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How to use a menstrual cup

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

A menstrual cup is a type of reusable feminine hygiene product. It’s a small, flexible funnel-shaped cup made of rubber or silicone that you insert into your vagina to catch and collect period fluid.

Cups can hold more blood than other methods, leading many women to use them as an eco-friendly alternative to tampons. And depending on your flow, you can wear a cup for up to 12 hours.

Available brands of reusable cups include the Keeper Cup, Moon Cup, Lunette Menstrual Cup, DivaCup, Lena Cup, and Lily Cup. There are also a few disposable menstrual cups on the market, such as the Instead Softcup.

Keep reading to learn more about how to insert and remove a menstrual cup, how to clean it, and more.

If you’re interested in using a menstrual cup, talk with your gynecologist. Although you can buy any of the brands online or in most stores, you’ll first have to find out what size you need. Most menstrual cup brands sell small and large versions.

To figure out the right menstrual cup size for you, you and your doctor should consider:

  • your age
  • length of your cervix
  • whether or not you have a heavy flow
  • firmness and flexibility of the cup
  • cup capacity
  • strength of your pelvic floor muscles
  • if you’ve given birth vaginally

Smaller menstrual cups are usually recommended for women younger than 30 years old who haven’t delivered vaginally. Larger sizes are often recommended for women who are over 30 years old, have given birth vaginally, or have a heavier period.

Before you put in your menstrual cup

When you use a menstrual cup for the first time, it may feel uncomfortable. But “greasing” your cup can help make the process smooth. Before you put in your cup, lubricate the rim with water or a water-based lube (lubricant). A wet menstrual cup is much easier to insert.

How to put in your menstrual cup

If you can put in a tampon, you should find it relatively easy to insert a menstrual cup. Just follow these steps to use a cup:

  1. Wash your hands thoroughly.
  2. Apply water or a water-based lube to the rim of the cup.
  3. Tightly fold the menstrual cup in half, holding it in one hand with the rim facing up.
  4. Insert the cup, rim up, into your vagina like you would a tampon without an applicator. It should sit a few inches below your cervix.
  5. Once the cup is in your vagina, rotate it. It will spring open to create an airtight seal that stops leaks.

You shouldn’t feel your menstrual cup if you’ve inserted the cup correctly. You should also be able to move, jump, sit, stand, and do other everyday activities without your cup falling out. If you’re having trouble putting in your cup, speak with your doctor.

When to take your menstrual cup out

You can wear a menstrual cup for 6 to 12 hours, depending on whether or not you have a heavy flow. This means you can use a cup for overnight protection.

You should always remove your menstrual cup by the 12-hour mark. If it becomes full before then, you’ll have to empty it ahead of schedule to avoid leaks.

How to take your menstrual cup out

To take out a menstrual cup, just follow these steps:

  1. Wash your hands thoroughly.
  2. Place your index finger and thumb into your vagina. Pull the stem of the cup gently until you can reach the base.
  3. Pinch the base to release the seal and pull down to remove the cup.
  4. Once it’s out, empty the cup into the sink or toilet.

Cup aftercare

Reusable menstrual cups should be washed and wiped clean before being reinserted into your vagina. Your cup should be emptied at least twice a day.

Reusable menstrual cups are durable and can last for 6 months to 10 years with proper care. Throw away disposable cups after removal.

A menstrual cup

  • is affordable
  • is safer than tampons
  • holds more blood than pads or tampons
  • is better for the environment than pads or tampons
  • can’t be felt during sex (some brands)
  • can be worn with an IUD

Many women choose to use menstrual cups because:

  • They’re budget friendly. You pay a one-time price for a reusable menstrual cup, unlike tampons or pads, which have to be continually bought and can cost upward of $100 a year.
  • Menstrual cups are safer. Because menstrual cups collect rather than absorb blood, you’re not at risk of getting toxic shock syndrome (TSS), a rare bacterial infection associated with tampon use.
  • Menstrual cups hold more blood. A menstrual cup can hold about one to two ounces of menstrual flow. Tampons, on the other hand, can only hold up to a third of an ounce.
  • They’re eco-friendly. Reusable menstrual cups can last a long time, which means you’re not contributing more waste to the environment.
  • You can have sex. Most reusable cups need to be taken out before you have sex, but the soft disposable ones can stay in while you get intimate. Not only will your partner not feel the cup, you also won’t have to worry about leaks.
  • You can wear a cup with an IUD. Some companies claim a menstrual cup could dislodge an IUD, but a 2012 study debunked that belief. If you’re concerned, though, check with your doctor about using a menstrual cup.

A menstrual cup

  • can be messy
  • may be hard to insert or remove
  • may be tough to find the right fit
  • may cause an allergic reaction
  • may cause vaginal irritation

Menstrual cups may be an affordable and environmentally friendly option, but you still need to keep a few things in mind:

  • Cup removal can be messy. You may find yourself in a place or position that makes it difficult or awkward to remove your cup. That means you may not be able to avoid spills during the process.
  • They can be tough to insert or remove. You may find that you’re not getting the right fold when you put in your menstrual cup. Or you may have a hard time pinching the base to pull the cup down and out.
  • It can be hard to find the right fit. Menstrual cups aren’t one-size-fits-all, so you may find it difficult to find the right fit. That means you may have to try out a few brands before finding the perfect one for you and your vagina.
  • You may be allergic to the material. Most menstrual cups are made from latex-free materials, making it a great option for people with latex allergies. But for some people, there’s a chance the silicone or rubber material can cause an allergic reaction.
  • It may cause vaginal irritation. A menstrual cup may irritate your vagina if the cup isn’t cleaned and cared for properly. It may also cause discomfort if you insert the cup without any lubrication.
  • There can be an increased chance for infection. Wash the menstrual cup very well. Rinse and let it dry. Don’t reuse a disposable menstrual cup. Wash your hands after.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

At home, at work, on the go! Lunette menstrual cups are designed to be simple and fuss-free period cups. Simply fold and insert. Done!

Use the guide below to learn how to insert a menstrual cup and you’ll be a period ninja in no time.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

1. Wash hands

Check that the air holes at the top of your cup are open. Wash your hands.

Wash your Lunette menstrual cup with Feelbetter Cup Cleanser and rinse it carefully.

2. Fold + Hold

Get comfy: you can insert the cup while sitting, standing or squatting. Spreading your legs will help with a successful and comfortable insertion. Relax.

Fold the cup in on itself to make flat, then in half to form a C shape.

3. Insert

Keep it rolled up and guide it rim first into the vagina. To check that the cup has fully opened, slide a clean finger up to the cup bottom and feel it – it should be round. Lunette can be used any time in your menstrual cycle, from heavy to light flow days.

4. Wear + learn

Lunette is emptied about 2–4 times a day, can be used for up to 12 hours, also overnight. The measuring lines on the cup help monitor your flow and easily learn your rhythm.

5. Remove + empty

Wash your hands and relax your muscles. Grasp the bottom of the cup. To break seal, squeeze the bottom of the cup.

Be sure not to pull it out by holding the stem alone. Tip contents into the toilet. Rinse & Reuse.

6. Clean + sanitize

Lunette should be cleaned before and after your cycle, and after emptying. To avoid odor and discoloration, rinse first in cold water, and then wash with hot water and Lunette Feelbetter Cup Cleanser designed for silicone cups.

How does the menstrual cup work?

The Lunette menstrual cup fits nice and snug, held in position by the seal formed by the walls of the vagina and the vaginal muscles. Your interior is superior and does all the work — you’ll barely feel a thing!

The cup is placed entirely inside the lower part of the vagina, just behind the pubic bone below the cervix.

Vaginas are tilted backwards, so guiding the cup towards the small of your back, moving it up and down will help you find the correct and comfortable position.

Rotate the cup to check that it has fully opened and doesn’t leak. Your cervix may move during menstruation, so inserting the cup requires practice and knowledge of your own anatomy.

Tips for first time menstrual cup insertion

Relax and take your time: Choose alone time when you can focus without distractions or interruptions. Perhaps after a warm bath when you are relaxed. If you are too nervous, the vaginal muscles will tighten, making it uncomfortable, if not impossible, for successful insertion.

Get Acquainted with yourself: It is always a good idea to know your own body. Take some time to locate the vaginal opening and even insert a finger to locate your cervix. It feels exactly like the tip of your nose. Knowing where your cervix is will help you to position the cup properly and not insert it too high.

Practice during your period: The vagina is more flexible and the blood works as a lubricant. OR . . .

Take a “dry run” before your period: You might be more comfortable practicing before your period if you feel squeamish about touching blood. In this case, use water as a lubricant.

Try different folds that accentuate the insertion poin: Most use the typical C-fold. However, there are many ways to fold a Lunette. Check out the most common different folds that you can use with your period cup.

Proper insertion direction: Be aware that the direction of insertion needs to be aimed towards the small of your back — not straight up.

Be patient: Know that it may take several times before you are successful. If you begin without the expectation of perfect insertion, you are more likely to be relaxed and pleasantly surprised when success happens.

Assess the stem: Once inserted, you will need to decide whether or not to keep the stem. If it protrudes, it will be uncomfortable. In this case, you likely won’t need the stem and can trim it off. However, if not, you may need it to assist with removal.

Tips for first time menstrual cup removal

Again – RELAX: Just as with insertion. Take your time!

Do NOT pull on the stem: The stem is used to gain access the bottom of the cup. If you pull on the stem, it will hurt! It will also create a mess since the cup won’t be supported or controlled when it exits.

Squeeze bottom to release suction: This is the key – the bottom of the cup has ridges for gripping. Grip the bottom and tweak the cup to the side. The idea is to pull an edge away from the vaginal wall to release suction. You will hear it when this happens.

Rock gently: Once suction releases, gently rock the cup from side to side as you pull it out. This technique might not be necessary, but helps with removal if the cup is feeling stubborn to come out.

Lunette is here to change attitudes about periods. This is our period.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

You’ve tried tampons and pads, but you’ve heard about menstrual cups? Using Ruby Cup is very similar to using tampons, and cups are widely used by people all over the world.

You can find out everything you need to know about how to use Ruby Cup – we’ll explain it all in one video and five simple steps.

How to use a Ruby Cup in 5 simple steps:

This step-by-step guide to using a menstrual cup will take you smoothly through each stage. Here’s how to get the very best of your cup, and your period:

1. Fold and hold
Always start by washing your hands. Fold Ruby Cup using a fold that works best for you. Many start with the C-fold. If that does not work for you, try some of the other folds to make insertion easier. Every menstruator’s anatomy is unique, so find the fold that works for you.

How to Use a Menstrual CupHow to Use a Menstrual Cup

Details on other menstrual cup folds are explained in our FAQs , to help you find the right folding method.

2. Insert and ensure
As with tampons, gently insert the folded cup into your vagina, tilting it back to the base of your spine. The cup should sit as low as it can comfortably sit inside your vagina, normally lower than a tampon but with the stem fully inside.

How to Use a Menstrual CupHow to Use a Menstrual Cup

When the cup is inside, it wants to pop open, creating a light suction. The suction is how the cup prevents leaks, so use your finger to check if it is fully unfolded. Twist or rotate the cup if you need to.

Do not rush, take your time – it’s like learning to use contact lenses.

