

To use this field-based method, simply insert the field (press Ctrl+F9 to add each set of field braces) immediately before the heading or text you want to start on the odd-numbered page.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1560) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Starting Chapters on Odd-Numbered Pages.

Author Bio

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. Learn more about Allen.

You can use section breaks to change the layout or formatting of pages in your document.

To change formatting in a document, insert a section break at the beginning of where you want the change. Set up the formatting change just past the new section break. If you want to change formatting again, put in another section break. If your changes are to be on the same page, choose the Continuous section break. Otherwise, choose Next Page, Odd Page, or Even Page section breaks.

If the formatting change occurs in the previous section, press Ctrl or Command + Z and move your cursor to after the section break and try it again.

Use section breaks to layout or format a document

When you insert a section break, choose the type of break that fits the changes you want to make. Here are the types with usage suggestions:

The Next Page command inserts a section break and starts the new section on the next page. This type of section break is useful to start new chapters in a document.

The Continuous command inserts a section break and starts the new section on the same page. A continuous section break is useful to create format changes such as a different number of columns on a page.

The Even Page or Odd Page command inserts a section break and starts the new section on the next even-numbered or odd-numbered page. To start document chapters always on an odd or even page, use the Odd page or Even page section break option.

To view section breaks, see Show section breaks.

To insert a section break, see Insert a section break.

To change a section break, see Change a section break.

To delete a section break, see Delete a section break

Here are some formatting that can be applied parts of your document using section breaks:

Use sections breaks to divide and format documents of all sizes. For example, you can break down sections into chapters, and add formatting such as columns, headers and footers, page borders, to each.

Add a section break

Select where you want a new section to begin.

Go to Layout > Breaks.

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

Choose the type of section break you want:

Next Page Section break starts the new section on the following page.

Continuous Section break starts the new section on the same page. This type of section break is often used to change the number of columns without starting a new page.

Even Page Section break starts a new section on the next even-numbered page.

Odd Page Section break starts a new section on the next odd-numbered page.

Important: Office 2010 is no longer supported. Upgrade to Microsoft 365 to work anywhere from any device and continue to receive support.

Insert a section break

Select where you want a new section to begin.

Go to Page Layout > Breaks.

Section break that you want to add:

A Next Page section break starts the new section on the next page

A Continuous section break starts the new section on the same page.

Tip: You can use Continuous section breaks to create pages with different number of columns.

An Even Page or an Odd Page section break starts the new section on the next even-numbered or odd-numbered page.

Insert a section break

Select where you want a new section to begin.

Go to Layout > Breaks, and then choose the type of section break you want.

How to start a new section on an odd page number in word 2013

Next Page Starts the new section on the following page.

Continuous Starts the new section on the same page. This section break is particularly useful for documents that have columns. You can use it to change the number of columns without starting a new page.

Even Page Starts the new section on the next even-numbered page. For example, if you insert an Even Page Break at the end of page 3, the next section will start on page 4.

Odd Page Starts the new section on the next odd-numbered page. For example, if you insert an Odd Page Section Break at the end of page 3, the next section will start on page 5.

You can add page breaks, but Word for the web can’t add section breaks yet.

If you have the Word desktop application, use the Open in Word command to open the document and add section breaks there. When you’re done and you save the document, it will continue to be stored where you opened it in Word for the web.