3. Use it up to twelve hours
One of the great benefits of using a menstrual cup is that it can be used up to twelve hours. However, most menstrual cup users find they need to empty their cup in the morning and again in the evening.

4. Remove and empty
With clean hands, gently pull the stem of the cup downwards until you can reach and hold the base of the cup. Pinch the base to release the suction and take it out gently.
You may need to use your pelvic muscles to push your lower cup in the vagina to help you reach the base with your fingers.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup How to Use a Menstrual CupHow to Use a Menstrual Cup

When you’ve got your cup, empty it in the toilet, and rinse it with water.
If you do not have access to water, you can wipe it with some tissue or simply reinsert it right after emptying it. But make sure to rinse it at your next available opportunity.

5. Re-insert
When your cup is rinsed, you can reinsert it, and you’re ready to go again! Ruby Cup care, having a look at cleaning and storing .

Switching From Tampons to a Menstrual Cup is no big deal

Making the change to another product is easier than you may think. Using a menstrual cup is very similar to using tampons, just with improved health benefits – no irritation, no chemicals and no drying out.

Menstrual cups are the modern alternative to tampons and pads. They are environmentally friendly and super healthy.

Finding the right menstrual cup does not have to be tricky. Ruby Cup comes in two sizes, medium and small. You can find more advice on how to choose the right menstrual cup size here.

How to use a menstrual cup in a public bathroom

Planning your next backpacking trip? Going camping or visiting a festival? Or even if you’re just planning a night out, you do not have to worry about using Ruby Cup. Emptying is easy no matter where you are.

If the sink is out of reach, simply wipe the cup clean with dry or damp tissue, or rinse with bottled water and reinsert straight-away. You can simply reinsert it without rinsing it, but make sure you rinse it at your next available opportunity.

More hacks on how to use a menstrual cup in a public bathroom, and what to do when you are traveling, c heck out our Traveling with a Menstrual Cup article and you’ll be ready for anything!

MENSTRUAL CUPS are seeing a tremendous rise in popularity as the favoured type of sanitary product. What is a menstrual cup? How does it work?

From tampons to sanitary towels, sanitary products are never going to be glamorous. They’re purely made for collecting the blood released during your period. So how do you pick which product suits you? The frequency and duration of period varies from one person to the next, so which method you prefer will depend on your flow. However, many women are turning to menstrual cups as an eco-friendly method.

Trending

What is a menstrual cup?

Fed up of pads and tampons? You have probably heard of a menstrual cup.

Perhaps your friends are bombarding you to try it, or maybe you’ve heard about the benefits of a menstrual cup.

Menstrual cups collect the blood rather than absorb it and they can be washed and reused.

The reusable nature of the cup makes it much more eco-friendly.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Menstrual Cup: Menstrual cups aren’t intimidating when you get used to them (Image: Getty)

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Menstrual Cup: Menstrual cups are becoming more popular (Image: Getty)

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How to Use a Menstrual Cup

How does it work?

You insert the bell-shaped cup when you start your period, and regularly empty it.

The purpose is to prevent your clothes from getting stained, just like any other method.

You need to remove the cup every four to 12 hours of use, depending on how heavy your flow is.

After taking it out, you need to empty and rinse the cup with cold water to avoid staining it.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Menstrual Cup: Boiling your cup will thoroughly clean it (Image: Getty)

How to use a menstrual cup

Before using your menstrual cup, you need to clean it!

The BeYou site explains: “You can do this by putting your cup in a saucepan of boiling water for 10 minutes.

“Alternatively, you can pop your new cup in a microwaveable container, making sure it’s submerged in water.

“Pop it in the microwave for 5 minutes et voila, your cup is sanitised. Once it has cooled down give your cup one last clean with your Foaming Menstrual Cup Cleanser and you’re ready to use it.

Between each menstrual cycle, boil your cup for 20 minutes to keep it clean.

You can purchase cup cleaning wipes or BeYou’s Foaming Cup Cleaner to clean it after each use if you need to.

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How to Use a Menstrual Cup

If you are nervous about using a cup, don’t worry! BeYou’s experts can assure you that a menstrual cup is not dangerous.

The site says: “Your cup will not get lost, your cup will not get stuck and yes, it will fit.” So stop worrying and practise inserting your cup.

Sit in a quiet place with a positive attitude and relax – the best time to do it is just before a shower or bath.

You need to fold the cup before insertion, and cups will have a wide range of folds to suit every woman’s anatomy.

The C or U fold is the most popular and well-known fold, but do your research to find out which fold is best for you.

If your cup is still folded when it is inserted, it won’t be able to catch all of your blood.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Menstrual Cup: You need to fold your menstrual cup before inserting it (Image: Getty)

You need to open the cup once inside by pressing on each side or pulling on the stem.

Once you’ve done this, you can keep it in from four to 12 hours, but try to avoid going past eight hours.

Some menstrual cups, such as the BeYou menstrual cup, will form a vacuum seal against your walls to avoid it falling out.

The upside to this is no leakage, but the downside is it can be tricky to pull out on the first go.

Break the seal by inserting your finger by the side of the cup or by pinching the base of the cup. Squeeze your cup to break the seal.

Wiggle it from side to side to ensure the cup is pointing upwards and slowly remove it.

Tip the contents into the toilet and flush, and then rinse the cup in the sink.

Reinsert your cup as normal, and repeat the process every four to eight hours.

STEP BY STEP GUIDE

We have put together some very useful information on how to use a menstrual cup. As a result, you will find the 5 easy steps to guide you during your 1st experience: how to sterilise it, how to insert it, how to wash it, how to remove it and how to store it

JUST A CUP IS A REUSABLE MENSTRUAL CUP made out of 100% medical grade silicon. The menstrual cup does not affect the PH of the vagina and does not use any chemicals.

The menstrual cup catches and collects the menstrual blood when the traditional menstrual protection absorbs it.

SOME IMPORTANT HYGIENE RULES have to be followed before,during and after its uses :

  • Before using it for the first time and before every cycle, cover your menstrual cup with water and boil it for 5 to 7 minutes. Make sure that it is fully covered so it does not damage the menstrual cup at the bottom of the pan.
  • Boiling the menstrual cup will ensure that it is 100% clean. It is a very important step to avoid any infection.
  • During your cycle, wash your cup with a gentle soap and rinse with clear water. Ensure that the 6 holes at the top of the cup are completely clean.
  • At the end of your cycle, boil your menstrual again and store it in your clothe bag until you next use it.

Just a Cup is for your personal use only. Do not give it to anybody else.

Now that you know how to clean Just a Cup. How do you insert it?

HOW TO INSERT YOUR MENSTRUAL CUP?

Just a Cup can be inserted in 6 very easy steps :
How to Use a Menstrual CupBefore inserting the menstrual cup, wash your hand with gentle soap and rinse under clear water
How to Use a Menstrual CupIn order to insert the menstrual cup, you will first need to fold it. Push down the cup with your thumbs.
How to Use a Menstrual CupFold the cup in half. This is the C-fold technique. Many techniques can be used to fold the menstrual cup. We recommend you try a few to see what suits you best.

How to Use a Menstrual CupFind a relaxing position. You can squat, seat on the toilet, put one leg on the toilet/bath tub. You might need to try the different position until you find the one that works best for you. Use the fingers of the other hand to facilit the access to the vagina.
How to Use a Menstrual CupMake sure you are fully relaxed before you insert the menstrual cup. Insert the folded menstrual cup, remove your fingers and let it pop open. You might hear a suction sound or even a pop. It is a good sign that the menstrual cup has fully opened in your vagina.
How to Use a Menstrual CupIf you are unsure that the suction has happened, you can rotate the menstrual cup gently by putting your fingers at the base. The rotation will make the cup unfold.

You can proceed with a final verification by placing a figure inside your vagina and insure that the menstrual cup is in place.

By comparaison with a tampon, the menstrual cup is seating lower in the vaginal canal. If the stem of the menstrual cup is too long, remove the menstrual cup, cut the stem at the desired lenght and reinsert.

Some persons remove the stem completely, other only a little bit or not at all. Try cutting the stem a little at the time to ensure you end up with the perfect length.

Do you have additional questions? Please refer to our FAQ.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

We can’t tell you how many times we get the question, “I bought my cup, now how do I use it?”. Consider this your complete guide to how to use a menstrual cup, written by initially sceptical menstrual cup users.

So, you’ve got your cup (or you’re yet to take the plunge, in which case we’d suggest buying a Flowcup here) and you’re looking at it thinking, how do menstrual cups work? Simply put, you’ve got yourself a bell-shaped sanitary product, designed to collect menstrual fluids, that sits against the vaginal wall (behind the pubic bone) just below your cervix.

Some of you will have never inserted a sanitary product before and others may be all aboard the tampon train thinking, this cup is significantly bigger and doesn’t come with an emergency eject string, what have I got myself into?

Well, one of the biggest menstrual cup benefits is how it reduces your personal waste from 15,000 tampons (or pads) to 4-5 menstrual cups in a lifetime. Yes girl! Call Greta Thunberg, we’re on team mother nature!

Preparing a menstrual cup

Step one when dealing with a menstrual cup is always to take a deep breath. We’d recommend repeating step one as often as needed because the thing about women’s bodies is when we get nervous, stressed or frustrated, they go into muscular lock down, which makes using a cup a little more difficult. So, breathe, be calm and think about all the landfill you’re no longer adding to.

Step two is to boil your cup or submerge your cup in boiling water for 5 minutes. This sterilises the cup and makes sure it’s squeaky clean. After doing this, wash your hands because we are busy, multitasking women and we don’t want any germs touching our perfectly sterile period cup.

How to insert a menstrual cup

You probably know there are a couple of different folds to make the cup smaller for insertion, but which fold is going to be right for you? Well, this is definitely something worth experimenting with when you’re comfortable with your cup, but for beginners, we recommend the push down fold because it has the smallest surface area to start with.

Very simply, push down one side of the cup into the centre of the cup and fold in half. Check out our video for a visual guide.

[Pro tip: wetting your cup before inserting it often makes the process easier and more comfortable]

Next, we’re going to insert the tall side of the cup into the vagina, towards the spine. Once the cup is completely inside the vaginal canal, it should pop open, but this doesn’t always happen naturally. We recommend turning the cup by the base a few times and then running your index finger around the bottom of the cup to feel for any folds. When the cup is properly inserted, you should feel no folds and the best part, you should be able to stand up, walk around and not feel it at all!

The best position to insert your cup is sitting, we recommend over the toilet. Some people like the “sumo squat” where you square up to your imaginary opponent and squat down. But, if you’re really struggling and no amount of deep breaths in the world is making it happen, try lying on your back with your knees bent.

Ok, so now the cup is in, yes girl! Look at you go! Have a cookie, you’ve earned it.

You now have up to 12 hours to go about your life. Freedom is here! You can swim, run, high jump or even just go to school without having to awkwardly scurry off to the bathroom every few hours to change your tampon. And as for night-time, you’ll enjoy a solid eight hours where you can lay as a star fish as you like, without destroying your sheets. Yes, please, sign us up!

Removing your menstrual cup

When it comes to removing your cup, people visualise the worst. Sure, there are running jokes about emptying your menstrual cup causing your bathroom to look like a crime scene, but that’s honestly like telling someone the first time they try to cook pasta sauce, the entire kitchen is going to be painted in Bolognese. We are ladies. We got this.

When removing your cup, it’s important to repeat Step One- deep breathe. It’s not uncommon for you to panic a little your first time removing the cup. You’re going to reach for the stem of the cup and if you can’t immediately grab it, your brain’s going to tell you “It’s stuck forever. It now lives there permanently; you’ll never get it out”. None of this is true, the cup cannot get lost inside you, it can only hang out in the vaginal canal, which is a different size for everyone but generally between 3-6 inches. For lots of women, peeing helps because the right muscles clench and move the cup down, closer to the vagina. We know that’s TMI, but isn’t this whole article TMI?

Grab the stem of your cup and wiggle it down. There will be some resistance, which is a good thing. The cup stays in place during the day because it creates a seal against the vaginal walls. That’s why it won’t fall out during a triple, reverse somersault dive, off an Olympic platform. Once the base of the cup is outside the vagina, push your index finger into the side of the cup. This will break the seal and allow the cup to be removed. The first time can be uncomfortable, but as you learn how to break the seal, you’ll be a pro in no time! Depending on the person, you’ll need to empty your period cup between 2–4 times a day.

Success (Yes girl!)

You might be surprised how little blood is in the cup after 12 hours. We’ve been changing pads for so long, we’ve never actually known how much we bleed. If your cup is full after 12 hours, you might want to remove it more regularly, if it’s not, then you can happily change it every 12 hours and go about your day.

After removing the cup, empty the contents in the toilet or down the sink. Some people like to remove it in the shower because the blood exits stage left with no mess at all! Rinse the cup with clean water or a tissue. We recommend water because it doubles as a lubricant to help reinsert the cup.

And now you’re a menstrual cup goddess. Remember, deep breathe, be chill, you’re doing more for the environment than most political leaders, water is your friend, keep your cup clean, keep your hands clean and feel free to do a cartwheel any time the cup is in.

Help end period poverty

The Cova Project is a women’s charity that provides menstrual cups and menstrual health education to girls in developing communities across Africa. If you’re interested in donating a cup to a girl living without access to sanitary products, click here. One cup is $7 and it can change a girl’s life for up to 10 years.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

EASY TO USE

You should have little trouble learning how to insert a Menstrual Cup.

Just fold it, so it looks like a Tampon, aim it toward the back of the vagina and give a little push.

How to Use a Menstrual CupHow to Use a Menstrual Cup

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

It will sit a lot lower than a Tampon, so you won’t need to push back as far.

When it’s inserted correctly, you won’t even feel its presence and it will not leak!

In fact, a lot of users forget it’s their time of the month altogether!

ALTERNATIVE MENSTRUAL CUP FOLD

The ‘ Push Down Fold”

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

HOW TO CLEAN YOUR MENSTRUAL CUP

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Clean before first use. You can either boil your floweret cup for 5-10 minutes in a pan, sterilise using sterilising tablets ( refer to manufactures instructions) or use our quick and convenient carry and clean steriliser this takes just 3 minutes in a microwave. Wash your hands thoroughly prior to insertion

The material we use allows the flow to easily slip out of the cup. A quick rinse in water will leave the cup ready to be reinserted.

If you’re out and about, don’t worry! You can use a piece of tissue, or a wipe, to clean your cup.

QUICK FAQS

Is Floweret suitable for everyone?

Floweret Cup is suitable for all ages and flows.

How long can you use A Floweret Menstrual Cup For?

The cup needs to be removed and cleaned at least once every 8-12 hours.

Can you use a Menstrual cup over night and for swimming ?

It is safe to use your menstrual cup overnight. You can also use your menstrual cup safely during exercise and swimming

MENSTRUAL CUP BENEFITS

Freedom!
Not having to replace a tampon or change a pad every few hours is quite liberating, you can use a Floweret Cup for up to 12 hours.

Great Alternative Menstrual Product
If you are just starting out on your menstrual journey or you are currently using Menstrual Pads or Tampons for your period, Floweret cups are a great solution, offering leak free periods, less mess, more comfort, plus, much better for you and the environment.

Floweret Cup is a cleaner, more comfortable and less expensive alternative to Tampons and Menstrual Pads. We know that change can be a little scary, but have no fear! We promise that you will love your Floweret Menstrual Cup and you’ll wonder why you waited so long to try it.

Lower Costs and Less Landfill Waste
Floweret Cups are designed for long-term use – up to a 10 years life cycle! Because they’re reusable, there is less waste to clog up our landfills, and fewer trees are sacrificed for paper-based alternatives.

In fact, you may use 16,000 disposables in your lifetime!
We are helping to reduce the 45 billion products disposed of, globally, each year.

Less Odour
Unlike Pads and Tampons, the fluid is not exposed to air, so you won’t have to worry about menstrual odour. When the cup is removed, the contents will appear like it has just discharged. Simply empty the contents into the toilet and flush!

Vaginal PH And Beneficial Bacteria Stay in Place
Tampons absorb all of your vaginal fluid along with the blood. This can disturb the delicate pH and bacterial balance of your vagina and can leave your vagina dry, and tampons uncomfortable.

Convenience
You can even Insert your Floweret Menstrual Cup before your period starts!
When it’s approaching your flow date, just insert the cup and enjoy comfortable protection. No more leaks or trying to find someone with a Tampon at work!

It is advised not to insert a Tampon pre-cycle.

Fewer Visits To The Pharmacy
Most customers don’t replace their cups for 10+ years!

That’s roughly 420 Tampons or Pads not used every year!

Just one simple change could have such a positive effect on the environment!

More time between changes
You need to change your Tampons every two to eight hours, depending on flow. With our cups you can enjoy up to 12 leak-free hours. Our Cups hold unto 3 x more than Tampons and Pads.

A menstrual cup is shaped like a small bell, it is inserted into the vagina to collect menstrual fluid. A cup is clean, hygienic, safe and comfortable, and produces no smell. Each cup is reusable and lasts 10 years, so saves the cost of 2,500 sanitary pads or tampons. You will not feel your cup inside you, and you can remove it easily.

How to insert the menstrual cup:

Give yourself time and stay calm. Find a quiet place where you will not be disturbed.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

1. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 30 seconds. You may wet the cup or put it in hot, clean water to soften it.

2. Sit, squat, or lie on your back with your legs apart. Or put one leg up on a chair or the toilet. Every woman is different, find a position that works for you.

3. Relax and breathe.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

4. Fold the cup and hold your labia apart, so that you can feel your vagina.
5. Gently push the cup up into your vagina, pushing towards your back, until it is all the way in. Let go and the cup will open, creating a seal between the cup and the sides of your vagina. If it is difficult to insert, relax and try again.
6. Check the cup is in the correct position in the vagina:

  • Run your finger around the side of the cup to ensure it is open
  • Pinch the base of the cup (not the tail) and move the Menstrual cup around.

You may need to use a cup for one or two periods before it is easy.

How to remove the menstrual cup:

1. Wash your hands with soap and water.
2. Relax and breathe.
3. Sit or squat with your legs apart. Or put one leg up on a chair or the toilet. Push down with your stomach muscles. Using your thumb and two fingers feel inside you for the base of your cup. Squeeze the base to release the suction and detach the cup from the walls of the vagina. Or insert a finger around the cup to release the suction. If you cannot feel the cup breathe and push down with your inner muscles.

4. Do not pull the tail or stem. Gently and slowly pull the cup out. Don’t worry if it makes a noise when you remove it, this is normal. When the base of the cup is almost out, use your finger to push the cup on one side to remove half of the rim then the other half will come out easily. This ensures the cup slides out while remaining upright to avoid spilling the content.
5. Empty the cup into a toilet or latrine.
6. Wash the cup with clean water or wipe it with tissue. You can reinsert it without washing, as it only has your own body fluids on the cup. Fold the cup as before and reinsert back into your vagina.

7. Empty your cup every 4 to 12 hours, depending on your menstrual flow. If you have a small cup, and it leaks, then you may need a larger size cup.

How to clean the menstrual cup:

Only use clean or drinking water to wash your cup. Do not use soap or bleach on your menstrual cup because it will cause irritation inside your vagina. When your period is finished, wash the cup and then boil it in water for 3 minutes, make sure the water covers it. Let it dry in the air and keep it in a cotton bag for next time, away from rats or insects. Do not keep it in an airtight or plastic bag or box.

How to fold the cup

Before it is inserted, the cup is folded to make it smaller. Practice folding the cup as small as possible.

Push-down fold: with one finger, push the rim of the cup down into the base of the cup. Pinch the sides of the cup together, making a triangle shape, hold the cup at the base and insert.

C Fold: fold the cup in half into a ‘c’ shape, hold the cup at the base and insert.
How does the cup stay inside? The vagina is made from elastic muscle, which can stretch wide open and also hold the cup tightly. You do not have to remove your cup to urinate. Sometimes when you defecate the cup falls out of place, then just remove it and reinsert.
What do I do if I drop my cup? If the menstrual cup falls on a clean surface it can be rinsed with clean water and reinserted. If it falls onto a dirty floor or latrine it must not be used again until it has cleaned with boiled water to kill any bacteria.

The Menstrual Cup Coalition supports the safe use of affordable menstrual cups by sharing knowledge and good practice globally.

All photos © World Menstrual Network unless otherwise stated.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Menstrual cups have been around a LONG time — we’re talking longer than tampons. (For real, the first patent on a period cup was filed before the first patent on a tampon.) But they’ve only recently come to the forefront as a way to supplement your period care. Those who already use menstrual cups feel really, really strongly about them – the word “life-changing” has come up. Instead of having to choose between pads and tampons, menstrual cups add to your options by offering a solution that gives you something different. Of course, that’s not without some important things to consider – plus a tricky learning curve. Here’s what you need to know.

What Is a Menstrual Cup?

A menstrual cup is a cup made of medical-grade silicone that’s specially designed to fit into your vagina. You insert it during your period so it can collect (rather than absorb) your blood; its edges conform to your vagina so it creates a pretty foolproof seal when it’s inserted properly – more on that in a bit. Then, once you remove it, you can dump out that blood, rinse out your cup with soap and water (or the wipes that are packaged with the cup), and put it back in for another round of period cover. Genius, right? The process should be painless, and the silicone material means you can reuse it month after month for up to 1-year.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Using a Menstrual Cup?

There are a few major advantages of using a period cup. The first is that it’s reusable. That not only saves you money in the long run – ka-ching – but you’re also not stuck bumming tampons off your friends if you run out. Instead, you can just rinse, wash, and use it again. You can safely wear a menstrual cup for up to 12 hours, although you may want to switch it up sooner. Unlike pads, it’s invisible and generally sensation-free so long as you’ve inserted it correctly.

The drawback is that it can be tricky to insert properly, especially if you’ve never used one before. Menstrual cups come with a bit of a learning curve that typically takes people a couple cycles to get the hang of, and it’s one that forces you to get up close and VERY personal with your vagina. If you don’t get the seal right once it’s in there, the cup could leak. A menstrual cup is also a little messy: Since you don’t just toss it as you would with pads and tampons, you have to clean it by rinsing it with mild soap and water every time before you reinsert it. That can be hard to do in a public bathroom, and we’re not even including the fact that the cup can make a weird sound as you’re pulling it out.

How Do You Use a Menstrual Cup?

Like so many things in life, a little practice can go a long way. Here’s how to use a menstrual cup if you’re a first-timer.

Step 1: Fold Your Menstrual Cup

Start by taking a deep breath. Then, fold your menstrual cup. There are a few ways to do this, and it all depends on which way you feel most comfortable. The easiest way – and thus a go-to for beginners – is the C-fold, in which you press the cup flat, pinch it in the middle and fold it over so it creates a C shape. (You can watch a demo in our Cup Guide, if you’re more of a visual learner.)

Step 2: Insert the Folded Cup

Next, insert the folded cup into your vagina as you would with a tampon. Once you release it, the cup will open up. To make sure it adheres to the wall of your vagina, gently tug on the stem a few times and rotate it in a circle. You shouldn’t be able to feel it once it’s in — and if you do, just take it out and try it again. Practice makes perfect, true, but even people who’ve been using menstrual cups for years need to redo it once or twice to make sure it’s in right.

Step 3: Remove the Menstrual Cup

Once you’re ready to remove your cup, you need to first break the seal. Heads up: Just like inserting it, this process can also take a minute, so don’t sweat if it takes a few tries. It helps to start in a squatting position. First, feel around for the stem. Once you find it, pinch the base of the cup (not the stem) to break the seal and remove it carefully, since the last thing you want is to spill it on your clothes. You can dump the menstrual fluid in the toilet, sink, or shower – whichever is more convenient.

How to Keep Your Cup Clean

As we mentioned, the thing about menstrual cups is that they can be a little messier than your average tampon. Every time you remove it, you should wash it out with water and soap before inserting it again. (You can also use a wipe if you don’t have access to a sink.) Once your period is over, give your cup a deeper clean by dropping it into a pot of boiling water. Let it hang out there for at least five to seven minutes, dry it completely, and return it to its cute storage case.

Cleaning your menstrual cup is super-important, so make sure to follow the package instructions. And you should replace it every year.

When to Use a Menstrual Cup

There are no rules when it comes to your period care. You can use a menstrual cup whenever you want, and do so without ditching your tampons and pads – it just depends on what works for you. For instance, a menstrual cup might be great overnight, while a tampon may work better if you know you won’t be able to clean your cup properly between uses (looking at you, grimy public bathrooms). Or maybe you want to use a menstrual cup and a pad at the same time. It’s all good, because becoming a menstrual cup user doesn’t make it the end-all, be-all. You’ve got options!

Which Menstrual Cup Is Right for You?

You can find menstrual cups at your local drugstore or online – seriously, it’s easy to find once you know what to look for. Most menstrual cups, like the Tampax Cup, come in two different sizes. There’s one menstrual cup size for a Regular Flow and another for a Heavy Flow, and you can get both in Tampax’s Menstrual Cup Starter Kit. Since your flow can vary month-to-month and throughout your period it’s your best bet for figuring out the right fit for you. Want to learn more about all things menstrual cups? Visit our Tampax Cups page for more.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

At home, at work, on the go! Lunette menstrual cups are designed to be simple and fuss-free period cups. Simply fold and insert. Done!

Use the guide below to learn how to insert a menstrual cup and you’ll be a period ninja in no time.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

1. Wash hands

Check that the air holes at the top of your cup are open. Wash your hands.

Wash your Lunette menstrual cup with Feelbetter Cup Cleanser and rinse it carefully.

2. Fold + Hold

Get comfy: you can insert the cup while sitting, standing or squatting. Spreading your legs will help with a successful and comfortable insertion. Relax.

Fold the cup in on itself to make flat, then in half to form a C shape.

3. Insert

Keep it rolled up and guide it rim first into the vagina. To check that the cup has fully opened, slide a clean finger up to the cup bottom and feel it – it should be round. Lunette can be used any time in your menstrual cycle, from heavy to light flow days.

4. Wear + learn

Lunette is emptied about 2–4 times a day, can be used for up to 12 hours, also overnight. The measuring lines on the cup help monitor your flow and easily learn your rhythm.

5. Remove + empty

Wash your hands and relax your muscles. Grasp the bottom of the cup. To break seal, squeeze the bottom of the cup.

Be sure not to pull it out by holding the stem alone. Tip contents into the toilet. Rinse & Reuse.

6. Clean + sanitize

Lunette should be cleaned before and after your cycle, and after emptying. To avoid odor and discoloration, rinse first in cold water, and then wash with hot water and Lunette Feelbetter Cup Cleanser designed for silicone cups.

How does the menstrual cup work?

The Lunette menstrual cup fits nice and snug, held in position by the seal formed by the walls of the vagina and the vaginal muscles. Your interior is superior and does all the work — you’ll barely feel a thing!

The cup is placed entirely inside the lower part of the vagina, just behind the pubic bone below the cervix.

Vaginas are tilted backwards, so guiding the cup towards the small of your back, moving it up and down will help you find the correct and comfortable position.

Rotate the cup to check that it has fully opened and doesn’t leak. Your cervix may move during menstruation, so inserting the cup requires practice and knowledge of your own anatomy.

Tips for first time menstrual cup insertion

Relax and take your time: Choose alone time when you can focus without distractions or interruptions. Perhaps after a warm bath when you are relaxed. If you are too nervous, the vaginal muscles will tighten, making it uncomfortable, if not impossible, for successful insertion.

Get Acquainted with yourself: It is always a good idea to know your own body. Take some time to locate the vaginal opening and even insert a finger to locate your cervix. It feels exactly like the tip of your nose. Knowing where your cervix is will help you to position the cup properly and not insert it too high.

Practice during your period: The vagina is more flexible and the blood works as a lubricant. OR . . .

Take a “dry run” before your period: You might be more comfortable practicing before your period if you feel squeamish about touching blood. In this case, use water as a lubricant.

Try different folds that accentuate the insertion poin: Most use the typical C-fold. However, there are many ways to fold a Lunette. Check out the most common different folds that you can use with your period cup.

Proper insertion direction: Be aware that the direction of insertion needs to be aimed towards the small of your back — not straight up.

Be patient: Know that it may take several times before you are successful. If you begin without the expectation of perfect insertion, you are more likely to be relaxed and pleasantly surprised when success happens.

Assess the stem: Once inserted, you will need to decide whether or not to keep the stem. If it protrudes, it will be uncomfortable. In this case, you likely won’t need the stem and can trim it off. However, if not, you may need it to assist with removal.

Tips for first time menstrual cup removal

Again – RELAX: Just as with insertion. Take your time!

Do NOT pull on the stem: The stem is used to gain access the bottom of the cup. If you pull on the stem, it will hurt! It will also create a mess since the cup won’t be supported or controlled when it exits.

Squeeze bottom to release suction: This is the key – the bottom of the cup has ridges for gripping. Grip the bottom and tweak the cup to the side. The idea is to pull an edge away from the vaginal wall to release suction. You will hear it when this happens.

Rock gently: Once suction releases, gently rock the cup from side to side as you pull it out. This technique might not be necessary, but helps with removal if the cup is feeling stubborn to come out.

Lunette is here to change attitudes about periods. This is our period.

How to use a menstrual cup Photo: Economictimes

Menstrual cups are an eco-friendly way to deal with your period. In this guide, we’re going to look at how you use one, how safe they are, and why it’s an excellent time to make the switch.

Choosing the right size cup

It’s very important that you use the right size and shape of menstrual cup. No two brands of menstrual cup are exactly the same. Whilst they are all made from the same materials, there are different sizes. Some cups are wider, some are longer. Your internal anatomy will dictate which size, shape and firmness you need, which is why it’s important to learn everything about menstrual cups. Younger women and those who have not had a vaginal birth will probably need a smaller cup.

How to insert a menstrual cup

Choose a quiet time when you are not going to be interrupted, as it may take a bit of practice before you get the hang of using your new menstrual cup. This is not something to try when you’re late for work, or in the ladies’ restroom at the office.

Head into your bathroom, lock the door and make yourself comfortable.

Wash your hands before inserting the cup. Do a good job here, as the last thing you want is to introduce some nasty germs into your body.

It’s going to feel a bit icky when you first try and insert a menstrual cup, even if you are accustomed to using a tampon. Menstrual cups are larger than tampons, so the trick is to fold it over to make it smaller. The cup will spring back into shape once its inside, so don’t worry that you will inadvertently damage it!

Wet the menstrual cup. It’s a lot easier to insert a lubricated cup than a dry one. You can also use water-based lubricant if you prefer.

Hold the rightly folded cup so the rim is facing upwards and the pointy end is facing down. The cup needs to be inserted rim first. Holding the cup firmly, relax and gently push it into your vagina. If it is positioned correctly, you won’t be able to feel it. If you can feel the cup, remove it, and try again.

Once a menstrual cup is inside your vagina, it should spring open and form a tight seal. The cup will not move until you take it out again, so if you can feel your menstrual cup shifting around, remove it and have another go.

If you’re finding it hard to insert the cup, try sitting on the toilet with your legs apart. Relax, take a few deep breaths, and think happy thoughts. The tenser you are, the harder it will be to insert the cup.

Some women find it easier to stand with one foot resting on a chair or the side of the bath when inserting their menstrual cup.

Removing a menstrual cup

Removing a menstrual cup isn’t always easy, but the trick is to break the seal before you try and take it out. Gently insert a clean finger inside your vagina and locate the rim of the cup. Push your finger against the rim, so it breaks away from the vaginal wall. This breaks the seal and makes it easy to remove the cup.

Grab the stem of the cup and gently remove it, taking care not to spill the contents. Empty the cup in a toilet or sink and rinse it out with clean water. It can then be reinserted.

You can also remove, empty, and clean your cup while you are in the shower. Fill it with soapy water and give it a good scrub with your fingers to remove any gunky bits.

Don’t trim the stem too short

Menstrual cups usually come with a stem, which you can grab and use to pull the cup out. It’s best to leave the stem long when you first start using a menstrual cup. This makes it easier to remove the cup. As you become more comfortable inserting and removing a menstrual cup, you can trim the stem so it’s shorter.

Practice makes perfect

Don’t despair if you are finding it hard to insert your menstrual cup. There is a knack to it, and once you have gone through the motions several times, it will get easier, we promise!

Practice inserting and removing your cup until you are comfortable with the process. Before long, you’ll be a pro at this.

Know when to remove your menstrual cup

The great thing about menstrual cups is that they can be left in place a lot longer than a tampon. Whereas you should change a tampon every four hours, it’s OK to wear a menstrual cup for up to 12 hours. However, an overly full cup will leak, so get to know your body and how often you need to empty your cup.

Most women’s menstrual flow is heaviest in the first 2-3 days, so it is best to empty your menstrual cup every 4-6 hours. Once your flow slackens off, you can leave the cup in place longer.

Try and get into the habit of emptying your menstrual cup a least twice a day. That way you won’t forget about it and end up dealing with a leak.

Tips for everyday use

Menstrual cups are very easy to use, but it’s wise to carry a small pack of toiletries with you when you are using one.

If you need to wear your menstrual cup and you don’t know if you’ll be able to rinse it out, have a bottle of water handy and use this to clean your cup. Since it can be a bit messy emptying a full menstrual cup, keep some wet wipes in your purse, just in case you can’t wash your hands.

Caring for your menstrual cup

Menstrual cups can last for many years with the right care.

• Wash your cup with soap at the end up the day, to keep it fresh and clean.

• Sterilize your cup in boiling water for 10-15 minutes at the end of your monthly cycle.

• Store your cup in a fabric bag between uses, to keep it clean.

Once you’ve tried a menstrual cup, you won’t want to go back to tampons and sanitary pads. Tell us how much you love your cup below in the comments.

Have you been wanting to try menstrual cups, but too nervous because you don’t know how to use them? That’s why we are here to help you! Hopefully by the end of this you won’t have any fear and you’ll be ready to try out a new period product.

How to Insert a Menstrual Cup

Remember, you might not get it the first time, and that’s okay. I know I sure didn’t! We suggest trying it at your house and relax. Grab a mug of your favourite tea, zen out and head to your bathroom. even grab a mirror if you need to. It’s not a race, take your time and get to know how the menstrual cup works with your body.

Here is a step-by-step guide on how to insert a cup for the first time:

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

  1. Wash your hands and the cup with clean water and a mild soap.
  2. Fold and hold the cup (as shown in the picture) – Everyone’s anatomy is unique, so try folding it a few different ways, and find one that is comfortable.
  3. RELAX and insert the folded cup, just like you would with a tampon.
    1. Push it in at a 45 degree angle.
    2. The cup should sit as low as it comfortably can in your vagina, usually just a little lower than a tampon, with the stem fully inside.
    3. When the cup is inside, it will ‘POP’ open and create a light, comfortable suction. This is what prevents any leaks.
  4. Twist and rotate the cup to make sure it is suctioned and won’t leak.

One of the benefits to using a cup is you can leave it in for up to 12 hours. This is obviously dependent on how heavy your period is, so test it out at home first to see what works for you.

If you are nervous about leaking, you can try a menstrual cup and a pair of period proof underwear, like our ‘Oh-No’ Proof Underwear. Check them out below:

To take it out, all you have to do is:

  1. Wash your hands.
  2. Gently pull the stem of the cup downwards, until you can grip the actual cup.
  3. Wiggle it back and forth and pull it down. Pinch the base of the cup, so it breaks the suction.
  4. When you’re pulling it out of your vagina, make sure to keep it upright, so there is no spillage.
  5. Dump the contents in the sink or toilet.
  6. Rinse the cup with water.

When you’re on your period, you can just rinse it thoroughly after each use. But at the end of your period, you will need to disinfect it. All you have to do is rinse it, and boil it for 3-5 minutes. There are many cup cleaners, you can also purchase too!

Menstrual Cup FAQ

What size should I get?

Each company has a different size guide, but if you are new to the period world, then choose the smaller size. If you are over 30 and have had a baby, than get the larger size.

Can I use a cup with an IUD?

Yes! Talk to your doctor first though to make sure the strings of the IUD are cut short. If you are ever questioning anything, always as your doctor as they will give you the best advice!

How are they different from tampons?

Menstrual cups actually collect the flow, where tampons absorb the blood. A major plus about cups is you don’t have to worry about Toxic Shock Syndrome. If you want to learn more about that, read out blog here .

Can a cup get lost inside me?

No, there is no where for the cup to go. If it seems really far up your vaginal canal, use your muscles to work the cup low enough for you to grab it with your fingers.

Will it get stuck?

No, the cup has nowhere to go but out. If you are trying to remove it, but it seems stuck, stay calm and make sure your muscles are relaxed. It’s only because it’s suctioned really well, so try to find the base of the cup and pinch it to loosen the suction.

What are they made of?

Menstrual cups are made of silicone. They need to be flexible to move with your body and made with high quality healthcare grade silicone.

How much do they hold?

Most hold an ounce of blood, which doesn’t seem like a lot, but that’s more than double what a tampon will hold.

Can you feel them?

As long as you have the right size and have inserted it correctly, you shouldn’t feel it at all. At the beginning, you will most likely have to try it out a few times. I know I sure did!

Can you swim with them?

Yes, of course! It will probably be comfortable than a tampon, actually.

Remember, there is no right or wrong to what you use as period protection. Menstrual cups are definitely better for the environment, but do what is comfortable for YOU.

Disclaimer: The blog writers at Knixteen are not medical professionals, and give this advice based on their own research and experience. If you have further questions or concerns, speak to a trusted medical professional.

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Incorrect use of menstrual cups could be resulting in some women suffering pelvic organ prolapse, the Victoria Derbyshire programme has been told.

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy wants some manufacturers to include better safety advice.

Menstrual cups fit into the vagina and collect period blood. They are not currently regulated in the UK, and there is no safety testing.

The government said the NHS was improving pelvic health clinic access.

Menstrual cups, which can last up to 10 years, have grown in popularity as a more sustainable alternative to single-use tampons and pads.

But there are claims that more education is needed before women decide to use them.

One woman, Jenny, told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme she believed menstrual cups were responsible for her minor pelvic organ prolapse, after she had used them for three months.

“I was scared and I was worried,” she said. “I didn’t know what it might mean in the long term.”

How to take out a menstrual cup safely

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Watch pelvic floor physiotherapist Kate Lough explain how to use a menstrual cup.

Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when the group of muscles and tissues that normally support the pelvic organs, called the pelvic floor, becomes weakened and cannot hold the organs in place firmly.

It causes one or more of the organs to drop down from the normal position and bulge into the vagina.

This can be the womb, bowel, bladder or top of the vagina.

Symptoms can usually be improved with pelvic floor exercises and lifestyle changes, but sometimes medical treatment is needed.

“There was no warning to say. this was a possible side-effect,” Jenny explained.

“And I had really thoroughly read the instructions, so I thought I was doing everything properly.”

Advice ‘hard to understand’

The vast majority of women do not encounter any problems.

There is limited research on the products, but in a report by the Lancet Public Health journal last year – which looked at 43 studies involving 3,300 women and girls living in rich and poor countries – the authors concluded menstrual cups were a “safe option”.

But the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy is calling for the cups – which are produced by a growing number of manufacturers worldwide – to be better regulated.

Currently they are not safety-tested, and there is no industry standard or body responsible for collating complaints.

Physiotherapist Kate Lough told the BBC: “Having looked at some of the information on some of the cups – particularly the information about taking the cup out -[it] is not correct and is hard to understand,” she said.

“Using your pelvic floor muscles to bring the cup lower in the vagina is not correct.”

She added: “Bearing down on the cup to push it within reach of your fingers is not good pelvic floor advice.

“It counters the advice women would be given to avoid prolapse.”

‘At first I was a convert’

Another woman, “Maria” – not her real name – started using the cups two months ago.

She has two children and had not previously had any prolapse-related issues.

“It was great at first [using the cups]. I was a convert,” she said.

But then she encountered a problem.

She was referred by her GP to a gynaecologist, who, she said, told her she had experienced a minor vaginal prolapse “that probably happened because of the cup”.

“She advised me not to use the cup any more,” she added. “She was not a fan of them at all, especially in women who’ve already had kids like me.”

The Department of Health pointed to NHS advice suggesting physiotherapy was “by far the most cost-effective intervention for preventing and treating mild to moderate prolapse”.

It said the NHS Long Term Plan had committed to ensuring “that women have access to multidisciplinary pelvic health clinics and pathways across England via referral.

“Clinics can also provide training and support for local clinicians working with women,” it added.

Follow the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme on Facebook and Twitter – and see more of our stories here.

Menstrual cups can seem intimidating, but they’re a serious game-changer.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Buying tampons or pads doesn’t exactly inspire a lot of excitement. Making the monthly drugstore run to pick up whatever brand is on sale is more of a necessary annoyance than anything else.

But menstrual cups—which have been giving mainstream period products a run for their money—have gotten so buzzy, they actually sound kind of fun.

One small 2011 study found that a whopping 91 percent of tampon users who switched to a menstrual cup would recommend the method. Intrigued? Here’s what all the hype is about.

How does a menstrual cup work, exactly?

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

“A menstrual cup is effectively a fluid collection cup made of medical-grade silicone that you place inside of the vagina,” explains Leah Millheiser, MD, a clinical assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Stanford University. Like a tampon, the cup sits inside the vagina like a roadblock between your period and your underwear. But rather than absorbing the blood like a tampon does, menstrual cups simply catch it.

Putting them in can seem a little intimidating—you have to get all up in there. “There is a learning curve, but once you get comfortable, it can be quick and easy,” says Adeeti Gupta, MD, a board-certified gynecologist and founder of Walk In GYN Care in New York. After cleaning the cup (and your hands) with soap and water, you essentially pinch and fold the sides to slide it into your vagina.

“The cup will open up on its own and cup the cervix,” says Dr. Gupta. To make sure it’s in place, “you can sweep your fingers around the cup gently while in the vagina to see if it opened up and if it’s covering the cervix,” she adds. Once the cup is full (which varies depending on how heavy your flow is), you simply pluck it out, empty the blood, rinse, wash, and repeat.

Is your period lighter than usual? One of these health problems could be to blame 📺

What are the benefits of using a menstrual cup?

Anything you do with a tampon, you can do with a menstrual cup—even swimming or hitting up the gym, says Dr. Millheiser.

Menstrual cups also hold their own against pads and tampons when it comes to leak protection, especially if you’re used to plowing through tampons on heavy flow days. Since menstrual cups catch the blood straight from its source, they tend to be more effective, Dr. Gupta says, and depending on the size of the menstrual cup, it may hold more blood than a super-absorbent tampon.

But the main reason many women choose to use the menstrual cup over other options is for the rinse and repeat factor, says Dr. Gupta. The average menstrual cup will cost you anywhere between $20 and $40, but you can keep one for at least a year, or sometimes even longer depending on the brand. The reusability seriously reduces the impact on the environment—and saves you a lot of cash. Think about it: the average box of tampons costs you about $7 per month. Add that up over the course of the roughly 40 years you’ll spend menstruating and you’re looking at over $3,300 that’s literally flushed down the toilet.

Are there any risks associated with menstrual cups?

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

There aren’t many downsides to the menstrual cup, according to the experts. As long you’re washing your hands before you put it in and take it out, “there’s absolutely no increased risk of infection,” says Dr. Millheiser. When it comes to toxic shock syndrome (TSS)—a rare but deadly bacterial infection that has been linked to super-absorbent tampons—menstrual cups are safer, since the silicone cups simply hold blood, rather than absorbing it, she adds.

The biggest drawback? “They can be messy,” says Dr. Millheiser. “One of the challenges with the cup is that you don’t always have access to clean it properly; you can’t always guarantee you’ll be home or in a bathroom stall with a sink when you need to empty the menstrual cup,” she says.

And without a private sink, staying hygienic is tricky. “Women often find that they have to take it out and put it back in without washing it with soap and water first,” says Dr. Millheiser. In a pinch, carrying a bottle of water and wipes can help you clean the cup and any spillage on the go, but she doesn’t recommend relying on that.

Other risks are minor. Usually complaints are tied to having trouble putting it in or taking it out. “It all depends on a woman’s comfort level and lifestyle,” says Dr. Gupta.

How to use a menstrual cup

There’s technically no time limit on how long you can keep a menstrual cup in (unlike tampons). If you’re bleeding a lot, you’ll want to empty the cup every few hours to prevent any leakage, but on a super light flow day, you could theoretically leave the menstrual cup in for a full 24 hours.

That said, both Dr. Millheiser and Dr. Gupta recommend taking your menstrual cup out to wash and reinsert at least every 12 hours. “To have blood just sitting there pooling [longer than that], you’re probably going to have some odor and might have leaks,” says Dr. Millheiser.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

If you’re getting stuck—literally—on the insertion, a water-based lube can help (like this one from Astroglide). “Just don’t use a silicone-based lube because that can actually break down the silicone of the cup,” she says.

Oh, and size matters. “Some companies make varying sizes according to the length and width of the vagina,” says Dr. Gupta—typically a small and a large. “Usually women who have not had a vaginal birth need the small size and women who have will need a large size,” she explains.

After each period, boil the cup in an open pot of water for about 5 to 10 minutes to disinfect it. “Let it dry on a paper towel and once it’s completely dry, put it away until you need it again,” says Dr. Millheiser.

Ready to ditch your tampons? Check out the expert-approved picks below.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

At home, at work, on the go! Lunette menstrual cups are designed to be simple and fuss-free period cups. Simply fold and insert. Done!

Use the guide below to learn how to insert a menstrual cup and you’ll be a period ninja in no time.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

1. Wash hands

Check that the air holes at the top of your cup are open. Wash your hands.

Wash your Lunette menstrual cup with Feelbetter Cup Cleanser and rinse it carefully.

2. Fold + Hold

Get comfy: you can insert the cup while sitting, standing or squatting. Spreading your legs will help with a successful and comfortable insertion. Relax.

Fold the cup in on itself to make flat, then in half to form a C shape.

3. Insert

Keep it rolled up and guide it rim first into the vagina. To check that the cup has fully opened, slide a clean finger up to the cup bottom and feel it – it should be round. Lunette can be used any time in your menstrual cycle, from heavy to light flow days.

4. Wear + learn

Lunette is emptied about 2–4 times a day, can be used for up to 12 hours, also overnight. The measuring lines on the cup help monitor your flow and easily learn your rhythm.

5. Remove + empty

Wash your hands and relax your muscles. Grasp the bottom of the cup. To break seal, squeeze the bottom of the cup.

Be sure not to pull it out by holding the stem alone. Tip contents into the toilet. Rinse & Reuse.

6. Clean + sanitize

Lunette should be cleaned before and after your cycle, and after emptying. To avoid odor and discoloration, rinse first in cold water, and then wash with hot water and Lunette Feelbetter Cup Cleanser designed for silicone cups.

How does the menstrual cup work?

The Lunette menstrual cup fits nice and snug, held in position by the seal formed by the walls of the vagina and the vaginal muscles. Your interior is superior and does all the work — you’ll barely feel a thing!

The cup is placed entirely inside the lower part of the vagina, just behind the pubic bone below the cervix.

Vaginas are tilted backwards, so guiding the cup towards the small of your back, moving it up and down will help you find the correct and comfortable position.

Rotate the cup to check that it has fully opened and doesn’t leak. Your cervix may move during menstruation, so inserting the cup requires practice and knowledge of your own anatomy.

Tips for first time menstrual cup insertion

Relax and take your time: Choose alone time when you can focus without distractions or interruptions. Perhaps after a warm bath when you are relaxed. If you are too nervous, the vaginal muscles will tighten, making it uncomfortable, if not impossible, for successful insertion.

Get Acquainted with yourself: It is always a good idea to know your own body. Take some time to locate the vaginal opening and even insert a finger to locate your cervix. It feels exactly like the tip of your nose. Knowing where your cervix is will help you to position the cup properly and not insert it too high.

Practice during your period: The vagina is more flexible and the blood works as a lubricant. OR . . .

Take a “dry run” before your period: You might be more comfortable practicing before your period if you feel squeamish about touching blood. In this case, use water as a lubricant.

Try different folds that accentuate the insertion poin: Most use the typical C-fold. However, there are many ways to fold a Lunette. Check out the most common different folds that you can use with your period cup.

Proper insertion direction: Be aware that the direction of insertion needs to be aimed towards the small of your back — not straight up.

Be patient: Know that it may take several times before you are successful. If you begin without the expectation of perfect insertion, you are more likely to be relaxed and pleasantly surprised when success happens.

Assess the stem: Once inserted, you will need to decide whether or not to keep the stem. If it protrudes, it will be uncomfortable. In this case, you likely won’t need the stem and can trim it off. However, if not, you may need it to assist with removal.

Tips for first time menstrual cup removal

Again – RELAX: Just as with insertion. Take your time!

Do NOT pull on the stem: The stem is used to gain access the bottom of the cup. If you pull on the stem, it will hurt! It will also create a mess since the cup won’t be supported or controlled when it exits.

Squeeze bottom to release suction: This is the key – the bottom of the cup has ridges for gripping. Grip the bottom and tweak the cup to the side. The idea is to pull an edge away from the vaginal wall to release suction. You will hear it when this happens.

Rock gently: Once suction releases, gently rock the cup from side to side as you pull it out. This technique might not be necessary, but helps with removal if the cup is feeling stubborn to come out.

Lunette is here to change attitudes about periods.

How to use a menstrual cup Photo: Economictimes

Menstrual cups are an eco-friendly way to deal with your period. In this guide, we’re going to look at how you use one, how safe they are, and why it’s an excellent time to make the switch.

Choosing the right size cup

It’s very important that you use the right size and shape of menstrual cup. No two brands of menstrual cup are exactly the same. Whilst they are all made from the same materials, there are different sizes. Some cups are wider, some are longer. Your internal anatomy will dictate which size, shape and firmness you need, which is why it’s important to learn everything about menstrual cups. Younger women and those who have not had a vaginal birth will probably need a smaller cup.

How to insert a menstrual cup

Choose a quiet time when you are not going to be interrupted, as it may take a bit of practice before you get the hang of using your new menstrual cup. This is not something to try when you’re late for work, or in the ladies’ restroom at the office.

Head into your bathroom, lock the door and make yourself comfortable.

Wash your hands before inserting the cup. Do a good job here, as the last thing you want is to introduce some nasty germs into your body.

It’s going to feel a bit icky when you first try and insert a menstrual cup, even if you are accustomed to using a tampon. Menstrual cups are larger than tampons, so the trick is to fold it over to make it smaller. The cup will spring back into shape once its inside, so don’t worry that you will inadvertently damage it!

Wet the menstrual cup. It’s a lot easier to insert a lubricated cup than a dry one. You can also use water-based lubricant if you prefer.

Hold the rightly folded cup so the rim is facing upwards and the pointy end is facing down. The cup needs to be inserted rim first. Holding the cup firmly, relax and gently push it into your vagina. If it is positioned correctly, you won’t be able to feel it. If you can feel the cup, remove it, and try again.

Once a menstrual cup is inside your vagina, it should spring open and form a tight seal. The cup will not move until you take it out again, so if you can feel your menstrual cup shifting around, remove it and have another go.

If you’re finding it hard to insert the cup, try sitting on the toilet with your legs apart. Relax, take a few deep breaths, and think happy thoughts. The tenser you are, the harder it will be to insert the cup.

Some women find it easier to stand with one foot resting on a chair or the side of the bath when inserting their menstrual cup.

Removing a menstrual cup

Removing a menstrual cup isn’t always easy, but the trick is to break the seal before you try and take it out. Gently insert a clean finger inside your vagina and locate the rim of the cup. Push your finger against the rim, so it breaks away from the vaginal wall. This breaks the seal and makes it easy to remove the cup.

Grab the stem of the cup and gently remove it, taking care not to spill the contents. Empty the cup in a toilet or sink and rinse it out with clean water. It can then be reinserted.

You can also remove, empty, and clean your cup while you are in the shower. Fill it with soapy water and give it a good scrub with your fingers to remove any gunky bits.

Don’t trim the stem too short

Menstrual cups usually come with a stem, which you can grab and use to pull the cup out. It’s best to leave the stem long when you first start using a menstrual cup. This makes it easier to remove the cup. As you become more comfortable inserting and removing a menstrual cup, you can trim the stem so it’s shorter.

Practice makes perfect

Don’t despair if you are finding it hard to insert your menstrual cup. There is a knack to it, and once you have gone through the motions several times, it will get easier, we promise!

Practice inserting and removing your cup until you are comfortable with the process. Before long, you’ll be a pro at this.

Know when to remove your menstrual cup

The great thing about menstrual cups is that they can be left in place a lot longer than a tampon. Whereas you should change a tampon every four hours, it’s OK to wear a menstrual cup for up to 12 hours. However, an overly full cup will leak, so get to know your body and how often you need to empty your cup.

Most women’s menstrual flow is heaviest in the first 2-3 days, so it is best to empty your menstrual cup every 4-6 hours. Once your flow slackens off, you can leave the cup in place longer.

Try and get into the habit of emptying your menstrual cup a least twice a day. That way you won’t forget about it and end up dealing with a leak.

Tips for everyday use

Menstrual cups are very easy to use, but it’s wise to carry a small pack of toiletries with you when you are using one.

If you need to wear your menstrual cup and you don’t know if you’ll be able to rinse it out, have a bottle of water handy and use this to clean your cup. Since it can be a bit messy emptying a full menstrual cup, keep some wet wipes in your purse, just in case you can’t wash your hands.

Caring for your menstrual cup

Menstrual cups can last for many years with the right care.

• Wash your cup with soap at the end up the day, to keep it fresh and clean.

• Sterilize your cup in boiling water for 10-15 minutes at the end of your monthly cycle.

• Store your cup in a fabric bag between uses, to keep it clean.

Once you’ve tried a menstrual cup, you won’t want to go back to tampons and sanitary pads. Tell us how much you love your cup below in the comments.

How to Use a Menstrual CupYou can keep it in for up to 12 hours and you only need one which can last up to 10 years. The menstrual cup ! But how to use this cup exactly and what to keep in mind when buying one?

Menstrual cups are flexible cups that are worn internally. Instead of absorbing the menstrual blood, like tampons do, they catch and collect it. Usually they’re made of silicone, but sometimes also of rubber (latex). There are two kinds: reusable and disposable single use cups. Here, we’ll focus on how to use the reusable cup.

Pick the right size
Some brands only have two different sizes: one for if you’ve already given birth vaginally and one for if you haven’t. With others, choosing the right size sometimes seems like advanced mathematics. Because with a menstrual cup, it isn’t about how heavy your flow is. Instead, it all depends on your physique. What’s your body type? Are you tall or short? How old are you? Have you already been pregnant? Are you still a virgin? Do you maybe have a tilted uterus or very strong pelvic floor muscles? And, last but not least, can you easily reach your cervix with your finger?

Cleaning
Always clean the cup before each first use by sterilising it. This is best done by putting it in boiling water for a couple of minutes. There’s also special cup wash and cup wipes. After removing the cup and emptying it (in the toilet), clean it by washing under running water before inserting again.

Inserting
There are a couple of different folding methods, but eventually they all come down to the same thing: making the rim of the cup as small as possible to make inserting easier. The most popular option is the C-shape: squeeze the cup flat and fold it in half lengthwise so the rim makes a C-shape. Insert the cup into the vagina rim-first. You can make insertion easier by wetting the cup (with water or water-based lubricant). Unlike a tampon, there’s no need to push the cup in as far as possible. Inside the vagina , it’ll unfold automatically and rest against your vagina wall, forming a seal to prevent leaks. Once the cup is inserted correctly, you shouldn’t feel it. Of course, always wash your hands before inserting or removing.

Removing
Remove the cup by reaching for it with your fingers and slowly squeezing the bottom part a bit. This will break the suction seal and will allow you to remove it. Don’t just pull on the stem as this might hurt and cause the contents to spill.

Pros
Because you wear the cup internally, you don’t see it. Convenient for when you’re in the sauna or exercising. You can keep it in pretty long (up to 12 hours, depending on how heavy your flow is). Because the blood doesn’t come in contact with oxygen, it doesn’t smell. Menstrual cups are reusable , so way better for the environment – and for your wallet. Also, you get to know your body and your cycle better; using the cup might for example prove that you lose less blood than you think. They’re softer for your body as well: because they collect the menstrual fluid instead of absorb, they don’t dry out the vagina.

Cons
Getting the right size for your body type can be tricky. And it also takes some time to get used to the cup. Suppliers advise to have patience and try it out for about three cycles before giving up. Removing a full cup can become a bit of a mess, especially if you’re a beginner. After a while, you’re usually able to do this on a public toilet though. Even one that doesn’t have a sink – just use paper or special wet wipes to clean before inserting.

Did you know
Menstrual cups aren’t a new invention at all. In the USA, they were already patented back in 1932!

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Curious about how to use your menstrual cup in a busy public bathroom? It’s easy. Menstrual cups are a healthy and convenient period product that gives you the freedom to go anywhere and do anything.

They are the perfect menstrual solution for people with active lifestyles and can be used whether you are in your office bathroom or out hiking in the woods.

How to manage your menstrual cup in a public bathroom

Menstrual cups have a much larger capacity than pads and tampons, and can be worn for up to 12 hours – so you may not have to empty your cup when you are out and about, but in case you do, try these simple steps.

3 Tips for emptying your menstrual cup in a public bathroom:

  • Always wash your hands before removing and emptying your Ruby Cup as usual.
  • If the sink is out of reach, simply wipe the Ruby Cup clean with dry or damp tissue, and reinsert.
  • Some people like to take a small bottle of water with them to rinse the cup over the toilet, do what feels best for you.

You can simply wash and rinse your Ruby Cup with water the next time you have a sink at hand or in the comfort of your own bathroom.

Using your period cup when you’re out in nature

If you are hiking in the woods or camping out in the wild, menstrual cups are the most convenient and eco-friendly menstrual health product to manage your period.

Changing your Ruby Cup out in nature will leave no trace and no waste. You will not have to carry your used tampons or pads around with you until the next garbage disposal.

Remember, your Ruby Cup holds three times more than a super tampon or a pad, which means there are fewer toilet stops along the way. They are also reusable, so you won’t ever run out of tampons or pads and can save packing space in your rucksack.

Tips for emptying your cup in nature:

Keep some water with you to clean your hands before and after emptying your menstrual cup. Find a quiet spot to remove and empty your Ruby Cup. After emptying your Ruby Cup, rinse with bottled water or simply reinsert straight-away.

5 Top reasons to travel with a menstrual cup

A menstrual cup is the essential travel companion. Here’s why:

1. Pack light

No need to fill your bag with pads and tampons, giving you more space in your luggage for the things you need! Cups are lightweight and you only need to pack one.

2. Save money

Menstrual health products are sometimes more expensive in other countries. No need to stock up on bulky toiletries before you leave.

3. Move freely

You can wear your period cup for up to 12 hours, so you can relax on long journeys, plane rides, hikes and bike rides.

4. Always ready

Finding sanitary products while travelling in remote areas can be difficult. With a menstrual cup, your period will never catch you off guard. You can also wear your cup before you start your period, leaving you tip-top prepared should your period arrive when you are ascending a mountain peak!

5. No waste period product

Menstrual cups are reusable, so you don’t need to find garbage disposals or leave sanitary waste behind. Protect the environment and respect your surroundings.

How to sterilize your menstrual cup while travelling

The easiest and most convenient way to boil your cup on the go is with the Ruby Cup Clean. It is made of the same premium-quality medical-grade silicone used for our Ruby Cups. Once folded it fits in any small bag or pocket and you can easily bring it with you anywhere.

Simply fill it with water, put your cup inside, lay the lid on top and pop it in the microwave for 5 minutes.

Especially if you’re staying with a friend or in a hostel, the Ruby Clean is really handy and convenient as you won’t have to ask for a pot to boil your cup in.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Menstrual cups are a type of reusable feminine hygiene product. A menstrual cup is a small, flexible funnel-shaped cup composed of rubber (or silicone) that the female inserts into her vagina to collect the period fluid.

Menstrual cups can hold more blood than other methods like tampons or pads. This makes them a leading feminine hygiene product for the menstrual cycle for many females. Depending on the flow, a female can wear a menstrual cup for up to 12 hours.

How to use a Menstrual Cup?

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

If a female is interested in using a menstrual cup, she should first talk about it with her gynecologist. Although one can buy a menstrual cup of any brand online or in medical stores, a female first needs to find out what size she will need.

To find out the right menstrual cup size for you, your gynecologist would consider the following factors-

  • The female’s age
  • Length of her cervix
  • If she has a heavy flow or not
  • Flexibility and firmness of the cup
  • The capacity of the menstrual cup
  • Strength of the female’s pelvic floor muscles
  • If the female has had a vaginal delivery

Smaller menstrual cups are mostly recommended for females younger than 30 years old and who have not had a vaginal delivery. Larger sizes of menstrual cups are often recommended for females who are over 30 years old and who have given birth vaginally or females who have a heavier period.

Before putting a menstrual cup-

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

When a female uses a menstrual cup for the first time, she may feel uncomfortable. But “greasing” the menstrual cup can help make it slide in smoothly. Before putting in the cup, lubricate its rim with water or a water-based lube ( or lubricant). A wet or lubricated menstrual cup is much easier to insert.

How to put in the menstrual cup?

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

If a female can put in a tampon, she should find it relatively easy to put in a menstrual cup. Just follow these steps to use a menstrual cup-

  1. Wash your hands.
  2. Gently apply water or a water-based lube onto the rim of the cup.
  3. Tightly fold the menstrual cup into half and hold it in your hand with the rim facing upwards.
  4. Insert the cup with the rim upwards into your vagina, just like you put a tampon. The cup should sit a few inches below the cervix.
  5. Once the cup is inside the vagina, gently rotate it. It will open up to create an airtight seal that would stop leaks.

You should not feel your menstrual cup if you have inserted the cup correctly. You should also be able to comfortably and properly move, jump, sit, stand, and do all the other everyday activities without any discomfort or your cup falling out. If you are having trouble putting in the cup, speak with your gynecologist .

When should you take out your menstrual cup ?

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

A female can wear a menstrual cup for about 6 to 12 hours, depending on whether or not she has a heavy flow. This means that she can use a cup even for overnight protection.

A female should always remove her menstrual cup by the 12-hour mark. If it gets full before then, she will have to empty it ahead of schedule to avoid leaking.

How to take out your menstrual cup?

To take out your menstrual cup, you need to follow these steps-

  1. Wash your hands thoroughly.
  2. Put your index finger and thumb inside your vagina. Pull out the stem of the cup until you reach the base.
  3. Slowly pinch the base to release the seal.
  4. Pull down and then remove the cup.
  5. Once the cup is out, empty it into the sink or toilet and flush.

Created for Greatist by the experts at Healthline. Read more

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Ever wonder why we continue the cycle of buying box after box after box of tampons and pads? You might be thinking, “There’s no other way!” But wait — yes, there is. It’s called a menstrual cup, and it’s the best dang thing to happen to periods in a looong time.

This reusable alternative to tampons and pads has gotten super popular in recent years — and for plenty of good reasons.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

So why do so many ladies love menstrual cups, and is it worth trying one yourself? We’ve got answers to all your burning menstrual cup questions. Plus, we rounded up the best cups to try. Let’s begin.

A menstrual cup is a reusable alternative to pads or tampons. The cup, typically made of flexible, hypoallergenic rubber or silicone, sits in your vagina and captures blood during your period. Once properly inserted, the cup forms a suction-like seal that keeps it from getting loose or leaking.

Unlike a pad or tampon, a menstrual cup doesn’t absorb fluid. It just captures fluid, pretty much the same way a drinking glass captures water from a faucet.

Depending on how heavy your flow is, you can leave the cup in place for up to 12 hours. When it’s time to take it out, you empty it, wash it off, and reinsert it.

Why would a woman opt to use a menstrual cup? Turns out there are actually a ton of big benefits. Read on!

  • It can be left in for up to 12 hours at a time. A menstrual cup can catch a lot of fluid and doesn’t pose the risk of toxic shock syndrome. So you can deal with it a lot less often throughout the day compared to a tampon or pad.
  • You don’t have to worry about running out of tampons or pads. A single cup is all you need.
  • It might leak less than pads or tampons. When inserted properly, a menstrual cup forms a suction-like seal designed to keep blood or fluid from spilling out. A menstrual cup can also hold up to an ounce of liquid, about three times as much as a regular tampon. That can mean less annoying leakage.
  • It’s easier on the planet. The average woman uses close to 10,000 tampons in her life. But a single menstrual cup can last for up to 10 years. That’s a lot of saved trash.
  • It can be worn with an IUD. There have been some claims that a menstrual cup could dislodge an intrauterine device, but research has mostly debunked that myth. According to pros, while it is technically possible to accidentally snag the IUD string during cup removal, it’s very unlikely. If you’ve got any menstrual cup-IUD concerns, just chat with your doc!

A menstrual cup is a safe alternative to tampons or pads, so it doesn’t come with any significant health risks. Still, there are a few potential drawbacks to consider:

  • There’s a small learning curve. Inserting a menstrual cup takes only a few seconds once you get the hang of it. But it might take a few tries before you feel like you’ve got it right and the cup is sitting comfortably in your vagina.
  • Emptying the cup can be a little messy. You might get a little blood or fluid on your hands when you take the cup out to empty and clean it.
  • Cleaning the cup in a public restroom can be tricky. It’s recommended that you clean your cup with soapy water after emptying it, before reinserting it. But that can be hard to do in a public bathroom stall without a sink. Some users get around this by just cleaning the cup with a damp or dry piece of toilet paper and doing a more thorough cleaning once they get home.
  • There’s a little bit of monthly upkeep. You should sterilize your cup in boiling water at the end of each cycle so it’s clean and ready to go for next month.

Menstrual cups differ a little from one brand to the next, and most manufacturers have their own instructions for how their cup should be inserted. But in general, here’s how the whole thing works:

  1. Wash your hands well with soap and water.
  2. Sit on the toilet or stand with one leg up on the toilet.
  3. Fold your cup in half vertically to make a U shape.
  4. Separate the folds of your labia and gently insert the folded cup.
  5. Grip the base of the cup and turn it to create a seal. (You should hear a little suction noise or feel the suction “locking” it into place.)

Then go do your thing! You might feel the cup inside your vagina right after inserting it, but you should stop noticing it after a minute or two. If you can still feel it after that, it might not be placed correctly, so try taking it out and reinserting it.

Surfing the crimson tide

Much has been said on the matter of menstruation. In ancient times, it was thought to make cows infertile; be the hallmark of dark witches; and even, uh, serve as a cure to leprosy. Knowing this, it’s hardly a surprise that this affliction is rife with rumours and misconception, causing most to shirk the topic all together. Some even go as far as to regard the subject taboo. To that, we say, no more. After all, we at Buro. Singapore pride ourselves as much disruptors of the intimate health realm as we are forward-thinking folk.

To date, we’ve addressed everything from vulva care to oral contraceptives — because knowledge is, indeed, power. With that in mind, it seems only apt that we talk about the latest in menstrual-management; that is, period cups. Could this eco-friendly, reusable chalice be the future of your monthlies? Read on to find out.

What is a menstrual cup?

Made from flexible plastic, they are small, funnel-shaped cups that can be (safely) inserted into the vagina. According to Stephanie Taylor, Founder and Managing Director of pelvic health company Kegel8, “it sits just below your cervix and collects any blood or lining you lose for up to 12 hours.” Do note, however, that this depends on your flow. Those who frequently experience heavy periods might only be able to wear it for 8 — 10 hours at a time.

Are there any pros to using a menstrual cup?

Its reusable status makes it more eco-friendly than disposable tampon and menstrual pad options. Users also don’t have to worry about their privates coming into contact with bleach or harmful substances, considering how it’s a well-known fact that certain tampons are treated with chemicals to bleach the cotton. It can be used if you’re a virgin or while swimming. Not forgetting, of course, the added bonus of it being cost-effective in the long-run.

Are there any cons to using a menstrual cup?

How do you insert a menstrual cup?

First off, do remember to disinfect after purchasing a cup. Period ovulation app, Clue, claims the best way to do so is to grab a pot, drop the menstrual cup in, and add water until the menstrual cup isn’t resting on the bottom of the pot. Next, stick it on the stove top. Boil the menstrual cup for five minutes, and that’s it. Remove the menstrual cup from the pot, and be sure to let it cool down completely before insertion.

Once that’s done, take the cup and fold the top portion in half. This will create a tight C or U shape. You can insert it while sitting, squatting, or even lying down, so opt for whichever position makes you feel comfortable. Part your legs, locate your vaginal opening, and slowly insert it until it is no longer protruding from your opening — make sure, however, that you can still feel the stem so you’ll be able to remove it safely after.

How do you remove a menstrual cup?

It is recommended that you get in a squatting position for this. Using your abdominal muscles, bear down as if you are having bowel movement — this, supposedly, pushes your menstrual cup slightly down in your vagina and makes it easier to grab onto. Gently pull at the stem and extricate it from there.

What is the best way to care for a menstrual cup?

Simply give it a thorough rinse with hot soapy water after each use. Use a mild soap to ensure that you won’t experience irritation after insertion. Long-time users claim that this method alone has allowed them to preserve and maintain their cups for up to a decade.

Where can I buy a menstrual cup?

Online is your best bet. You won’t even have to rely on international orders — The Period Co, for instance, is based in Singapore and also provides a wide range of reusable menstrual products to choose from. Other options include Freedom Cups (also SG-based), Lunette, and Saalt.

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Birth control is an important concern for all who are in the reproductive phase of their life. People want options that are safe, readily available and convenient. An IUD (Intrauterine Device) is a popular option and IUD users often want the option to combine it with a practical menstrual cup .

But can a menstrual cup and an IUD be used together?

Yes. You can use a menstrual cup and IUD together. Just follow our simple tips below to make sure that both your menstrual cup and IUD work well together.

IUDs , also known as coils, are small, t-shaped devices inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy. Lasting for years— between five and ten -they mean you can have sex without condoms or other contraception. Just make are sure that both you and your partner don’t have any STIs as IUDs don’t protect you against sexually transmitted infections.

Your family doctor, gynaecologist or reproductive health care professional will be able to advise you on which one will work best for your body and your needs. It may be an IUD which releases hormones or one without. Tell your health care professional that you are using or thinking of using a Ruby Cup and ask them to trim the strings a little. Ask them when you can start using the menstrual cup after your IUD has been inserted as each person is different.

After inserting the IUD you will be called back for a 6-week check-up. If you forgot to mention that you wanted to use a Ruby Cup when you had it inserted, now is a good time to ask if you can start using a menstrual cup. You will also be asked to check that you can feel the strings regularly to make sure that it hasn’t moved. You can do this just before inserting your menstrual cup.

A guide to IUDs and menstrual cups

Yes, it can happen. However, research has shown that “there is no evidence that women who report using menstrual cups . for menstrual protection had higher rates of early IUD expulsion .” 1 So an IUD can come out unexpectedly whether you are using a menstrual cup or not. Here are a couple of tips to help you prevent unwanted IUD movement.

The first thing to do is to make sure that your menstrual cup is positioned properly . Ruby Cup is designed to sit low in the vagina, and if placed properly, it shouldn’t be touching your IUD strings. You can ask the strings to be trimmed when it is first inserted.

Since menstrual cups rely on suction to prevent leaks when removing the cup, it is important to release the suction-created seal 2 on the cup before removing it; otherwise, it could pull on the IUD. This is no different to whether you are using an IUD or not. Removing the suction will mean the Ruby Cup comes out smoothly. Read more about how to remove the cup breaking the seal .

Yes, it is possible to combine a menstrual cup with an IUD. Just make sure you regularly check on your IUD strings and make sure that the suction is released properly before taking it out.

Date last reviewed: March 2020

Written by Dr Alice Byram Bsc Med & Surg UMA MA Hons MML Cantab

Dr Alice Byram was born in England to a French-British family. Following on from a degree in Spanish from the University of Cambridge, she went to Spain to study medicine. On her return to the UK, she worked in Emergency Medicine for several years before recently returning to Barcelona.

Hello from Lena

Thank you for choosing Lena.

At Lena, we believe a shift in consciousness is happening. Collectively, people across the globe are making strides toward a better way of being and living.

Inspired by this modern awareness we designed the Lena Cup so you can maintain a comfortable and active lifestyle during your period. Lena was developed for complete comfort and functionality – you can dance, run, swim and use your cup overnight.

I’m thrilled for you to try Lena, it has changed my life and I believe it will improve yours.

Welcome to a better period.

Vili and the Lena team 🌷

Notes on Lena

• You must empty your cup at least two times per day.
• You can wear Lena overnight and up to 12 hours at a time.
• Always keep your Lena Cup clean.
• Always wash your hands when handling your cup.
• Lena should seal to your vaginal walls, not your cervix.
• You can use the toilet while wearing your cup.
• You must remove your cup prior to sexual intercourse.
• Ensure that the four air holes are always clean and open.
• Store your Lena Cup in its original cotton bag.
• Keep Lena away from children and animals.
• If you notice any cup damage, replace it immediately.
• Lena Cup is not a contraceptive device.
• Lena won’t protect you from sexually transmitted diseases.
• Do not use Lena for prenatal or postpartum bleeding.
• Do not let your cup overflow while wearing it.
• To avoid staining, rinse your cup with cold water first.
• During the first days of use establish your own individual emptying schedule. Check and empty your cup every few hours, depending on fill level and adjust accordingly.
• If you have or are experiencing gynecological problems, please consult a physician prior to using a menstrual cup.
• If you are experiencing any pain, pressure or discomfort while using your menstrual cup, please remove it immediately and consult a physician.

Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a serious and potentially fatal disease caused by toxin-producing strains of the staphylococcus aureus bacterium. TSS symptoms include, but are not limited to, sudden high fever, diarrhea, vomiting, sunburn-like rash, fainting or blacking out. If you experience any of the above symptoms during or shortly after your period, seek medical assistance immediately.

Using Lena Cup

Learning how to effortlessly use your Lena Cup can take some time, patience and practice. For some users this can take a couple of cycles but once mastered, using your Lena Cup will feel natural and easy.

When learning how to use a new cup, we encourage users to experiment with the different folds, to insert their cup higher or lower in the vagina and to find their own unique insertion and removal method. If you need assistance, please contact us at [email protected]

Boil your cup before the first use and between periods. Fill a pan with plenty of clean water. Bring to boil and let your cup float for 5-7 minutes while ensuring that the cup does not touch the bottom of the pan. You can use a pair of tongs to keep your cup in place and to remove it from the boiling water. Let your Lena Cup cool down before using it.

Insertion

Wash. Using water and mild soap, wash hands and cup.
Fold. Fold your cup.
Relax. You can stand, sit or raise one of your legs. Hold your cup firmly folded and guide it towards your vagina.
Separate. Relax your pelvic muscles and gently separate your labia with your other hand.
Insert. Guide your cup into your vagina, pointing it upwards and slightly toward your tail bone. Aim to keep your cup folded until it is entirely inside of your vagina.
Release. Gently release your folded cup – it will pop open and seal to your vaginal walls, not to your cervix.
Test. Run a finger along the base of your cup to check for folds and gently try
to rotate the cup to test that it is sealed. If your cup has sealed, it will not yield to your attempts to rotate it. Once placed correctly and sealed, your cup will stay in place and collect your flow.

Removal

Wash. Using water and mild soap, wash your hands.
Relax. Relaxing is essential for the removal of your cup. You can stand, sit or squat to remove your cup.
Locate. Insert your fingers into your vagina and locate the base of your cup.
If you cannot reach it, gently bear your weight down and pull on the stem until you feel the base of the cup.
Pinch. Once you grab the base of the cup, pinch the bottom in order to release the suction seal.
Remove. Hold the base of the cup and shimmy your cup from side to side while guiding it out. Keep your cup upright to avoid spills.
Empty . Empty and wash your cup.
Re-insert or Store. Once empty and clean, re-insert your cup as outlined in the Insertion section of this User Guide. If your period is finished, store your cup in its original Lena cotton bag or in any breathable container.

The stem

Lena Cup will position itself differently for everyone. For some it will stay in place at the base of the vagina, for others it may ride up higher – both are normal. The position of your cervix can change during your monthly cycle.

Wear your cup for a couple of days to establish where the cup sits and if you need to trim the stem. Most users do not need to trim the stem.

Most Lena Cup users can accommodate the entire cup and stem (Figure 1) .

If your cervix is positioned lower and your stem sticks outside of your vagina, you may want to trim it accordingly (Figure 2) .

Never attempt to trim the stem while wearing your cup.

Do not rely solely on the stem to remove your cup. Use the stem to shimmy the cup from side to side until you are able to pinch the base and release the seal.

Get to know your Lena Cup

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Folding Lena Cup

When inserting Lena you will need to first fold your cup. There are three main folds:

How to Use a Menstrual Cup

Practice using all three folds to find which one works best for you, since each fold guides and positions the cup differently. When inserting your cup, you need to hold your cup folded until it is inside of your vagina.